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Old Feb 26th, 2017, 03:57 AM
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Re: 1987

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Originally Posted by Ms. Anthropic View Post
And once the local interest stories lost, the coverage stops.

Top 2 seeds defeated in first round
Chicago Sun-Times
January 8, 1987
Len Ziehm

Mary Lou Piatek and Evonne Vermaak, the top seeded players, were upset yesterday in the first round of the $10,000 U.S. Tennis Association women's tourney at Mid-Town Tennis Club.

Piatek, from Munster, Ind., was ousted by Lindsey Bartlett of Portola Valley, Calif., 0-6, 6-4, 6-4, and Vermaak, a South African living in Chicago, fell to Lake Zurich's Linda Harvey-Wild 6-1, 6-4.

Former Wimbledon champion Billie Jean King, a late entry into the doubles portion of the fifth annual event that concludes Saturday, will make her tourney debut today.

King and partner Ilana Kloss will face Evonne Derkinderen and Mara Eykenboom of Holland in a first-round match expected to start about 2 p.m.

Piatek and Vermaak, the top-seeded doubles team, also are scheduled to compete at that time against Erika Smith of Piedmont, Calif., and Liz Morrman of Huntsville, Ala.
Actually, Linda Harvey-Wild (later to go by just Linda Wild) is listed as from Lake Zurich, a northwest suburb of Chicago, and throughout her career she gave Hawthorne Woods (a suburb right by Lake Zurich) as her hometown... so she was always a local Chicago girl .
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Old Feb 27th, 2017, 12:55 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grafiati View Post
Actually, Linda Harvey-Wild (later to go by just Linda Wild) is listed as from Lake Zurich, a northwest suburb of Chicago, and throughout her career she gave Hawthorne Woods (a suburb right by Lake Zurich) as her hometown... so she was always a local Chicago girl .
Well, somebody should have told the Sun-Times that. Then again, nobody pays too much attention to the geography of these perpetually war-torn, perpetually bankrupt foreign countries like Chicago, Detroit, Miami, and Puerto Rico.
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Old Feb 27th, 2017, 12:56 AM Thread Starter
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Re: 1987

HANA PLAYS UP TO HER POTENTIAL
Alan Clarkson
January 8, 1987
Sydney Morning Herald

Hana Mandlikova is approaching her goal of becoming the best woman tennis player in the world.

Hitting her ground strokes with authority and her volleys with remarkable precision, she crushed the young South African Elna Reinach 6-1 6-3.

Reinach, who beat Liz Smylie in the previous round, did not play badly. She was simply outplayed by Mandlikova, who is playing a lot better than her world ranking of four.

Mandlikova went into yesterday's match after having a hole drilled through the nail of her big toe on her right foot.

The new pair of shoes she wore on Tuesday were a fraction too small and a blood blister formed under her toenail.

In Tuesday evening's doubles match Mandlikova had to have a five-minute injury break while she received attention for the injury.

After the match a hole was bored through the nail to release the congealed blood.

There has never been the slightest doubt that Mandlikova was one of the most gifted tennis players in the world.

As her coach, Betty Stove, pointed out yesterday, there was still room for improvement in Mandlikova's game.

Stove compared Mandlikova's game to that of a roulette player who bets on 12 numbers and one who plunges on simply one.

"The one who bets on 12 numbers may win in the long run, but Hana does not play like that," she said.

"She can stay back and rally but she does not like to play that kind of tennis.

"She is prepared to take risks. That is the way she enjoys the game."

Stove did not agree that Mandlikova lacked consistency, the label that has been attached to her after a couple of uncharacteristic performances.

"It is hard for Hana to stay healthy. She is not built like a truck but she is a finely tuned athlete," Stove said.

Mandlikova, fresh from her triumph in winning the Queensland Open, expected a tougher match from her South African opponent.

They met in an early round of the US Open when Reinach, according to Mandlikova, played a lot better.

"She has great ground strokes which sit very low and especially on grass. I was surprised she did not play better," Mandlikova said.

"Overall, I think I played pretty good."

Mandlikova said it was not as difficult to maintain the high standard she had set herself.

"I think I have played so many tournaments and so many matches that you know what you are doing," she said.

"I know I have to rest for one day all day and just do whatever I want to.

"It is just a matter of knowing yourself and doing the right things.

"I still feel that I can reach the potential I wanted to reach. Obviously, I want to be No 1 one day and I will work hard to reach that potential.

"I am as happy as I have ever been in my life. As long as you are happy you are able to do so many things."

Mandlikova does not feel that marriage has changed her, although it has made her happier and that helps her tennis because she is more relaxed.

