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post #136 of 145 (permalink) Old Dec 14th, 2014, 07:55 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Serve and Volley-40's tennis



Miss Kay Stammers, Britain's leading tennis player, and her husband, Mr. Michael Menzies, outside St. Peter's, Eaton Square, London, after their marriage on January 24. Mr. Menzies is a second lieutenant in the Welsh Guards. (Evening Post, 29 February 1940)
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post #137 of 145 (permalink) Old Dec 14th, 2014, 07:59 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Serve and Volley-40's tennis




The Duke and Duchess of Windsor welcome American professional tennis stars visiting the Bahamas to play in a series of Red Cross benefit matches. The members of the team, from the left, are John Nogrady, Donald Budge, Miss Mary Hardwick, and Miss Alice Marble. (Evening Post, 25 March 1941).
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post #138 of 145 (permalink) Old Feb 14th, 2016, 05:01 PM
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Re: Serve and Volley-40's tennis

I don't think Juanita Reed Stanley in the encyclopedia. A great description of an economic depression: Tennis balls only cost 10 cents each, but you don't have the dime to buy one.

GAME STILL NETS HAPPINESS FOR EX-CHAMP
The Roanoke Times
February 28, 1996
LISA P. SMITH, Staff Writer

Juanita Reed Stanley sat in the dinette area of her comfortably furnished home, the notes about her tennis activities spread out on the table in front of her.

The seven-time Roanoke City-County tennis champion nervously referred to her notes, which she wrote the night before, to talk about winning the tournament from 1946-1951 and again in 1960.

The tournament was a competitive event for local tennis amateurs ranging from junior boys and girls to men and women.

Stanley breezed through many of her matches to become the champion, according to articles written about her in this newspaper during the 1940s and '50s.

Stanley said her toughest match was against her younger sister, Wanda. Stanley won, though, 8-6, 9-7.

"We were both so totally exhausted that our mother had to put us both to bed."

Stanley also competed in doubles play.

In 1948, '49, '51 and '60, she was a champion in the women's doubles championship. And she was a finalist in the 1951 Virginia State Women's Tournament.

She once dreamed of turning professional. But the dream was impossible to accomplish, she said.

"It was so expensive, and the players didn't make as much money as they make now. But if there was reincarnation, I would come back and become a professional."

Stanley began reliving her introduction to the game.

"[Wanda and I] grew up during the Depression, so we had to find recreation that didn't cost much money."

Stanley was 12 when she got her first racket. "I can remember they were building the tennis courts at Fishburn Park, and every day during the summer I would go there to watch them work, waiting for them to finish."

The courts became a regular meeting place for Stanley and her friends.

"The balls were 10 cents apiece, so we could only play if we found any discarded balls."

Stanley played a lot of matches with boys, "because they were stronger, and that helped me a lot in my tournament play."

She earned two titles during her junior and senior years at Jefferson High School.

During her years of competitive play, Stanley married Jack Stanley in May 1948. Stanley also worked full time in the Roanoke office of the Social Security Administration as a claims representative and then as an operations analyst.

Because she wanted to focus more on her work, Stanley decided to retire from competitive tennis in 1951.

Stanley also added a new addition to her family during retirement as well, her daughter, Sharon was born in 1953.

In 1960, Stanley went back to play one last time, winning the women's singles and doubles championships. "I did the tournament in 1960 just to see if I still had it."

But this retirement didn't mean she was through with the sport. She continued to play on a recreational level by joining tennis leagues and reserving time at private tennis clubs. She now makes the game a vital part of her leisure time, playing at least three or four times a week.

Stanley's husband and daughter, both of she taught the game of tennis, play with her, along with her daughter's husband, Ed Mitchell.

But the enjoyment the sport brings also can be an obstacle, especially when professional matches are televised, Stanley said.

"I enjoy watching the major tennis tournaments on television, like the U.S. Open and the Australian Open. When they are on, I can't get anything else done."

These tournaments do, however, give Stanley a chance to see her favorite player, Steffi Graf.

"Steffi is a great all-around player,'' she said. "I like her mainly because of her one-handed backhand. I admire Monica Seles, but I don't like her two-handed backhand."

By watching these professionals play and also reading articles about them, Stanley said she has improved her own game.

"I have a more complete game now than when I was younger. I've learned so much from watching the pros on television and reading tennis magazines."

Being away from competitive tennis also has helped her.

"I play with more reckless abandon now. I try for more of my shots because there is no pressure to win."
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post #139 of 145 (permalink) Old May 31st, 2016, 12:09 AM Thread Starter
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Re: Serve and Volley-40's tennis

Gussie Moran in 1949. This is a rare color photo




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post #140 of 145 (permalink) Old Mar 8th, 2017, 07:35 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Serve and Volley-40's tennis

Nelly Landry in 1946 at Wimbledon.



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post #141 of 145 (permalink) Old Apr 20th, 2017, 01:57 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Serve and Volley-40's tennis



This photo from the Monaco ITF website presents a mystery within two other mysteries. The board provides us with names and a trophy.

