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Discussion Starter #21
SCOUTING - Mileage Adds Up For Mrs. Lloyd
By Thomas Rogers
January 12, 1984
New York Times

Although Chris Evert Lloyd felt elated when she finished a seven-mile run last summer, the long-range effects of the jaunt were not beneficial to the world's second-ranked women's singles tennis player.

''I felt I needed exercise, so I ran with a friend who is a marathoner,'' Mrs. Lloyd said yesterday.

''I felt pleased to finish seven miles, but I bruised the arch on my left foot. I was able to keep competing, by using ice and taping the foot, until the crunch came in the fall. I played three tournaments in a row on hard surfaces, and the pain spread into my heel. The pain inhibited my running.''

Mrs. Lloyd followed the advice of doctors and did not play again after losing to Martina Navratilova for the sixth straight time of the year in Tokyo last Nov. 15. She skipped the Australian Open and spent three weeks in December undergoing therapy that included massages, heat and ultrasound treatments in London.

''My foot feels fine now,'' she said. ''I practiced in Florida during the first week of the year, using arch supports in my tennis shoes.''

Mrs. Lloyd, 29 years old, whose 1983 tournament earnings of $430,436 pushed her career total to $4,796,246, will begin her 1984 season on Feb. 21 in the United States Indoor Championships at Livingston, N.J.

''I'll play in about 20 tournaments, as usual, concentrating on the Grand Slam events,'' she said. ''I'll continue my career as long as I am healthy, continue to play well and enjoy the game. I can't see myself playing more than three years, but I said the same thing when I was 21. You never know with me.''
 

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Discussion Starter #22
A Tennis Town
By Michael Katz
January 3, 1984
New York Times

The Washington Redskins are not the only hot ticket in the capital. Women's tennis, even without Martina Navratilova and Chris Evert Lloyd, is a sellout.

The semifinal and final rounds for the opening Virginia Slims event of the year, which began yesterday at the George Washington University Smith Center, were sold out even before Miss Navratilova, the No. 1 women's player in the world, withdrew from the tournament last week. Mrs. Lloyd, the No. 2 player, never entered, which leaves Andrea Jaeger, No. 3, as the top-seeded competitor. Miss Navratilova begged off, claiming ''total exhaustion'' and a sore left shoulder.

Charles Brotman, a tournament spokesman, acknowledged that the field was not as strong as usual, but he said, ''Next to the Redskins, this is a tennis town.''

''Tennis fans buy backwards,'' said Brotman. ''First, they get tickets to the finals, then to the semifinals. Those were sold out a few weeks ago, and now the quarterfinals are almost all gone.''

What helped create the sellouts, he conceded, was that the tournament is not being held, as customary, at the Capital Centre in Landover, Md., which can hold more than 15,000 spectators for tennis, but is instead at the 5,500-seat college arena.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
GADUSEK TURNS TABLES ON BUNGE
The Philadelphia Inquirer
Tuesday, January 3, 1984
From Inquirer Wire Services

Bonnie Gadusek spoiled the return to competitive tennis by West Germany's Bettina Bunge yesterday by recording a straight-set upset over the third seed in the $150,000 Virginia Slims of Washington tennis tournament.

Bunge, participating in her first tournament since Wimbledon, as she was recovering from an ear operation and tendinitis in the shoulder, fell in 79 minutes, 6-1, 6-4. In three previous meetings between the players, Bunge, ranked seventh in the world, had not lost a set.

Yesterday, however, Gadusek broke Bunge's serve in the second and fourth games, capturing the first set in 26 minutes. Then she came back from a 1-3 deficit in the second set to advance to the next round in the 32-woman single-elimination tournament.

After Bunge broke service to take a 3-1 lead in the second set, Gadusek returned to break Bunge's serve at love to get back into the set.

Gadusek, ranked 19th in the world, again broke service in the critical ninth game of the set - on a double-fault by Bunge - to take a 5-4 lead before closing out the match by holding serve.

Yvonne Vermaak of South Africa won by 6-4, 3-6, 6-1 from Andrea Leand. JoAnne Russell recovered from 2-5 in the second set to down Sweden's Chatrin Jexell, 6-3, 7-5. Kim Schaefer eliminated Kim Sands, 6-4, 6-3.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Gomez breaks Noah -- again
The San Diego Union
Wednesday, January 4, 1984
From News Services

Ecuadorian Andres Gomez spoiled the return of France's Yannick Noah to tournament tennis last night with a 7-6, 7-6 victory in the opening round of the $250,000 Lite Beer Challenge of Champions.

In other matches, defending champion Ivan Lendl of Czechoslovakia dispatched Poland's Wojtek Fibak 6-4, 6-1 in 45 minutes, and Sweden's Mats Wilander defeated Jimmy Arias 6-2, 3-6, 6-3.

Both Gomez and Noah held serve through both sets, but Gomez won the tiebreakers 8-6 and 7-4. It was the third straight time Gomez, ranked No. 13 in the world by the Association of Tennis Professionals, defeated No. 5 Noah.

"I don't know the reason. There's nothing in particular," said Noah, the French Open champion, who has been idle for three months. "Except his game."

The eight-player challenge tournament features five of the world's top six players, according to the ATP computer rankings. Lendl is ranked No. 2, Wilander No. 4 and Arias No. 6. Also playing is No. 3 Jimmy Connors and Gene Mayer. Missing is No. 1 John McEnroe.

Today, Wilander will meet Fibak, Connors takes on Gomez and Noah meets Mayer. The winner of the final Sunday will take home $100,000.

o o o

Top-seeded Andrea Jaeger and fourth-seeded Wendy Turnbull of Australia advanced, but Canada's Carling Bassett was upset in the first round of the $150,000 Virginia Slims of Washington (D.C.).