While she is relaxed she caused some nervous palpitations in the stands during the postponed final of the Queensland doubles championship - Mandlikova and Wendy Turnbull against Liz Smylie and Betsy Nagelsen.

Watching the match were Peter Smylie, Liz's husband, and Mark McCormack, who is married to Betsy Nagelsen.

Between them they played every shot, but it did not do their wives much good.

Against the consistency of Mandlikova and Turnbull they were beaten 6-4 6-3.

The husbands could console themselves that it ws the first time in 11 matches that their wives had been beaten in a doubles match.

Turnbull, the top-ranked Australia, showed the difference between those who are in the top bracket and the youngsters clawing their way up the ladder

Turnbull was far too experienced, although she was not as consistent as she would like to be in beating the talented Nicole Provis 6-2 7-6 (7-4).

Provis was overawed by the centre court stage in the first set but she rallied in the second set and had two set points but could not withstand the pressure mounted by Turnbull when it mattered.

Provis learnt that she has to work harder on the "big" points and this was one of the major differences between the two players.

In the other main matches yesterday Zina Garrison beat Camille Benjamin 6-4 6-2, Anne Minter toppled the English girl Anne Hobbs 2-6 6-3 6-3 and Dinky van Rensburg beat Robin White 6-3 2-6 6-1.
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Old Feb 27th, 2017, 12:57 AM Thread Starter
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Re: 1987

Tennis: Hobbs has to bow to fatigue
The Times
London, England
January 8, 1987
BARRY WOOD, SYDNEY

Anne Hobbs, of Cheshire, yesterday failed to follow up her fighting victory over Helen Kelesi, of Canada, losing 2-6, 6-3, 6-3, to Anne Minter, from Melbourne, in the second round of the Family Circle New South Wales women's open tournament here.

The beginning of the match was delayed for a couple of minutes while officials tried to remove a pink-breasted galah - a parrot-type bird - from the court. A delay of several hours would have suited Miss Hobbs better. She found it difficult to raise her game to overcome a very much in-form opponent.

Following her three-hour singles match against Miss Kelesi the day before, she had joined Jo Durie in a first round doubles match, losing in three sets to Elise Burgin and Rosalyn Fairbank - and it all took its toll.

'It's a fact that I played five and a half hours of tennis yesterday,' Miss Hobbs said. 'Quite frankly, I would have liked to have delayed the match. I'm disappointed because I could have beaten her in any other tournament if I'd have had a day's rest or not played the doubles last night. I am pretty shattered, and whoever it was today was going to be tough for me.'

It would have been asking a lot for Miss Hobbs, even though she feels particularly fit, to recover sufficiently to produce her best tennis against Miss Minter. But she refused to blame her defeat entirely on fatigue. 'The first set went my way purely and simply because I just played well. She made a lot of errors and didn't pass well,' Miss Hobbs said. 'I think she was a little nervy in the beginning and didn't quite know what to do.

'But she just came out steamrolling at the beginning of the second set and then I was down all the way. She began to pass me on my serve and I was getting nowhere near it. I was always two feet behind. I changed my serve to help me get in faster and started hitting to her forehand but she hit winners off it. There was awful lot that I tried to do but she had an answer for it.'

Meanwhile, the quaintly-named Dinky van Rensberg, who first came to international attention when she reached the quarter-finals of the Dow Chemical Classic in Birmingham last summer and has improved her world ranking over the past year by 300 places, upset the eighth seed, Robin White, of the United States, 6-3, 2-6, 6-1.

RESULTS: Second round: D Van Rensburg (SA) bt R White (US), 6-3, 2-6, 6-1; W Turnbull (Aus) bt N Provis (Aus), 6-1, 7-6; H Mandlikova (Cz) bt E Reinach (SA), 6-1, 6-3; A Smith (US) bt P Hy (HK), 6-1, 6-1; A Minter (Aus) bt A Hobbs (GB), 2-6, 6-3, 6-3. Third round: Z Garrison (US) bt C Benjamin (US), 6-4, 6-2; L McNeil (US) bt E Burgin (US), 6-1, 4-6, 6-2.
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Old Feb 27th, 2017, 12:58 AM Thread Starter
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Re: 1987

Headline unavailable
January 7, 1987
United Press International
*
SYDNEY, Australia -- Top-seeded Hana Mandlikova cruised into the third round of the $150,000 Family Circle New South Wales Open Wednesday with a 6-1, 6-3 victory over South African Elna Reinach.

