Female Tennis Player of the Century - TennisForum.com
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 81 (permalink) Old Oct 15th, 2004, 06:08 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 476
                     
Female Tennis Player of the Century

Martina Navratilova (born October 18, 1956) is undoubtedly the greatest female tennis player in the long history of the game. She played on the WTA Tour, competing in the singles from 1973 until 1994. She won 18 major singles titles from 1978-1990 (including nine at Wimbledon including six in a row 1982-1987), 167 singles tournaments (out of 380 played) and 162 doubles tournaments (out of 286 played) including 31 in the major competitions.

She was born in Prague and grew up in the Krkonose region. When her parents separated she went with her mother to Revnice where she became interested in tennis. Her mother re-married in 1962 and her stepfather, Mirek Navratil,became her first coach. She played in her first junior tournament in 1964 and began working with George Parma. She became a professional player in 1973, reaching the quarter-finals of her first Grand Slam event. In
September 1975 she took up permanent residence in the US after the
tournament in New York City (she became a US citizen in 1981).

Initially unsuccessful it was not until 1978 that she won her first major
title, beating Chris Evert to win the Wimbeldon women's singles. A rigourous
training regime finally showed its worth from 1982 when she won fifteen
singles tournaments and fourteen doubles in that year and 28 in the
following year, just missing a singles Grand Slam. She had a extended and
fiercely competitive on-court rivalry with Chris Evert, a clash of
contrasting styles that lasted until Evert retired in 1988.

The rise of young female stars in the late 1980s broke Navratilova's
dominance. In 1991 she lost in three major finals, every time to Monica
Seles. Her last major Open victory was in 1993, when she beat Seles to win
the Paris Open. She announced her intention to retire from the WTA Tour at
the end of 1994 and in that year she still made two Open finals (Rome and
Wimbledon), losing both to Conchita Martinez.

In 2000 Martina Navratilova was grandly inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in Newport, Rhode Island.

She returned to the professional tennis circuit after her retirement, and as
of 2003 was playing competitively. In January 2003 she won the Australian
Open mixed doubles title with Leander Paes, thus becoming only the third
player (after Doris Hart and Margaret Court to win every possible title
(singles, women's doubles, mixed doubles) from the four Grand Slam
tournaments. At the same time, at 46 years and 3 months, she became the
oldest player, male or female, to have won a Grand Slam title, eclipsing the
record set by Norman Brookes, who was a month younger when he won the mens doubles at the Australian Championships in 1924.

Martina's return to tennis sees her still winning Grand Slam doubles titles
after the retirement of Martina Hingis, who was named after her.

In July 2003, again with Leander Paes, she won the Wimbledon mixed doubles,
equalling Billie Jean King's record of 20 Wimbledon titles, which is what
she came out of retirement specifically to chase.

Her 58 grand slam titles place her second on the all-time list behind
Australia's Margaret Court, who has 62.
Athena is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 81 (permalink) Old Oct 15th, 2004, 10:44 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 391
                     
Quote:
Originally Posted by Athena
Martina Navratilova (born October 18, 1956) is undoubtedly the greatest female tennis player in the long history of the game. She played on the WTA Tour, competing in the singles from 1973 until 1994. She won 18 major singles titles from 1978-1990 (including nine at Wimbledon including six in a row 1982-1987), 167 singles tournaments (out of 380 played) and 162 doubles tournaments (out of 286 played) including 31 in the major competitions.

She was born in Prague and grew up in the Krkonose region. When her parents separated she went with her mother to Revnice where she became interested in tennis. Her mother re-married in 1962 and her stepfather, Mirek Navratil,became her first coach. She played in her first junior tournament in 1964 and began working with George Parma. She became a professional player in 1973, reaching the quarter-finals of her first Grand Slam event. In
September 1975 she took up permanent residence in the US after the
tournament in New York City (she became a US citizen in 1981).

Initially unsuccessful it was not until 1978 that she won her first major
title, beating Chris Evert to win the Wimbeldon women's singles. A rigourous
training regime finally showed its worth from 1982 when she won fifteen
singles tournaments and fourteen doubles in that year and 28 in the
following year, just missing a singles Grand Slam. She had a extended and
fiercely competitive on-court rivalry with Chris Evert, a clash of
contrasting styles that lasted until Evert retired in 1988.