Jaeger, the world's third-ranked women's tennis player, cruised to a 6-2, 6-3 victory over Sharon Walsh, and Turnbull overcame some early erratic play to defeat Great Britain's Anne Hobbs 6-7, 6-2, 6-3, but Bassett fell to Sandra Collins 5-7, 7-5, 7-5 after holding a 4-1 lead in the third set.

In other matches, sixth-seeded Hana Mandlikova of Czechoslovakia disposed of Camille Benjamin 6-4, 6-2; Lisa Bonder was a 6-7, 6-1, 6-2 victor over West Germany's Claudia Kohde-Kilsch; and Pam Casale beat Pascale Paradis of France 6-2, 6-2.

Second-seeded Sylvia Hanika of West Germany, who was a finalist last year, was forced to withdraw because of a viral infection.

o o o

Seventh-seeded Heinz Guenthardt of Switzerland and Balazs Taroczy of Hungary came from behind for a 3-6, 7-6 (7-3), 6-4, 6-2 victory over South African Kevin Curren and American Steve Denton to make a successful start of their title defense in the $200,000 World Doubles Tennis Championships at the Royal Albert Hall in London.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Win puts Connors in semifinals
The San Diego Union
Friday, January 6, 1984
From News Services

Jimmy Connors became the first player to earn a spot in the semifinals of the $250,000 Challenge of Champions tennis tournament in Rosemont, Ill., with a 7-5, 7-5 victory over Gene Mayer last night.

Connors, who came from behind to win the last four games of the second set, raised his record to 2-0 in the eight-man, round-robin exhibition tournament. Mayer dropped to 0-2 and has only a slim chance of making tomorrow's semifinals.

In other matches, Jimmy Arias (1-1) rallied for a 5-7, 6-3, 6-2 triumph over Wotjek Fibak (1-2) of Poland.

Mats Wilander (2-1) and Ivan Lendl (1-1) were to play later last night.

o o o

Unseeded Lisa Bonder needed only 33 minutes to upset top-seeded Andrea Jaeger, who was under the weather, 6-0, 6-1 in a second-round match in the $150,000 Virginia Slims of Washington. Jaeger, who said that she couldn't run because of menstrual problems, scored only 9 points in the first set, then dropped the first five games of the second set. After salvaging the sixth game on her serve, Jaeger reached deuce before Bonder won the match. Bonder, the 36th-ranked player in the world, will face the tournament's fifth seed, Zina Garrison, in today's quarterfinals. In other second-round action, Pam Casale eliminated fourth-seeded Wendy Turnbull of Australia 6-4, 6-7 (7-4), 6-4; sixth-seeded Hana Mandlikova of Czechoslovakia triumphed 7-6 (7-4), 6-1 over Terry Phelps; and Barbara Potter easily handled West Germany's Eva Pfaff, 6-2, 6-1.

o o o

Third-seeded Swedes Anders Jarryd and Hans Simonsson outfought defending champions Heinz Guenthardt of Switzerland and Balazs Taroczy of Hungary 6-7 (0-7), 6-4, 3-6, 6-2, 6-4 in the $200,000 World Doubles Tennis Championships at London's Royal Albert Hall.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
SEEDS TOPPLED IN MATCH-PLAY GOLF
The Miami Herald
Saturday, January 7, 1984
From Herald Wire Services

[...]

Tennis

Americans Fritz Buehning and Peter Fleming dethroned reigning champions Heinz Gunthardt and Balasz Taroczy to reach the semifinals of the WCT World Doubles Championships in London. Buehning and Fleming won, 3-6, 6-4, 6-2, 6-1, allowing the Swedish Davis Cup team of Anders Jarryd and Hans Simonsson to advance to the semifinals.

In today's matches, Buehning and Fleming will face the Czech duo of Pavel Slozil and Tomas Smid. Jarryd and Simonsson will play Mark Edmondson of Australia and American Sherwood Stewart.

Edmondson, 29, and Stewart, 37, the oldest team in the event and partners for just four months, finished undefeated and in first place of the White Group after defeating the brother team of Tim and Tom Gullikson, 6-2, 7-6, 7-6.

Jarryd and Simonsson, who lost in the Davis Cup final in Australia last week, beat Kevin Curren of South Africa and American Steve Denton, 6-3, 4-6, 6-7, 6-4, 6-4.

More tennis

Sixth-seeded Hana Mandlikova and eighth-seeded Helena Sukova reached the semifinals of a $150,000 women's tournament in Washington. Fifth-seeded Zina Garrison also reached the semifinals by allowing Lisa Bonder only seven points in the first set in an easy 6-1, 6-3 triumph. Garrison will face Pam Casale, who defeated Kathy Horvath, 6-2, 6-1. Mandlikova routed unseeded Bonnie Gadusek of Largo, Fla., 6-2, 6-4. Sukova won, 4-6, 6-1, 6-3, over Barbara Potter ... Favored Ivan Lendl and Jimmy Connors rode straight-set victories to the semifinals of the Lite Tennis Challenge of Champions in Rosemont, Ill. ... John McEnroe, who led in the computer rankings more than any other male tennis players during 1983, was named the first Association of Tennis Professionals Computer Player of the Year.

[...]
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Miss Garrison Gains Final
Associated Press
January 8, 1984
New York Times

WASHINGTON, Jan. 7— Zina Garrison fought from a 2-0 deficit in the third set to defeat Pam Casale today and join Hana Mandlikova in the final of the $150,000 Virginia Slims of Washington tennis tournament.

After Miss Mandlikova eliminated a fellow Czechoslovak, Helena Sukova, 6-1, 7-6, Miss Garrison, seeded fifth, advanced to only the second final of her professional career with a 6-0, 5-7, 6-2 victory over Miss Casale.

