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Discussion Starter #401
FERNANDEZ TAKES GIRLS' 16 CROWN
The Miami Herald
Sunday, December 23, 1984
JIM CARSON, Herald Writer

Mary Joe Fernandez was playing the role perfectly. She politely smiled for the cameras, patiently signed the autographs and cheerfully accepted the little pecks on the cheek.

It was a crowd of about 1,200 fans adoring South Florida's latest tennis heroine, but there likely will come a day when 120,000 will say they were there when Fernandez won her first Orange Bowl International girls' 16s title.

Especially if Fernandez fulfills the promise of a tennis career some are predicting will eclipse even that of another South Florida heroine, Chris Evert Lloyd of Fort Lauderdale.

Saturday at the Flamingo Park/Capital Bank Tennis Center on Miami Beach, Fernandez, a 13-year-old prodigy from Miami, took the third step in becoming the first girl to win all four Orange Bowl titles with a convincing 6-4, 6-1 victory over Argentina's Patricia Tarabini.

"Me, a hero? I don't know about that," Fernandez said after the match. "And as far as being the next Chris Evert, there will never be another Chris Evert."

But even Evert didn't win all four Orange Bowl titles, although she did win the 18s in the early 1970s.

Fernandez probably would have been seeded first or second in the 18s this year, but her parents and her coach, Guillermo Aubone, don't want to risk burning her out.

"We saw what happened to Andrea Jaeger and Tracy Austin, and we don't want that to happen to Mary Joe," Aubone said. "She has plenty of time to win all these titles."

Fernandez, who has already won the Junior Orange Bowl 12s and 13s titles, took little time in finishing off Tarabini. The players traded service breaks through the first eight games of the first set, then Fernandez held in the ninth game and broke Tarabini in the 10th for the 6-4 decision.

In the second set, the players traded service breaks again in the first two games, but Fernandez steam-rollered her fourth- seeded opponent in the next five games for a 6-1 victory and the championship.

"I just had a little trouble getting my rhythm going in the first set," said Fernandez, the top-ranked 16s player in the United States. "In the second set, I started finding my shots and placing them well."

Argentina didn't far too well in the boys' 16s final, either. Top-seeded Guillermo Perez Roldan of Argentina was beaten by second-seeded Horst Skoff of Austria, 6-1, 6-4.

Other Argentinians were successful Saturday. Top-seeded Gabriela Sabatini of Argentina advanced to today's girls' 18s semifinals with a 6-0, 6-1 victory over seventh-seeded Shawn Foltz of Indianapolis. Sabatini will play fifth-seeded Neige Dias of Brazil, who defeated Laura Garrone of Italy, 6-2, 6-4. That match is at 11:30 a.m. on the Abel Holtz Stadium center court.

In the other semifinal, sixth-seeded Merecedes Paz of Argentina will face second-seeded Katrina Maleeva of Bulgaria at 12:30 p.m. Paz beat Natalie Bykova of the Soviet Union, 6-4, 6-4. Maleeva had a hard time in defeating Federica Bonsignori of Italy, 1-6, 6-2, 6-3.

In the boys' 18s quarterfinals, top-seeded Luke Jensen of East Grand Rapids, Mich., beat Augustin Moreno of Mexico, 6-1, 6-0. But No. 2 seed Bruno Oresar of Yugoslavia fell as ninth- seeded Ricky Brown of Brentwood, Tenn., upset the world's fifth- ranked player, 6-3, 6-3.

Tenth-seeded Jay Berger of Plantation scored another upset by defeating seventh-seeded Michael Tauson of Denmark, 6-4, 6-0. Eighth-seeded Claudio Pistolesi of Italy beat 14th-seeded Leonardo Lavalle of Mexico, 6-3, 7-6 (7-1).

In today's semifinals, Pistolesi plays Brown at approximately 1:30, and Jensen plays Berger at about 3:30. Both matches are on center court. The final will be played Monday.