Making her first appearance on the slick grass center court of White City, Mandlikova needed less than an hour to subdue Reinach, a baseliner. Mandlikova is using the Sydney event to prepare for next week's Australian Open, which will be the last played at the historic Kooyong Courts in Melbourne.

Mandlikova, 25 next month, next faces her doubles partner, Australian Wendy Turnbull, for a quarterfinal berth and said all friendships will be forgotten.

''Wendy is a good friend of mine but on court nobody is my friend. I just go after the ball and don't see who is on the other side of the net,'' she said.

Oddly, Mandlikova faced Reinach and Turnbull in consecutive matches at the U.S. Open last year, losing to Turnbull in a fourth round upset.

Mandlikova, who married an Australian citizen last year and recently applied for Australian citizenship, is commanding plenty of extra attention from media representatives and tennis fans in Australia.

The veteran Turnbull reached the third round meeting with a 6-1, 7-6 (7-4) decision over Nicole Provis of Sydney.

South African Dinky van Rensburg sprang the day's biggest upset by ousting Robin White of Fort Worth, Texas, the 8th seed. Van Rensburg belied her world No. 69 ranking with a 6-3, 2-6, 6-1 triumph over White, who has a world ranking of 16 and a wealth of experience on grass.

Zina Garrison of Houston was the first player into the quarterfinals when she overpowered Camille Benjamin of Fort Worth, 6-4, 6-2, while Lori McNeil of Houston took two hours and 10 minutes to join her close friend in the last eight by beating Elise Burgin of Baltimore, Md., 6-1, 4-6, 6-2.

Hard-hitting Australian Anne Minter overcame early problems with her service to beat Britain's Anne Hobbs, 2-6, 6-3, 6-3, while Anne Smith of San Antonio, Texas, never was troubled by Hong Kong's Patricia Hy, winning the second round match, 6-1, 6-1.
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Re: 1987

The Brits had not yet resigned themselves to the fact the situation was hopeless but not serious.

Tennis: British women claim to be moving in the right direction
The Times
London, England
January 8, 1987
BARRY WOOD, SYDNEY

On the face of it, nothing much seems to have changed as far as the fortunes of British women's tennis is concerned in 1987. The straight sets' defeat suffered this week by two British players, Jo Durie and Sara Gomer, by Americans in the second round of the New South Wales open tournament in Sydney hardly indicates that this year is going to be any better than 1986, which, on a team basis, was a total disaster.

A first-round crushing by lowly Denmark in the Federation Cup in Prague was followed by a 7-0 whitewash by a second rate American team in the Wightman Cup on home ground at the Albert Hall.

But, conversely, individual performances by some leading players have shown promise. The exception was Annabel Croft, masquerading as Britain's No 1 on the basis that on the week the new rankings were announced last year, she was placed above Miss Durie on the computer.

Miss Croft admitted openly that she had considered retiring before her success in San Diego in May, 1985, resulted in her first tournament title and a period of respectability. Those thoughts crossed her mind again during 1986 and, although she pulled off a couple of victories at the US Open, they were isolated successes in a dismal year.

She has been concerned enough to take several weeks off, to work on her fitness and game. After forgoing the Australian circuit, Miss Croft returns in February in Oklahoma and will be encouraged by the knowledge that the smallest success will offset last year's lost computer points and lift her up the rankings again.

Miss Durie, now restored to the No 1 position, had a fine year and continued to climb back towards the world's top 20 once again. In fact, she moved up to 19th before finishing the year at 24. Her ling-time coach, Alan Jones, considered that her progress would have been even more pronounced if it had not been for some niggling injuries.

''There are times when her tennis still isn't good enough, and Jo is always the first to say 'Yes, I've got to improve' or 'I wasn't good enough today'. But what people don't realize is the number of times Jo has plugged away at tournaments when a lot of people would have pulled out because of injury,'' he said.

A severe back injury that required surgery and kept her out of tennis for most of 1981 still plays on her mind. ''Subconsciously, I can't forget about my back operation,'' she said. ''I know that the same thing isn't going to happen again, but I suppose it's always in the back of my mind.

''That doesn't help my confidence, and it makes me hold back sometimes because I know that if I go into a certain position it's going to hurt.''

Despite her progress during the past year, in which she has become a better player than when she reached the top five three years ago, she has received a lot of criticism. ''It makes me mad when people say that I haven't had a good year. I reached the quarter-finals of three tournaments and the semi-finals of Mahwah, where I went three sets with Steffi Graf. Throughout the year, I've had pretty steady results.''

