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Discussion Starter #41
A NEW NOAH SETS OUT TO KEEP FRENCH TITLE
The Philadelphia Inquirer
Sunday, May 27, 1984
Associated Press

The French Open begins tomorrow with all eyes on defending champion Yannick Noah, the first Frenchman in 37 years to win the coveted Grand Slam event.

Much has changed since Noah delighted his countrymen by beat Sweden's Mats Wilander in an emotion-packed finale at Roland Garros Stadium.

His dreadlocks are gone, replaced by a much shorter hairstyle. Bachelorhood has been succeeded by marriage. Even his address had changed. Noah, 24, moved to New York last year, saying he needed a break from the goldfish-bowl life that Paris had become for him.

But some things, he hopes, remain the same. The two-week contest on the famed red clay courts will give Noah a chance to prove that fame and fortune have not undone his unique blend of athleticism and shot-making ability.

Noah will be the No. 6 seed, with American John McEnroe seeded first.

The top-seeded woman is Martina Navratilova, chasing her first Grand Slam - the French, Wimbledon, U.S. Open and Australian Open titles in the same year. Last year, hard-hitting American Kathy Horvath beat Navratilova in the quarterfinals here.

Defending champion Chris Evert Lloyd, a five-time champion on the sticky surface where she has reigned for more than a decade, is seeded No. 2. Though Navratilova crushed Lloyd in their last clay match, the two have not met here since 1975, when Lloyd won easily.

Noah, in a bit of a slump this season, may face a strong challenge from McEnroe and Jimmy Connors, the best hopes for the first American men's victory at the French Open in 29 years.

While Noah has been fending off the French press, adjusting to married life and getting over the recent death of his grandfather during a coup attempt in Cameroon, McEnroe has been injury-free and full of confidence.

The 25-year-old New Yorker has won every tournament he has played since January, including the Grand Prix Masters, the U.S. Pro Indoors, Madrid, the World Championship Tennis Finals in Dallas and the WCT Tournament of Champions at Forest Hills.

But the temperamental lefthander, baffled by the slow clay in Paris, has never made it past the quarterfinals there. Last year, McEnroe lost to 1982 champion Wilander in a tough four-set dual.

With its 128-man draw, the 1984 edition of the French Open , at the ever- expanding Roland Garros near the Bois de Boulogne, has drawn all but two of the world's top male players. Eliot Teltscher of the United States and Kevin Curren of South Africa have withdrawn with injuries.

Most of the women were at the Italian Open in Perugia, and open play Tuesday and Wednesday. Clay-court specialist Tracy Austin of the United States, again the victim of injuries, has again postponed her long-awaited comeback. Pam Shriver, never at her best on clay, will play doubles with Navratilova.

Connors, 32, thrashed last year by France's Christophe Roger-Vasselin in the semifinals, is seeking victory in the only Grand Slam event he has never won. Connors is the third seed, behind McEnroe and Ivan Lendl of Czechoslovakia.

Connors' participation was thrown into question by a sinus condition, but the man who holds 103 Volvo Grand Prix titles arrived in Paris last week to practice and attend numerous festivities in his honor.

The French Open purse has been increased by $250,000 over last year, to a total of $1.8 million. The men's singles, which many players call the hardest tournament to win, pays about $131,250 to the victor. The losing finalist will collect about $65,000.

Other top contenders for a berth in the June 10 finals include Lendl, the No. 2 seed. The 25-year-old righthander, who has never won a Grand Slam event, has reached five finals since January, but he won only at Luxembourg. He crushed Connors in the semifinals on clay at Forest Hills but was no match for the aggressive McEnroe, who won handily.

Like Noah, Wilander, 19, seeded fourth, has made a less-spectacular showing this season. Though always a threat on clay, three major losses have recently come at the hands of fellow Swedes Henrik Sundstrom and Stefan
Edberg.

Sundstrom, 20, ranked No. 11 in the world, has posted one of the best records on the men's circuit this season with wins at Bari, Tunis and Monte Carlo, where he trounced Wilander.

Other clay-court masters expected to fare well at this stadium named for a World War I ace include seventh-seeded Andres Gomez of Ecuador, Jimmy Arias of the United States and Argentina's Guillermo Vilas and Jose Luis Clerc.

Gomez, 24, has victories at Nice against Sundstrom and at Rome against U.S. teenager Aaron Krickstein.

Vilas, 31, still trying to repeat the aggressive backcourt play that earned him three final berths and the championship in 1977, is No. 12 in the world rankings.
 

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Discussion Starter #42
U.S. team makes final
The San Diego Union
Sunday, May 27, 1984
From News Services

John McEnroe coasted to a 6-3, 6-0 victory over Jose Higueras of Spain yesterday to lead the United States into the final of the $531,000 Ambre Solaire World Team Tennis Cup, in Duesseldorf, West Germany.

In today's final, the U.S. team, which was undefeated in the Blue Group of the eight-nation tourney, will meet Czechoslovakia, which won the Red Group. McEnroe, top-ranked in the world, will face Ivan Lendl, ranked second.

The match will be the players' final test before the French Open in Paris, which starts tomorrow. McEnroe and Lendl are seeded to meet in the final.

The U.S. team took an unbeatable 2-0 lead over Spain when Jimmy Arias defeated Juan Aguilera 6-3, 6-7, 6-0. McEnroe and Peter Fleming completed the sweep with a 7-5, 6-2 victory over Aguilera and Manuel Orantes.

ITALIAN SEMIS WASHED OUT -- Rain postponed the semifinals of the $150,000 Italian Women's Open in Perugia, forcing organizers to reschedule the matches for today and move the finals to tomorrow.

Rain also postponed the end of the last quarterfinal match yesterday, leaving Manuela Maleeva of Bulgaria with a 7-6, 2-2 advantage against Virginia Ruzici of Romania.

Earlier, top-seeded Chris Evert Lloyd advanced to the semifinals when defending champion Andrea Temesvari of Hungary defaulted because of a back injury. Lloyd will face Lisa Bonder, who beat Raffaela Reggi of Italy 6-3, 6-3. In the other quarterfinal, Canadian Carling Bassett easily beat Yvonne Vermaak of South Africa 6-1, 6-2, and will face Maleeva or Ruzici.

The finals' postponement leaves Lloyd uncertain about beginning the defense of her French Open crown on schedule. The French Open begins on Monday.

The rules say the Italian Open must be completed by midnight tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter #43
People in sports
Daily Breeze
Torrance, CA
Tuesday, May 29, 1984
Associated Press

Martina Navratilova, her eyes set on her fourth consecutive Grand Slam tournament and a $1 million bonus, and Jimmy Connors, seeking to become the first American to win the men's singles title in 29 years, moved easily into the second round of the $1.8 million French Open tennis tournament in Paris.

Connors, the No. 3 seed, crushed fellow countryman Eric Fromm, 6-2, 6-3, 6-1, in under two hours on the center court at Roland Garros.

Connors, recovered from a sinus problem that sidelined him recently, won on a combination of baseline and net play. ''I was hitting the ball well and he was missing a few shots,'' the 31-year-old Connors said.

In other men's matches, 16-year- old Aaron Krickstein, beaten in the Italian final by Ecuador's Andres Gomez, routed Eduardo Oncins of Brazil, 6-0, 6-1, 6-1. Another teen-age winner was Sweden's Kent Carlsson, who downed the veteran Georges Goven of France, 6-0, 6-2, 6-0.

Top-seeded John McEnroe and second-seeded Ivan Lendl were not scheduled.

Navratilova, aiming to become only the third woman and the fifth player ever to win the coveted Grand Slam, followed Connors on court and made an equally strong start against French junior Nathalie Tauziat, winning, 6-1, 6-2.

The big surprise of the day was the elimination of fourth-seeded Andrea Jaeger in the women's singles. Jaeger forfeited her match against little-known fellow American Jamie Golder after dropping the opening set, 7-5.

Jaeger, a finalist in 1982, said she had aggravated a sore arm in the chilly, overcast weather.

''It was cold out there and the longer I stayed on the court, the worse my arm got,'' she said. ''It would have been stupid to keep on and really damage my arm.''
Navratilova, the world's top-ranked woman and the 1982 winner here, said she had never heard of Tauziat, who had to qualify. ''That kept me awake, but it didn't bother me,'' said Navratilova, who had not competed in four weeks.

In a first round match before rain halted play today, Catherine Tanvier defeated Lucia Romanov of Romania, 6-2, 7-5.

[...]
 

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Discussion Starter #44
EVERT LOSES FINAL OF ITALIAN OPEN
The Miami Herald
Tuesday, May 29, 1984
Herald Staff

Seventeen-year-old Manuela Maleeva of Bulgaria upset top-seeded Chris Evert Lloyd, 6-3, 6-3, to win the Italian Open tennis tournament Monday in Perugia.

Maleeva needed just one hour 36 minutes to down Evert, moving her opponent around the court and forcing repeated errors.

Rain has plagued the $150,000 tournament, and Maleeva played the final after completing a quarterfinal match against Virginia Ruzici of Romania, then downing Canada's Carling Basset in the semifinal on the clay courts of the Junior Tennis Club in this central Italian city.

Maleeva, who is ranked 12th in the world on the Women's Tennis Association computer, completed the final set of a quarterfinal match that had been delayed since Friday by downing Ruzici, 7-6, 4-6, 6-2. Then she defeated Bassett, 6-2, 6-2, to advance to the final. Evert defeated Lisa Bonder in the semifinals, 6-1, 6-1.

Evert has won this tournament five times, in 1974, '75, '80, '81 and '82.

* * *

Fourth-seeded Andrea Jaeger was eliminated, but Martina Navratilova and Jimmy Connors moved into the second round of the French Open in Paris.

Jaeger forfeited her match against little-known fellow American Jamie Golder after dropping the opening set, 7-5.

Jaeger said was troubled by an arm injury, could not continue and was even considering pulling out of Wimbledon next month.

Connors, the No. 3 seed who is hoping to become the first American in 29 years to win the men's singles title, crushed fellow countryman Eric Fromm, 6-2, 6-3, 6-1, in under two hours on the center court at Roland Garros Stadium.