Miss Mandlikova, ranked 12th in the world, will be seeking her first victory in a major tournament in more than two years. Miss Garrison is ranked 10th in the world. The winner of the match Sunday night will receive $30,000.

Miss Casale reversed the flow of the match in the second set. After Miss Garrison broke serve to go up, 2-1, Miss Casale broke serve in the fourth and sixth games and in the decisive 12th game to pull even.

Miss Casale opened the set by holding serve and then breaking Miss Garrison's serve. But from that point it was all Miss Garrison, who made up for a 6-0, 6-0 defeat in the French Open in the only previous meeting between the two right-handers.

Miss Mandlikova, who gained the championship without dropping a set, needed to hold service to tie the second set at 6-all and force the tiebreaker.

In the tiebreaker, won by Miss Mandlikova, 7-5, both players held serve until the final point when Miss Sukova committed an unforced error, hitting her shot in the net.

Swedish Pair Advance

LONDON, Jan. 7 (UPI) - Anders Jarryd and Hans Simonsson of Sweden moved into the final of the $200,000 world doubles tournament today by beating Mark Edmondson of Australia and Sherwood Stewart of the United States, 6-4, 7-6, 5-7, 7-6, in a a tense 2-hour, 51-minute rematch of last year's French Open final.

Peter Fleming and Fritz Buehning of the United States were defeated by Pavel Slozil and Tomas Smid of Czechoslovakia, 6-7, 7-5, 6-3, 6-4, in the other semifinal of the eight- team event. The sixth-seeded Czechoslovakians took 2 hours, 35 minutes for a memorable victory over the second-seeded Americans, who both stand a towering 6-foot-5.

This will be the first all-European final in the 12-year history of the World Doubles Tennis Championships.

Connors and Lendl Win

ROSEMONT, Ill., Jan. 7 (AP) - Ivan Lendl and Jimmy Connors were sharp as they took 3-0 records into the semifinals of the eight-man, $250,000 Lite Challenge of Champions today in quest of the $100,000 top prize. Lendl trounced Jimmy Arias, 6-2, 6-1, in 39 minutes Friday night, and Connors followed with a 6-1, 7-5 triumph over Yannick Noah.

Connors was scheduled to face Wojtek Fibak, and Lendl was to meet Andres Gomez, who turned back Gene Mayer, 6-3, 6-1. Fibak did not play Friday night, but his 1-2 record was good enough for a semifinal berth because of Lendl's triumph over Arias.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
MISS MANDLIKOVA TAKES FINAL EASILY
United Press International
January 9, 1984
New York Times

WASHINGTON, Jan. 8— Hana Mandlikova of Czechoslovakia won her first tournament in more than two years tonight, defeating Zina Garrison, 6-1, 6-1, in the final of the $150,000 Virginia Slims of Washington.

The match took only 46 minutes, as Miss Garrison went for risky shots and could not handle her opponent's attacking style. Miss Mandlikova, ranked 12th in the world, played coolly and hit many winners en route to earning the $30,000 first prize in the opening event of the winter tour.

''If you put pressure on Zina's backhand and sometimes her forehand, it can really give her trouble,'' said the victor. ''I just tried to serve well and go to the net.''

After Miss Garrison, a Texan, had held for 1-1, Miss Mandlkova reeled off six games for the set. She broke Miss Garrison at love in the first game of the second set, and when she held serve after an 18-point second game, Miss Garrison appeared to lose her spirit.

Miss Garrison earned $15,000. She was in the final for only the second time in her professional career.

Connors Winner

ROSEMONT, Ill., Jan. 8 (UPI) - Jimmy Connors won his second Lite Challenge of Champions today by brushing aside Andres Gomez, 6-3, 6-2, 6-1, in the final of the $250,000, eight-player exhibition. The winner got $100,000 and the loser $60,000.

Gomez, who upset top-seeded Ivan Lendl, last year's winner, in a match that ended after 1 A.M. Sunday, could not find the same form in the final, making many unforced errors. Connors lost only one set in the round robin, which began Tuesday.

Taking seven straight games midway through the match, Connors was never in trouble. He was sharp at the net and with passing shots. He trailed only once, when Gomez held serve in the opening game. Connors lost only 12 points in the third set, ending the match in 93 minutes. He and Gomez are in the 12-man field for the Volvo Masters, starting Tuesday in New York.

Czech Team Victor

LONDON, Jan. 8 (AP) - Pavel Slozil and Tomas Smid of Czechoslovakia defeated Sweden's Anders Jarryd and Hans Simonsson, 1-6, 6-3, 3-6, 6-4, 6-3, today and won the World Championship Tennis doubles title. The winners shared $72,000.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Connors wins easily
The San Diego Union
Monday, January 9, 1984
From News Services

"This was the best I played all week," said Jimmy Connors yesterday, and Andres Gomez was in no position to dispute the statement.

Connors, 31, blazed past the 23-year-old Ecuadorian tennis champion in a battle of left-handers to win the $250,000 Chicago Challenge of Champions 6-3, 6-2, 6-1 at Rosemont, Ill.

It was easy, so easy that Connors needed only 1:33 to win the best-of-five match in straight sets and take down the top prize of $100,000. Gomez earned $60,000. Both Connors and Gomez will be among those who will compete in the Masters Tournament in New York this week.

"It didn't start that way," said Connors, "but I hit a couple of good shots, and he missed a couple and I started gaining confidence. This is the best I've played all week, but I can play better.

"This tournament helped me," said Connors. "Match by match, I got better and played deeper. At 31, you have to work harder. My conditioning, my tennis and my attitude have improved."

o o o

Pavel Slozil and Tomas Smid, the Czechoslovakian tennis duo, defeated Sweden's Anders Jarryd and Hans Simonsson 1-6, 6-3, 3-6, 6-4, 6-3 in a fluctuating final yesterday at London and won the WCT World Doubles Championships for the first time.