The rise of young female stars in the late 1980s broke Navratilova's
dominance. In 1991 she lost in three major finals, every time to Monica
Seles. Her last major Open victory was in 1993, when she beat Seles to win
the Paris Open. She announced her intention to retire from the WTA Tour at
the end of 1994 and in that year she still made two Open finals (Rome and
Wimbledon), losing both to Conchita Martinez.

In 2000 Martina Navratilova was grandly inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in Newport, Rhode Island.

She returned to the professional tennis circuit after her retirement, and as
of 2003 was playing competitively. In January 2003 she won the Australian
Open mixed doubles title with Leander Paes, thus becoming only the third
player (after Doris Hart and Margaret Court to win every possible title
(singles, women's doubles, mixed doubles) from the four Grand Slam
tournaments. At the same time, at 46 years and 3 months, she became the
oldest player, male or female, to have won a Grand Slam title, eclipsing the
record set by Norman Brookes, who was a month younger when he won the mens doubles at the Australian Championships in 1924.

Martina's return to tennis sees her still winning Grand Slam doubles titles
after the retirement of Martina Hingis, who was named after her.

In July 2003, again with Leander Paes, she won the Wimbledon mixed doubles,
equalling Billie Jean King's record of 20 Wimbledon titles, which is what
she came out of retirement specifically to chase.

Her 58 grand slam titles place her second on the all-time list behind
Australia's Margaret Court, who has 62.
Five Major factors to be considered in determining the Greatest Ever/Best of the Best.

For CONSISTENCY ... go with Evert's 13 consecutive years with a Grand Slam singles title.

For BRILLIANCE….go with Seles who already had 8 majors at age 19-winning 55 of her last 56 Grand Slam tournaments prior to the 1993 tragedy. No one had ever broken in like this, on either side of the sport. Not Bjorn Borg or Chris Evert or John McEnroe or anybody.

For LONGEVITY ... go with Navratilova's 19 consecutive years in the top 5 in singles and her almost 30 years between her first and last final in a Grand Slam event.

For DOMINANCE ... go with Navratilova being the only woman player to hold the record for most singles titles at 2 of the 5 biggest events in women's tennis (Wimbledon and WTA Tour Championships) ALTERNATE: Helen Wills Moody with her 15 singles titles from Wimbledon and the U.S. Championships.

For OVERALL WINNING RECORDS ... go with Navratilova for her 160+ singles titles and her 160+ doubles titles. ALTERNATE: Margaret Court with her record for most singles titles -- and most overall titles -- at the Grand Slam events.

Last edited by LADIEZ CHAMPION; Oct 15th, 2004 at 10:50 AM.
LADIEZ CHAMPION is offline  
post #3 of 81 (permalink) Old Oct 15th, 2004, 11:26 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Under Carlos Moya
Posts: 4,918
                     
Quote:
Originally Posted by LADIEZ CHAMPION
Five Major factors to be considered in determining the Greatest Ever/Best of the Best.

For CONSISTENCY ... go with Evert's 13 consecutive years with a Grand Slam singles title.

For BRILLIANCE….go with Seles who already had 8 majors at age 19-winni
Quote:
Originally Posted by LADIEZ CHAMPION
ng 55 of her last 56 Grand Slam tournaments prior to the 1993 tragedy. No one had ever broken in like this, on either side of the sport. Not Bjorn Borg or Chris Evert or John McEnroe or anybody.

For LONGEVITY ... go with Navratilova's 19 consecutive years in the top 5 in singles and her almost 30 years between her first and last final in a Grand Slam event.

For DOMINANCE ... go with Navratilova being the only woman player to hold the record for most singles titles at 2 of the 5 biggest events in women's tennis (Wimbledon and WTA Tour Championships) ALTERNATE: Helen Wills Moody with her 15 singles titles from Wimbledon and the U.S. Championships.

For OVERALL WINNING RECORDS ... go with Navratilova for her 160+ singles titles and her 160+ doubles titles. ALTERNATE: Margaret Court with her record for most singles titles -- and most overall titles -- at the Grand Slam events.