Navratilova, hoping to become only the third woman and the fifth player ever to win the coveted Grand Slam, followed Connors on court and made an equally strong start against French junior Nathalie Tauziat. Despite a few anxious moments at the start of the second set, Navratilova, the women's top seed and champion here in 1982, overwhelmed her inexperienced opponent, 6-1, 6-2.

The Grand Slam used to mean winning all four major tournaments -- the U.S., French and Australian titles, and Wimbledon -- within the same calendar year. But two years ago, the International Tennis Federation announced it would henceforth recognize anyone who held all four titles consecutively, even if that meant overlapping into two seasons.

The ITF stressed the point by putting up a $1 million bonus to anyone who achieved the feat.

In a late match on an outside court, No. 15 Tim Mayotte lost in straight sets to Rolf Gehring of West Germany.

Mayotte, whose serve-and-volley game is perfectly suited to the grass at Wimbledon, where he consistently does well, failed to come to terms with the slow Roland Garros surface and was beaten, 7-5, 6-1, 7-6 (8-6).

John McEnroe, the top seed in the men's singles, will see his first action today, as will three other strong contenders for the title: Ivan Lendl of Czechoslovakia, Sweden's Mats Wilander and defending champion Yannick Noah of France.

No American has won the men's trophy here since Tony Trabert successfully defended his title in 1955. But Connors made few mistakes and coped confidently with the slow bounces and long rallies.

Other seeds to come through their first-round matches Monday included No 17 Jose Higueras of Spain, No. 7 Andres Gomez of Ecuador and No. 9 Henrik Sundstrom of Sweden. All won in straight sets.

In the women's singles, two West Germans, No. 14 Claudia Kohde-Kilsch and No. 11 Sylvia Hanika, both reached the second round comfortably.
 

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Discussion Starter #45
I bet that was a real quiet bus ride.

MALEEVA CATCHES EVERT NAPPING
The Miami Herald
Tuesday, May 29, 1984
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seventeen-year-old Manuela Maleeva of Bulgaria took a nap between matches Monday, then went out and upset top-seeded Chris Evert Lloyd, 6-3, 6-3, to win the Italian Open tennis tournament. The title was Maleeva's second in 15 days, following a victory in the Swiss Open.

After completing the last set of a quarterfinal match with Romania's Virginia Ruzici and downing Canada's Carling Bassett in a semifinal in the rain-plagued $150,000 tournament, the youngster took a rest in the locker room.

"I slept for a half-hour on a couch," she said, adding, "I never expected to win the match."

Maleeva beat Ruzici, 7-6, 4-6, 6-2, then downed Bassett, 6-2, 6-2, to advance to the final.

Evert also had to play a semifinal in the morning, beating fellow American Lisa Bonder, 6-1, 6-1.

Evert had defeated Maleeva in three prior matches this year.

The final took 1 hour 36 minutes, as Evert, seeking her sixth title here, was kept on the run by Maleeva's sharp ground strokes on the clay court. She was scoring especially with her two-handed backhand, angling the ball close to the lines. And she surprised the 29-year-old American with deft lobs the few times Evert went to the net.

Evert, who holds the record for the longest winning streak on one surface, capturing 125 consecutive matches on clay from August 1973 to May 1979, also had trouble holding serve throughout the match.

After the match, the players boarded a bus for Rome to make a plane connection for Paris, where they will compete in the French Open.

In the doubles final, the Czechoslovak team of Iva Budarova and Helena Sukova defeated Virginia Ruzici of Romania and Kathy Horvath of the United States, 7-6, 1-6, 6-4.
 

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Discussion Starter #46
EX-UM STAR OUSTS JAEGER BY DEFAULT
The Miami Herald
Tuesday, May 29, 1984
From Herald Wire Services

Until Monday, little was known about 22-year-old Jamie Golder, a former member of the University of Miami tennis team who has played professionally for only 15 months.

With a tough first-round match against fourth-seeded Andrea Jaeger, Golder was expected to be swept out of the French Open tennis championships in Paris with the center-court crowd looking on in sympathy.

But the script worked out differently.

Golder took the opening set, 7-5, after trailing, 1-5, and then found herself in the second round when Jaeger defaulted because of an arm injury.

"I never felt she was giving 100 percent and thought something was wrong. But I didn't know whether it was an injury or just lack of concentration," said Golder, a product of Piper High in Sunrise.

"Obviously I would rather have won the match in the normal way. It's less satisfying when someone defaults, but a win is a win."

"My arm stinks," said Jaeger, who has been criticized recently for lackluster efforts. "The longer I played, the worse it got, especially on service. It was stupid to ruin my arm for one match."

Asking Jaeger if she would still enjoy playing tennis if she were not hurt is "like asking someone if they had hurt legs whether running would be fun," she said.

Jaeger said that she had considered passing up the French Open because of the injury, which she suffered several weeks ago. She also said she was unsure about playing at the Wimbledon championships, which begin June 25.

Martina Navratilova and Jimmy Connors moved easily into the second round.

Navratilova, the women's top seed and champion here in 1982, overwhelmed Nathalie Tauziat, 6-1, 6-2, in 46 minutes.

Connors, the No. 3 seed in men's singles, crushed fellow countryman Eric Fromm, 6-2, 6-3, 6-1 in under two hours on the center court.

One seeded player was ousted in the men's singles. In a late match on an outside court, No. 15 Tim Mayotte of the United States lost to Rolf Gehring of West Germany, 7-5, 6-1, 7-6 (8-6).

John McEnroe, the top seed in the men's singles, will see his first action today, as will three other strong contenders for the title: Ivan Lendl of Czechoslovakia, Sweden's Mats Wilander and defending champion Yannick Noah of France.

Monday's first-round results:

Men

Vitas Gerulaitis d. Lloyd Bourne, 3-6, 6-7, 6-4, 6-4, 8-6; Tony Giammalva d. Robert Seguso, 7-5, 0-6, 7-5, 7-5; Rolf Gehring d. Tim Mayotte (No. 15 seed), 7-5, 6-1, 7-6 (8-6); Gianni Ocleppo d. Joao Soares, 4-6, 6-3, 2-6, 6-3, 6-4; Roland Stadler d. Derek Tarr, 4-6, 1-6, 6-4, 6-3, 6-3.

Harold Solomon d. Christophe Roger-Vasselin, 6-0, 4-6, 6-1, 3-6, 6-4; Andres Gomez (7) d. Bernard Mitton, 6-3, 6-3, 6-4; John Lloyd d. Colin Dowdeswell, 6-4, 6-1, 2-6, 6-4; Brian Gottfried d. Van Winitsky, 6-1, 6-0, 6-2; Karl Novacek d. Danie Visser, 6-3, 5-7, 6-0, 6-3.

Jose Higueras d. Ilie Nastase, 6-3, 6-0, 6-3; Joakim Nystrom d. John Fitzgerald, 7-6 (7-4), 6-0, 4-6, 7-6 (9-7); Cassio Motta d. Chip Hooper, 6-4, 7-6 (7-4), 4-6, 4-6, 6-2; Marcel Freeman d. Steve Denton, 6-4, 4-6, 6-4, 6-4; Emilo Sanchez d. Marcos Hocevar, 7-6 (7-4), 6-3, 7-5.

Brad Gilbert d. Shlomo Glickstein, 4-6, 6-4, 6-1, 2-6, 6-2; Henrik Sundstrom (9) d. Alvaro Fillol, 6-1, 6-3, 6-3; Pascal Portes d. Florin Segarceanu, 6-7 (1-7), 6-4, 6-4, 6-4; Wojtek Fibak d. Hans-Dieter Beutel, 6-2, 4-6, 6-1, 3-6, 6-4; Mike Leach d. Julio Goes, 5-7, 7-6 (7-4), 7-5, 6-4.

Jimmy Connors (3) d. Eric Fromm, 6-2, 6-3, 6-1; Mel Purcell d. Carlos Kirmayr, 6-3, 7-6, 6-2; Gabriel Urpi d. Ramesh Krishnan, 4-6, 6-4, 6-1, 6-2; Slobodan Zivojinovic d. Diego Perez, 6-3, 7-6, 6-4; Ben Testerman d. Marty Davis, 6-2, 6-4, 6-2.

Francesco Cancellotti d. Francois Errard, 6-3, 6-3, 7-5; Carlos Castellan d. Simon Youl, 6-2, 0-6, 6-1, 6-3; Martin Jaite d. Alberto Tous, 2-6, 6-3, 6-3, 6-2; Kent Carlsson d. Georges Goven, 6-2, 6-0, 6-0; Hans Gildermeister d. Victor Pecci, 6-4, 6-3, 6-2; Aaron Krickstein d. Eduardo Oncins, 6-0, 6-1, 6-1.

Women

Camille Benjamin d. Claudia Monteiro, 6-4, 4-6, 6-1; Melissa Brown d. Helene Cedet, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4; Rene Uys d. Angelika Kanellopoulou, 7-5, 6-4; Jo Durie d. Lilian Drescher, 6-3, 6-3; Masako Yanagi d. Molly Van Nostrand, 6-2, 6-3.

Marie-Christine Calleja d. Susan Leo, 7-6 (7-0), 6-4; Sabrina Goles d. Terry Phelps, 7-6 (7-0) 6-4; Larissa Savchenko d. Ann Henricksson, 6-1, 6-2; Wendy White d. Leslie Allen, 6-3, 5-7, 6-1; Tine Scheuer-Larsen d. Hana Fukarkova, 7-5, 6-2.

Anne Hobbs d. Rina Einy, 4-6, 6-2, 6-0; Vicki Nelson, d. Sandy Collins, 6-2, 5-7, 6-4; Bettina Bunge d. Carina Karlsson, 6-2, 6-4; Kathy Rinaldi d. Ginny Purdy, 7-5, 6-2; Shelly Solomon, d. Patricia Hy, 4-6, 7-6 (7-5), 6-2.

Jennie Klitch d. Kim Steinmetz, 6-1, 6-2; Isabelle Demongeot d. Amanda Tobin, 6-2, 6-3; Lori McNeil d. Emiko Okagawa, 7-5, 5-7, 6-1; Amy Holton d. Tina Mochizuki, 5-7, 7-6 (7-4), 6-1; Eva Pfaff d. Pilar Vasquez, 6-4, 6-7 (2-7), 6-4.