A crowd of 4,500 watched the match in London's Royal Albert Hall. It was the first all-European final in the 12-year history of the tournament. Slozil and Smid won a first prize of $72,000. Jarryd and Simonsson earned $36,000.

o o o

Hana Mandlikova of Czechoslovakia won her first title in more than two years, defeating Zina Garrison 6-1, 6-1 in the finals of a $150,000 Virginia Slims of Washington tennis tournament. Mandlikova, the No. 6 seed ranked 12th in the world, needed only 46 minutes to subdue Garrison, the No. 5 seed. Mandlikova collected $30,000.

o o o

Jenny Klitch of Columbus, Ohio, took just 65 minutes to capture her first professional tennis title as she downed veteran Pam Teeguarden 6-2, 6-1 in the finals of the $50,000 Ginny of Nashville. She earned $7,000.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
A NIGERIAN'S TENNIS ODYSSEY
By JANE GROSS
May 7, 1984
New York Times

With Jimmy Connors waiting for him in the second round, Nduka Odizor's prospects were not bright at the Tournament of Champions, but the 25-year-old Nigerian did not expect to be summarily dismissed, 6-0, 6-3, in his first match yesterday by Danie Visser of South Africa.

Odizor is a hard-court specialist, and after having lost on the synthetic clay at the West Side Tennis Club the last two years, he devoted himself to mastering the slower surface.

''It took 12 months to prepare for this tournament,'' said Odizor, who lost the first nine games of yesterday's match. ''Before coming here, I was playing the best I ever played on clay. All the work I put in went down the drain today.''

Then he turned more philosophical and noted that ''you win some, you lose some, but I'm not dead yet.''

Not Ready for Big Ones

Even before his jolting loss, Odizor decided that his clay-court game was not yet ready for the Italian and French championships, which he does not plan to enter until next year. While other players, especially Americans, were willing to essentially write off the European clay circuit, Odizor said he was determined to become ''an all-around player.''

His tennis odyssey, although far less successful, is reminiscent of Yannick Noah's. Both were discovered playing the game on dusty courts in their native Africa, after which both left for other places to develop their talent. Odizor's sponsor was Dr. Robert Wren, a University of Houston professor and tennis fan, who met him on a trip to Lagos, the Nigerian capital, 10 years ago and encouraged him to move to Texas.

He finished high school in Houston, then enrolled at the university, three years ahead of his basketball-playing countryman, Akeem Olajuwon. While working toward a degree in marketing, Odizor earned all-America honors three times and was the school's athlete of the year in 1981, when he was a semifinalist in both singles and doubles at the National Collegiate Athletic Association championships.

His progress on the men's tour has been more modest. He climbed from a ranking of 457 in 1980 to 65 last year, with his most impressive results coming at Wimbledon, where he beat Guillermo Vilas on the way to the round of 16. Odizor, known as The Duke, won his place at the Tournament of Champions by capturing two titles in 1983 - in Taiwan and Nigeria.

Yesterday, he compared his loss to the one suffered by the University of Houston against Georgetown in the N.C.A.A. basketball final, which he said he watched in tears. ''The opponent came out and played so well that it was too deep a hole,'' he said. ''I planned to start slow because I wanted him to overhit, but he made me miss before I could get my rhythm going.''

As for his impending match against Connors Wednesday, Visser did not even try to act bravely. ''I've never played him before,'' he said, ''and I'm scared.''

Lendl in Doubles

The opening program was so uninspiring that more than 50 spectators passed up the matches in the stadium to press against a fence watching Connors practice on a court tucked behind the clubhouse. . . . Ivan Lendl, who usually concentrates on singles, is scheduled to play doubles with Ricky Meyer of New York.

Final to Mrs. Lloyd

JOHANNESBURG, May 6 (UPI) - Chris Evert Lloyd took less than an hour to beat Andrea Jaeger, 6-3, 6-0, and capture the $30,000 first prize in the South African women's championships today.

''I was tired after a late semifinal last night, and bad calls put me off,'' said Miss Jaeger. ''You just have to have everything perfect when you play against Chris.''
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Baseball Playoffs Start at Bellevue
Omaha World-Herald
Thursday, May 10, 1984
Associated Press

[...]

Tracy Austin of the United States has informed organizers she will not compete in the French Open tennis championships, organizers said Wednesday. No reason was cited for Miss Austin's decision not to attend the competition scheduled from May 28 to June 10.

Miss Austin is the second top U.S. player to forego the Grand Slam event. Pam Shriver announced earlier she will not play singles at the championships, but will team with Martina Navratilova in doubles play.

[...]
 

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Discussion Starter #32
IF IT'S SUNDAY IT MUST BE THE FIFTH DAY OF HER 3-MONTH EUROPEAN TOUR
The Miami Herald
Sunday, May 13, 1984
Herald Staff

If this is Sunday, it must be England for Ronni Reis, Sunset High's two-time state singles champion who embarked on a three-month tour of Europe Tuesday.

Reis will play in a variety of junior and pro tournaments during her swing through France, Italy, Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands and Great Britain, including qualifiers for the French Open and Wimbledon.

"We'll play in a lot of small, $10,000 tournaments, too," Reis said. "I hope to get some points and move up in the rankings."

The 18-year-old senior is missing the last month of school, but her teachers agreed to let her take final exams when she returns in August. She will attend the University of Miami on a tennis scholarship.

"Graduation is fun and I'll miss it," Reis said. "But I think this is more worthwhile."

Reis will be accompanied by her coach, Patricio Apey, as well as 10 other players, most of whom are Apey's students from South America.

"This is something we've been planning all year," Apey said. "We did it last summer, but Ronni couldn't come then. The girls gain a lot of experience from international competition."

