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post #1 of 30 (permalink) Old Aug 31st, 2004, 06:30 PM Thread Starter
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Match Report/Champions in their Day.

If you have a report of any match especially those significant in the outcome of a major event post it here!

Last edited by chris whiteside; Sep 25th, 2004 at 07:11 AM. Reason: Added to title.
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post #2 of 30 (permalink) Old Aug 31st, 2004, 06:34 PM Thread Starter
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Reptinted from Nancy Richey career thread.

Square Madison. March 29, 1968.

Women's Final Billie-Jean King v Nancy Richey.

The Match of the tourney was Richey-King.

Neither player had met across the net since 1964. Nancy held a considerable edge in the number of prior victories over BJ, indisputably acclaimed the #1 women's player in the world in 1966 and 1967. (Note. In fact BJ had only ever beaten Nancy once before).

In the first 7 games of the first set they played on even terms. Then in the eighth, Billie Jean asserted control with superior volleying and a series of overhead smash placements, mostly the result of short Richey lobs, moving ahead to take the set 6-4. In the 2nd set B.J. continued to maintain her dominant offensive attack, breaking Nancy's service in the 4th and 6th games. At 5-1 serving for the match Nancy forced a series of King errors and broke not just her opponent's service but her confidence as well. As the crowd went wild, the never daunted Nancy was spurred on in her attack.

In the 9th game, Mrs. King, still leading 5-3 served for the match on the 7th point of the game......missed an overhead just momentarily in the lights. This sealed her doom. It hardly seemed possible. But happen it did. The slight 115 pound Nancy Richey pummelled her opponent into submission by taking 12 straight games, winning 4-6 7-5 6-0.

"Open Tennis? What would be the difference?" said Nancy.

From Lawn Tennis magazine. May 1968.
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post #3 of 30 (permalink) Old Aug 31st, 2004, 06:56 PM Thread Starter
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1961 French Champioships.

Quarter Final.

Margaret Smith (Court) #3 v Ann Haydon (Jones) #6

This was a stirring match indeed. Gone was the lassitude and weary approach suffered by Miss Haydon since the beginning of the season and in its place was an eagerness and confidence and an irrepressible spirit. The tall, athletic Miss Smith with the strong service and volley always working in conjunction has speedy and penetrating ground shots too and she applied her whole repertoire competently against Miss Haydon. It was Miss Haydon's capacity to impose her own game that brought her such an impressive victory. She had the advantage of more experience and she used it cleverly. The shrewd mixture of her drop shots and lobs made a far more complicated pattern for the Australian's serve and volley campaign and it was this variation that gave much of the initiative to Miss Haydon. Miss Smith thrives on angles, especially those which open up the court to her punishing cross-court forehand drives; she is almost totally incapable of hitting the ball down the line with better than average club accuracy. Miss Haydon saw to it that she seldom had those angles. Long down the middle, short down the middle, and always a dead ball, she gave the game Australian nothing.

The score was 7-5 12-10. Miss Haydon went to 3-0 in the first set, was checked at 3-all and then in the tightest of games the score mounted to 6-5 for Miss Haydon after she had held the game point 4 times. And then she broke through for the set. Again in the second set each won three games in a row. Miss Haydon was trailing at 3-5 and was faced with a set point gainst her at 8-9 when the Australian double faulted. At 10-all Miss Smith, who had gallantly survived a crisis to level doubled up with cramp in her foot, the strain of more than 100 minutes of grullimg rallies finally telling. After four minutes attention, she resumed but Miss Haydon was now on top as she took the remaining games for the match.
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post #4 of 30 (permalink) Old Sep 1st, 2004, 12:21 PM
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Great idea for a thread Chris! When I get caught up I'll try and contribute


That French match makes a person respect Ann's fighting qualities. If anyone could make you cramp Ann could with all those drop shots.
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post #5 of 30 (permalink) Old Sep 2nd, 2004, 06:18 AM Thread Starter
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Is this one of the best match reviews ever written?!

1969

Wimbledon semi-final.

Billie Jean King #1 v Rosemary Casals (unseeded).

The least said about this match the better. Suffice to report that Mrs King won 6-1 6-0

Nice one.
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post #6 of 30 (permalink) Old Sep 2nd, 2004, 06:54 AM
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LOLChris


It reminds me of Ethel Merman's autobiography. She promised the publishers a chapter on her train wreck of marriage to actor Ernest Borgnine. It lasted a whole 32 days


She kept her promise-the chapter consisted of a blank page.
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post #7 of 30 (permalink) Old Sep 2nd, 2004, 06:59 AM
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The 1924 Olympics

I love to bring up this match whenever people think that the French booing players is something new. The guard not letting the finalist into the stadium. And topping it all off-"Oski-oski-wow-wow!