Yvonne Vermaak d. Julie Harrington, 6-1, 6-1; Martina Navratilova (1) d. Nathalie Tauziat, 6-1, 6-2; Nathalie Herreman d. Rene Mentz, 0-6, 6-2, 6-3; Isabelle Vernhees d. Beth Herr, 6-3, 6-2, 6-2; Sylvia Hanika (11) d. Kate Latham, 6-1, 6-0.

Anne White d. Sederica Bonisgnori, 6-2, 7-5; Petra Huber d. Alycia Moulton, 6-2, 6-3; Marcella Mesker d. Katerina Skronska, 6-2, 6-3; Etsuko Inoue d. Elizabeth Sayers, 4-6, 6-4, 6-2; Jamie Golder d. Andrea Jaeger (4), 7-5, default.

Rosalyn Fairbank d. Sue Barker, 6-2, 6-3; Claudia Kohde- Kilsch (14) d. Renata Sasak, 6-2, 6-1; Elena Elissenko def. Betsy Nagelsen, 6-3, 6-4; Natalia Riva d. Anna Maria Cecchini, 6-3, 6-4; Pam Teeguarden d. Felicia Raschiatore, 6-1, 6-2.
 

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Discussion Starter #47
MCENROE GAINS IN PARIS
Lexington Herald-Leader
June 1, 1984
Andrew Warshaw, Associated Press

PARIS, May 31— With John McEnroe and Martina Navratilova leading the parade yesterday, the top-seeded players in the French Open tennis championships marched easily into the third round.

The parade, however, will go on without Jose Luis Clerc of Argentina, Czechoslovakia's Tomas Smid, Jo Durie of Britain, American Kathy Jordan and Hungary's Andrea Temesvari, all of whom were upset on the slow red clay courts in this $1.8 million tournament.

And the road to the third round was exhausting for John Frawley of Australia, who struggled for 5 hours 15 minutes before eliminating West Germany's Hans-Jorgen Schwaier, 6-1, 4-6, 6-3, 6-7, 8-6 - the longest match ever at Roland Garros Stadium.

A holiday crowd on the Feast of the Ascension of 24,297, a record for one day, also saw 16-year-old Aaron Krickstein of Grosse Pointe, Mich., runner-up at the Italian Open in Rome, outlast Wojtek Fibak of Poland, almost twice his age, winning, 10-8, in the fifth set.

McEnroe, Ivan Lendl and Jimmy Connors all advanced without dropping a set. Navratilova and Chris Evert Lloyd were in devastating form en route to an expected clash in the women's finals.

Yannick Noah of France, the defending men's champion, at last got his service going and beat Belgium's Bernard Boileau 6-4, 6-4, 6-4. Noah's concentration deserted him in his firstround match 24 hours earlier when he was taken to five sets by Mark Dickson of the United States.

But teen-ager Karel Novacek of Czechoslovakia, ranked 356th in the world, stunned Clerc, the No.-8-seeded player, 2-6, 6-2, 6-3, 3-6, 8-6, and Emilio Sanchez of Spain upset No. 14 Smid, 7-6, 6-4, 6-4.

In the women's singles, fifth-seeded Jordan, of King of Prussia, Pa., lost to Virginia Ruzici of Rumania, 6-3, 6-2; No. 7 Durie fell to Laura Arraya of Peru, 6-2, 5-7, 6-4, and No. 12 Temesvari was stopped by Sabrina Goles of Yugoslavia, 7-5, 6-4.

McEnroe, seeded No. 1, was warned when he smashed and broke his racquet in the third set against a fellow American, Ben Testerman. He had several other minor skirmishes with the umpire, but none were serious, and he went on to beat Testerman, 6-4, 6-1, 6-4.

Lendl, seeded second, routed Mario Martinez of Bolivia, 6-1, 6-0, 6-1; Connors (No. 3) set back John Lloyd of Britain, 6-4, 6-1, 6-4; Mats Wilander of Sweden (No. 4) beat John Alexander of Australia, 6-4, 6-1, 6-3, and No. 5 Jimmy Arias of Buffalo eliminated Gianni Ocleppo of Italy, 7-5, 6-2, 6-2.

Despite their victories, both McEnroe and Connors complained about the soft surface. "I had a lot of bad bounces," McEnroe said. Connors was equally critical.

Navratilova stomped Marcella Mesker of the Netherlands 6-1, 6-1; No. 2 Evert Lloyd blanked Japan's Masako Yanagi 6-0, 6-0, and No. 3 Hana Mandlikova of Czechoslovakia downed Susan Mascarin of Grosse Pointe Shores, Mich., 6-2, 6-4.

McEnroe began his match tentatively, serving poorly and making an uncharacteristic number of unforced errors, and Testerman was happy just to stay back and let the tournament favorite make mistakes. But with his service broken and trailing 2-4, McEnroe won nine games in a row and raced into a two- sets-to-love lead.

Testerman never gave McEnroe the same problems as last year when their stormy first-round match went to five sets. But he was unhappy about the number of calls that went in McEnroe's favor.

"The guy in the chair did not control the game very well," Testerman said. "I missed a lot of opportunities, but you are not supposed to overrule calls unless they are blatantly wrong, and several today were very close."

Lendl, beaten on clay by McEnroe in Dusseldorf, West Germany, last week, produced a more convincing victory than his rival.

The No. 2 seed, still bidding to win his first Grand Slam tournament, took just 85 minutes to thrash Martinez.

Connors also was in excellent form in the only Grand Slam event he has never won, mixing up his shots and hitting the lines with uncanny regularity.

Navratilova moved a step closer to winning the elusive Grand Slam. She already is the reigning champion of Wimbledon, the U.S. Open and the Australian Open.

Beaten only once this year, Navratilova said afterward: "If I win the Grand Slam, there'll be a hell of a party."

Commenting on the $1 million bonus she would receive from the International Tennis Federation if she wins the Grand Slam, she said: "It's certainly a big chunk of money. But I promise you, the money is the last thing on my mind."

A crowd of 24,297, a record high for a single day, saw 16-year-old Aaron Krickstein of Grosse Pointe, Mich., runner-up at the Italian Open in Rome, come within a whisker of ousting Poland's Wojtek Fibak, who's almost twice his age. Fibak took the fifth set 10-8.

In addition to McEnroe, Lendl, Connors, Arias and Noah, seven other seeds advanced in the men's singles.

They were Spain's Jose Higueras (12) and Juan Aguilera (13), Ecuador's Andres Gomez (7) and three Swedes -1982 French Open champion Mats Wilander (4), Henrik Sundstrom (9) and Anders Jarryd (11).

Second-round results WOMEN Chris Evert Lloyd (2) d. Masako Yanagi 6-0, 6-0 Kathy Horvath (8) d. Etsuko Inoue 6-1, 6-0 Anne White d. Isabelle Demongeot 6-4, 6-3 Kathy Rinaldi d. Nathalie Herreman 6-4, 6-0 Claudia Kohde-Kilsch (14) d. Sophie Amiach 6-4, 6-0 Elena Elissenko d. Natalia Riva 6-0, 6-2 Marie-Christine Calleja d. Catarina Lindqvist 4-6, 7-5, 6-1 Raffaella Reggi d. JoAnne Russell 7-6 (7-2), 6-1 Michelle Torres d. Rosalyn Fairbank 7-6 (7-5), 7-6 (7-4) Sylvia Hanika (11) d. Pam Teeguarden 1-6, 6-0, 6-3 Zina Garrison (6) d. Petra Delhees 6-4, 3-6, 6-2 Petra Keppeler d. Ann Hobbs 6-3, 6-2 Hana Mandlikova (3) d. Susan Mascarin 6-2, 6-4 Camille Benjamin d. Jamie Golder 6-2, 6-2 Martina Navratilova (1) d. Marcella Mesker 6-1, 6-1 Manuela Maleeva (10) d. Yvonne Vermaak 6-2, 6-1 Catrin Jexell d. Marcella Skuherska 6-2, 6-3 Melissa Brown d. Wendy White 6-2, 6-7 (7-4), 6-3 Catherine Tanvier d. Lori McNeil 6-4, 6-2 Virginia Ruzici d. Kathy Jordan (5) 6-3, 6-2 Laura Arraya d. Joe Durie (7) 6-2, 5-7, 6-4 Larissa Savchencko d. Myriam Schropp 6-4, 4-6, 6-3 Jenny Klitch d. Fiorella Duxin 6-4, 1-6, 7-5 Eva Pfaff d. Isabel Vernhees 6-0, 3-6, 6-1 Amy Holton d. Paula Smith 7-5, 6-2 Steffi Graf d. Shelley Solomon 6-2, 6-1 Iva Budarova d. Tine Scheuer-Larsen 6-3, 6-4 Lisa Bonder (13) d. Vicki Nelson 6-2, 6-2 Mima Jausovec d. Pat Medrado 6-4, 6-4 Sabrina Goles d. Andrea Temesvari (12) 7-5, 6-4 Carling Bassett (15) vs. Petra Huber 6-3, 2-6, 5-2, match halted, darkness.