Reis has been to Japan, but never Europe.

"Italy," she said. "That's the country I can't wait to see."
 

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Discussion Starter #33
MCENROE BONES UP FOR FRENCH TEST
Philadelphia Daily News
Monday, May 14, 1984
United Press International

Even while thrashing Ivan Lendl yesterday, John McEnroe had a faraway gleam in his eyes.

The battling New Yorker has ended all debate about the identity of the No. 1 tennis player in the world, and by winning the $500,000 Tournament of Champions for the second year in a row, he has proven his ability to play on clay.

Now, there are bigger stakes ahead for McEnroe.

It has been 29 years since an American man has won the French Open , the world's premier clay-court championship, and it is a prize McEnroe wants dearly when the competition begins May 28.

"I feel better now about my chances going to the French," McEnroe said after beating Lendl, 6-4, 6-2, at Forest Hills. "The French wasn't that important in my mind five or six years ago. I don't think people realize how the French has changed within the last couple of years as far as prestige is concerned."

Although he is unbeaten in 32 matches this year, with seven tournament titles to his credit, McEnroe doesn't believe he'll go into the French Open as the favorite.

"I think I'm one of six," McEnroe said. "There's no clear-cut favorite right now."

McEnroe lost in the quarterfinals of the French Open last year to Mats Wilander.

Playing an aggressive, gambling style, McEnroe attacked the net whenever possible against Lendl and achieved the only break of the opening set in the 10th game.

McEnroe, earning the $100,000 first prize, boosted his earnings for the year to $343,250. Lendl won for $40,000.

David Dowlen and Nduka Odizor, former teammates at the University of Houston, won the doubles title from Ernie Fernandez and David Pate, 7-6 (7-3), 7-5.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
McEnroe honors mom by destroying Lendl
The San Diego Union
Monday, May 14, 1984
From News Services

John McEnroe, employing his relentless attacking style to perfection, gave his mother something special for Mother's Day.

"I gave her this match," the New York left-hander said after defeating Czechoslovakia's Ivan Lendl 6-4, 6-2 yesterday to successfully defend his title in the $500,000 Mercedes Tournament of Champions at the West Side Tennis Club in New York.

Then he backed up a little.

"Well, (I gave her) one-tenth of this match."

That works out to $15,000 of his $150,000 first-place purse for the mother of the world's No. 1 tennis player.

"Today I was aggressive, and I stayed back and played the points out, too," McEnroe said. "I think I'm playing the best ever I have in my career, but I still think I can improve as a player."

Lendl, who pocketed $40,000, said McEnroe taking the ball on the rise caused him problems.

"The ball comes back much faster," said Lendl, who won this tournament in 1982. "If someone can do that and keep going, it's just too hard to beat. Yesterday, I just pushed the ball back, but today I had to put something on the ball. But John just did something better."

It was McEnroe's seventh tournament victory of 1984, his 32nd consecutive match win and boosted his 1984 earnings to $443,250.

In winning this unique champions-only event for the second straight year, McEnroe proved that he can play on clay.

"I've been relatively healthy," McEnroe said in explaining his remarkable year. "Everything's been falling into place. The fact that I beat two good clay-court players here will help my chances over there (at the French Open, which is played on slow, red clay)."

Besides Lendl, who reached the final of the French Open in 1981, McEnroe eliminated Jimmy Arias, the reigning U.S. Clay Courts and Italian Open champion, in the semifinals.

Lendl had advanced to yesterday's title match by handing reigning U.S. Open champion Jimmy Connors his worst-ever loss, 6-0, 6-0.

o o o

Bjorn Borg scored a 6-2, 6-2 victory over top-seeded Bill Scanlon to win a $200,000 tennis tournament at Osaka, Japan, yesterday.

Borg, who retired from major tournaments in 1981, won $30,000 and Scanlon took home $15,000.

Carling Bassett, the 16-year-old from Canada, routed Bettina Bunge of West Germany 6-2, 6-4 in the women's finals and won $30,000. Bunge received $15,000.

Scanlon teamed with American Pam Shriver to beat compatriots Greg Holmes and Beth Herr 6-2, 3-6, 6-2 in the mixed doubles final. The winners shared $16,000 and the losers $8,000. Eight men and eight women players took part in the five-day tournament.

o o o

The top-seeded UCSD team of Eugene Jones and Dan Beers downed Raman Jayapathy and Riley Horan of Gustavus Adolphus 6-0, 6-3 yesterday in the doubles final of the NCAA Division III men's championship at Emory University near Atlanta, Ga.

Sixth-seeded Scott Moore of the University of Redlands won the singles championship, beating Alex Palladino of Kalamazoo College 6-1, 7-6 (7-4). Jones and Beers qualified for entry in the Divison I individual tournament starting Thursday at the University of Georgia.

o o o

Francesco Cancellotti of Italy defeated American Jimmy Brown 6-1, 6-4 and captured the $15,000 first prize in the Roger and Gallet Grand Prix Tournament on the clay courts of the Cascine Tennis Club at Florence, Italy.

In defeating the 19-year-old Brown, Cancellotti became the first Italian in four years to win the Grand Prix title at the $75,000 tournament, considered a warmup for the Italian Open beginning today at Rome's Foro Italico.

o o o

Unseeded Juan Aguilera of Spain outlasted Sweden's Henrik Sundstroem in a five-set marathon to win the $250,000 West German Open at Hamburg.

The 22-year-old from Barcelona took 3 hours and 27 minutes for his 6-4, 2-6, 2-6, 6-4, 6-4 victory in front of a a crowd of 10,000 at Hamburg's Rothenbaum arena. The win was worth $42,500 to Aguilera.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
'Wunderkind' knocks off Gadusek
The San Diego Union
Friday, May 18, 1984
Associated Press

Steffi Graf, at 14 the youngest West German competitor, yesterday eliminated top-seeded Bonnie Gadusek 6-0, 6-4 in the $150,000 German Women's Open Tennis Tournament in Berlin.