Along with Miss Durie's progress, British hopes for the future have been boosted by the steady development of Miss Gomer, whose enormous maturity over the past 12 months has been reflected in many fighting performances. The girl from Torquay has threatened several of the leading players and a major victory is not far away. ''The year exceeded my expectations,'' Miss Gomer enthused. ''Much of my success is due to Ken Fletcher. I worked with him solidly for a month after Wimbledon, the hardest I've ever worked, and then I went out to America and had my best results. I now put far more thought into the game.''

For Anne Hobbs, the year was another frustrating round of injuries. She was unable to follow up her tournament victory in New Zealand at the end of 1985, and her ranking subsequently slumped to 99 by the end of the year. Nevertheless, she maintains her positive outlook. ''Looking into 1987, my main ambition is to play the full year,'' she said. ''In 1986, I was out for four or five months with a double stomach muscle injury. The split from my coach, Chris Bradnam, really upset me, but we got back together in September.

''Now I'm very fit, probably the fittest I've ever been. Mentally I'm strong. I'm giving myself another three years. I mean, I'm not going to be a world number one, but during the last few months I feel I have been playing really well, and if I keep playing like that, then I'm going to start winning again.''
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Old Feb 27th, 2017, 12:59 AM Thread Starter
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Re: 1987

CODE CALL TAKES SHINE OFF TURNBULL VICTORY
Alan Clarkson
January 9, 1987
Sydney Morning Herald

Wendy Turnbull was close to tears when she was given a code of conduct warning during her straight sets win over her doubles partner and top seed Hana Mandlikova in the third round of the Family Circle NSW Open at White City yesterday.

At a critical stage in the second set, after she had broken to lead 2-1, the central umpire told Turnbull she had been reported by a linesman for making a gesture with her hand.

Turnbull objected to the charge and told the umpire she had not made any gesture.

"I didn't do anything," she retorted.

Turnbull admitted later that she had been on the verge of crying over the incident.

"I will give $1 million to anyone who can show that I made any sort of gesture with my hand," she said.

"Do they think I am crazy to do such a thing, especially on national television? I didn't do it - it's as simple as that."

After the match Turnbull spoke to Mandlikova's coach, Betty Stove, who agreed there had been no gesture from the Australian.

From the stand it was also apparent that nothing had been done to earn Turnbull the warning.

Despite being unsettled, Turnbull produced a consistent brand of tennis to topple the out-of-touch Mandlikova 6-3 7-5.

Her effort was far more impressive than her victory over Nicole Provis on Wednesday.

She served well, particularly on the big points, and hit some glorious forehands to fend off the pace of Mandlikova's shots.

Mandlikova had a chance to level the scores when she served for the set at 5-3 but lost it basically through a couple of double faults.

"I think it's always difficult to play your doubles partner because you get to know each other's game," Turnbull said after the match.

"I think I put pressure on her today and I played much better than I have been. I think I was mentally tougher when it came down to the big points.

"It was tough on Hana to play after winning in Brisbane. It was a hectic time for her."

It was the second time in as many matches that Turnbull had beaten Mandlikova, who is now ranked fourth in the world, 15 places ahead of the Australian.

The last time was in the fourth round of the US Open when the Australian won in three sets.

In Brisbane last week Turnbull was beaten in the opening round of the Queensland Open and this spurred her to get back into the rhythm of practice.

She had her family around her and she had been distracted by a number of telephone calls from friends welcoming her home.

Mandlikova's form yesterday was poor in contrast to her brilliant performance on Wednesday.

She played badly and was the first to admit it.

"I was not hitting great shots at all," she said in her usual straight-from-the-shoulder assessment of her game.

"I think I was playing very poorly today. I would not call it up and down. I would just call it bad play - that's all."

Later, Mandlikova and Turnbull joined forces in a strong display to beat Manon Bollegraf and Helen Kelesi 6-1 6-2 in the doubles.

Yesterday's other third-round singles matches went as scheduled with an interesting blend of newcomers and experienced players making their way into the quarter-finals.

Turnbull will play the serve-and-volley artist Lori McNeil, Helena Sukova meets tough opponent Zina Garrison, Bulgaria's Manuela Maleeva plays the Japanese surprise packet, Etsuko Inoue, and Catarina Lindqvist meets second seed Pam Shriver.

Shriver said yesterday she was a little "hacked off" after tournament officials requested that another singles match be slotted in before she was due to play.

Shriver was down to play in the third match but there was a minor panic when Anna Maria Fernandez had to forfeit to Sukova because of a back injury after only eight games.

It meant a sudden shortening of the program and a hasty transfer of the Maleeva-Anne Smith match from an outside court to the centre court.

"The deal was if Hana and Wendy's match went to three sets the schedule would stay as it was," Shriver said.