*******************

Helen Wills wins the gold before a French audience of 8,000 that cheers her every error and greets her winners with stony silence.

The final was typical of the circus the 24 Oympics was, as Didi Vlasto was denied entrance to the finals she was due to play in! After arguing with a guard for 10 minutes outside a stadium where the crowd was stomping it's feet in impatience she simply ran past him. Boos showered the two finalists as they entered the court some 20 minutes late. As small group of Californians amuses Helen and puzzles the crowd with a loud chant of her college song, "Oski-Oski-Wow-Wow!". It's the only support Wills has.

It doesn't matter as she exposes Didi Vlasto's weak backhand for an easy win. The match is not exciting as Wills loops high topspin shots to Vlasto's backhand until she gets a putaway shot or Didi drove out or into the net. Helen comes to the net only twice the whole match. Both times Vlasto passed her clean.

In the end Wills coolness during the match won over the French, who gave her an ovation following the short affair.

It was a better reaction than the finals of the doubles-where she was booed over a line call that went her way. Through it all she lived up to her reputation for showing no emotion .

Wills and McKane were solid favorites after the withdrawal of Suzanne Lenglen, still ill after Wimbledon. Lenglen watched Wills' matches with great interest.In the semis Kitty seeemed set to win in set two before suffering a complete collapse after the crowd influenced line close line calls by yelling and screaming at linespeople.

Covell/Mckane had a set point at 5-2 in the last set of the doubles but couldn't convert.

Competitors were highly displeased with facilities. At one point the US team threatened to withdraw unless "civilized facilities" were provided. The list of demands included water, towels, and a place to rest, none of which had been provided. The French put up a tin shack for changing rooms and began to provide bottled water and towels. Even the courts came in for a blasting as when the players arrived they were only piles of sand. Though laid just in time, the courts kicked up a dust bowl at the slightest wind.

To top if off the main stadium was next door. As one player recalled, "there was no knowing when a pistol would suddenly go off or a national anthem blare forth, or some announcements bellowed or rebellowed in some language. Vendors sold ice cream and bananas "at the top of their lungs" during points, and for many matches only the umpire showed, leading to the recruitment of lines people from spectators!


All in all the event had so many problems that it contributed towards making this the last medal Olympics gamesfor tennis until 1988.
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post #8 of 30 (permalink) Old Sep 2nd, 2004, 08:17 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rollo
The 1924 Olympics

I love to bring up this match whenever people think that the French booing players is something new. The guard not letting the finalist into the stadium. And topping it all off-"Oski-oski-wow-wow!



*******************

Helen Wills wins the gold before a French audience of 8,000 that cheers her every error and greets her winners with stony silence.

The final was typical of the circus the 24 Oympics was, as Didi Vlasto was denied entrance to the finals she was due to play in! After arguing with a guard for 10 minutes outside a stadium where the crowd was stomping it's feet in impatience she simply ran past him. Boos showered the two finalists as they entered the court some 20 minutes late. As small group of Californians amuses Helen and puzzles the crowd with a loud chant of her college song, "Oski-Oski-Wow-Wow!". It's the only support Wills has.

It doesn't matter as she exposes Didi Vlasto's weak backhand for an easy win. The match is not exciting as Wills loops high topspin shots to Vlasto's backhand until she gets a putaway shot or Didi drove out or into the net. Helen comes to the net only twice the whole match. Both times Vlasto passed her clean.

In the end Wills coolness during the match won over the French, who gave her an ovation following the short affair.

It was a better reaction than the finals of the doubles-where she was booed over a line call that went her way. Through it all she lived up to her reputation for showing no emotion .

Wills and McKane were solid favorites after the withdrawal of Suzanne Lenglen, still ill after Wimbledon. Lenglen watched Wills' matches with great interest.In the semis Kitty seeemed set to win in set two before suffering a complete collapse after the crowd influenced line close line calls by yelling and screaming at linespeople.

Covell/Mckane had a set point at 5-2 in the last set of the doubles but couldn't convert.

Competitors were highly displeased with facilities. At one point the US team threatened to withdraw unless "civilized facilities" were provided. The list of demands included water, towels, and a place to rest, none of which had been provided. The French put up a tin shack for changing rooms and began to provide bottled water and towels. Even the courts came in for a blasting as when the players arrived they were only piles of sand. Though laid just in time, the courts kicked up a dust bowl at the slightest wind.