The unseeded Graf beat Gadusek, ranked No. 10 in the world, 6-0, 6-4 before a crowd of 2,000 in only 88 minutes to advance to the quarterfinals.

Graf previously had beaten Pat Medrado of Brazil, and Gadusek defeated fellow American Jamie Golder.

Meanwhile, eighth-seeded Kathy Rinaldi beat Ivanna Madruga-Osses of Argentina 7-5, 6-2 to advance to the quarterfinals, and Andrea Leand defeated Andrea Temesvari of Hungary 6-3, 6-2.

Catherine Tanvier of France ousted West German Sylvia Hanika 6-1, 6-4 in only 70 minutes, and Claudia Kohde of West Germany eliminated Mima Jausovec of Yugoslavia 6-1, 6-2 in 57 minutes.

o o o

Third-seeded Yannick Noah of France became the latest upset victim at the $315,000 Italian Open Tennis Championships in Rome, dropping a tough third-round match to Diego Perez of Uruguay 3-6, 6-2, 6-4.

The victory by the unseeded Perez over Noah, rated sixth in the world, leaves only two of the top 10 seeded players still competing on the clay courts of Rome's Foro Italico.

Eighth-ranked Jose-Luis Clerc of Argentina made easy work of Gianni Ocleppo, beating the Italian 6-1, 6-1 in an afternoon match, and No. 5 Andres Gomez of Ecuador advanced to the quarterfinals with a 3-6, 6-4, 6-1, victory over Sweden's Anders Jarryd, seeded ninth.

"I really played to win this time," said Perez, 22, who lost to Noah in Monte Carlo in April. "I went to the net because he doesn't have a good backhand passing shot."

Noah, complaining of an abdominal strain, said he was feeling the effects of having played two tough matches on Wednesday.

Claudio Panatta, younger brother of retired Italian star Adriano Panatta, continued to thrill the partisan fans by advancing to the quarterfinals. He downed Stefan Simonsson of Sweden 6-4, 7-5. In the only night singles match, Francesco Cancellotti of Italy, who upset No. 1 seeded Mats Wilander Wednesday, ousted 12th-seeded Chris Lewis of New Zealand 6-3, 7-5.

o o o

Four days after suffering the worst defeat of his career, Jimmy Connors has withdrawn from the Bank of Oklahoma Tennis Classic in Tulsa, citing a severe sinus infection. Connors lost to Ivan Lendl 6-0, 6-0 on Sunday. It was the first shutout of his professional career.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
16-year-old Krickstein reaches Italian final
The San Diego Union
Sunday, May 20, 1984
From News Services

Sixteen-year-old Aaron Krickstein overpowered Diego Perez of Uruguay 6-4, 6-0 in Rome yesterday to become the youngest finalist in the history of the Italian Open Tennis Championships.

The hard-hitting high school student from Grosse Pointe, Mich., will face fifth-seeded Andres Gomez of Ecuador today in the final of the $315,000 tournament.

Gomez, 24, a winner here in 1982 and ranked seventh in the world, beat Argentina's Jose-Luis Clerc 6-3, 6-2 in yesterday's other semifinal.

Keeping his composure before the packed center court crowd at the Foro Italico, Krickstein ousted Perez with a strong serve and a stinging forehand on the clay. But he said he expects a difficult match against Gomez, who is expected to go to the net against his young opponent to neutralize Krickstein's powerful ground strokes from the baseline.

"If he's serving well, it will be tough for me," Krickstein said.

Between the semifinal matches, Sweden's Bjorn Borg, twice the Italian champion, was greeted with a standing ovation when he came to center court. Borg, here for a promotional appearance, was the youngest player to win in Rome when he took the Italian title for the first time in 1974 at 17.

Krickstein, who will be 17 on Aug. 2, plans to finish his junior year in high school this year, studying between matches. He also will enter the French Open and Wimbledon.

"My books are here, but I haven't opened them," he confessed.

o o o

Second-seeded Kathy Horvath and sixth-seeded Claudia Kohde of West Germany will meet today in the final of the $150,000 German Open in Berlin.

Kohde beat Kathy Rinaldi 6-4, 6-0 in only 55 minutes of the semifinals Saturday, and Horvath defeated eighth-seeded Catherine Tanvier of France 6-3, 7-5.

o o o

Fourth-seeded Michael Pernfors of Georgia edged No. 2 Jonny Levine of Texas 1-6, 7-6, 6-2, and third-seeded Lawson Duncan of Clemson dispatched unseeded Barry Moir of Auburn 6-0, 6-4 to reach the final of the 100th annual NCAA Tennis Championships, in Athens, Ga.

The match today will bring the NCAA's individual singles title to a Deep South school for the first time since Jose Aguero of Tulane won the championship in 1956. Neither Georgia nor Clemson has ever had an NCAA singles titlist.

In doubles competition, the top-seeded team of Jerome Jones and Kelly Jones of Pepperdine and sixth-seeded Rick Leach and Tim Pawsat of USC advanced to the final by winning their quarterfinal and semifinal matches yesterday.

o o o

Fifth-seeded Lisa Spain of Georgia fought off three match points in the second set and upset second-seeded Gretchen Rush of Trinity 3-6, 7-6 (12-10), 6-3 to advance to the final of the NCAA women's individual championships in Los Angeles.

Spain will face fourth-seeded Linda Gates of Stanford, who beat SMU's Ann Hulbert 6-7, 7-6, 7-5, for the singles title.

The San Diego State University doubles team of Cynthia MacGregor and Linda Howell was eliminated yesterday in the semifinals.