I think that each of the top women champions personifies at least one aspect of true greatness:
Evert's consistency went beyond winning a slam for 13 consecutive years to being #1 both as a teenager and at 31 years old, for failing to reach the semis just once (when ill) in a major from US71-US87.

Noone won so much so young as Monica, surely the most prolific prodigy in the game (only Connolly stands comparison).

Martina's longevity in singles and all-round is indeed unsurpassed, though King and Evert also score high in this respect.

As for dominance, it depends how you look at it. Martina's unparalleled dominance at the #1 tournament is a big achievement and her 82-84 stats are also amazing but Chris was as dominant on clay as Martina was on grass and Steffi's stats 87-9 are great too.

Marge Court's accumulation of major titles is indeed extraordinary.

The win-streaks of Court, Graf, Evert and Navratilova are all amazing.
One fact that is rarely mentioned is that Martina is the only woman to win the biggest title in singles and doubles on the four main surfaces - indoors (YEC), grass (Wimby), hard (US) and clay (RG) in a calendar year (84). Steffi did a clean sweep of the singles in 95 and 96.

While each of us has his/her own view on the greatest ever (or at least post-war), each one of the four women mentioned above was "better" in at least one respect than the other three. In voicing our own preferences (mine being Martina), we take nothing away from our own fave by acknowledging the achievements of the others.

Last edited by Andy T; Oct 15th, 2004 at 12:25 PM.
Andy T is offline  
 
post #4 of 81 (permalink) Old Oct 15th, 2004, 11:40 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 47,378
                     
Quote:
One fact that is rarely mentioned is that martina is the only woman to win the biggest title on the four main surfaces - indoors (YEC), grass (Wimby), hard (US) and clay (RG) in a calendar year (84).
Wow...nearly as impressive as winning the grand slam imo.
bandabou is offline  
post #5 of 81 (permalink) Old Oct 15th, 2004, 11:46 AM
Senior Member
 
irma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: the netherlands
Posts: 13,635
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy T

The win-streaks of Court, Graf, Evert and Navratilova are all amazing.
One fact that is rarely mentioned is that martina is the only woman to win the biggest title on the four main surfaces - indoors (YEC), grass (Wimby), hard (US) and clay (RG) in a calendar year (84).
Maybe because she is not the only one?
irma is offline  
post #6 of 81 (permalink) Old Oct 15th, 2004, 12:19 PM
Senior Member
 
FrauleinSteffi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 461
                     
I think Steffi had brilliance & dominance of 3 generations & awesome consistency & athleticism shes a contener for best ever & female player of the century...Matina N & Chris Evert are the other 2 I think....

Why Steffi Graf is the greatest ever.