To top if off the main stadium was next door. As one player recalled, "there was no knowing when a pistol would suddenly go off or a national anthem blare forth, or some announcements bellowed or rebellowed in some language. Vendors sold ice cream and bananas "at the top of their lungs" during points, and for many matches only the umpire showed, leading to the recruitment of lines people from spectators!


All in all the event had so many problems that it contributed towards making this the last medal Olympics gamesfor tennis until 1988.

Nice one about Ethel Merman, Rollo.

So those were the good old days? Nothing's changed much at RG, then. If anyone could remain emotionless in the face of such hostility it would be Helen Wills. But it would have been an experience to have been in the crowd. Although , the men's game I would love to have been present at some of the Davis Cup matches say in Italy or South America. The away team would almost have needed body armour.
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post #9 of 30 (permalink) Old Sep 7th, 2004, 10:46 AM Thread Starter
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1968 Wimbledon semi-final

Billie Jean King #1 v Ann Jones #4

Score to BJK 4-6 7-5 6-2

MRS JONES FORGETS LESSONS AT CRUCIAL MOMENT

The Fourth of July at Wimbledon, but the Americans only succeded in half-clebrating the occasion as Judy Tegart will meet Billie Jean King, their champion in the final.

Only the British will be disappointed by the way the affair ended. Mrs Jones, who lost to her great rival in the final last year, seemed to have learnt how to beat her in the course of her three months of professional touring. Before yesterday they had each won three matches, and for more than an hour on the Centre Court , it looked as though Mrs Jones, seven times a semi-finalist, and one of the finest hard court players in the world, might have the best of all her chances of winning the greatest of the grass court titles.

For those who have watched their other duels - at Wimbledon, in the Wightman Cup and at Forest Hills last year - yesterday's contest seemed curiously unrelated to anything that had gone before. A stranger might have thought that Mrs Jones had a long record of confident aggression behind her and that Mrs King was habitually uneasy and liable to miss her chances at the net. Mrs Jones spoiled as cleverly as ever, and volleyed more purposefully than she did in her amateur days. She had always been a shrewd strataegist, using her head as well as her racket. Travelling with Mrs King seemed to have given her a new and deeper knowledge of where the American was going to place her shots.

She was tidy and efficient. Mrs King seemed depressed, and - this is a word which one never expected to use about her - lethargic. Before the tournament she had withdrwn from Beckenham and Queen's, and flown home to California because she was feeling tired and ill. In her previous four matches she had not lost a set, but she hardly seemed to be her normal self. No bounce; no zest; she wasn't even talking to herself between points; there was no sign of the old bespectacled eagerness, or that hungry bird look which used to come over her face whenthere was a volley to be snapped up.

Three times in the first set Mrs Jones was a break up. Twice Mrs King broke back. The tird time, Mrs Jones held on by conceding only one point in two service games.

A break to 2-1 gave Mrs Jones the edge in the second set. She had three break points against her in the next game, but Mrs. King then made five successive mistakes, four of them on the forehand side.

Mrs Jones came within two points of leading 5-2. There were no agonised glances towards the players' stand; her chin which had drooped all the way through the final last year, jutted belligerently........and yet, as what seemed to be the finish drew near, memories of their past meetings, of long British leads which melted suddenly, began to rear ugly heads. "We are not safe yet," said a tall man in a mustard hat and coloured suit. Suddenly, it was noticable that there was a briskness and determination in the way that Mrs King picked up the balls to serve at 3-5. She won that game to love. ("Ann played a bad game. She slugged every return."..."But you were getting your first serve in and serving harder, weren't you?"..."It had to go in some time. It was getting late.")

Then came the crisis. Mrs Jones served for the match. At 15-all she hit a ball wide to Mrs King's forehand. The shot might have beaten the American, but she scrambled up for a lob. Mrs Jones might have killed the ball, and nearly did, but Mrs King, topping it slightly, drove across court from the backhand. It found a gap of about a foot between Mrs Jones' forehand and the sideline, kept low and skidded off the line - a spectacular winner and a warning of the challenge which was to come. The British player won one more point in that game and them lost the next 13.. The sleeping tigress was awake. Mrs Jones began to look as though the ghosts of matches past were appearing before her one by one.

Regular readers can skip the next paragraph. The final set followed a familiar pattern. Mrs Jones kept on volleying, but shots that had been going in fell out, and her first serve lost its accuracy. ("A semi-final at Wimbledon isn't the place to start practising your first service," she said tersely.) She thought that she still had a chance at this time, but the Centre Court's crowd quickly lost its optimism At 1-3 she managed to break back but went down 4-2 and it was clear that the end was near. ("When you are playing someone as good as that, if you don't take the opportunity when it arrives, you don't often get another chance.")