MacGregor and Howell, seeded No. 3, won their quarterfinal match 6-3, 6-4, over Christina Rozwadowski and Lauri MacGill of South Florida. They then lost to Stanford's unseeded team of Elise Burgin and Linda Gates 6-2, 6-4.

By making it to the quarterfinals, MacGregor and Howell earned All-America status. MacGregor, a sophomore, was eliminated by Gates in the singles quarterfinals Friday. MacGregor is now a two-time All-American in singles and doubles.

o o o

Saddleback's David Salmon lived up to his top seedings yesterday.

Salmon captured the California Community College singles title at Grossmont, then teamed with Jim Stephens to give Saddleback the doubles title.

Salmon, winner of the Pacific Coast Conference, Ojai and Southern California Regional tournaments, downed Shawn Hayes of Delta Community College 6-2, 6-2. He and Stephens beat a team from Long Beach Community College 6-3, 6-4.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
NCAA finals go to the 'Dogs'
The San Diego Union
Monday, May 21, 1984
From News Services

It was a banner day for the University of Georgia Bulldogs yesterday in the NCAA Division I tennis championships.

At Athens, Ga., Georgia's Michael Pernfors used a strong baseline game to rout Clemson freshman Lawson Duncan 6-1, 6-4, for the singles title in the 100th annual NCAA Men's Tennis Championships.

Meanwhile, at Los Angeles, Georgia senior Lisa Spain captured the NCAA Division I women's singles title with a 7-5, 3-6, 6-2 victory over Linda Gates of Stanford.

Spain, seeded fifth, used a powerful forehand to keep the fourth-seeded Gates off balance. A three-time All-American, Spain will now play in the French Open and the qualifying rounds of Wimbledon.

Pernfors, a 20-year-old native of Sweden playing on his home court, became the first representative of a Southern school to win the NCAA singles crown in 29 years and the first ever from Georgia.

The 85-minute match was a battle of baseline players that featured long rallies. Pernfors, a 5-foot-8, 150-pounder, refused to say if he would return to Georgia and try to defend his title next year or join the pro circuit.

In the doubles championship, top-seeded Jerome Jones and Kelly Jones of Pepperdine -- the latter a former San Diego resident and junior champion -- defeated Southern California's Rick Leach and Tim Pawset 6-3, 7-6 (7-4). The Joneses, who are not related, easily won the first set and came back to win the second in a tiebreaker after trailing 5-2.

In the women's doubles final Gates and her Stanford partner, Elise Burgin, breezed to a 6-3, 6-4 victory over UCLA's Elizabeth Minter and Lynn Lewis. Lewis is from San Diego.

o o o

Andreas Gomez of Ecuador won the Italian Open yesterday, defeating 16-year-old Aaron Krickstein of Grosse Pointe, Mich., 2-6, 6-1, 6-2, 6-2 in a wind-marred final at Rome.

Krickstein, the youngest finalist ever here, proved no match to the fifth-seeded Gomez, who won his second Italian title.

Throughout the match, wind gusts churned up clouds of clay, disturbing the players' vision and knocking down advertising signs lining the center court at the Foro Italico.

Krickstein raced out to a quick lead, winning the first set in 28 minutes, but Gomez, seventh-ranked in the world, then turned the match around. Gomez, who won the Italian championship in 1982, takes home $48,000 for the victory.

Krickstein said he'd never played in worse conditions before. "On a lot of the points, I could only see with one eye. With the wind I couldn't get to his backhand."

o o o

West Germany's Claudia Kohde defeated Kathy Horvath 7-6, 6-1 in the final of the $150,000 German Women's Open at Berlin. The 20-year-old West German, who had been seeded sixth, took 86 minutes to beat the second-seeded American before a crowd of 4,500. Kohde, the former West German champion, fended off four set points in the first set, which was decided 10-8 with a tiebreaker, and dominated the second set.

o o o

Libor Pimek of Czechoslovakia upset Gene Mayer 6-4, 4-6, 7-6, 6-4 to win the title in the $93,000 Bavarian Open at Munich.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
SPORTS PEOPLE; Serving for No. 4
Published: May 24, 1984
New York Times
Associated Press

Martina Navratilova was seeded first, Chris Evert Lloyd second and Hana Mandlikova third for the French Open tennis championships, which begins Monday.

It is the first of the year's Grand Slam events. If Miss Navratilova wins the title on the slow red clay of Roland Garros Stadium in Paris, she will have four consecutive ''slam'' titles, including the Australian, Wimbledon and United States, although not in the same calendar year. However, the achievement would be worth $1 million in bonus money.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Tennis returns to Olympics; Rockets eye dream front line
The Christian Science Monitor
Thursday, May 24, 1984
Ross Atkin, Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor

As one of the most universally played sports, tennis belongs in the Olympics. Organizers of the first modern Olympics felt that way, and so too does this summer's Los Angeles host committee, which requested that tennis be placed back in the Olympics after a long absence

Few realize that tennis was one of only five sports to appear in each of the first eight Olympics, beginning in 1896. When it was eventually dropped, the Davis Cup, which had begun in 1900, was well established as a global tennis competition. The sport's present reinstatement is not exactly total, since it will only be a demonstration event in L.A., just as it was at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics. No medals will be awarded, but tennis has been approved as a competition sport for the 1988 Games in Seoul. However, that could change if the Olympics were moved from Korea to avoid potential boycott snags. The host committee reserves the right to designate two demo sports, the other being baseball this time

Because the Olympics theoretically ban professionals, their appearance in tennis will naturally come as a surprise. But officials have decided to determine eligibility by age, with 20 the cutoff point.