· Steffi is the ONLY player (man or woman) to have won a Golden Grand Slam - winning the four Grand Slam titles - the Australian Open, the French Open, Wimbledon and the US Open - in a single calendar year - 1988. In that year, Steffi also won the Olympic Gold Medal in Seoul - hence the name Golden Grand Slam.
·Steffi has won her 22 Grand Slam on four different surfaces - Rebound Ace at Flinders Park, Clay at Roland Garros, Grass at Wimbledon and cement Hard Court at Flushing Meadow. This fact, in itself, makes Steffi's Grand Slam unique.
· Steffi is the ONLY player (either male or female) to have won all four of the Grand Slam events at least 4 times.
· Steffi is the ONLY player (either male or female) to have won each of the four Grand Slam events in singles AND TO HAVE SUCCESSFULLY DEFENDED each and every one
· Steffi is one of only two players (either male or female) to have won the French Open and Wimbledon in the same year and to have done so four times. She achieved this in 1988, 1993, 1995 and 1996. Helen Wills Moody did it in 1928, 1929, 1930 and 1932. Bjorn Borg achieved it three times - 1978, 1979 and 1980
· Steffi had already won 7 Wimbledon titles by the age of 27
· It took Steffi only 9 years between her first and her eighteenth Grand Slam titles, while it took Margaret Court 11 years, and Chris Evert and Martina Navratilova 13 years each.
· Steffi holds the record for any player (either male or female) for the number of consecutive weeks as number 1 in the world - 186 weeks between 17th August 1987 and 10th March 1991.
· Steffi is the only player (either male or female) to have won all four Grand Slam singles titles in the 80s AS WELL AS in the 90s
· By winning the 1994 Australian Open, Steffi became only the second woman (Martina Navratilova was the other doing it in 1983/84) to win a non-calendar year Grand Slam, having already won the 1993 French Open, Wimbledon and US Open titles.
· Steffi holds the record for consecutive appearances in Grand Slam finals at 13 - from the 1987 French Open up to the 1990 French Open
· Steffi has won at least 3 Grand Slam titles in five different years - in 1988 she won all 4; in 1989 and 1993 she won 3 and was a finalist in the fourth; in 1995 and 1996 she won all three of the Grand Slams she played.
· Steffi has earned an Olympic Gold Medal (1988 at Seoul), a Silver Medal ( 1992 at Barcelona) and a Bronze Medal (1988 at Seoul in doubles).
· Steffi won the Lipton 5 times - a record for a man or woman. The Lipton is the biggest tournament outside the Grand Slams.
· Between 1986 and 1996, Steffi won at least 7 titles every year. Also she won at least one Grand Slam title every year between 1987 and 1996.
· Steffi has been the World Champion of Tennis seven times in ten years - 1987 to 1990, 1993 and 1995 and 1996. Seven times is a world record.
· Steffi has been the Corel WTA Player of the Year 1987 to 1990 and 1993 to 1996.
· Steffi holds a winning record against every significant player she has ever played, except Martina Navratilova (9-9) and Tracy Austin (1-1).
· Steffi holds the record as the player who has held the number 1 ranking in the world for the l o n g e s t period of time. As of the 24th March 1997, she had been in the top position for 377 weeks (over 7 years). The previous record was 331 weeks which was held by Martina Navratilova.
· Steffi won 107 titles
FrauleinSteffi is offline  
post #7 of 81 (permalink) Old Oct 15th, 2004, 12:22 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Under Carlos Moya
Posts: 4,918
                     
Of course you're right, Irma: Steffi did it too in 95-6, didn't she? mea culpa!
Andy. Martina's the only one to have done it in singles and doubles, though.
Andy T is offline  
post #8 of 81 (permalink) Old Oct 15th, 2004, 12:24 PM
Moderator - BFTP
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 24,846
                     
Nice article Athena. "Undoubtedly the greatest" always makes me laugh, but I guess that's the way these things are written.

Thanks for the surface feat Andy T. Evert came very close in 1976-if she had beaten Evonne in the Virginia Slims it would have given her the missing indoor crown.
Rollo is offline  
post #9 of 81 (permalink) Old Oct 15th, 2004, 02:32 PM
Senior Member
 
irma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: the netherlands
Posts: 13,635
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy T
Of course you're right, Irma: Steffi did it too in 95-6, didn't she? mea culpa!
Andy. Martina's the only one to have done it in singles and doubles, though.
yep she did (Steffi I mean)
To do it in singles and doubles is really amazing though. And I think there were no bye's anymore either (in comparing with the seventies) so she she had to play the full schedule, even when she was obvious so good in both that she probably didn't spend too much time on court anyway
irma is offline  
post #10 of 81 (permalink) Old Oct 15th, 2004, 09:28 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 7,293
                     
Quote:
Originally Posted by Athena
[B]Martina Navratilova (born October 18, 1956) is undoubtedly the greatest female tennis player in the long history of the game. ....

Oh, that's why Navi wins almost all "best ever" polls?


Calimero377 is offline  
post #11 of 81 (permalink) Old Oct 15th, 2004, 09:52 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 7,293
                     
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy T
[I]


I think that each of the top women champions personifies at least one aspect of true greatness:
Evert's consistency went beyond winning a slam for 13 consecutive years to being #1 both as a teenager and at 31 years old, for failing to reach the semis just once (when ill) in a major from US71-US87.

Noone won so much so young as Monica, surely the most prolific prodigy in the game (only Connolly stands comparison).

...