MEN Jimmy Connors (3) d. John Lloyd 6-4, 6-1, 6-4 Emilio Sanchez d. Tomas Smid (14) 7-6 (7-1), 6-4, 6-4 Cassio Motta d. Jakob Hlasek 6-3, 7-5, 7-5 Jimmy Arias (5) d. Gianni Ocleppo 7-5, 6-2, 6-2 Thierry Tulasne d. Libor Pimek 6-3, 6-3, 6-1 Jan Gunnarsson d. Michael Westphal 6-4, 0-6, 6-4, 6-4 Brian Gottfried d. Mike Leach 2-6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-0 Hans Gildemeister d. Brad Gilbert 6-1, 6-2, 6-4 Kent Carlsson d. Pascal Portes 6-1, 6-3, 3-6, 4-6, 6-4 Paul McNamee d. Henri Leconte 7-5, 6-1, 2-6, 6-3 Andres Gomez (7) d. Marcel Freeman 7-5, 6-2, 6-3 A.Jarryd (11) d. S. Edberg 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 (7-5), 7-6 (7-4) Michiel Schapers d. Marian Vajda 6-3, 6-1, 6-7 (4-7), 6-4 John Frawley d. H. Schwaier 6-1, 4-6, 6-3, 6-7 (2-7), 8-6 Roland Stadler d. Loic Courteau 6-0, 6-3, 3-6, 7-5 Rolf Gehring d. Tarik Benhabiles 6-3, 4-6, 6-1, 6-4 Mel Purcell, Murray, Ky., d. Gabriel Upri 6-4, 6-2, 6-4 Ivan Lendl (2) d. Mario Martinez 6-1, 6-0, 6-1 Yannick Noah (6) d. Bernard Boileau 6-4, 6-4, 6-4 Karl Novacek d. Jose Luis Clerc (8) 2-6, 6-2, 6-3, 3-6, 8-6 Jose Higueras (12) d. Robert Seguso 6-3, 6-4, 6-4 Harold Solomon d. Carlos Castellan 4-6, 6-4, 6-0, 7-5 Balazs Taroczy d. Bruce Manson 6-3, 6-1, 6-0 Martin Jaite d. Vitas Gerulaitis 6-3, 1-6, 6-4, 6-3 Claudio Panatta d. C. Barazzutti 7-6 (7-2), 4-2, retired John McEnroe (1) d. Ben Testerman 6-4, 6-1, 6-4 Henrik Sundstrom (9) d. J. Nystrom 6-2, 6-2, 7-6 (7-1) Francesco Cancellotti d. S. Zivojinovic 6-3, 6-1, 2-6, 6-4 Mats Wilander (4) d. John Alexander 6-4, 6-1, 6-3 Heinz Guenthardt d. Jimmy Brown 7-6 (7-3), 4-6, 6-0, 6-1 Wojtek Fibak d. A. Krickstein 6-3, 2-6, 6-7 (4-7), 7-5, 10-8 Juan Aguilera (13) d. Balazs Taroczy 7-5, 6-1, 6-1.
 

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TENNIS SERVES UP TRUE AMATEURISM
Philadelphia Daily News
Friday, June 1, 1984
BILL FLEISCHMAN, Daily News Sports Writer

This is an Olympic Trials? Where are the fans? Where's the excitement? Where are the ABC cameras?

Anyone strolling into the National Tennis Center yesterday would have thought some junior tournament had been driven indoors by the interminable rain that was turning the East into a rain forest.

Louis Armstrong Stadium, center stage for the U.S. Open that is played here each September, was deserted yesterday. The outer courts that are crowded with spectators during the Open also were vacant, giving a visitor the impression that this dreary day resembled a chilly March afternoon more than a presumably ideal late May tennis day.

The NTC's indoor courts looked more like a Saturday at your favorite tennis club. Players outnumbered family and press representatives, who watched the matches from the elevated players lounge area where the McEnroes, Connors, Lendls, Navratilovas and Evert-Lloyds relax, however briefly, during the Open.

The Olympic tennis candidates, mostly from colleges and high schools, were properly tanned and were wearing the latest expensive tennis fashions. But other than Andrea Leand and Gretchen Rush, you probably never heard of any of them.

On the courts, they also were put in their proper place. There were no linesmen or ballboys. Players who are big shots back at school were poking their rackets at the baseline curtains, searching for stray balls, just like weekend players. This is the Olympic spirit, right? Sport for the fun of it.

"This brings back memories," said Leand, the world's 30th-ranked women's player and the only professional in the Olympic Tennis Trials. "All the mothers and fathers . . . no ballboys . . . no one to call the lines. I even went out (for her match) without a ballpocket (in her tennis outfit)."

Leand didn't mean to sound condescending when she added, "It feels like a junior tournament."

Leand, who gained fame three years ago by upsetting No. 2 seed Andrea Jaeger in the second round of the U.S. Open, is only 20, but she feels like a matriarch in the Olympic Trials.

"I'm playing against all these people I've never heard of," she said, glancing at the idle players. "I didn't realize they'd be this young."

One youngster who is trying to earn one of the two remaining women's Olympic berths (Jaeger and Kathy Horvath were awarded wild cards by the U.S. Tennis Association) is Eleni Rossides, of Washington, D.C. If you are over 40 and a football fan, the name might sound familiar. Eleni's father, Gene, was a great quarterback at Columbia. He's now a successful attorney in Washington.

Eleni, a 5-2 junior at Sidwell Friends School, won yesterday over Niurka Sodupe, of Miami, 7-7 (8-6), 7-5. Eleni's prize is a quarterfinal match today against the top-seeded Leand.

"I'm definitely a long shot," she said, smiling. "But I like the variety of competition here. It's not the same juniors you usually play."

"It is a strange atmosphere," said second-seeded Gretchen Rush, a Trinity (Texas) University junior from Pittsburgh. "It's a no-pressure situation. The younger kids are playing and it won't hurt your ranking."

Last year Rush reached the quarterfinals of the French Open, which is under way in Paris. Both Rush and Leand figure there will be other French Opens. But there won't be another Olympics for them (or, maybe, for anyone else). Even though tennis is just a demonstration sport in Los Angeles this summer, both said trying out for the Olympics is a top priority.

"I'm here because it's the Olympics," said Rush, the Pan American Games singles champion. "There are no medals, but that doesn't matter. I was in the Pan American Games and that was a thrill of a lifetime, with 100,000 people screaming and yelling when you walked in with the other American athletes. That thrill is something more than you get from a pro tournament, where you're just playing for yourself."

"Just being part of the Olympics will be exciting," said Leand, a Brooklandville, Md., native who is now based in New York. "I had a little taste of it in the Macabiah Games. Something like that definitely brings out your patriotism.

"You don't take for granted all the advantages we have in the United States. When you travel, you realize how good we have it."

Just when you think the politicians have succeeded in dousing the Olympic flame, you talk with young athletes like Leand and Rush and think maybe the politicians can't completely screw it up after all.

Jim Grabb feels the same way. Grabb, a 6-3, 160-pound flagpole who plays No. 3 singles for Stanford, looked around the players lounge yesterday and said, "Sure this lacks fans, but whoever makes it will be part of something special. The Olympics are the ultimate in amateur sports, aren't they? Who cares about politics?"

Grabb, No. 7, is one of only two seeded men's players who still have a chance for an all-expenses paid trip to Los Angeles. No. 5 Richey Reneberg, of Houston, is the other. Since Jimmy Arias, last year's U.S. clay court and Italian Open champion, is the only men's player to receive a wild card into the Olympics, at least Grabb and Reneberg are competing for three spots rather than just two like the women.

No one is grumbling into their Perrier about Arias, Jaeger and Horvath receiving automatic Olympic wardrobe fittings.

"It's a good rule," Leand said. "You won't get a Jaeger if she has to miss the French Open. Having a Jaeger play in the Olympics is a big deal."

Having the troubled Jaeger play anywhere soon might be a big deal. Now in her fifth pro season, the frequently injured Jaeger, who will be just 19 next week, is hinting that she soon might abandon tennis to attend college, or race dirt bikes, or something.

Gayle Godwin is one person who hopes Jaeger continues playing at least through the Olympics. Godwin is the UCLA women's coach who will serve as technical observer - that's Olympic-ese for coaches of demonstration sports - of the U.S. Olympic women's team.

Godwin, who is also the U.S. Junior Federation Cup coach, has been part of the anonymous gathering here all week. But she says it hasn't depressed the players.

"I think most of them want the Olympics more than anything else they've ever done," Godwin said.
 

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Discussion Starter #49
Talk about a circus. Tennis was not yet a real professional undertaking.

MCENROE ROLLS ON TO 4TH ROUND
The Miami Herald
Saturday, June 2, 1984
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Top-seeded John McEnroe yelled at photographers, shouted at the crowd and argued with officials but still eliminated fellow American Mel Purcell in a stormy third-round match Friday at the French Open tennis championships.

McEnroe rolled to a 6-4, 6-4, 6-1 triumph in a match marked by prolonged verbal battles with umpire Claude Richard of France and photographers who were positioned behind one end of the court.

Also posting a third-round victory Friday was the women's top seed, Martina Navratilova.

McEnroe's match, played on the same court where he had so many problems in his opening match against Ben Testerman last year, was marked by a confusing, at times hilarious, incident midway through the opening set.

The fireworks began when McEnroe, upset by the uneven surface on Court 1, demanded that the court be swept. The match was stopped for 22 minutes while four groundsmen worked on the court. One gestured to the umpire and threw his arms in the air, while the others attempted to brush away uneven sections of the red clay court.

When they finished, McEnroe again declined to continue until the balls were changed. Richard obliged, but he was overruled by the supervisor, who said it was not time for a ball change. After another heated exchange between McEnroe and officials, play began after a 30-minute delay.

McEnroe went on to take the set, but more trouble was to follow.

Richard had asked the photographers behind McEnroe not to take photographs while the 25-year-old New Yorker was serving.

But McEnroe doesn't speak French.

"This is a disgraceful exhibition of humanity," he shouted. And when he again asked Richard to speak to the photographers, he was warned for delay of game.

"It's the only place in the world where they have cameramen behind the lines," McEnroe said after the match. "You ask them to stop, and they say 'yes' but keep taking your picture. They are the most inconsiderate people in the world. Today was an absolute disgrace."

As McEnroe lost concentration and continued to get angry with the court and the photographers, Purcell got back into the match until the men's No. 1 seed and tournament favorite broke the Kentuckian for a 5-4 lead.

In the fifth game of the third set, McEnroe began to repair one section of the court. When Richard told him to play, McEnroe replied, "I'm just fixing the court so that when he serves, the ball doesn't bounce over my head."

Then there were more antics. In another protracted argument, Richard awarded a point against McEnroe.

McEnroe asked for the supervisor because of all the problems and was handed a penalty point, which put him behind 0-15. Under the Volvo Grand Prix rules, another infraction would call for him to be disqualifiqualified.

But McEnroe served and volleyed his way out of trouble, sending the match into a third set.

With the last 16 in his sights, McEnroe swept into a 4-1 lead. He still had time to challenge the cameramen one last time, and shouted, "I can't concentrate in this zoo," before taking his place in today's fourth round.