Consequently, anyone 20 or under can represent his or her country, even Sweden's Mats Wilander, the 1982 French Open champion. Wilander has indicated his desire to compete, as have American pros Andrea Jaeger, Kathy Horvath, and Jimmy Arias. The three Americans will receive automatic wild card entries into the Olympics rather than be required to qualify for the US team at the May 28-June 2 tournament at the National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadow, N.Y

The basis for their qualifying exemption, made in part because of a conflict with the French Open, is that each player ranks among the world's top 20

The caliber of competition, therefore, should be quite high, and certainly light years ahead of what it was at the 1896 Olympics in Athens, when the best players stayed away. John Pius Boland, an Irish tourist in Greece that year, took advantage of the situation to win the men's singles title

[...]
 

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Discussion Starter #40
TENNIS PROS FACE GRUELING 2 WEEKS
The Miami Herald
Sunday, May 27, 1984
JIM MARTZ, Herald Sports Writer

Paris in the spring means love to some, but to the tennis circuit, it means the most grueling two weeks of the year.

"I've always thought the French Open is the toughest tournament to win," says Harold Solomon, a finalist in 1976. "It's the toughest mentally and physically. Day in and day out, the rallies are longer and the matches are longer because of the slow red-clay courts. And there are so many good European and South American clay-court players. The tournament used to be even tougher because there were no tiebreakers and the balls were heavier."

This year's tournament, which will begin Monday and continue through June 10, is spiced by an intriguing array of questions:

* Will John McEnroe, 32-0 this year and the recent winner of the WCT Forest Hills championship on clay, become the first American to win the men's title since Tony Trabert in 1955?

* Can Yannick Noah, who last year became the first Frenchman to win the men's championship since 1946, defend his title despite the pressure from his homeland that was so great he moved to New York to seek anonymity?

* Can Martina Navratilova win her fourth consecutive Grand Slam tournament, thus earning a $1 million bonus put up by the International Tennis Federation?

* Will Chris Evert Lloyd bounce back from her humiliating 6-1, 6-0 loss to Navratilova on Amelia Island's clay and successfully defend her title?

The key to any of these questions being answered in the affirmative is patience and perseverance. The French Open is not a slam-bam affair as is the U.S. Open on cement or as Wimbledon and the Australian Open can be on grass. It's a survival-of-the-fittest test.

Ed Rubinoff, who in 1962 was the only American to qualify and reach the first round, can attest to that.

"With all due respect, I was a strong clay-court player, and in the years I played, we had a relatively weak American group," says Rubinoff, a former University of Miami All-American and now an attorney in Miami. "Those clay courts are so tough to play on. And you have a bunch of European players used to them, names you've never heard of.

"You can't attack them, and you're out there all day long. Americans are not mentally conditioned to play two to three hours to win a match, 6-1, 6-1.

"McEnroe is perfectly capable of winning any match. He's so mentally tough, until he loses control of himself. But it's a question of temperament and knowing it's going to take 10 to 15 shots a point to win. And do it over five sets and over 14 days."

Frank Froehling, a semifinalist in 1971 and now constructing tennis courts in Florida, adds, "McEnroe certainly is the best player in the world. But I can't see him going two weeks on the slow red clay. Maybe Jimmy Arias could. He has that kind of game."

The list of players who could win the men's title is as tall as the Eiffel Tower. Favorites besides McEnroe, Noah and Arias include Ivan Lendl, 1982 French champion Mats Wilander, Jose Higueras, last week's Italian champion Andres Gomez, and Jose-Luis Clerc. Possible breakthroughs include the latest Swedish sensations, Henrik Sundstrom and Stefen Edberg, and France's Henri LeConte. Solomon believes that he and fellow South Florida clay-court specialists Brian Gottfried and Eddie Dibbs "are way long shots."

Solomon also thinks it's "a fluke" that no American has won the men's title in 28 years. And Trabert says, "It's a sad commentary, and I don't know why."

In that same period, six U.S. women have won the French singles, including Evert five times between 1974 and 1983, and naturalized citizen Navratilova in 1982. In light of Navratilova's domination of Evert (10 straight matches) and her newfound confidence and patience on clay, she is the overwhelming favorite.

"I did far better than I thought I could at Amelia Island and the next week at Orlando when I beat Laura Arraya, 6-0, 6-1," says Navratilova. "I feel very comfortable on clay. I know what shots to hit, and I know when to slide.

"I should do even better on red clay. I grew up on red clay, and I'm playing better on clay now than I did two years ago when I won the French."

Last year, Navratilova was upset in the fourth round by Kathy Horvath, her only loss of the year. Since then, Martina the Magnificent has won the next three legs of the Grand Slam -- Wimbledon, the U.S. Open and the Australian Open.

Now comes the battle of the traditionalists against the International Tennis Federation, which is changing the ground rules for winning the Grand Slam. Traditionally, that has meant winning all four major tournaments in the same calendar year.

Only four players have accomplished the feat -- Don Budge in 1938, Maureen Connolly in 1953, Rod Laver in 1962 and '69, and Margaret Court in 1970. But last year, ITF President Philippe Chatrier decreed that any player who captures all four Grand Slam titles in a row, in any time frame, wins the Grand Slam.

Fault! says the U.S. Tennis Writers Association, which voted overwhelmingly against the ITF plan and said it wouldn't recognize a non-calendar-year sweep of the four majors as a Grand Slam.

"I will call it a Grand Scam or Grand Sham," says columnist and commentator Bud Collins, who will be part of NBC's crew telecasting the tournament. Adds Tennis magazine Managing Editor Alexander McNab, "The ITF's move is an unfair and unnecessary dilution of the game's greatest challenge, and a denigration of the accomplishments of the four previous Grand Slam winners . . . It's essentially a PR gimmick."

Nevertheless, Navratilova will accept the Grand Slam crown if she wins, not to mention the extra $1 million. "To me, it counts if they say it counts, and the ITF and Women's Tennis Association say it does," she said.
 
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