JUNIOR OB TENNIS

Nicolas Pereira of Venezuela defeated No. 3 seed Jack Friaerson of Athens, Ga., 7-5, 6-7, 6-1, in the quarterfinals of the boys' 14s at the University of Miami.

Pereira will meet David Nainkin of South Africa, and Pieter Norval of South Africa will play Jim Courier of Dade City in today's semifinals.

Boys' 12 -- Johan Alven of Sweden defeated top-seeded Ricky Lee of Worthington, Ohio, 6-2, 6-0, in one quarterfinal match at Biltmore.

William Kyriakos of Brazil defeated No. 2 seed Paul Pridmore of North Aurora, Ill., 6-3, 4-6, 6-3, and No. 3 seed Ivan Baron of Pembroke Pines defeated Marco Zuniga of Mexico, 6-1, 5-7, 6-3, to advance to today's semifinals.

Today, Baron meets Kyriakos, and Michael Flanagan of Dallas plays Alven.

Girls' 14 -- No. 2 seed Iwalani McCalla of Los Altos, Calif., defeated Diane McKeon of Boca Raton, 6-4, 6-2, while No. 3 seed Caryn Moss of Pembroke Pines defeated Karyn Cooper of Peru, 6-0, 6-2.

In today's semifinals at the Marriott, Moss will meet McCalla, and Shihi Okada of Japan will play Andrea Berger of Plantation.

Girls' 12 -- Top-seed Luanne Spadea of Boca Raton and No. 2 seed Meredith Geiger of Edmond, Okla., both won their quarterfinal matches to advance to today's semifinals at Salvadore.

* * *

Mike Niemi of Tampere, Finland, defeated Svetozar Merinkovic of Belgrade, Yugoslavia, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4, to capture the boys' under-18 title of the Citrus Bowl International Junior Tennis Championships at Laver's International Tennis Resort in Delray Beach.
 

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Discussion Starter #402
Need to have some mention of the infamous Nelson def. Hepner match.

"Shoot them. Shoot them both." -- Major Arnold Toht, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Lucasfilm/Paramount Pictures, 1981

Navratilova, Shriver win opening tests
The San Diego Union
Wednesday, September 26, 1984
From News Services

Top-seeded Martina Navratilova and second-seeded Pam Shriver defeated their first-round opponents in straight sets yesterday in singles matches of the Virginia Slims of New Orleans tennis tournament.

Navratilova won 6-3, 6-0 against unseeded Lisa Spain of Moultrie, Ga., in the night's final match, and Shriver crushed unseeded Terry Phelps 6-0, 6-2. Spain lost in the semifinals of the Ginny of San Diego tourney Saturday.

Fourth-seeded Zina Garrison beat Australian Elizabeth Sayers 6-3, 6-0 in an afternoon match.

In earlier matches, Terry Holladay defeated Debbie Spence, the San Diego tourney winner, 2-6, 7-5, 6-2; fifth-seeded-Bonnie Gadusek was upset by unseeded Alycia Mouton 6-1, 6-3, and sixth-seeded Pam Casale of Fairfield New Jersey defeated Gigi Fernandez of Puerto Rico 7-6, 7-5, 8-6.

In other action, Jenny Klitch defeated Sharon Walsh 7-6, 4-6, 6-4 with a 7-5 tiebreaker, and eighth-seeded Kathy Rinaldi beat Michelle Torres 6-2, 6-0.

STANSBURY WINS AGAIN -- California's Cary Stansbury provided a major surprise for the second consecutive day Monday in the Grand Prix men's professional tennis series at Honolulu, upetting Canada's Glenn Michibata 6-4, 6-7 (5-7), 6-3 in a first-round singles match.

The unseeded Stansbury made it to the Hawaii main draw by defeating South Africa's Berry Moir, the No. 1 seed in the qualifying finals, on Sunday.