Purcell and Grand Prix supervisor Ken Farrar agreed with McEnroe that the court conditions were poor.

Farrar's assessment was the least damning. But he said: "I think he had a legitimate gripe about the condition of the court, but it was playable in my opinion."

Purcell and McEnroe, however, both called the court "unplayable." McEnroe went further.

"I think it's the worst court I've ever played on," the volatile left-hander said. "It wasn't even level -- forget about the 50 holes that were all around there. This is supposed to be a Grand Slam event, but I have never played on such a bad court."

Purcell complained of "big chunks in the clay." When asked about McEnroe's behavior, Purcell said, "He's such a perfectionist, anything will bother him. That's just Mac. It's what people want to see . . . I think it's kind of funny usually, but today I didn't."

Also advancing to the round of 16 was America's top-rated clay court player, fifth-seeded Jimmy Arias, who defeated Italy's Claudio Panatta, 7-6, 6-3, 6-3, in an erractic match on the wind-swept Center Court.

Panatta, whose older brother Adriano won the title here in 1976, was up two set points at 6-5 in the first set before Arias battled back to win the game and send the set into a tiebreaker. Arias took the tiebreaker 7-1, then went on to capture the last two sets easily.

Unseeded Brian Gottfried won his third-round battle, downing Rolf Gehring of West Germany, 7-6, 6-4, 6-4.

Navratilova, her timing still not perfect, needed only an hour today to advance into the final 16 of the French Open tennis championships.

The top seed, who was upset in the fourth round here last year -- her only loss of 1983, defeated Marie-Christine Calleja of France 6-1, 6-3 as she seeks to capture her fourth consecutive major tournament title and complete a Grand Slam title, which includes a $1 million bonus.

In a match that was halted Thursday night because of darkness, 15th-seeded Carling Bassett of Canada, who led 5-2 in the final set, needed only two more games to finish off Petra Huber of Austria 6-3, 2-6, 6-3.

Earlier today, Americans Zina Garrison and Kathy Horvath became the first to advance to the final 16. Garrison, seeded sixth, stopped Raffaella Reggi of Italy 7-5, 6-4 in an entertaining Center Court match, while Horvath swept past Kathy Rinaldi 6-0, 6-3.

Besides Navratilova, several other seeds advanced in the women's singles, including No. 3 Hana Mandlikova of Czechoslovakia and No. 14 Claudia Kohde-Kilsch of West Germany, along with unseeded Petra Keppeler of West Germany.

Rain caused a three-hour delay and forced postponement of several matches, including third-seeded Jimmy Connors' meeting with Martin Jaite of Argentina.
 

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LEAND SERVES UP PROFESSIONAL WIN
Philadelphia Daily News
Saturday, June 2, 1984
BILL FLEISCHMAN, Daily News Sports Writer

"Who do I play next?" asked Andrea Leand, the No. 1-seeded women's player in the Olympic Tennis Trials.

Told that her next opponent is Maeve Quinlan, Leand replied, "Never heard of her." Smiling, Leand added, "Is she over 15?"

The fourth-seeded Quinlan, who plays for Northwestern University, is over 15. Eleni Rossides, Leand's opponent in yesterday's quarterfinal, is also over 15. Barely.

The other day the 20-year-old Leand, the only professional in the Trials, said she didn't know most of the players who are competing for places on the U.S. team. After yesterday, it's unlikely Leand will ever forget Rossides.

Playing under clear skies in the shadow of Louis Armstrong Stadium at the National Tennis Center, the 16-year-old Washington, D.C., resident was within two points of an astonishing upset of Leand.

In her first match against a professional, the 5-2 Rossides stunned Leand by winning the first set, 6-1. Leand, an imposing 5-11 who accentuates every shot with a grunt, rebounded to take the second set, 6-2, then led, 3-1, in the final set.

From there on Leand should have been saying, "Nice try kid, back to the pajama parties." But Rossides, a steady, tireless player, refused to collapse. Rossides broke Leand twice, won the next four games to lead 5-4 and was up 30-0 serving for the match.

However, Leand won the next four points to tie the set at 5-5 and marched on to take the next two games, including a shutout in the final game with Rossides serving.

"I was waiting for a situation like this to happen," a relieved Leand said later. "I knew things were going too well.

"I hadn't played a set like the first one in a long time. I didn't know what to expect from her. But, unlike the first two girls I played, she can hit the ball. And she's feisty."

Rossides' father will send up a proud puff of cigar smoke to that tribute. Gene Rossides was an outstanding quarterback at Columbia back before pro football seized most of the attention in New York.

"She's a competitor," Gene said, standing in the background with his wife while their daughter handled the press as efficiently as she handled Leand. ''We enjoy watching her because she enjoys it and because she takes it in stride.

"There's no such thing as a pep talk with her," said Rossides, who is an attorney. "That just puts pressure on her. We had fun when we played football, although it wasn't fun when we lost because we had a tough coach in Lou Little."

Because she felt she was in a no-risk position, Eleni intended to enjoy her match against Leand.

"I didn't even feel pressure when it was 5-3," Eleni said. "I wasn't getting nervous at all, and I was wondering why.

"At 5-3, she just started going for shots. She won the match. She didn't play tentative at all. I let her control the tempo."

Since it will be at least a few years before Eleni Rossides experiences the self-centered economic realities of professional tennis life, she could convincingly admit she felt compassion for Leand's dilemma. After skipping the French Open to try qualifying for a berth on a non-medal Olympic team, here was the world's 30th-ranked women's player facing elimination and humiliation.

"I admire her for being here," Eleni said. "A lot of pros aren't here
because there's no money and nothing to gain. I think more professionals should have played here."

"I'm very surprised more pros didn't come here," Leand said. "But those (under 20) who are eligible - (Lisa) Bonder, (Beth) Herr, (Michelle) Torres, and (Leigh) Thompson - are good clay court players. I can understand why they wouldn't want to miss the French."

Fewer than 100 people watched Leand survive yesterday, which was too bad. At least those people can say they saw something special.

NET NOTES: Texan Richey Reneberg, the only surviving men's seed, meets Californian Kelly Jones in a semifinal today. No. 5 Reneberg, 18, will attend Southern Methodist University.
 

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CONNORS, EVERT SURVIVE CHALLENGES IN FRENCH OPEN
The Miami Herald
Sunday, June 3, 1984
From Herald Wire Services

Defending champion Yannick Noah of France and No. 2 seed Ivan Lendl of Czechoslovakia swept into the final 16 of the French Open tennis championships Saturday.

But several other seeds in both the men's and women's singles, including Jimmy Connors and Chris Evert Lloyd, had plenty of trouble on their way to the fourth round.

Noah blew out Australia's John Frawley, 6-1, 6-4, 6-3. At one stage during the match, Noah won 24 of 25 points on his service, which never was threatened by his opponent.

But Noah, whose concentration is often suspect, says he can do even better.

"I need a tough match," he said. "When you play a good player, your game improves. I feel better and better.

"I try to improve (mentally) every time," Noah said, "but you have to realize that in the early rounds, I'm playing people who have nothing to lose while I have little to gain."

Lendl, bidding to win his first Grand Slam tournament, although he has been in four finals, posted a 6-1, 7-5, 6-4 victory over Australia's Paul McNamee.

McNamee played a suicidal grass-court game in the opening set but then changed his strategy, stayed back, and slugged out the rallies from the baseline of the red clay courts. Still, Lendl won most of the big points and was a comfortable winner.

But Connors, trying to win the only Grand Slam tournament that has eluded him, had more than a few problems overcoming Argentine qualifier Martin Jaite.

Connors, seeded third, dropped the first set playing tentative tennis and was surprised by the tenacity and court speed of his 19-year-old opponent. Connors had to save a series of break points early in the second set before finally winning, 4-6, 6-4, 6-3, 6-1.

Defending champion Evert also had an unexpectedly tough fight before defeating ittle-known Soviet teen-ager Larissa Savchenko, 6-2, 4-6, 6-2.

Evert, seeded second, took the first set with three service breaks -- she also lost her own service once. But once Savchenko, 17, overcame her early nervousness, she played inspired tennis.

"There is no question about it -- I was pushed," said Evert. "But I never thought I was going to lose, and I needed a tough match."

Ninth-seeded Henrik Sundstrom of Sweden also had a tough match. But it was even tougher for Hans Gildemeister of Chile.

Sundstrom, 20, was down 2-6, 0-6, 1-5 and 0-30 on his serve when Gildemeister suddenly fell apart, committing 12 unforced errors in a row. Sundstrom won the next six games to take the third set, 7-5, then cruised through the last two sets, 6-3, 6-4.

"That was the first miracle of my life," said Sundstrom. "I had almost accepted that he was playing me out of the match. Then, at 1-5, everything changed, and luckily for me he started to choke. It was incredible."

Men

Third round -- Jimmy Connors (3) d. Martin Jaite, 4-6, 6-4, 6-3, 6-1; Henrik Sundstrom (9) d. Hans Gildemeister, 2-6, 0-6, 7-5, 6-3, 6-4; Jose Higueras (12) d. Cassio Motta, 5-7, 3-6, 6-1, 6-2; Francesco Cancellotti d. Karel Nocacek, 6-3, 6-2, 6-3; Yannick Noah (6) d. John Frawley, 6-1, 6-4, 6-3; Anders Jarryd (11) d. Michiel Schapers, 6-2, 6-0, 6-0; Juan Aguilera (13) d. Harold Solomon, 6-3, 6-7, 6-2, 6-2; Ivan Lendl (2) d. Paul MacNamee, 6-1, 7-5, 6-4; Jan Gunnarsson d. Heinz Gunthardt, 3-6, 7-6 (7-1), 6-1, 3-6, 6-1; Balazs Taroczy d. Wojtek Fibak, 2-6, 4-6, 6-3, 6-2, 6-4; Andres Gomez (7) d. Kent Carlsson , 7-6 (7-2), 7-5, 6-3; Mats Wilander (4) d. Thierry Tulasne, 6-2, 6-2, 6-4.