Madam,
Hingis was the youngest player to win 3 slams and the youngest to win 4 slams,
Seles was the youngest to win 5, 6, 7 and 8 slams,
Connolly the youngest with 9 slams,
Graf the youngest with 10 slams,
Court the youngest with 11, 12 and 13 slams,
Graf the youngest with 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21 and 22 slams.

Only to put things into perspective .....
Calimero377 is offline  
post #12 of 81 (permalink) Old Oct 15th, 2004, 10:53 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 391
                     
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy T
[I]

Noone won so much so young as Monica, surely the most prolific prodigy in the game (only Connolly stands comparison).

.
Becoming curious to learn about youthful players of the past, I found that the greatest achiever among modern players was Monica Seles, who as a 16-year-old in 1990 broke the century old record and became the first youngest Grand Slam Champion in over 103 years. Not since 15 year old Lottie Dodd won Wimbledon in 1887 had tennis seen such a youthful champion. The player who also holds the all time record in winning the most Slam championships as a teenager was Seles, who captured eight before her stabbing at age 19. Steffi Graf won six as a teenager, Hingis five.

The teenaged superstar phenomenon extends back in tennis history. During the 1920's, Californian Helen Wills won the U.S. Nationals three times as a teenager enroute to a career total of 19 singles Slams. But the credentials as the second greatest-ever player as a teenager, almost beyond argument, belong to another Californian, a member of the next tennis generation, a player I deeply admired. Her name is Maureen Connolly.

Maureen Connolly was born in San Diego in late September 1934. She went to the U.S. Nationals at Forest Hills as a 14- and 15-year-old, and she lost in the second round on both occasions. She won the U.S. Nationals at 16 years + 11 months in 1951, then won both Wimbledon and the U.S. at 17. At age 18 in 1953, Little Mo won all four Slams, thereby achieving the first women's Grand Slam. Then at 19 she won both Garros and Wimbledon, making a total of nine Slam triumphs as a teenager and a W-L record in Slams of 52-2, where her only two losses came in those first tries at Forest Hills.

Connolly's was primarily a heavy-hitting game from back court, founded on her ability to drive the ball firmly and consistently within inches of the lines, machine-like. She was very similar to Seles, not only in her tactics but also in her unrelenting determination and concentration during matches.

Her only major difference with Seles was that Connolly's time preceded Open tennis. During her time at the pinnacle there were no plausibly dangerous opponents active in the pro ranks.

Connolly never competed after age 19. In summer 1954 while on horseback she was badly hurt in an accident with a truck. She died of cancer at 34. Her story is one of tennis's most compelling.

Last edited by LADIEZ CHAMPION; Oct 15th, 2004 at 11:19 PM.
LADIEZ CHAMPION is offline  
post #13 of 81 (permalink) Old Oct 15th, 2004, 11:19 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 64
                     
My view would be the that Steffi was the greatest "singles" player of all time but overall Martina would be the greatest due to longevity.
GrantyBoy is offline  
post #14 of 81 (permalink) Old Oct 16th, 2004, 03:33 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 2,714
                     
Quote:
Originally Posted by Athena
When the world recalls the biggest sports story in 1988 only one name comes to mind : Florence Griffith Joyner or Flo Jo.

1988 Shatters US and World records in the Olympic Trials in Indianapolis, Indiana, breaking her own records just established. Considered the "fastest woman alive."
1988 Wins three Olympic Gold medals (100 meter, 200 meter and 400 meter relay) and one Silver medal (1600 meter relay) in Seoul, South Korea. Broke the world record in 200-meters in semifinals, then broke her own record in the finals, by running 200-meters in 21.34 seconds.
1988 Voted US Olympic Committee and Associated Press Female Athlete of the Year, Wins the Sullivan Award as her nation's top athlete. Awarded the Jesse Owens Award as an outstanding field and track athlete.
You do recognize that only a handful of players both men and women have won the calendar year grand slam. Martina N. is not one of them.

As long as a calendar year grand slam remains as difficult to accomplish as it is now and as it has been in the past, everyone who has accomplished the feat will continue to be held in very high esteem.

