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Re: 1987

MANDLIKOVA BREEZES INTO TOURNEY SEMIS
San Jose Mercury News
January 3, 1987
Mercury News Wire Services

Top-seeded Hana Mandlikova scored a 6-3, 6-3 victory over teen-ager Helen Kelesi on Friday to move comfortably into the semifinals of a $100,000 women's tennis tournament in Brisbane, Australia.

Mandlikova is ranked fourth in the world.

She earned a meeting with third-seeded Helena Sukova, a 7-5, 6-3 victor over Ros Fairbank.

Fairbank squandered a set point before losing the first set and was swamped in the second.

The other semifinal will feature Pam Shriver and Betsy Nagelsen.

Second-seeded Shriver breezed past Eva Pfaff 6-3, 6-4 in her quarterfinal, while Nagelsen stopped Elizabeth Smylie 3-6, 6-2, 6-3.

The semifinals are today, and the championship is Sunday.

TENNIS: Nduka Odizor upset top-seeded Ramesh Krishnan in the quarterfinals of the $97,000 South Australian Open in Adelaide, Australia. The eighth-seeded Odizor crushed Krishnan in straight sets, 6-3, 6-2. Odizor will play Bill Scanlon in the semifinals today. Scanlon overcame Glenn Michibata 7-6 (7-5), 7-5 in a rain-plagued quarterfinal.
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Re: 1987

Mandlikova beats fellow Czech She will now meet Pam Shriver in final of Australian tourney
The Toronto Star
January 4, 1987
Associated Press

Top-seeded Hana Mandlikova of Czechoslovakia defeated countrywoman Helena Sukova in three sets yesterday to advance to today's final of the $100,000 Jason Classic women's tennis tournament at Brisbane, Australia.

Mandlikova, who downed third-seeded Sukova, 4-6, 6-1, 6-4, will play second-seeded Pam Shriver of the United States.

Shriver trounced fellow American Betsy Nagelsen, 6-1, 6-3, in the other semifinal.

Mandlikova said beating Sukova in the semis had boosted her confidence for facing Shriver.

"Shriver is a real server and volleyer and I had not played much of that style of tennis during the tournament before facing Helena," said Mandlikova, 24, the No. 4 player in the world.

Shriver has lost seven of her nine meetings with Mandlikova over the past six years.

"I had a complex about her, but not any more," Shriver said. "This will be the first time we have met on grass and whoever serves the best will win the match."

Shriver served superbly against Nagelsen, hitting a succession of forehand winners.

"That's the best Pam has ever played against me," said Nagelsen, who hurt her own cause with six double faults.

The tournament is the first Virginia Slims series event of the year and the opening grass court warmup event for the Australian Open, which begins on Jan. 12 at Kooyong.

Scanlon, Masur in final

American Bill Scanlon and Australian Davis Cup player Wally Masur meet today in the final of the South Australian Open after solid semifinal victories yesterday.

Scanlon dropped the first set 6-7 (7-3) to Nigerian Nduka Odizor, then moved into the next round over his 28-year-old opponent, 6-4, 6-4.

Masur then beat Michiel Schapers of the Netherlands, 6-4, 6-0, to set up the final in this warm-up for the Australian Open.

Becker wins exhibition

Boris Becker, the 19-year-old two-time Wimbledon champion, defeated Henri Leconte of France, 6-7 (2-7), 6-4, 6-3, in an exhibition match yesterday in West Berlin.

Leconte blasted an ace past Becker to take the first set, but the West German rallied before 7,000 spectators to clinch the next two and win the duel in just over two hours.
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Re: 1987

'TRUE BLUE' HANA FIGHTS BACK
January 5, 1987
Sydney Morning Herald

BRISBANE: Hana Mandlikova warmed up for the Australian Open with a convincing three-set win over American Pam Shriver in the Jason Women's Tennis Classic final at the Milton courts yesterday.

In a match delayed by rain the Czech player, who has applied for Australian citizenship, won 6-2 2-6 6-4.

"I'd like to celebrate my Australian passport with a win in the Open in Melbourne," said Mandlikova, who has not won a major tournament in 18 months.

Living up to their high status in world rankings, the players ignored the slippery centre court surface and unleashed a whirlwind display of breathtaking singles that had the crowd in an uproar throughout.