Women

Third round -- Anne White d. Sylvia Hanika (11), 6-4, 6-2; Chris Evert Lloyd (2) d. Larissa Savchenko, 6-2, 4-6, 6-2; Lisa Bonder (13) d. Amy Holton, 6-4, 6-1; Camille Benjamin d. Catrin Jexell, 6-1, 6-1; Laura Arraya d. Eva Pfaff, 5-7, 6-2, 6-2; Sabrina Goles d. Bettina Bunge, 6-3, 1-6, 6-3; Manuela Maleeva (10) d. Mima Jausovec, 6-1, 6-3; Virginia Ruzici d. Iva Budarova, 6-0, 6-1; Carling Bassett (15) d. Jennie Klitch, 7-6 (7-3), 6-3.
 

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TENNIS SERVES UP TRUE AMATEURISM
Philadelphia Daily News
Friday, June 1, 1984
BILL FLEISCHMAN, Daily News Sports Writer

This is an Olympic Trials? Where are the fans? Where's the excitement? Where are the ABC cameras?

Anyone strolling into the National Tennis Center yesterday would have thought some junior tournament had been driven indoors by the interminable rain that was turning the East into a rain forest.

Louis Armstrong Stadium, center stage for the U.S. Open that is played here each September, was deserted yesterday. The outer courts that are crowded with spectators during the Open also were vacant, giving a visitor the impression that this dreary day resembled a chilly March afternoon more than a presumably ideal late May tennis day.

The NTC's indoor courts looked more like a Saturday at your favorite tennis club. Players outnumbered family and press representatives, who watched the matches from the elevated players lounge area where the McEnroes, Connors, Lendls, Navratilovas and Evert-Lloyds relax, however briefly, during the Open.

The Olympic tennis candidates, mostly from colleges and high schools, were properly tanned and were wearing the latest expensive tennis fashions. But other than Andrea Leand and Gretchen Rush, you probably never heard of any of them.

On the courts, they also were put in their proper place. There were no linesmen or ballboys. Players who are big shots back at school were poking their rackets at the baseline curtains, searching for stray balls, just like weekend players. This is the Olympic spirit, right? Sport for the fun of it.

"This brings back memories," said Leand, the world's 30th-ranked women's player and the only professional in the Olympic Tennis Trials. "All the mothers and fathers . . . no ballboys . . . no one to call the lines. I even went out (for her match) without a ballpocket (in her tennis outfit)."

Leand didn't mean to sound condescending when she added, "It feels like a junior tournament."

Leand, who gained fame three years ago by upsetting No. 2 seed Andrea Jaeger in the second round of the U.S. Open, is only 20, but she feels like a matriarch in the Olympic Trials.

"I'm playing against all these people I've never heard of," she said, glancing at the idle players. "I didn't realize they'd be this young."

One youngster who is trying to earn one of the two remaining women's Olympic berths (Jaeger and Kathy Horvath were awarded wild cards by the U.S. Tennis Association) is Eleni Rossides, of Washington, D.C. If you are over 40 and a football fan, the name might sound familiar. Eleni's father, Gene, was a great quarterback at Columbia. He's now a successful attorney in Washington.

Eleni, a 5-2 junior at Sidwell Friends School, won yesterday over Niurka Sodupe, of Miami, 7-7 (8-6), 7-5. Eleni's prize is a quarterfinal match today against the top-seeded Leand.

"I'm definitely a long shot," she said, smiling. "But I like the variety of competition here. It's not the same juniors you usually play."

"It is a strange atmosphere," said second-seeded Gretchen Rush, a Trinity (Texas) University junior from Pittsburgh. "It's a no-pressure situation. The younger kids are playing and it won't hurt your ranking."

Last year Rush reached the quarterfinals of the French Open, which is under way in Paris. Both Rush and Leand figure there will be other French Opens. But there won't be another Olympics for them (or, maybe, for anyone else). Even though tennis is just a demonstration sport in Los Angeles this summer, both said trying out for the Olympics is a top priority.

"I'm here because it's the Olympics," said Rush, the Pan American Games singles champion. "There are no medals, but that doesn't matter. I was in the Pan American Games and that was a thrill of a lifetime, with 100,000 people screaming and yelling when you walked in with the other American athletes. That thrill is something more than you get from a pro tournament, where you're just playing for yourself."

"Just being part of the Olympics will be exciting," said Leand, a Brooklandville, Md., native who is now based in New York. "I had a little taste of it in the Macabiah Games. Something like that definitely brings out your patriotism.

"You don't take for granted all the advantages we have in the United States. When you travel, you realize how good we have it."

Just when you think the politicians have succeeded in dousing the Olympic flame, you talk with young athletes like Leand and Rush and think maybe the politicians can't completely screw it up after all.

Jim Grabb feels the same way. Grabb, a 6-3, 160-pound flagpole who plays No. 3 singles for Stanford, looked around the players lounge yesterday and said, "Sure this lacks fans, but whoever makes it will be part of something special. The Olympics are the ultimate in amateur sports, aren't they? Who cares about politics?"

Grabb, No. 7, is one of only two seeded men's players who still have a chance for an all-expenses paid trip to Los Angeles. No. 5 Richey Reneberg, of Houston, is the other. Since Jimmy Arias, last year's U.S. clay court and Italian Open champion, is the only men's player to receive a wild card into the Olympics, at least Grabb and Reneberg are competing for three spots rather than just two like the women.

No one is grumbling into their Perrier about Arias, Jaeger and Horvath receiving automatic Olympic wardrobe fittings.

"It's a good rule," Leand said. "You won't get a Jaeger if she has to miss the French Open. Having a Jaeger play in the Olympics is a big deal."

Having the troubled Jaeger play anywhere soon might be a big deal. Now in her fifth pro season, the frequently injured Jaeger, who will be just 19 next week, is hinting that she soon might abandon tennis to attend college, or race dirt bikes, or something.

Gayle Godwin is one person who hopes Jaeger continues playing at least through the Olympics. Godwin is the UCLA women's coach who will serve as technical observer - that's Olympic-ese for coaches of demonstration sports - of the U.S. Olympic women's team.

Godwin, who is also the U.S. Junior Federation Cup coach, has been part of the anonymous gathering here all week. But she says it hasn't depressed the players.

"I think most of them want the Olympics more than anything else they've ever done," Godwin said.
He later became one of the best doubles players with the assist of Patrick McEnroe.
 

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Discussion Starter #53
Connors, Lendl and Mrs. Lloyd Advance
Associated Press
June 3, 1984
New York Times

PARIS, June 2— Ivan Lendl, bidding to win his first Grand Slam title, moved into the final 16 of the French Open tennis championships today with a 6-1, 7-5, 6-4 victory over Paul McNamee of Australia.

Yannick Noah, the defending champion; Jimmy Connors and Chris Evert Lloyd also advanced in the $1.8 million clay-court tournament.

In what he later called a ''miracle,'' Henrik Sundstrom of Sweden pulled out his third-round match with Hans Gildemeister of Chile after trailing by 2-6, 0-6, 1-5, love-30 on his serve. Gildemeister hit into a series of unforced errors, allowing Sundstrom to take the third set, 7-5. Then the Swede won the final two sets, 6-3, 6-4.

'He Started to Choke'

''It was the first miracle of my life,'' Sundstrom said. ''I had almost accepted that he was playing me out of the match. Then everything changed. Luckily for me, he started to choke.''

Noah dominated Australia's John Frawley, 6-1, 6-4, 6-3; Connors had to recover to beat unheralded Martin Jaite of Argentina, 4-6, 6-4, 6-3, 6-1, and Mrs. Lloyd played for 1 hour 37 minutes before eliminating 17-year- old Larissa Savchenko of the Soviet Union, 6-2, 4-6, 6-2. Ann White of St. Petersburg, Fla., upset 11th-seeded Sylvia Hanika of West Germany, 6-4, 6-2, and two other Americans, Lisa Bonder and Camille Benjamin, were among the winners. But Harold Solomon was eliminated in four sets by the rising young Spaniard, Juan Aguilera.

Lendl had some anxious moments before he wore down McNamee. At the start of the match, the Australian played a serve-and-volley game, going to the net on the slow clay as if it were his favorite grass surface. But Lendl passed him almost at will and continued to dominate with two love games at the start of the second set. Changes Tactics

McNamee, ranked 41st in the world, then changed tactics. He stayed back, slugging it out from the baseline. He fought back twice to level at 3-3 and 5-5, then had a point for 6-5. But he missed his chance and Lendl took the set. The final set went with serve until 3-3, then Lendl made the key break.

At one point in his match, Noah reeled off 24 of 25 points over six games, and he never lost his serve.

Connors said he had made a mistake in trying to feel out Jaite in the first set. ''I'd never played him before, or even seen him play, so I was too cautious,'' said the American left- hander. ''I should have just played my regular game.''

Mrs. Lloyd, the defending champion, had dropped only one game in two previous matches. But she found the Soviet teen-ager a formidable opponent. Once the Russian had overcome her nervousness, she played inspired tennis.

Hitting forehands and backhands down the lines and scoring with drop shots, Miss Savchenko moved to a 4-2 lead in the second set. Mrs. Lloyd, struggling, got back to 4-4, but was broken in the ninth game and dropped the set.

In the final set, Mrs. Lloyd recovered her composure and built a 5-1 lead. But her opponent, who reached the doubles quarterfinals at Wimbledon last year, was not finished. Two drop shots and two whistling backhands gave her a break. However, the deficit was too large and she bowed out in the next game.
 

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Discussion Starter #54
EVERT DEFEATS MALEEVA TO AVENGE LOSS IN ITALY
The Miami Herald
Monday, June 4, 1984
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Chris Evert Lloyd rallied Sunday to beat Bulgaria's Manuela Maleeva, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2, and avenge a loss in last week's Italian Open final while joining a parade of seeded players moving into the quarterfinals of the French Open tennis championships.

Evert, the defending champion and No. 2 seed, survived Maleeva's torrid start before she wore down the talented teen-ager.

The two top seeds, John McEnroe and Martina Navratilova, also advanced to the quarterfinals. McEnroe needed three hours and 50 minutes to eliminate 12th-seeded Jose Higueras of Spain, 6-4, 7-6, 3-6, 6-3, in a match interrupted twice by rain.

Higueras, one of the finest clay-court players and twice a semifinalist here, narrowly failed to pull out the second set. He took the third and fought right to the end.