"But if it was over in two sets the other match would go on before ours.

"I kept watching the black clouds coming over so when I went on the court I was battling a bad mood."

Shriver realises she faces a tough match today against baseliner Lindqvist which could force her to stay back and use more ground strokes.

She says she is on target and desperately wants to win in Sydney to erase the memory of the final she lost to Turnbull in 1980 when she held six match points only to lose them - some through her own errors.

"My mind is finally mended after that. The twitch left me last year," she said with that infectious smile.

Despite a swirling wind yesterday Shriver was far too strong for Gretchen Rush and she won 6-3 6-0.

In other matches, Lindqvist beat Dinky van Rensburg 7-5 7-5, Manuela Maleeva toppled Anne Smith 7-5 6-1 and Inoue beat Victoria's Anne Minter 6-4 2-6 6-4.
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Re: 1987

Tennis: Turnbull repeats her US Open victory over eminent partner
The Times
London, England
January 9, 1987
BARRY WOOD, SYDNEY

Hana Mandlikova has described her doubles partner Wendy Turnbull as being like a good wine, growing better as she grows older. Last week in Brisbane that might have been in doubt as the 34-year-old Australian expired with hardly a whimper against Heather Ludloff.

Yesterday, Miss Turnbull bounced back by defeating Miss Mandlikova, the top seed, 6-3, 7-5 in the third round of the Family Circle New South Wales women's open tournament here. It was the second victory in succession for Miss Turnbull over the Czechoslovak, the last upset occuring in the US Open in September.

It was another of those erratic performance from Miss Mandlikova that we used to witness with depressing regularity but which have now become a rarity. Several brilliant points would be followed by a string of elementary errors. That is how it was but Miss Mandlikova did not see it the same way.

'I think I was playing very poorly and I wouldn't even call it up and down. I would just call it bad play,' she stated.

If Miss Mandlikova was distraught now that her preparations for the Australian Open have been disrupted then she hid it well. 'I am disappointed that I lost but I am not going to die because of it,' she said. 'Wendy played very well and I didn't serve very well. It was just a day that she didn't miss anything. She really mixes up her shots a lot and sometimes her serve is so soft it's difficult to do anything off it.'

Miss Mandlikova believed she had received some of the backlash of Miss Turnbull's defeat last week. 'I think that helped her mentally because she realized she had to work a little bit harder than she had been and she was probably little more eager than I was.'

Miss Turnbull admitted the defeat last week had been an incentive to do well. 'It made me more determined,' she agreed. 'I was mentally tougher when it came down to the tight points.'

There were no other upsets, although the Swedish No 1, Catarina Lindqvist, was threatened by Dinky van Rensberg before pulling through 7-5, 7-5. For the second seed, Pam Shriver, and third seed, Helena Sukova, things were much easier. Miss Shriver lost only three games against Gretchen Rush, describing the second set - in which she lost just five points - as the best she had ever played.

Miss Sukova was on court only 27 minutes before Anna Maria Fernandez retired with a back injury.

THIRD ROUND: W Turnbull (Aus) bt H Mandlikova (Cz), 6-3, 7-5; P Shriver (US) bt G Rush (US), 6-3, 6-1; C Lindqvist (Swe) bt D Van Rensberg (SA) 7-5, 7-5; E Inoue (Jap) bt A Minter (Aus), 6-4, 2-6, 6-4; H Sukova (Cz) bt A M Fernandez (US), 5-2 (ret); H Maleeva (Bul) bt A Smith (US), 7-5, 6-1.
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Re: 1987

Headline unavailable
January 8, 1987
United Press International

SYDNEY, Australia -- Wendy Turnbull Thursday brushed aside top-seed Hana Mandlikova in straight sets in the third round of the $150,000 New South Wales Open Tennis Championships at White City.

Turnbull, 34, of Australia, crushed the 24-year-old Czechoslovakian 6-3, 7-5 in an 80-minute match.

After the match, Mandlikova did not seem to be ruffled by her loss.

''I am disappointed to lose the match, but I am not going to die,'' she said. ''It was a day when she didn't miss anything.''

Mandlikova's thoughts quickly turned to her major mission in Australia -- challenging Martina Navratilova next week's for the Australian Open singles title.

''I will now be fit for the Open. I have played a lot of matches in the last couple of weeks and I was a little tired,'' she said.

Turnbull, the tournament's 10th seed, will meet Californian Lori McNeil, seeded 7th, in the quarterfinals Friday.

Turnbull kept Mandlikova pinned to the baseline with deep service returns and forced the Czechoslovakian into hurrying her shots as the chunky Turnbull moved in behind her service for the volley.