In three other upsets, unranked Van Winitsky toppled fourth seed Leif Shiras 3-6, 6-3, 6-4; David Pate knocked off seventh-seeded Danie Visser of South Africa 7-6 (11-9), 6-4; and John Alexander of Australia toppled Nigeria's Nduka Odizor, the fifth seed, 7-6 (7-5), 6-1. Odizor twisted his ankle in the fifth game of the second set and had no chance after that.

Stansbury used his 6-foot-5 height to advantage in edging the 5-foot-6 Michibata. Stansbury never lost his serve, although Michibata came close to breaking him three times in the second set.

Sixth-ranked Mark Dickson labored three nervous hours to a 6-4, 6-7 (5-7), 7-5 victory over unseeded Kelvin Belcher.

RUSSELL WINS OPENER -- Top seed Joanne Russell, winner of the 1984 Ginny of Indianapolis, breezed to a 6-2, 6-2 victory over Kris Kinney in the opening round of the $50,000 Virginia Slims Ginny of Richmond (Va.) tournament.

No. 2 seed Vicki Nelson ousted Jean Hepner 6-4, 7-6 (13-11) in a match that lasted 6 1/2 hours. The tiebreaker alone went one hour and 47 minutes, including one point that crossed the net 643 times and lasted 29 minutes.

The match began at 3:13 p.m. EDT and was halted because of darkness at 7:15 p.m. Tour directors then had the match moved to a lighted court where play resumed at 9:07 p.m. and continued until 11:36 p.m.

Unseeded Ginny Purdy ousted No. 3 seed Kim Sands 6-1, 7-6 (7-2) while No. 8 seed Leslie Allen fell to unseeded Rene Mentz 6-2, 6-4.

The other four seeds all posted victories -- No. 4 Barbara Gerken defeating Marianne Groat 6-1, 6-1; No. 5 Jennifer Mundel ousting Lele Forood 4-6, 3-0 (retired); No. 6 Lilian Drescher downing Felicia Raschiatore 6-2, 6-0; and No. 7 Pilar Vasquez defeating Elizabeth Minter 6-4, 6-2.
 

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Discussion Starter #403
SPORTS PEOPLE; Marathon Match
The New York Times
September 26, 1984

Vicki Nelson of Wooster, Ohio, returned to the tennis court yesterday, apparently recovered from her record marathon victory Monday night. Miss Nelson, who is seeded No. 2 in the $50,000 Virginia Slims Ginny of Richmond tournament, had played a 6-hour-31-minute match in eliminating Jean Hepner, 6-4, 7-6.

The 13-11 tiebreaker lasted 1 hour 47 minutes - the longest in the history of professional tennis - and had one point that lasted 29 minutes, with the ball crossing the net 643 times. ''I thought I was going to go crazy,'' Miss Nelson said. ''I was up a set and ahead 3-2 in the tiebreaker. No matter what I did with the ball, she kept hitting it back. It took me a long time to get up the nerve to come in, but she finally hit a short lob and I put it away - forever.'' The overhead gave Miss Nelson a 4-2 lead in the tiebreaker, but the marathon didn't end until Miss Hepner netted 2 points. Miss Nelson teamed with Lilian Drescher of Switzerland yesterday to win a doubles match.
 

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Discussion Starter #404
FOR NAVRATILOVA, IT'S NOT TIME YET TO LET UP
The Philadelphia Inquirer
Sunday, October 14, 1984
Associated Press

Sitting in the interview room at Wimbledon after another victory, Martina Navratilova listened carefully to the question.

"In March of 1981," the interviewer said, "prior to the Avon Championships in New York, you said about women's tennis: 'Someone will always stand out and be No. 1 the way Chris (Evert Lloyd) did last year. But no one is good enough to win 15 or 20 tournaments. There are so many good young players.'

"What do you think now of your statement then?"

For the world's top-ranked woman tennis player, it was like a short lob. As quickly as she ends points on the court, Navratilova shot back an answer.