At the end, Mrs King looked so confident that you would not have thought she was ever in the slightest danger of defeat. Just one more near miss for Mrs Jones. In the end it was not even as close as their final at Forest Hills last September.

The British press just love to kick their sportsmen when they are down and there were headlines such as "THE DAY QUEEN ANN ABDICATED".
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

This was all based on the assumption that Mrs Jones had only to turn up for the final against Judy Tegart to win it. I'm not so sure. This was probably Judy's best ever tournament. Margaret Court was slightly below her beat but Judy was inspired against her in the quarter-final and had bulldozered Nancy Richey off court in the semi. Although losing to BJK in the final she pushed her all the way as the score 9-7 7-5 suggests.

Mrs Jones although her defence could cope admirably with all but the VERY best was never happy playing against serve and volleyers on grass until she took Margaret Court on at her own game in the 1969 semi. Before 1967 I believe she had never been beaten by Miss Tegart but going into the 68 Wimbledon she had lost 3 of their last 4 meetings including a semi at Madison Square Gardens 3 months previously although the story here was that she had not recovered from a bad bout of food poisoning which had forced her to withdraw from the final at Mexico City a few days before.

Given the tag of favourite and the immense pressure she would have been under from the British media and public IMO had Ann managed to serve out her match with Billie Jean I believe Judy Tegart would have been a Wimbledon champion.
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post #10 of 30 (permalink) Old Sep 7th, 2004, 12:17 PM
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I love these match reports!

Great thread!
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post #11 of 30 (permalink) Old Sep 22nd, 2004, 01:36 PM
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1958 French Championship

Körmöczy remembers the tournament
Original Source: June 1958, Picture Sport Magazin
(transletad by myself so sorry for the bad grammer)


„I played in the Quarters against Haydon. It was a distasteful, hard-fought match. I cought cold on the day before, and I had a little fever too. The freckled Ann was 3rd on the British rangkings, so I thought, I could beat her. I didn’t like, that she’s a left-handed. She hit strong, top-spin forehands, I could handle these from very high in the air, from a position like this very difficult to attack. Her backhands were deep slices, in the beginning I didn’t know what to do against them. She quckly led 2-0. The I found out the right tactic: because she reached everything from the baseline, I had to luer her into the net, and there hit good passing shots, or lob her, in bief break her rhythm. This worked for me, I won the first set 6-3.
She already led 4-1 in the second set, I felt very tiredI knew, If we had a final set, I would lose. This thought gave me some saved strenth, I started to play betten again and took the next 5 games in a row.
My semifinal opponent was Segal, a slim girl from Bermuda who had excellent build (she beat the world ranked No. 9. Truman in the previous round). I played probably my best tennis ever! The first game took 10 minutes, luckily I won it, and also some confidence, she got nervous, and it is always deciding factor. I beat her 6-1 6-0, I already knew that Bloomer is in the final. She beat the 18-year-old brazilian Bueno. Bueno seems a small, frail girl, but she is an unbelievable huge talent, in 2 years she’ll be on the top.
Bloomer is a ’blood-sucker’ type. Tough, hardworking, very fast and… last year she killed me 6-1 6-1… It was sure I was unable to beat her from the baseline, I had to go to the all the time. I planned the previous morning I go onto court to practise the vollies, but there came a huge ice-storm, the courts went under the water. So I run half an hour at the afternnon. It was good to me.
On the day of the final I packed all my suitcases, and brought everything to the lockerrom.
I thought at night I travel to home, getting the final is a great result anyway. 10000 people were sitting in the stadium. I told myself, it’s not a final, it’s just a simple match. My coach József Somogyi recognised before the match that Bloomer was practising the drop-shot returns with the british captain Paish. I got ready for that, and I reached all of the sort balls. The match went: 0-1, 4-2, 5-2 for me, after that Bloomer won the next 2 games, that time a little wind came to the court, it helped me, I hit long balls into the corner and at the net I won the points, 6-4!
At the start of the send set, I felt bad, my feet had gone to sleep, I had to put behind me this nerve-tiredness quickly!Bloomer led 4-1 that time, I decided to le this set go, and the in the remaining part I let Shirley to run, and bring myself back togeother. Bloomer took the set 6-1, but luckily I was right at the finish. After the second set, there was the opportunity to have a bathroom break, I said I didn’t need it, I saw that Bloomer got glad, shethought she’d have an easy third set.
In the final set till 5-0 I did what I wanted. Then again there came a downhill for me, I thought it could be over. Bloomer won 2 games as quick as lightning, and it came to my mind over and over that Patty lost from 5-0 up in the final set to Haillet reviously, I feard it’d happen to me too. 5-2, 40/15, two match points. The crowd started to cheer and it made me nervous, I made an unforced error, I told myself again it’s only a simple ball, like the other, not match point. I served, Bloomer missed the return! Oh my god, I through my racquet, jumped the net, I cuddled Shirley, I wondered she is not happy. I won the biggest clay-court tournament!”
Int he first half of 1958 Suzy (Zsuzsa) Körmöczy won 5 events in a row, 35 matches without losing a sinlge one.
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post #12 of 30 (permalink) Old Sep 22nd, 2004, 01:51 PM
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I feel because of her nationality Suzy was underappreciated. For a little girl who was a child prodigy before the war in 1939 it was along road to her French Open as a mature woman.