Pam Shriver of Lutherville, Md., posted a no-nonsense 6-3, 6-0 win over Gretchen Rush of Mt. Lebanon, Pa., on center court. Shriver was a finalist in the Sydney event in 1980 but has failed to reach the quarterfinal in three subsequent attempts.

Earlier, Anna Maria Fernandez of Torrance, Calif., was forced to default her match against Helena Sukova of Czechoslovakia because of a back injury sustained in the opening point of their match.

Sukova was leading 5-0 in the first set when Fernandez told the umpire she could not continue.

Sweden's Karina Lindqvist scored a straight-set victory over South African Dinky van Rensburg, and Manuela Maleeva of Bulgaria made short work of Anne Smith of San Antonio, Texas, winning 7-5, 6-1.

Japan's No. 1 player, Etsuko Enoue, scored a hard fought 6-4, 2-6, 6-4 triumph over Australian Anne Minter to claim a quarterfinal spot.
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Re: 1987

Tennis: McEnroe withdraws
The Times
London, England
January 9, 1987
BARRY WOOD, SYDNEY

John McEnroe, who has never felt at ease on his visits to Australia, has pulled out of the Ford Australian Open, beginning in Melbourne next week (Barry Wood writes).

The former world No 1, who is still in the process of re-establishing himself among the top ranks after the lengthy hiatus from the tennis circuit during 1986, has aggravated a recurring back injury while practising on grass in Palm Springs and has been advised by his doctor not to play.

McEnroe's absence adds to his first round dismissal at last year's US Open and ensures the spotlight remains firmly on Ivan Lendl and Boris Becker. The West German has failed to live up to expectations so far on the grass courts of Australia but his chances of claiming at least one title has been enhanced by his decision to play mixed doubles with Martina Navratilova.

'It was originally my friend, Judy Nelson's, idea and we started discussing it at the US Open,' Miss Navratilova revealed. 'We've talked about it on and off several times since and now I am really looking forward to it. It should be fun.'
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Re: 1987

Tennis: Navratilova parts with her coach
The Times
London, England
January 10, 1987
REX BELLAMY, Tennis Correspondent, SYDNEY

Martina Navratilova and Mike Estep, her coach and practice partner since June 1983, have ended their professional association. Both stress that they are parting on friendly terms which they intend to maintain. For some time, Estep has wanted to move on to another job but he gave Miss Navratilova until the end of 1986 to find a replacement.

During the Australian championships, which will begin on Monday in Melbourne, her practice partner will be Randy Crawford. Like Estep and Miss Navratilova, Crawford is based in Dallas.

A player of Miss Navratilova's class and experience does not really need a coach; but she does need a male practice partner who can keep her physically and competitively sharp, advise her about strategy, ensure that any technical deficiencies are spotted and corrected, and provide consistent reassurance.

Estep has filled those roles so effectively that during their association, Miss Navratilova won 25 titles (10 singles, 12 women's doubles and three mixed doubles) in the grand slam championships of France, Wimbledon, the United States and Australia. Miss Navratilova's total tally, from 1974 to 1986, has been 42: 15 singles, 23 women's doubles and four mixed doubles.

She might have done it without Estep, but, on the other hand, she might not.

In addition to Estep's desire to change course, there could be another reason for the break. These coach-player relationships tend to become repetitive. Any coach has only so much to give as a sparring partner, adviser and motivator.

It is an awesome thought that Miss Navratilova might even benefit from the switch.
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Re: 1987

Navratilova, Estep split
Houston Chronicle
January 9, 1987
Houston Chronicle News Services

NEW YORK - Martina Navratilova and her coach, Mike Estep, have agreed "to part ways amicably in order to pursue other interests," the tennis star said yesterday.

The decision is effective immediately, Navratilova said by telephone before leaving for Australia, where she will defend her Australian Open singles and women's doubles titles.

"Mike and I remain on very friendly terms," the world's top-ranked player said. "We both enjoyed great success in the past several years and will maintain a solid, professional relationship."

Estep, who like Navratilova lives in Fort Worth, Texas, began coaching Navratilova in June 1983 after she was upset in the fourth round by Kathleen Horvath. Before that, he competed on the men's tour, his only tournament title coming in 1973.

Since Estep began coaching her, Navratilova has won 10 Grand Slam singles titles, including six in a row at one stretch, four mixed doubles titles and 12 women's doubles crowns at the French, U.S. and Australian Opens and Wimbledon.

A native of Dallas, Estep was a four-time All-American at Rice University.