"I lied," she said, her face breaking into a wide grin.

Navratilova , now in the midst of a five-week break, has run her winning streak to a record 65 matches and has captured 12 straight tournaments. This streak began in January, after she lost to Hana Mandlikova, snapping a 54- match winning string.

"You'd think that she would come down to earth a little and have a little bit of a letdown," said Lloyd, who held the old match record of 55 and, ironically, was Navratilova 's 55th consecutive victim.

The record was tied in the women's final at the U.S. Open, where Navratilova also equaled another record - winning her sixth straight Grand Slam title, matching the feat set by American Maureen Connolly in 1953 and equaled by Australia's Margaret Smith Court nearly two decades later.

"I never thought Chris' record would be broken," Navratilova said. She said she did not think she would have another chance after her loss to Mandlikova.

(The men's Open-era consecutive-match winning streak record is 50, set in 1977 by Guillermo Vilas of Argentina.)

In June, Navratilova captured the French Open women's singles championship, her fourth consecutive Grand Slam tournament. She was rewarded with a $1 million bonus from the International Tennis Federation for completing the square - the championships of France, England, United States and Australia - in succession.

Many critics, especially Americans, say the Grand Slam must be completed in a single calendar year, as Connolly did in 1953 and Court in 1970. Navratilova wants to silence that criticism.

"I have it all mapped out to give you guys your Grand Slam in one calendar year," she said, adding that she wants to win a seventh consecutive Grand Slam singles title because "it's something that's never been done before."

This year, Navratilova has won $2,096,256 in prize money and bonuses, breaking the sport's single-season record held by Ivan Lendl of Czechoslovakia, who won $2,028,650 in 1982.

In her career, Navratilova has earned nearly $8.5 million. John McEnroe is the men's leader with $6.7 million in career earnings.

Navratilova , a native of Czechoslovakia who became an American citizen in 1981, has so dominated the game that even her closest rivals have had to change their games.

"I'm playing better than I ever have," said Lloyd, who ruled women's tennis for nearly a decade but who has lost her last 13 meetings with Navratilova . "I can beat 99 percent of the players by playing a baseline game, my usual baseline game, but playing aggressively from the back court. But that hasn't been successful against Martina.

"About five or six years ago, I just went out and tried to beat everyone love and love. But now that Martina is on the scene, I try to take a few more chances in the early rounds, because if I make it to the final round, I know what shots I can use and they've been practiced then.

"I don't think my ground game is going to get much stronger at this point. I think that's my foundation. I just think it's a matter of working on the other things, such as my serve.

"I really think that when I play Martina, because she holds her serve so well, that I have to hold my serve to stay with her. In the last few matches, that has been the difference, because she's broken my serve."

At Wimbledon, Lloyd said: "If it weren't for Martina, I'd be dominating women's tennis."

Kathy Jordan, who is ranked in the top 10 in the world, agreed.

"There's a big gap between No. 1 and the rest of us," Jordan said. ''With Chris, Hana and Pam Shriver, you know they aren't going to make winners all the time. You know they are going to be human. But Martina. . . .'

Navratilova has not limited her success to singles. Her first Grand Slam title came in 1974, when she teamed with Ivan Molina of Colombia to win the mixed doubles at the French Open.

She has won 14 women's doubles in Grand Slam events, teaming with Betty Stove of the Netherlands, Lloyd, Billie Jean King, Anne Smith and Shriver. In 1979, she helped King capture her record 20th Wimbledon title.

But with Shriver, Navratilova has been even more dominant in doubles than she has been in singles. The two have captured the last four Wimbledon crowns, the last six Grand Slam titles and 73 consecutive matches.

What's next?

"I haven't reached my peak," Navratilova said. "The potential's there. I just haven't gotten to it. I feel I can improve on every aspect of my game."

With her outstanding record, just how good is this talented, powerful lefthander with an all-court game? Will she go down in history as the greatest women's player ever?