Except for the final set, McEnroe struggled with his first serve, but even not playing his best, he had the edge over Higueras, who lacked variety in his game.

McEnroe also made news at the French Open when he got into an argument with several news photographers, who later threatened to boycott the tournament. A compromise was reached today, allowing photographers to continue to shoot pictures from court level except whan a player is serving.

Navratilova took only 45 minutes to overwhelm 14th-seeded Claudia Kohde-Kilsch of West Germany, 6-0, 6-1.

In the surprise of the day, in which play was interrupted twice by rain, Melissa Brown, a 16-year-old amateur from Scarsdale, N.Y., upset sixth-seeded Zina Garrison of Houston, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3.

Also posting victories in women's singles were No. 8 Kathy Horvath, No. 3 Hana Mandlikova of Czechoslovakia, No. 15 Carling Bassett of Canada, Lisa Bonder and Camille Benjamin.

In the men's singles, other winners Sunday were fifth- seeded Jimmy Arias, who will face McEnroe in the quarterfinals, and No. 9 Henrik Sundstrom of Sweden.

In a three-hour confrontation between Arias, a clay-court expert, and Brian Gottfried, a serve-and-volleyer, Arias eventually won, 6-4, 2-6, 6-4, 1-6, 6-2.

Sundstrom beat Italy's Francesco Cancellotti, 7-5, 6-1, 6-2, and will play the winner of today's match between third- seeded Jimmy Connors and Spain's Emilio Sanchez. That match, originally set for Sunday, was rescheduled because of darkness.

The women's quarterfinal pairings will have Navratilova against Horvath, who upset Martina in the fourth round here last year; Mandlikova against Brown; Bonder against Benjamin; and Bassett against Evert.

Maleeva, 17, took the first set and appeared to be on the verge of repeating her Italian Open upset.

But in the fourth game of the second set, Maleeva's game suddenly fell apart. After breaking Evert's service once again, she had seven game points for a 3-1 lead, lost them all and never recovered.

As the errors crept into Maleeva's game, Evert stepped up a gear, and her opponent won only three points in the last five games of the match.

It was Evert's 48th victory here. Only Sweden's Bjorn Borg, who won the men's singles a record six times, has won more matches -- 49.

Sunday's results:

Men

Fourth round -- Henrik Sundstrom (No. 9 seed) d. Francesco Cancellotti, 7-5, 6-1, 6-2; Jimmy Arias (5) d. Brian Gottfried, 6-4, 2-6, 6-4, 1-6, 6-2; John McEnroe (1) d. Jose Higueras (12), 6-4, 7-6, 3-6, 6-3.

Women

Fourth round -- Chris Evert Lloyd (2) d. Manuela Maleeva (10), 3-6, 6-3, 6-2; Melissa Brown d. Zina Garrison (6), 6-3, 3-6, 6-3; Martina Navratilova (1) d. Claudia Kohde-Kilsch (14), 6-0, 6-1; Kathy Horvath (8) d. Ann White, 6-1, 6-1; Carling Bassett (15) d. Laura Arraya, 6-4, 6-0.

Hana Mandlikova (3) d. Petra Keppeler, 6-0, 4-6, 6-1; Lisa Bonder (13) d. Virginia Ruzici, 6-4, 6-3; Camille Benjamin d. Sabrina Goles, 6-3, 5-7, 8-6.
 

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Discussion Starter #55
MCENROE AND NAVRATILOVA ADVANCE
The Philadelphia Inquirer
Monday, June 4, 1984
United Press International

John McEnroe growled his way to a four-set victory over Jose Higueras of Spain yesterday to advance to the quarterfinals of the $1 million French Open tennis championships.

The New Yorker took 3 hours and 51 minutes to complete his 6-4, 7-6 (7-5), 3-6, 6-3 victory in a match that was twice interrupted by rain, which caused several matches to be postponed.

McEnroe, trying to become the first American man to win the French Open since 1955, next faces No. 5 Jimmy Arias. Arias, 19, was taken the distance by Brian Gottfried before winning, 6-4, 2-4, 6-4, 1-6, 6-2.

McEnroe and Higueras were repeatedly upset over line calls. But while the Spaniard kept himself in check, McEnroe gave full vent to his anger. He interrogated linesmen, harangued spectators and pelted two balls at photographers, earning a warning.

"It's very difficult playing here because people don't listen," McEnroe said. "I am out there trying to do a job, but they are out there deliberately trying to upset me."

Before the rain, Martina Navratilova ripped Claudia Kohde of West Germany, 6-0, 6-1, to advance to the final eight. She next faces Kathy Horvath, who eliminated Navratilova in the fourth round last year - Navratilova's only defeat of the season. Horvath, the No. 8 seed, had an easy quarterfinal passage, routing Anne White, 6-1, 6-1.

Navratilova was never pressured by Kohde, taking only 45 minutes to beat the West German and setting up her return match against Horvath.

"I don't think I will ever pay the debt," Navratilova said. "But since last year, I have played her on both cement and clay and beaten her in straight sets. In fact, I beat her in straight sets on clay just two months ago, but it will be a good challenge for me to play her here and also for me to redeem myself."

No. 2 Chris Evert Lloyd, a five-time French winner and the defending champion, avenged her loss to Manuela Maleeva in the Italian Open with a 3-6, 6-3, 6-2 decision over the Bulgarian teenager. Evert's quarterfinal opponent is No. 15 Carling Bassett of Canada, who defeated Laura Arraya of Peru, 6-4, 6-0.

Melissa Brown, a 16-year-old amateur from White Plains, N.Y., scored the only upset of the day, defeating No. 6 Zina Garrison, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3.

"It was easily my biggest win ever," said Brown, playing her first major tournament. "It is the first time I have ever beaten anyone in the top 10."

Her next opponent is 1981 champion Hana Mandlikova of Czechoslovakia, the No. 3 seed, who beat Petra Keppeler of West Germany, 6-0, 4-6, 6-1.

In the only other men's singles yesterday, No. 9 Henrik Sundstrom of Sweden outlasted Italian Francesco Cancellotti, 7-5, 6-1, 6-2. He will play the winner of the held-over match between No. 3 Jimmy Connors and Spain's Emilio Sanchez.

McEnroe suffered lapses of concentration and made a string of unforced errors. His service was off, allowing Higueras to attack.

It looked like a routine victory for the Wimbledon champion after the opening set. In the second set, Higueras matched McEnroe, shot for shot, but McEnroe eventually won it 7-5 in the tie-breaker of the 13th game.

The score was 1-1 in the next set when there was a 45-minute stoppage for rain. Higueras got back into the groove when play resumed, holding set point at 5-2, before black clouds emptied again, causing a 40-minute delay. The Spaniard won the set, but McEnroe produced a stunning return of serve and a sizzling forehand down the line to gain the vital break for 4-2 in the fourth set.
 

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Discussion Starter #56
FUTURE STARS DOT U.S. TENNIS
Philadelphia Daily News
Monday, June 4, 1984
BILL FLEISCHMAN, Daily News Sports Writer

Meet the Olympic men's tennis team. Until a few months ago, one player admits he was an all-star head case. Another fell off his bicycle last fall and suffered a broken jaw. Another is a hyper, magazine-handsome blond who just graduated from high school.

These are the California Kids Plus One.

The One is Jimmy Arias, the world's No. 5-ranked player. His stature and commitments to the Italian Open and French Open caused the United States Tennis Association to give him a wild-card position on the Olympic team, thereby sparing Arias the aggravation of a rainy week at the National Tennis Center in New York City.

Andrea Jaeger, the world's No. 5-ranked women's player, and No. 11 Kathy Horvath also were wild-carded onto the Olympic team.

The recent head case is Kelly Jones, a slender, dark-haired Pepperdine University junior. Unless you are addicted to college tennis or search the tennis weeklies for results of the USTA's summer satellite circuits, you probably never have heard of Jones and his two teammates, who clinched their Olympic trip Saturday. This situation will change quickly, according to Steve Stefanki, the men's team's technical observer (since tennis is a demonstration sport in Los Angeles, he can't be called coach).

"Kelly Jones has five times as much talent as Vitas Gerulaitis," said Stefanki, 32. "And he has more talent, skill-wise, than Yannick Noah. He has the potential to be in the top 10 in the world.

"But he has been about No. 800 mentally and emotionally. It's like he has all the tools in the toolbox, but he doesn't know which one to use."

"I didn't have a good college year," said Jones, whose sister, Kim Jones Shaefer, is the reigning U.S. Women's Pro Indoor champion. "When you try to be No. 1 at Pepperdine, you figure you'll take a lot of lumps."

Jones's lumps left him No. 57 in the final college rankings. How does a young man whose father is a retired Army officer suddenly turn his game around in time to qualify for the Olympics? A couple weeks on KP duty?

Jones tips his racket to Allen Fox, the Pepperdine coach.

"My coach has a PhD in psychology," Jones said. "If I wasn't at Pepperdine, I probably would still be in my slump.

"He could tell what was happening. He calls it mental perspective. It's teaching yourself that nothing is bad. If you miss a shot, what's the big deal?

"Whatever happens, you shouldn't be hard on yourself. That's probably the toughest thing for a player to overcome - not getting angry with himself."

During the Olympic Trials the 6-foot Jones rarely displayed emotion on court, which was a complete switch from his earlier sulking periods.

"Three months ago, if you had told me I would make the Olympic team, I would have laughed at you," Jones said. "I had a couple slumps that didn't make me feel too happy about my future in tennis."

And now? "It feels great," Jones said. "I'm excited."

Another potential pro tour star is Derrick Rostagno. Like Jones, the 6-1 Rostagno had an undistinguished college year. But whereas Jones's problems were mental, Rostagno's physical ailments prevented him from excelling.

Rostagno fell off his bicycle last November. When the broken jaw he suffered in the fall healed, he was ready to play again. But then he discovered he also had suffered a broken toe in the accident.

"I didn't know the toe was broken until I started playing again," Rostagno said. "Last Sunday (before the trials began) was the first time I could move. Now I feel like flying. I feel fantastic!"