Navratilova reportedly has hired former Wimbledon champion Virginia Wade and Randy Crawford, a club player, as hitting partners.

Becker downs McNamee

ADELAIDE, Australia - Two-time Wimbledon champion Boris Becker of West Germany beat Australia's Paul McNamee 6-3, 6-3 in the round-robin Rio International exhibition.

In the other match, Australia's Pat Cash defeated Sweden's Anders Jarryd 5-7, 6-3, 6-3.

Mecir in quarterfinals

AUCKLAND, New Zealand - Top-seeded Miloslav Mecir of Czechoslovakia reached the quarterfinals of the New Zealand Open championships with a 6-3, 6-3 victory over Canada's Glenn Michibata.
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Re: 1987

Headline unavailable
January 9, 1987
United Press International
*
SYDNEY, Australia -- Tennis champion Martina Navratilova has split with her touring coach, Mike Estep, it was announced Friday.

The pair have been together since the 1983 French Open but have decided to part amicably after an era that has netted Navratilova 25 grand slam titles.

Navratilova is scheduled to arrive in Australia Saturday for the Ford-Australian Open with her new 'practice partner' Randy Crawford, who is the teaching professional at the Ridglay Country Club in Forth Worth, Texas.

Crawford, 29, has been on a friendly basis with the champion for some time. In recent months he has worked with touring pro Gigi Fernandez.
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Re: 1987

TURNBULL DISPLAYS A NEW LEASE OF LIFE
ALAN CLARKSON
January 10, 1987
Sydney Morning Herald

The faltering tennis career of Wendy Turnbull took on a new lease of life yesterday when she won a place in the major semi-finals of the Family Circle NSW Women's Open championship for the first time in 17 months.

Although not showing the domineering tactics she displayed in beating top-seeded Hana Mandlikova on Thursday, Turnbull hit some great forehands yesterday to beat Lori McNeil 6-4 7-5.

The win, which gave her a place in the semi-finals of the $223,000 tournament at White City, was the first time since the Eastbourne tournament in 1985 that Turnbull - Australia's top-ranked woman player - had earned a semi-final billing.

Her superior experience surfaced after she held two service breaks in the second set to lead 4-1 only to be confronted by a tougher than expected battle when the scores became deadlocked at 4-4.

"I relaxed a bit because I was going along quite comfortably," she said after the match.

"I made a few more unforced errors and I let her into the game. My experience enabled me to regroup and get that edge back."

Turnbull admitted that she was not as consistent as she used to be and had made more errors on her returns.

"The one thing I have is a bit of a mental edge over some of the players," she said.

"They know I don't give up when I go out there and it is a psychological advantage. That's experience."

Turnbull faces an even tougher opponent today against the in-form Zina Garrison who blasted Helena Sukova off the court yesterday to win 6-3 6-1.

Garrison's form was immaculate. She hit some great passing shots and was quick around the court to give Sukova no chance of getting into the match.

"I thought I was pretty cool," Garrison said. "I feel I am maturing, although last year I did not play as well as I did in 1985. I am trying to put everything together from '85 and '86."

Garrison believes she is at last gaining the experience she should have had earlier in her career when she exploded on to the circuit with a couple of spectacular performances.

"I really did not have a lot of experience but now I think I'm a little bit older and a little bit wiser," she said.

Garrison and Turnbull had a good look at each other's game in an absorbing doubles match later in the day.

It was a considerable boost for Garrison and McNeil to beat Turnbull and Mandlikova 6-2 6-4.

But despite Turnbull's impressive display, the player to beat is obviously Pam Shriver, who outpowered Catarina Lindqvist 6-4 6-2.

Shriver served magnificently against the young Swede who eliminated her from last year's Australian Open.

When Shriver's service works well the rest of her game slots into place and there are not too many players in the world who can match her.

Lindqvist hit some great passing shots to help her break back in the first set when Shriver was serving for the set 5-2.

She held her own service but Shriver pounded down two first-court aces that swung wide to take the set and set up her path to the semi-final.

Shriver is confident about her tennis without being cocky and she has a lot of respect for her opponents.

"I don't take anyone or anything for granted," she said.

"I knew I had to serve well, especially after last year's Australian Open when I had set up and led 3-1 only to lose the match."

Shriver is playing well in the tournament because she is fresh after declining to nominate for the doubles.

She intends restricting the number of doubles tournaments this year because, as she put it, "I have only so many serves left in my right arm."

Asked if she intended to play the mixed doubles in the Australian Open, she replied: "Not unless some real cutey asks me".

Cutting through Shriver's natural infectious humour, she is playing consistently better than at any time in her career.