"It's a long-term goal," she said, "and it's also a very subjective goal, because there will always be people who'll say, 'Well, I saw Suzanne Lenglen and she was better.'

"If you go on titles alone, then Margaret Court was the greatest. If you go on Wimbledon titles, then Suzanne Lenglen or Helen Wills Moody were the greatest. If you go on longevity, then Chris would be the greatest , and perhaps I would be right behind her.

"So, it depends on what criteria you use. If you go on the best percentage over a certain period of time, then I'm right there, because I've been playing so many matches and losing once or twice a year."

Year . . . after year . . . after year.
 

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SPORTS PEOPLE; Marathon Match
The New York Times
September 26, 1984

Vicki Nelson of Wooster, Ohio, returned to the tennis court yesterday, apparently recovered from her record marathon victory Monday night. Miss Nelson, who is seeded No. 2 in the $50,000 Virginia Slims Ginny of Richmond tournament, had played a 6-hour-31-minute match in eliminating Jean Hepner, 6-4, 7-6.

The 13-11 tiebreaker lasted 1 hour 47 minutes - the longest in the history of professional tennis - and had one point that lasted 29 minutes, with the ball crossing the net 643 times. ''I thought I was going to go crazy,'' Miss Nelson said. ''I was up a set and ahead 3-2 in the tiebreaker. No matter what I did with the ball, she kept hitting it back. It took me a long time to get up the nerve to come in, but she finally hit a short lob and I put it away - forever.'' The overhead gave Miss Nelson a 4-2 lead in the tiebreaker, but the marathon didn't end until Miss Hepner netted 2 points. Miss Nelson teamed with Lilian Drescher of Switzerland yesterday to win a doubles match.
What a crazy match!

One point lasting 29 minutes:banghead:
 

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Sukova helped Evert lengthen one of her best records-winning a slam every consecutive year for 13 years.

1974 to 1986 is a lot better than 1974-1983.

She was so close to losing it in 1984. Tough as Chris was, I believe Martina would have taken the final-and THE Grand Slam-and with it big GOAT points.

Just a few points and tennis history turned on a dime.
 

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She probably could have won between 2-4 major if she got a major win early. She was never going to be a dominant player clearly, and Graf was always going to be a horrendous matchup for her. With the change to graphite she was never going to have the longevity to take much advantage of Martina and Chris aging out of their primes either. However confidence was a bit of a problem for her, and getting a slam win at 17 by beating prime Chris and prime Martina, would have bolstered her enough to take a couple more of her future chances. Her last real chance of a slam was the 1990 Australian Open when she let the end of the 3rd set slip vs a well out of form Graf, and would have almost certainly beaten a green Fernandez in the final.

Someone like Sabatini is still really a better player and won only 1 slam (although that is one of the biggest mysteries ever IMO) though, so it is impossible to say for sure.
 

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Someone like Sabatini is still really a better player and won only 1 slam (although that is one of the biggest mysteries ever IMO) though, so it is impossible to say for sure.
Gaby had a "for sale" sign stuck on her by Papa Sabatini. That child was WAY overplayed for her young age.
 

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Gaby had a "for sale" sign stuck on her by Papa Sabatini. That child was WAY overplayed for her young age.
Yeah for sure, but how much that contributed to her going 3-15 in slam semis, and how much of it was just mental frailty, weaknesses never addressed in her game, or just the tough era she got stuck in, is hard to say. It probably contributed largely to her relatively young age burnout and retiring by 26, having been a shadow of herself for atleast 3 and a half years by that point.
 

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That was so depressing to me, gabys swift decline. When poor monica got stabbed I thought gaby might have a chance at the French since she came so close to beating her in '92, and it always seemed like a given that gaby would take at least one French! I think that Fernandez debacle did her in just as much as anything. Sorry, off subject.
 