It began as a damp, depressing day and 30 minutes before the scheduled start play looked impossible.

But because of the drip-dry qualities of the centre court and a sudden break in the weather the final began only 90 minutes late.

Mandlikova, using topspin, broke service twice and won the first set in 26 minutes.

But the magic and style that graced that set was quickly wiped out by the long-legged Shriver who showed her own brand of gutsy skill to level at one set all.

The girl from Baltimore showed that to cope with an onslaught such as that unleashed by Mandlikova required considerable strength and confidence.

Shriver charged to the net and swamped Mandlikova with an avalanche of volleys.

"I should have climbed in right there but I played back on my heels," Shriver said later, referring to the first set.

But Mandlikova, never seriously contemplating defeat, fought back by breaking Shriver's serve in the fifth game of the deciding set.

Even then the match wasn't over because Shriver climbed straight back out of the difficult situation to break service and level at three games all.

But the super-slim Mandlikova used her powerful backhand to perfection and took the set after being held to deuce.

"I feel I'm an Aussie already," an elated Mandlikova said at the post-match media conference.

"Pam is very popular here but I thought the crowd was on my side - certainly on Saturday 100 per cent.

"I hope to be taken as an Aussie. I love the country and I want people to accept me."

Mandlikova recently married a former Czech who now runs a restaurant in Sydney.

The weather took its toll in the doubles final in which Mandlikova and Wendy Turnbull played Liz Smylie and American Betsy Nagelsen.

A halt was called at 3-3 in the first set. The match will be completed in Sydney during the week in which the players assemble for the NSW Open.
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Re: 1987

Tennis: Time will tell if delight can last
The Times
London, England
January 5, 1987
SIMON BARNES

I have seen the future, and it is going to be agony. The agony will be shot through with moments of delight, moments that will make the agonies yet more piercing. Yes, the great British tradition of tenterhook tennis seems to come, we shall still be saying, as we do every year: 'Surely she can't lose now?' Oh, can't she? Don't ever underestimate a British tennis player when it comes to losing.

On Saturday, I watched the girls' final of the Prudential junior covered court championships at Queen's Club. Prudence was not, I think, the outstanding characteristic of either Sarah Loosemore or Sally Timms. Miss Loosemore faltered when 3-1 down in the first set by completing her service game with a double fault. Miss Timms scented blood. What does a British player do when she scents blood? She comes over faint, that's what. Miss Timms lost her own service game with a double fault on the last point.

What British girls like to adversity. In adversity, Miss Loosemore started to play cracking tennis, and she won the first set 6-3. In the second set, she scented blood. Guess what happened? Miss Timms won the second set 6-2. Miss Timms scented blood, and Miss Loosemore had to play in adversity. Guess what? Miss Loosemore won the final set 6-0. 'I wasn't nervous today,' she said afterwards. I'm glad about that. I would hate to watch her when she was nervous.

There was no sign of the Florida face of stone, nor the Czechoslovakian face of she who admits nothing. Inscrutability was out. The match was full of squeeking and terrible stamps, and when things got worse, the girls cried things like 'Nyunnngh!', They rolled their eyes, sighed like furnaces, shrugged their shoulders up past their ears, gave themselves the most terrible tellings-off in a ferocious mutter and when they missed their shots every line of their bodies seemed to say, 'Now look what God made me do!'

As a pure exhibition of tenterhook tennis, it was quite perfect. And actually, Miss Loosemore is a tremendous tennis player. The tournament was for girls aged 18 and under. Miss Loosemore won it at 15, making it her third national title. She has terrific potential and what is more, she is a delight to watch. She is charming and graceful, and she likes to go for her shots: she is no base-lining metronome.

'Well, I've been up and down all week,' she said afterwards. What British player is not? Her next career move is her mock O levels, and then the real thing in the summer. After that, she doesn't know. She plays tennis in the lunch hour at school. Once a week her mother drives her four hours there and back for an hour's coaching.

So is her attacking game a product of coaching? 'Oh no, I've always liked to go forwards. It's just that before, I always missed.' But on Saturday, she mostly hit. When her game is hot, it is a real treat. Her opponent is two years older but had no answer to those hot streaks. But hot streaks come and hot streaks go. Like all British tennis players, in every singles match she plays Miss Loosemore has to defeat two opponents: one on each side of the net.