Qualifying for the Olympics was important to these players, who all seem to come from towns named Rancho Palos Verdes or Rolling Hills. But Rostagno had a special reason: his grandfather, Juan, was a pistol shooter for Argentina in three Olympics.

"I wanted to keep it in the family for that reason," Rostagno said.

Eric Amend is the hyper recent high school grad who completes the men's team. The 5-10 Amend, who was California's top-ranked high school player, is the noisy one. He will attend USC.

Stefanki likes the balance and hardcourt experience of his players. The Los Angeles Tennis Center on UCLA's campus, where the Olympic tennis will be played, offers hardcourts but with a relatively slow surface.

Stefanki, whose brother, Larry, is a touring pro, said his players will tune up for the Olympics by playing the USTA circuit and some European tournaments.

"When we do practice together," Stefanki said, "because they lack international experience, we'll pretend it's the Olympics each time."

That Arias won't show up until the day before the Olympics begin doesn't bother Stefanki or the other players. As Gretchen Rush, who joins Jaeger, Horvath and Andrea Leand on the women's Olympic team, said, "At first I was mad that they opened it to pros. But I thought that if I was in LA, I don't think I'd want to go watch Gretchen Rush or Cinny MacGregor (a trials semifinalist) play. I'd want to see Jaeger or Jimmy Arias. I'm glad they're playing."
 

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Discussion Starter #57
IN FRANCE, LENDL AND CONNORS WIN
The Philadelphia Inquirer
Tuesday, June 5, 1984
Associated Press

Rain washed out all but a few hours' play at the French Open tennis championships yesterday, but not before Ivan Lendl, Jimmy Connors and Andres Gomez had booked their places in the quarterfinals of the men's singles.

Lendl, the No. 2 seed, demolished 11th-seeded Anders Jarryd of Sweden, 6-4, 6-0, 6-4. The righthander, still seeking his first Grand Slam title after reaching four finals, has not lost a set in four rounds of the competition.

He served magnificently and his forehand was deadly, but he joined the list of players who have complained about court conditions, describing the surface after a lengthy break for rain as "not playable."

In the quarterfinals, Lendl will meet Gomez, of Ecuador, who yesterday ousted another Swede, Jan Gunnarsson, 6-3, 6-1, 6-3.

"He's a difficult player on any surface, and I'll have to play very solidly," Lendl said of Gomez, who also has not dropped a set so far.

As on Sunday, Connors had first-set jitters. His opponent, unseeded Emilio Sanchez of Spain, who is ranked 87th in the world on the ATP computer, had three break points to take a 4-0 lead in the opening set, but missed his chance.

Connors responded by taking 10 games in a row and then went on to play "as good as I have ever done on clay."

The third-seeded American won, 6-4, 6-1, 6-1, and said afterward: "I still have a lot of road to cover, but I'm still in there."

In the quarterfinals, Connors meets Sweden's Henrik Sundstrom, whom he beat in the third round at Wimbledon last year, their only meeting in 1983. Since then, Sundstrom has improved dramatically and has three 1984 tournament victories, including a straight-set triumph over countryman Mats Wilander in Monte Carlo.

Wilander's fourth-round match against No. 13 Juan Aguilera of Spain was one of several washed out by the rain, which caused a 3-hour, 15-minute delay in the middle of the day. The rain returned later, accompanied by thunder and lightning. In all, only a little over three hours of play was possible.

The defending champion, Yannick Noah, was in a struggle on the center court with Balazs Taroczy, the Hungarian veteran, and their match will be completed Tuesday. Taroczy led, 6-3, 2-6, 1-0. Also postponed were several women's quarterfinals, including Martina Navratilova's meeting with Kathy Horvath, who upset her last year in this tournament. Hana Mandlikova won the first set from 16-year-old Melissa Brown of Scarsdale, N.Y., but the surprising Brown led in the second set, 3-2, when play was stopped. She was the top 14's player in the United States in 1982.
 

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Discussion Starter #58
Connors finds touch to beat Sanchez, rain
The San Diego Union
Tuesday, June 5, 1984
From News Services

Jimmy Connors sleepwalked through the start of his match yesterday against Emilio Sanchez before rousing himself for a straight-set victory to advance to the quarterfinals of the $1 million French Open tennis championships.

After finding his touch late in the first set, the No. 3 seed had no problem with the 19-year-old Spaniard and posted a 6-4, 6-1, 6-1 decision -- just before rain delayed play 3 hours, 20 minutes.

Only three of the scheduled seven singles matches were completed because of the rain.

The downpour arrived when No. 2 Ivan Lendl was two sets up and 3-3 in the third against Anders Jarryd of Sweden. Lendl showed no signs of rustiness when he resumed, eliminating the No. 11 seed, 6-4, 6-0, 6-4.

No. 7 Andres Gomez of Ecuador stopped Jan Gunnarsson of Sweden, 6-3, 6-1, 6-3, to earn a quarterfinal meeting with Lendl.

Meanwhile, a compromise averted a threatened boycott by angry news photographers after John McEnroe demanded that organizers close the photo pits behind the baselines on Center Court and court No. 1. Photographers will be allowed to continue to shoot pictures from the pits, except when players are serving.

Sunday, McEnroe complained that the whirring noise from their motor-driven cameras was bothering him during his serve.
 

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Discussion Starter #59
Streak Ends for a 16-Year-Old
Associated Press
June 6, 1984
New York Times

PARIS, June 5— On a day when such giants of the game as John McEnroe, Jimmy Connors, Chris Evert Lloyd and Martina Navratilova advanced to the semifinals, Melissa Brown of Scarsdale, N.Y., a 16-year- old amateur, was finally eliminated from the French Open tennis championships.

''It was really nerve-racking, the first time I've ever played anyone in the top five,'' Miss Brown said after she lost her quarterfinal match to Hana Mandlikova of Czechoslovakia, 6-1, 6-4.

Ranked 122d in the world, Miss Brown put up a courageous fight before falling to the superior skills and experience of the third-seeded player.

When their match on the clay at Roland Garros Stadium was abandoned because of rain on Monday, the youngster led, 3-2, in the second set. But she could win only one more game when play resumed today.

''I was just starting to relax and get into the game yesterday,'' she said. ''I could have played better. I was too tentative. I need more patience and must work on my volleys.''

On her way to the quarterfinals in her first Grand Slam tournament, Miss Brown first eliminated a qualifier, Helene Cedet of France. Then she beat three Americans - Wendy White, Michelle Torres and, in a major upset, sixth-seeded Zina Garrison.

The night before facing Miss Mandlikova, she said, she slept for only three hours.

''I had been hoping just to get past the first round, then I found myself in the quarterfinals,'' she said. ''It was unreal and I couldn't sleep.''

She moves on to Britain next week to play at Eastbourne and Wimbledon, but her interest in the French championships is far from over, as she goes staight into the junior girls' event here. But she said, ''I suppose it will be a bit of a letdown after the past week.''

Miss Navratilova reversed her only defeat of last year by dispatching Kathy Horvath, 6-4, 6-2, and next faces Miss Mandlikova, the 1981 champion, who was once her ball girl.

Mrs. Lloyd, the defending champion, who is seeking her sixth French crown, had to rally to defeat 16-year- old Carling Bassett of Canada, 4-6, 6-1, 6-0. Her semifinal opponent is the surprising Camille Benjamin, a 17- year-old Californian who edged 13th- seeded Lisa Bonder of Michigan, 7-6, 5-7, 6-3.

McEnroe, the world's No. 1 player, rolled up his 41st straight victory this year in defeating fifth-seeded Jimmy Arias, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4, and is in the semifinals for the first time here. On Friday he plays Connors, who ended a run of three quarterfinal defeats here by beating ninth-seeded Henrik Sundstrom of Sweden, 7-6, 6-1, 6-4.

The remaining men's quarterfinals are Yannick Noah vs. Mats Wilander, and Ivan Lendl vs. Andres Gomez.

McEnroe and Connors are 12-12 since they first met in 1977, and have not faced each other on clay for five years. But McEnroe admitted: ''Every time we play on clay, I lose to him. He returns a serve so well that I can't count on my serve to attack him. I shall just stick to my game.''
 

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Discussion Starter #60
EVERT OUSTS BASSETT IN PARIS
The Miami Herald
Wednesday, June 6, 1984
From Herald Wire Services

Chris Evert Lloyd recovered from a first-set lapse Tuesday to defeat Carling Bassett, 4-6, 6-1, 6-0, and reach the semifinals of the French Open tennis championships.

Evert, 29, the defending champion and five-time winner at Roland Garros Stadium, lost only four points in the final set as she dominated Bassett, 16, with aggressive volleying at the net.

"Carling always plays well against me," said Evert, who had won three previous matches with the Canadian. "She plays loose. I don't know if she got a little tired or down on herself, but she wasn't the same player in the second and third sets.

"To beat her, you have to attack her. That's not really my game, and it's tough to do on clay, but that's what you have to do against her."

A downcast Bassett, whose best previous performance in a grand slam event had been reaching the fourth round of Wimbledon in 1983, said she was glad to get this far.

"I'm happy with the way I played," she said.

"In the second set, she went up a notch. She started pressuring me into making errors. She was hitting the line every time. I tried to get in as much as I could, but she was hitting the ball deep, so I couldn't get in."

"I just felt really good today," said Evert. "In the second and third sets, I felt I could go for the lines. "Those were the two best sets I've played in the tournament."

Evert advanced to a semifinal meeting with 17-year old Camille Benjamin of the United States, who defeated Lisa Bonder, 7-6, 5-7, 6-3.

In other women's quarterfinals, top-seeded Martina Navratilova beat Kathy Horvath, 6-4, 6-2, and Hana Mandlikova ousted Melissa Brown, 6-1, 6-4.

In the men's fourth round, defending champion Yannick Noah finished his rain-delayed match by beating Balazc Taroczy, 3-6, 6-2, 7-6 (7-3), 7-6 (7-3), and 1982 champion Mats Wilander defeated Juan Aguilera, 6-2, 6-1, 6-3.

Top seed John McEnroe and No. 3 Jimmy Connors were the first men to reach the semifinals. McEnroe beat No. 6 Jimmy Arias, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4, and Connors ousted Henrik Sundstrom, 7-6 (7-4), 6-1, 6-4.
 
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