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She probably could have won between 2-4 major if she got a major win early. She was never going to be a dominant player clearly, and Graf was always going to be a horrendous matchup for her. With the change to graphite she was never going to have the longevity to take much advantage of Martina and Chris aging out of their primes either. However confidence was a bit of a problem for her, and getting a slam win at 17 by beating prime Chris and prime Martina, would have bolstered her enough to take a couple more of her future chances. Her last real chance of a slam was the 1990 Australian Open when she let the end of the 3rd set slip vs a well out of form Graf, and would have almost certainly beaten a green Fernandez in the final.

Someone like Sabatini is still really a better player and won only 1 slam (although that is one of the biggest mysteries ever IMO) though, so it is impossible to say for sure.
Helena never really played her best at Wimbledon unfortunately which after the 84 AO would've been a major that most would've tagged her as a contender. Despite the big serve, I think her very large swings and movement let her down. Her best chance was 87, when she beat Chris and Martina at Eastbourne, but lost a cliff hanger to Shriver 10-8 in the quarters (after Pam had won a 10-8 match against Hanika the round before).

Yes, she should have really beat Graf in 1990 at the AO. She admitted she choked at 4 all in the 3rd vs Steffi.
 

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That was so depressing to me, gabys swift decline. When poor monica got stabbed I thought gaby might have a chance at the French since she came so close to beating her in '92, and it always seemed like a given that gaby would take at least one French! I think that Fernandez debacle did her in just as much as anything. Sorry, off subject.
IMO Sabatini was already on decline before RG 93. I am not sure if even without the Fernandez debacle she would capatilize much on the Seles stabbing as far as big titles, especialy RG, since Graf had already begun to firmly turn the matchup with Gaby back in her favor. Graf had crushed Gaby a couple times earlier in 93 including a couple bagel sets, even if Gaby did give her 1 close final (still had not beaten her in over a year by then though). Sanchez was always starting to gain favor over Gaby in their recent head to heads, and unlike Gaby who had already peaked/started a slow decline, Sanchez was only really coming into her own and getting better starting around now.

However yes the RG 93 debacle was a disaster for Gaby and pretty much ended any home of her being a serious slam contender again. That RG might have been one of her best possible chances too as Sanchez was in horrible form that event and she would have played her next, and Graf was also subpar. She probably could have atleast made the final against Graf.

After her very strong 87, 88, and 89 years, then a brief slump, Gaby IMO hit her absolute peak from 90 U.S Open-91 Wimbledon. After that 91 Wimbledon final vs Graf where she served for it twice and lost, she had her first very small decline. Then after blowing the 92 RG semis vs Seles from 4-2 up, she had a further decline. The 93 RG was the third and final blow, that really accelerated the big decline though. Basically each loss took something out of her, and she came back a bit weaker thereafter from it.
 

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Helena never really played her best at Wimbledon unfortunately which after the 84 AO would've been a major that most would've tagged her as a contender. Despite the big serve, I think her very large swings and movement let her down. Her best chance was 87, when she beat Chris and Martina at Eastbourne, but lost a cliff hanger to Shriver 10-8 in the quarters (after Pam had won a 10-8 match against Hanika the round before).

Yes, she should have really beat Graf in 1990 at the AO. She admitted she choked at 4 all in the 3rd vs Steffi.
Helena's best chance at Wimbledon could have been 87 when she came in on great form, winning Eastborne by beating Evert and Navratilova back to back. Mandilikova didn't even play that Wimbledon. She got super bad luck though drawing her career nemesis Shriver in her quarter, then her ultra nemesis Graf as the potential semi had she gotten there. She lost an amazing match to Shriver, 8-6 in the 3rd, and even had she won she would have faced Graf who she lost her last 21 matches to. Had she been in the other half with Evert and Navratilova, and someone taken Graf out for her (possibly Sabatini who took Graf to 3 sets) she would have had a real chance.