She jokes a lot about when she had the series of match points against Turnbull in the final of the 1980 NSW Open and lost.

"I feel I am owed one," she retorted.

Her first hurdle will be Manuela Maleeva, the gritty young Bulgarian who fought her way into the semi-finals with a 4-6 6-2 6-2 win over Japan's Etsuko Inoue.

Shriver has beaten Maleeva in their four meetings but she is well aware of the Bulgarian's use of the drop shot and her deadly accurate lob.

In continuing their doubles upset, the young Australian pairing of Jenny Byrne and Janine Thompson scored an outstanding 7-5 7-5 win over top seeds Claudie Kohde-Kilsch and Helena Sukova.

Sukova, who played in the singles and doubles with a pressure bandage on her left leg, was out of touch in the singles and the "disease" spread to Kohde-Kilsch in the doubles.
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Re: 1987

Tennis: Shriver's majesty is rewarded with semi-final placing
The Times
London, England
January 10, 1987
REX BELLAMY, Tennis Correspondent, SYDNEY

Pam Shriver, whose purple skirt reflects the recent majesty of her tennis, is the only player who was seeded to reach the singles semi-finals of the New South Wales championships, sponsored by Family Circle, and has actually done so. Today's pairings will be Wendy Turnbull v Zina Garrison and Manuela Maleeva v Miss Shriver.

Miss Turnbull, aged 34, has beaten two more highly-ranked players, Hana Mandlikova and Lori McNeil, and has reminded us that since her first tour (in 1972) she has contested 23 singles or doubles finals in grand slam tournaments. She is heavier than she used to be and confesses that she no longer moves as well and is less consistent. 'But experience may have given me a little mental edge over most players,' she said yesterday after a 6-4, 7-5 win over Miss McNeil.

Miss Garrison, like Miss McNeil, is a black product of public parks coaching in Houston. In 1985 she reached the semi-finals at Wimbledon and yesterday she played increasingly well to win 6-3, 6-1 against Helena Sukova who had won their four previous matches. 'I'm getting older and wiser,' Miss Garrison said. 'Today I was pretty cool and tried to pick my shots. She came in a lot on her second serve. The ball was just sitting there and I could hit it where I wanted.'

Miss Maleeva, like Miss Sukova, is short of match play but had a 4-6, 6-2, 6-2 win over Enstsuko Inoue of Japan, a neatly competent but lightweight grass court player who had previously put Claudia Kohde-Kilsch out of the running. Miss Shriver, who freely admits that she has hit the most consistently good form of her career, beat Catarina Lindqvist 6-4, 6-2, thus avenging a defeat in the last Australian championships.

The doubles teams seeded to reach the final were both beaten. Jenny Byrne and Janine Thompson had a 7-5, 7-5 win over Miss Kohde-Kilsch and Miss Sukova and Miss Garrison and Miss McNeil beat Miss Mandlikova and Miss Turnbull 6-2, 6-4. Throughout a glorious summer day there were hints that a few celebrities cared less about success in Sydney than they did about their preparation for the forthcoming Australian championships.

This, after all, is the Eastbourne of the Australian season: a charming, comparatively relaxed event in which the women adjust their thinking and their tennis to the imminent challenge of a grand slam tournament on grass. Come to that, the ambiance of the White City is much like that of Eastbourne but without the evergreen oaks and the shrieking gulls - visually more pleasing than the double-decker trains that trundle alongside the White City.

What a startling tonic it has been to exchange wintry West Sussex for summer in Sydney. Yesterday there was relentlessly bright, smouldering heat. The umpires were sheltered by flowery, fringed parasols. The players' shadowed silhouettes, stunted at midday, gradually lengthened. And there is a restfully pervasive greenness about the White City. Even the roofs of the stands are green, the seats aquamarine.

Sydney is a good place to be, anyway. There are lots of Australians in it and the place has as much room for the eccentric as the aesthete. Two long-familiar chums, Sue Barker and John Alexander, are doing television commentaries. And what a joyous accident it is that your cricket and tennis correspondents, who had not met since 1979, are again sharing a table - which would have been far more likely at some pub in Longparish or Midhurst. Some sort of cricket match begins here today but Australians seem reluctant to talk about it.

RESULTS: Quarter-finals: M Maleeva (Bul) bt E Inque (Japan) 4-6, 6-2, 6-2; Z Garrison (US) bt H Sukova (Cz) 6-3, 6-1; W Turnbull (Aus) bt L McNeil (US) 6-4, 7-5; P Shriver (US) bt C Lindqvist (Swe) 6-4, 6-2.
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