As to whether or not Flo Jo's achievements in 1988 overshadowed Steffi's accomplishmenta, you do recognize that Steffi Graf was not eligible for two of the three awards you mentioned. She was not an American. For the same reason, she may not have had a good chance to win the only award for which she was eligible - Associated Press Female Athlete of the Year.

It is also the case that Flo Jo never competed after the 1988 Olympics. Some jealous competitors speculated that she was afraid to compete because of increasing suspicion that she had taken performance enhancing drugs.

Whatever the case, Flo Jo's time at the top was quite short, a matter of a few months in fact, from the time of the US Trials to the time of the Olympics. For Steffi Graf, 1988 was just the beginning.
LDVTennis is offline  
post #15 of 81 (permalink) Old Oct 16th, 2004, 04:49 AM
Senior Member
 
daze11's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: BrOoKLyN, NY
Posts: 3,074
                     
We've discussed this topic many times, and from that i don't believe there is a best because there are no universal quantifying factors to consider which include all the issues of the time a player is active within...just the fact that Graf could walk into the sport with the fitness assumptions previously constructed by Navratilova for her to inherit shed some shadows in comparing their respective accomplishments. As well, Evert's wood racquet era requiring greater mastery and focus to win with consistency being factored in, along with Mary Carillo's comment that "Chris Evert basically invented the backcourt game that so many players today now take for granted." Andyou can also attribute to her legacy her making the sport 'acceptable' and attractive to play for a greater amount of women world-wide. It's a tricky matter to judge the full measure of a player after the stepping stone others take-off from has been carved by the player who proceeds them.

But with that, Chris has some impressive numbers she can be quite proud to wave, in no way in competition with any of the aforementioned players accomplishments:

• From age 16 – 32, Evert reached the semis or better in 48 of 49 Grand Slams, with the 1 pre-semi loss, as AndyT pointed out, coming due to documented food poisoning the night prior.

• Chris won at least one of the four Grand Slam singles titles for an unparalleled 13 consecutive years, an open-era record.

• Evert won more than half of the tournaments she entered throughout her 20 year career, made the finals in 76% of them, and made at least the semifinals in 90% of all the events she entered.

• Not only Steffi, but Evert was #1 for 7 years (of 8, between 1974-81) though a WTA non-computer 'opinion-based' ranking in ’74 obscures that from the history books. In this very ’74 season, she joined BJ King & M Court as the only players in the Open Era to win over 100 matches (103-7), winning the French & Wimbledon titles back-to-back.

• Evert won a record 157 Tournament Singles Titles after her 289th event. When Martina Navratilova matched her record, it was after Navratilova’s 343rd event.

• Evert holds the record for most French Open singles titles, winning 7 total. This is all the more impressive when one considers that she did not even play in this clay court GS event in 1976, 77, or 78 when she was both #1 in the world and undefeated on clay, considered unbeatable at the time on that surface.

• Evert won a record 125 consecutive matches on a single surface, clay, spanning a near 6-year period between August 1973 and May 1979 (with 71 of those sets being won by the score of 6-0); doubly impressive as this accomplishment was achieved during the wood racquet era, when a bad day could not be masked by larger sweet spots and compensated for by racquet-generated speed. Wood racquets reveal any mis-hit or lapse in concentration, unlike today. When she was finally beaten, it was a third set 7-6 loss in the semifinals of the Italian Open against Tracy Austin. She didn't lose again on clay until the '81 French Open, for a staggering 197-1 match record on clay surface court.

• Chrissie won 6 of 8 US Open singles titles between 1975 and 1982, including 4 in a row (75-78). And a strict baseliner, she made 10 Wimbledon finals.

• From 1972 to her retirement in 1989, Evert was never ranked lower than fourth in the world for any given ranking week. She was also never ranked lower than either #1 or #2 during the entire 16 year span of 1974 through 1986 in the year-end rankings.

• In April 1985, Evert was named Greatest Woman Athlete of the Last 25 Years by the Women’s Sports Foundation. In 1976, she was the first woman ever to be chosen as Sports Illustrated's Athlete of the Year.

• Evert’s .901 winning percentage (1,309-145) is the best in pro tennis history, male or female.

Last edited by daze11; Oct 16th, 2004 at 05:07 AM.
daze11 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the TennisForum.com forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome