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post #31 of 44 (permalink) Old Jun 18th, 2010, 03:46 AM
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Re: Jo Durie

Hey there IAIN, I am actually getting footage of all seven
1986 Wightman cup matches, should be arriving tomorrow.
Rinaldi starting things off vs Gomer, then she teamed up
with Gadusek in doubles to beat Gomer & Croft.

That Durie/Graf 84 Wimbledon is a doozie!

Tennis Matches on DVD -
www.RickLovesTennis.com/

"I started playing tennis when I was 4, but I didnt start playing seriously until I was 8." Kathy Rinaldi
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post #32 of 44 (permalink) Old Jun 18th, 2010, 07:22 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Jo Durie

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Originally Posted by Ricksasha View Post
Hey there IAIN, I am actually getting footage of all seven
1986 Wightman cup matches, should be arriving tomorrow.
Rinaldi starting things off vs Gomer, then she teamed up
with Gadusek in doubles to beat Gomer & Croft.

That Durie/Graf 84 Wimbledon is a doozie!
RickIf you get a chance could you email me any new matches you have had in the last few months concerning any British female player of the 70s or 80s. Or indeed Lloyd and Mottram? Hey that was actually a lot closer a Wightman Cup than the score suggests and I would love to see them again. Gomer pushed Rinaldi in the first rubber and Durie and Gadusek had a really fine match the next day. As was the doubles that sealed it when Croft and Gomer lost to White and Gadusek. Have to say I was, as a patriotic 16 year old, devastated as it was the first ever whitewash at the Albert Hall, and really was the first warning sign of the cups demise. Durie was great in the Wightman Cup I felt.
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post #33 of 44 (permalink) Old Jun 30th, 2015, 07:41 PM
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Re: Jo Durie

Warrior queen lays down arms at last - Wimbledon 1995
The Times
London, England
Friday, June 30, 1995
Simon Barnes

English institutions have a long-established tradition when it comes to dealing with people who have done them exceptional service and shown them exceptional loyalty. They treat them like rubbish.

So it was that Jo Durie, who has been playing Wimbledon since 1977, and who has probably suffered the longest series of agonies in the history of British tennis, was not granted burial with full military honours yesterday.

Any institution with a sense of occasion -- I do not even say a sense of honour -- would have put Durie on Centre Court for what looked certain to be her last hurrah. But no, she was next door on No1.

The crowd did their best to make up for the appalling manners of the All England Club, and gave her a standing ovation as she left. She had played the No4 seed, Jana Novotna, the woman who dampened the Duchess of Kent's shoulder, and had gone out of the Wimbledon women's singles competition for the last time, 6-2, 6-2.

Nothing has come easy for her and, in a way, one is pleased that all the appalling agony is over for her at last. No more dreadful cries, no more defeated head-shakes, no more of that terrible look-what-God-just-did-to-me expression.

All that anguish has been for her the breath of life for not much less than 20 years. She has a lust for conflict, a passion to perform. And if she cannot perform and win, then she has always taken what has been for her the only other possible option: perform and lose.

I am reminded of the gambler who said that winning was the most exciting thing in life. And the second most exciting thing in life was losing.

Durie has been the wobbly-man of British sport, the bottom-weighted clown that you can knock over again and again and again. Every time you do so, it bobs up again asking for more.

The word indomitable does not even begin to do her justice. A person of rare courage, she will endure anything: pain and humiliation, the surgeon's knife and year after year on the road, a life that is endless and lonely and exhausting. All so that she can get out there and perform. Yes, and suffer yet another two-set martyrdom.

She has always been a good player and might have been a great one. In the early Eighties she touched fifth in the world rankings. Tall, athletic and with a wonderful take-that-you-hound sort of forehand, she looked, from those summits, set to dominate tennis for years.

But she suffered a terrible attack of vertigo and slithered back to more comfortable regions in the mid-twenties. With a fragile knee and a temperament to match, she never knew those rarefied heights again.

But she never gave up. With an apparently endless supply of courage, she has faced physical pain and inevitable defeats with endless aplomb, screaming at the heavens and always turning out at the next possible tournament.

"I had so many game points and I didn't take them," Durie said afterwards yesterday. Have we, by chance, ever heard those words on her lips before? Well, never mind that now. "I'm glad I played, well, pretty good today," she said. And she did, better than the scoreline suggests. She missed the big points: shock-horror.

Durie has always, however, retained, even in the depths of anguish, some kind of sense of proportion, of self-deprecation. "I mean, British tennis must be in a pretty bad way, if I'm No1," she said a few years back. She has also always had a genuine quality of niceness and understanding, which is rare in any professional athlete, let alone one that works in so lonely a world as tennis.

But now, after a long life in tennis, a life that has been not so much a matter of commitment as of physical addiction, it is time for her to reassess. What to do now? She has no idea. In fact, after the match she was going through its ebb and flow with her coach, Alan Jones, still looking for ways to improve. Rather wonderful, that, in a sort of crazy way.

It is hard to know what British tennis will do without her. Why is the British women's game in such poor shape, she was asked. "We all wish we were better," she said plaintively, and disconcertingly, too. Honest as ever.

It is also hard to know what she will do without British tennis. A painful occasion yesterday? Not a bit of it. "I felt full of joy, in a way. I loved it. I enjoyed it so much. I wished it could go on forever."
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post #34 of 44 (permalink) Old Jun 30th, 2015, 07:42 PM
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Durie plays her last singles at Wimbledon - Wimbledon 1995
The Times
London, England
Friday, June 30, 1995
John Goodbody and Kathryn Knight

JO DURIE played her last singles match at Wimbledon yesterday after losing an emotional second-round match to Jana Novotna of the Czech Republic.

Durie, 34, will not play in the singles tournament again on doctor's orders. She has had four operations on her knees and has been told that she may not be able to walk at 60 if she does not cut down on professional tennis.

Durie is still in both doubles competitions, and yesterday the crowd was willing Durie to one last triumph in the singles, but she lost 6-2 6-2 to Novotna, the 1993 finalist. Afterwards she hugged her coach, Alan Jones. Her mother Diana, 73, who is seriously ill with a brain tumour, admitted she "had a wee weep" as she watched her daughter on television.

Four seeds bowed out of the men's singles yesterday: Michael Chang, Stefan Edberg, Jim Courier and Andrei Medvedev.
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post #35 of 44 (permalink) Old Jun 30th, 2015, 07:43 PM
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Re: Jo Durie

Loyal fans say farewell in style to British star
The Hamilton Spectator
Ontario, Canada
Friday, June 30, 1995
ASSOCIATED PRESS

British player Jo Durie may have lost the match, but she got a standing ovation for it.

Durie, who has a Wimbledon title to her name, once beat Steffi Graf to reach the quarter-final and gained the semifinal of both the French and U.S. Opens in 1983. She may not be the biggest name in world tennis but, after 18 years in the game and a decade as No. 1 in her country, she is a star in success-starved Britain.

That's why the six-footer received a standing ovation on Court No. 1 yesterday when she made her Wimbledon farewell. Durie lost 6-2, 6-2 to fourth-seeded Jana Novotna, but it was the loser who got the biggest cheers.

"I felt full of joy because I was so pleased that I made it to the second round on a big court," Durie said. "I loved it. I enjoyed it so much out there today, that I wish it could have gone on forever.

"I had 18 years on tour and achieved so much."

Durie, who teamed with Jeremy Bates in winning the Wimbledon mixed doubles title in 1987, eliminated Graf in the fourth round of the 1984 singles competition.

"I'm very proud of what I have achieved and can go out feeling very proud of myself."
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post #36 of 44 (permalink) Old Jul 8th, 2015, 04:40 AM
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Re: Jo Durie



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post #37 of 44 (permalink) Old Jul 8th, 2015, 04:42 AM
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post #38 of 44 (permalink) Old Jul 8th, 2015, 04:44 AM
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Photo of a younger Jo from 1979



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post #39 of 44 (permalink) Old Jul 8th, 2015, 04:46 AM
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Re: Jo Durie

Centre Court-1983



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post #41 of 44 (permalink) Old Jul 8th, 2015, 06:35 PM
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Re: Jo Durie

I was surprised and feel for Jo, that her last match against Novotna wasn't put onto the Centre Court. She'd have deserved it. The Steffi vs. Coezter match was on Centre at the same time.
(Even though Durie played a mixed match on Centre later that year.)
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post #42 of 44 (permalink) Old Jan 29th, 2016, 07:31 AM
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Re: Jo Durie

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Originally Posted by tommystar View Post
I was surprised and feel for Jo, that her last match against Novotna wasn't put onto the Centre Court. She'd have deserved it. The Steffi vs. Coezter match was on Centre at the same time.
(Even though Durie played a mixed match on Centre later that year.)
It was Jo herself who asked to be placed on Court No.1. The committee were going to put her on Centre Court, but she wanted to be able to go and hug her coach after the match. That was only possible on the old No.1 Court due to the surrounding stands being at court level.

Maybe she thought it a bit much to climb up to the players box in Centre, so wanted an easier walk.
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post #43 of 44 (permalink) Old Jan 29th, 2016, 07:41 AM
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Jo Durie: From the clay to the commentary box

Jo Carter January 20, 2011

Jo Durie won two mixed doubles titles with Jeremy Bates © Getty Images
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Andy Murray carries the weight of the nation on his shoulders in Melbourne as he bids to end Britain's 75-year wait for grand slam glory. Although Britain haven't had a singles champion at the Australian Open since Virginia Wade in 1972, 20 years ago, there have been British flags flying high in Melbourne more recently.
In January 1991, the unseeded British pairing of Jo Durie and Jeremy Bates beat American duo Robin White and Scott Davis 2-6 6-4 6-4 to claim the Australian Open mixed doubles title - three-and-a-half years after lifting the trophy at Wimbledon. As the first major of the year begins to hot up, we take a look back at the career of the last British woman to reach a grand slam semi-final.
After turning professional at the age of 17, Durie stamped her mark on the women's tour at the 1983 French Open. Having never previously made it past the second round at Roland Garros, Durie stormed to the semi-finals, dispatching three seeded players on the way. After seeing off Pam Shriver and Tracy Austin to reach her first grand slam semi-final, the unseeded Durie eventually fell to Mima Jausovec in three sets.
"That result at the French was a big break for me," Durie told ESPN. "I had been playing quite well up until that point but nobody really expected me to do well on clay - it was my worst surface. I had had some success on the clay but I was a set and a break up in the semi-final against Jausovec and maybe the enormity of the occasion got to me."
Durie's performance at Roland Garros saw her fly up the rankings, and she proved that it was no fluke with a semi-final appearance at the US Open later that year, where she lost an entertaining encounter 6-4 6-4 to second seed Chris Evert.
"It was my first time on Center Court," Durie recalls. "After I won my quarter-final match against Ivanna Madruga-Osses on the Grand Slam court and I went onto the court to practice and Alan [Jones, Durie's coach] said, 'don't pretend you are not here - there are going to be a hell of a lot of people out there'.
"Going onto Center Court you have to go down a long tunnel and you come out into the bright, blinding sunshine. It was jam-packed with people wanting Chris Evert to win, but the worst thing for me was I didn't know where my coach Alan [Jones] was sitting.

If I had been like Martina Navratilova and my body had let me I would have carried on playing a lot longer.


"I was frantically trying to search the crowds for him to have something to focus on and it took me the whole of the warm-up to find him. That really helped me relax and after that I loved every minute of the match. I lost in two quite close sets and I just wanted to play another set I was enjoying myself so much."
While she never managed to emulate three-time grand slam winner Virginia Wade, Durie tasted success at Wimbledon in 1987, partnering Bates to the mixed doubles title.
"I think that was the most nervous I have ever been on court," Durie reflects. "On match point Jeremy was serving to Darren Cahill and I knew he was going to hit the ball straight at me so I just told myself to get the racket on it.
"Sure enough he hit it at me and somehow I managed to get the racket on it and it squirted over the net. It was a terrible volley but it was enough and it was the most incredible feeling to win in front of a British crowd at Wimbledon."
After adding the Australian Open doubles title to her trophy cabinet, as well as two singles titles from Mahwah and Sydney, Durie hung up her racket in 1995 after her final bow at Wimbledon.
"By that time my body couldn't go on much longer," Durie admits. "I had been having problems with my knees since about '91 but I loved my tennis so much I kept going when I should have probably called it a day.
"I had a wildcard for Wimbledon in 1995 and I was determined to win a match - I didn't care who I played. I wanted to win so badly - I beat Alexia Dechaume-Balleret in the first round and met Jana Novotna in the second round.
"I asked to play on the old Court One and it meant I could go over to Alan after the match and give him a hug. The press said it was disgraceful that I wasn't playing on Centre but it was my decision and it was the way I wanted to bow out with all my friends and family there.


Jo Durie coached Elena Baltacha until 2008 © Getty Images
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"The decision to retire was quite an easy one for me because by that stage my knees were so badly gone. If I had been like Martina Navratilova and my body had let me I would have carried on playing a lot longer.
"I had managed to get back into the top 30 which was one of my main goals but then I played Jennifer Capriati in the fourth round of the US Open in 1991 and she thrashed me. It was probably that moment I started thinking about retiring when a 14-year-old hit the ball that hard."
Durie turned her focus to coaching, and oversaw the early careers of both Elena Baltacha and Anne Keothavong as teenagers. She also began commentating for the BBC and has since worked at Eurosport.
"Elena Baltacha and Anne Keothavong both came to the French Connection academy when they were teenagers - Anne was 14 and Elena 15. They both did very well at the US Open juniors. Anne left us when she was 19 but she reached the semi-finals at Wimbledon juniors. It was really nice to see them both doing well and they came so far.
"I didn't miss training because it had become so painful for me. I filled the void pretty quickly as I went straight into coaching and it was great; I had to start learning all over again, and then when I went into TV I knew nothing about it so I had to start from the very beginning.
"Travelling with the tour for Eurosport helps me keep in touch with the tennis and what is going on. I watch practice sessions and talk to coaches and that helps me with my own coaching so the two go hand in hand," added Durie, who also coaches holiday makers at La Manga resort in Spain.
"It's just nice to see people enthusiastic about their tennis and want to learn and improve - for me that's the most important thing - I still love my tennis."
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post #44 of 44 (permalink) Old Jul 10th, 2019, 12:26 PM
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Re: Jo Durie


Serena: "We have great personalities like Jelena (Jankovic) on the tour."
Jelena: "If I had to pick someone after me, I'd pick Serena."


Serena Williams Maria Sharapova Jelena Jankovic
A. Radwanska V. Zvonareva C. Wozniacki P. Kvitova
N. Petrova A. Chakvetadze A. Myskina L. Davenport M. Hingis
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