[email protected] the "blood-sucker" Bloomer comment. That's a perfect description of a guy I hate to lose too.


Thanks so much Tommystar
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post #13 of 30 (permalink) Old Sep 22nd, 2004, 02:12 PM
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lol @ these, when I get a minute I'll try and add to the thread, I have a great one regarding Sue Barker and Chris Evert
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post #14 of 30 (permalink) Old Sep 24th, 2004, 11:15 AM Thread Starter
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That was a great post on Suzy Kormoczy's French victory, tommystar. They often spell her name with an "i" at the end but I always thought it was "y" and you should know being from Hungary!

Suzy was a wonderful player and particularly on clay she was one of the leading world stars. She had magnificent results at RG in the late 50's. It's just a pity she rarely ventured too much outside Europe although she did go to England for the grass court season. And, of course, she won the Italian Champs in 1960 beating Haydon again in the final.

She had a very long career in Tennis. I think she might have played in England just before WWII as a very young teenager. She sounds a lovely person. After being beaten by Ann Haydon in the French semi in 1961 her only comment was that she was pleased for Ann as she was such a nice girl. Imagine someone today making a comment like that!
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post #15 of 30 (permalink) Old Sep 25th, 2004, 11:37 AM Thread Starter
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SINGLES CHAMPION WITHOUT PARALLEL - MAUREEN CONNOLLY From a 1962 article.

"Her service was decidedly weak, her overhead smash often uncertain and she was once beaten 6-0 6-0, in a ladies' doubles final at Wimbledon. Yet, in the entire history of lawn tennis competition, bo one can match Maureen Connolly's unique achievement in singles.

When Donald Budge succeeded in winning the four major championships of the world in 1938, it was said at the time, with some confidence, that no one could possibly improve on that magnificent feat.

But, fifteen years later, Miss Connolly bettered that performance by winning the same four major championship singles titles at her first attempt while still in her teens.

Nor, is that all, for "Little Mo's" consecutive singles successes in the world's four top tournaments are without parallel: from September 1951, when she won the American singles at Forest Hills as a 16-year-old, until July 1954 when she gained her third successive Wimbledon singles crown, she never once suffered a defeat.

Despite her lack of service power, Miss Connolly still managed to win countless victories against opponents possessed with a top-flight service and her Wimbledon victories over such a fine-serving player as Louise Brough - by 7-5 6-3 in the 1954 final are amongst the outstanding proofs of this.

"Little Mo" was able to achieve her unique run of championship successes on the centre courts of the world on the solidarity of her magnificent ground strokes. Hit with tremendous power and supreme accuracy, Miss Connolly's ground strokes were second to none. Only a tragic accident to her leg while out riding her horse Colonel Merryboy on July 20th 1954, prevented her continuing her unparalleled run of world championship successes. Nine in number they were: (I don't need to post these - we all know them).

In 1962 it is incredible to reflect that Miss Connolly's unique sequence of nine consecutive major world championship wins in singles from September 1951 to July 1954 was achieved before she had even reached her 20th birthday.

Rightly rated one of the greatest women tennis players of all time, Maureen Connolly's record in championship singlws stamps her as the Singles Champion without parallel."

Unless I have misunderstood a couple of things in the article eagle-eyed Blasters will have noticed inaccuracies. As has been posted elsewhere Maureen lost in early rounds of two previous American Championships before winning her first title. She also lost a handful of times in smaller events during her Slam run.

Just how to put this incredible record into context against the other greats in Tennis can only be subjective and a matter of great debate but certainly her run compared to any 3-year period of the others' careers is unequalled although Graf, Navratilova and Seles come close.
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