#1 Who are they?
#2 Where are they and what is date?


#1 Who are they?


The person on the left can only be Gloria Butler, a forgotten but important person in tennis history.

Her father was a wealthy American businessman named George Butler. The family lived in the tiny principality of Monaco. After George died in the late 1930s Gloria stayed on and ran te Monte Carlo tournament, which we know of today as the Monte Carlo Masters tournament.

Gloria ran the event well into the 1960's. She put on a player party with skits that became absolutely legendary, with the players entertaining their peers and a crowd.

She later spent time in California, where she was one of the few friends of Bill Tilden to stay loyal to him after his run-ins with the law. In fact Butler basically supported Bill for a time. He nicknamed her "Angel Child".

We do not have much information on her later life or if and when Gloria died. According to Gar Mulloy in his 2009 book As It Was, she gave away her last remaining wealth to a commune.

The figure on the left is (Mlle or Mme) Speranza. I'm guessing the scoreboard reads "Mlle Speranza", but can't verify this this due to the smallness of the shot. She seems too young to be Mme Daisy Wyns Speranza Wyns (or Wyns Speranza), who entered French events as early as 1909. Mme Speranza Wyns was ranked #1 in Monaco in 1932.

If it is Mme Speranza-Wyns the woman on the right would be at least in her mid 50s. Having exact dates of birth and death for Daisy Sperana-Wyns would help enormously, but this is yet another mystery.

On the other hand the Speranza in this photo is clearly no spring chicken, and looks older than Gloria Butler.

There was at least one other Speranza. We know in 1947 that Gloria Butler entered the French with Lucia Speranza. The team defaulted in the event.

#2 Where and when was the photo taken?

The clothing suggests late 1930s and early 1940s. The trophy suggests they are (or have already) played a singles final.

And coming from a Monaco based site gives us a clue that this is a Riviera tournament. The "jeaux" on the scoreboard makes that nearly 100% certain.

That leads me to guess it is 1947 with Gloria Butler and Lucia Speranza at a Riviera tournament. Are there other explanations I might have overlooked? If anyone has information about Speranza or Butler please share!


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post #142 of 145 (permalink) Old Apr 24th, 2018, 12:43 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Serve and Volley-40's tennis

Broughie and Ozzie (photo from the Berkeley Tennis Club)

Louise Brough (left) and Margaret Osbourne duPont (right) dominated tennis in the late 1940s. They won every Wimbledon and US National title from 1947 to 1950.

Louise had more natural talent but was also prone to nerves. Margaret had fewer weapons but was, by all accounts, a master tactician. She was like an older sister and mentor to Brough.



I had the honor of speaking to Brough a few times over the phone about a decade ago.

One of the more amusing anecdotes was about Will duPont. Will was super rich; the duPont family easily being the wealthiest family in Delaware. Will loved horses and tennis. By the late 1930s he was sponsoring many tennis players. He pursued Alice Marble, who apparently refused to marry him.

He did things like provide tennis players with housing, training opportunities, and transportation. He helped the women fly to Wimbledon in an era when this was rare. He even provided meat for the top US women when they traveled to Europe. Strange as that sounds today, meat was so scarce all over Europe after World War II that is was rationed for years. Imagine the expense involved in shipping meat across the Atlantic, in 1946,

This was one of the many advantages American players of the era had, for they were much more robust compared to their European counterparts. Louise and Margaret could have all of the eggs and steak they wanted, while British girls were lucky to get eggs at all for breakfast! Rationing in Britain went on well into the 1950s.

Will turned his attentions elsewhere after Marble tuned him down. Louise told me he made a move on her in the back of his limo! Will was in the middle with Louise at one end and Margaret the other. It was dark, and he went for Brough. She pushed him away towards Margaret.

Margaret wasn't so shy. She eventually married Will, had a child, got divorced, and lived with her female companion Margaret Varner in Texas, where they raised horses.


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post #143 of 145 (permalink) Old Jul 10th, 2018, 12:56 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Serve and Volley-40's tennis

The 1949 British Wightman Cup team.





Can anyone identify them?


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File Type: jpg 1949wightmancup.jpg (94.6 KB, 6 views)


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Last edited by Rollo; Jul 10th, 2018 at 01:06 PM.
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post #144 of 145 (permalink) Old Jul 10th, 2018, 01:00 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Serve and Volley-40's tennis

1947 Wightman Cuo. Doris Hart hits a shot while Betty Hilton's face is framed in the racquet




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post #145 of 145 (permalink) Old May 2nd, 2019, 03:26 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Serve and Volley-40's tennis

My how times have changed.


The WTA tour in 2919 FINALLY has a woman who has manged to win 2 titles this year.


From 1938 to 1940 Alice Marble won over 100 matches in a row without a defeat. Her last singles defeat was in the semifinals at Wimbledon, where she lost to Helen Jacobs 6-4 6-4.


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