Wimbledon grass is totally different from Australian Open grass. Helena had problems with agility so I think the fast slick grass would be hard for her to deal with. Australian grass is thick but the bounce is better, and the footing is a little easier. I can see why hard courts and sometimes indoors, along with bouncier Australian grass, where her best courts.
 

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It is such a shame Sabatini was unable to serve out for victory in the 1991 Wimbledon final, because when you look at her talent, she should really have had at least one US Open and one Wimbledon to look back on. I feel she belongs more in the same group as Hana Mandlikova (four GS) and Virginia Wade (three GS). I feel she should also have won the 1987 French Open. The SFs had Graf against Sabatini and Evert against Navratilova. But the two clay-court specialists lost -- Evert was completely dismantled and Sabatini lost a close match to Graf (in the final Graf was lucky to win and got a break in the third set because Martina was put off by someone calling out when making a second serve -- I would have replayed the point). Now, if Gaby had just won the 1987 French Open, it would have done wonders for her confidence and she might have also ended her career on three or four GS titles. She is a little like Evonne Cawley, who criminally missed out on US and FO titles which surely fate intended her to have. I guess nice girls, like good boys, also finish second, sigh...
 

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Helena's best chance at Wimbledon could have been 87 when she came in on great form, winning Eastborne by beating Evert and Navratilova back to back. Mandilikova didn't even play that Wimbledon. She got super bad luck though drawing her career nemesis Shriver in her quarter, then her ultra nemesis Graf as the potential semi had she gotten there. She lost an amazing match to Shriver, 8-6 in the 3rd, and even had she won she would have faced Graf who she lost her last 21 matches to. Had she been in the other half with Evert and Navratilova, and someone taken Graf out for her (possibly Sabatini who took Graf to 3 sets) she would have had a real chance.

Wimbledon grass is totally different from Australian Open grass. Helena had problems with agility so I think the fast slick grass would be hard for her to deal with. Australian grass is thick but the bounce is better, and the footing is a little easier. I can see why hard courts and sometimes indoors, along with bouncier Australian grass, where her best courts.
It was 10-8 against Shriver in that match and Pam saved a match point too.

Helena never passed the QF's on grass after 84 final which many would find surprising after her stunning run that year. Albeit the Aussie was only played twice more on grass after that year. The AO wasn't played in 86. Helena lost in 4R to Liz Smylie in 87 after leading 4-1 in the 3rd which was a shock.

I think Helena had such a love for Australia too, and seemed to play her best here. I'm trying to think if she ever won a lead-up tournie in oz. She spearheaded Czechoslovakia to a Fed Cup win in 88 in Melbourne.
 

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The Pretty Polly Classic - Tuesday 23rd October 1984 - Order Of Play

Court One

Final Round Qualifying Competition
Sue Barker v Virginia Ruzici
Reny Uys
Terry Holliday v Jo Durie
Barbara Potter v Yvonne Vermaak
Kathy Jordan & Pam Shriver v Terry Holliday & I Kuczynska

Court Two

Final Round Qualifying Competition
Kathy Horvath v Terry Phelps
Beth Herr v Alycia Moulton
Camille Benjamin v Andrea Temesvari
Andrea Leand v Joanne Russell
Alycia Moulton & Paula Smith v Jennifer Mundel & Rene Uys
 

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The Pretty Polly Classic - Wednesday 24th October 1984 - Order Of Play

Court One

Anna Maria Cecchini v Virginia Wade
Barbara Potter v Catherine Tanvier
Sara Gomer v Anne Hobbs
Elise Burgin v Jo Durie
Sylvia Hanika v Mima Jausovec
Followed by Three First Round Doubles Matches

Court Two

Pascale Paradis v Jamie Golder
Terry Phelps v Virginia Ruzici
Katerina Skronska v Sabrina Goles
Catarina Lindquist v Steffi Graf
Joanne Russell v Alycia Moulton
Followed by Three First Round Doubles Matches
 
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