It is, mercifully, too early for Miss Loosemore to have a nation's annual hopes. All we can say so far is that she is a quite tremendous prospect. And when you are 15, nobody knows how you will ne at 25. She might develop the mental strength of an elephant and the killer instinct of a tigress. Who can say? On Saturday she gave us all great pleasures and great British agonies. At 15, anybody might achieve anything. Even consistency.

RESULTS: Boys: Final: D Sapsford (Surrey) bt M Petchey (Essex), 7-6, 6-4. Doubles: J HUnter (Surrey) and Petchey bt D Kirk (S Lincolnshire) and N Pashley (Surrey), 6-4, 6-1. Girls: Final: S Loodsemore (S Wales) bt S Timms (Essex), 6-3, 2-6, 6-0. Doubles: C Bateman (Essex) and A Simpkin (Leics) bt A Niepel (Lancs) and N Tooper (Yorks), 6-1, 6-2.
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Re: 1987

Tennis: Durie still dances to same tune
The Times
London, England
January 6, 1987
From BARRY WOOD, SYDNEY

Jo Durie and Sara Gomer both struggled to advance to the second round of the Family Circle NSW women's open in Sydney in the final preparation tournament for the Australian Open. Durie won 6-3, 3-6, 6-4 over Michelle Jaggard, the Australian junior, and Gomer beat Amanda Dingwall, also of Australia, 6-4, 3-6, 7-5.

Durie should have swept her young opponent aside, but instead looked ill at ease throughout the encounter and can consider herself fortunate to still be in the competition as the inexperience of Jaggard allowed Durie to recover time and time again from countless unforced errors. The British girl was tense and produced hardly a single impressive shot throughout the match.

'I am very relieved to get through because she's a tough player. She hit a few good passing shots and hit her forehand very well,' Miss Durie said. She confessed that she lacked confidence, a problem that has stalked her throughout her career.

'I was a little uncertain of myself and it didn't feel that happy out there, so I just told myself to hang in and scrape through. I think it's just a matter of not having enough self-confidence to go out there and knock-off first match, like I really should do.

'I don't know why I don't have confidence after all these years. If I knew, I would be ranked No. 1 in the world. I'm still searching for it, and all I can do is try my hardest. '

To improve her world ranking, Miss Durie has made profitable use of her recent seven-week break from the circuit, incorporating the help of Jane Fonda in her search for greater fitness.

'I've played the Fonda workout record while I was at home,' she said. 'I've struggled with it and it hasn't been very elegant, but I've been making myself do it and think it has paid off. Hopefully I will be able to keep it going when I have the odd weeks at home. '

Her new routine also includes running, working with weights and regular visits to her physiotherapist, in a self-styled fitness programme. 'I devised my own because I feel I know what I need to work on,' she said. 'It was a bit of an experimentation at first, but after a week I basically knew what I was going to have to do'.

RESULTS: First round: E Burgin (US) bt S Hanika (WG), 6-3, 6-3; 6-2; A Henricksson (US) bt C Porwick (WG), 6-4, 5-7, 6-1; A-M Fernandez (US) bt A Betzner (WG), 7-5, 6-4; C Lindqvist (Swe) bt E Krapl (Switz), 6-1, 7-6; D Balestrat (Aus) bt G Fernandez (P Rico), 6-1, 7-6, G Rush (US) bt M Werdel (US), 6-0, 6-4.
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Re: 1987

VETERAN FINDS HER OLD SKILLS TO GIVE YOUNGSTER A LESSON
Alan Clarkson
January 6, 1987
Sydney Morning Herald

"There is still some life in the old girl yet," Sharon Walsh-Pete said with a grin as she walked off an outside White City court yesterday after beating one of Australia's better younger players.

Walsh-Pete outskilled Janine Thompson, 19, in a straight sets 6-4 7-5 victory in the first round of the $230,000 Family Circle NSW Open.

Walsh-Pete, who will turn 35 next month, had to battle her way into the tournament through the qualifying rounds.

She has played only five singles tournaments since competing in the Ford Australian Open 13 months ago mainly because of a series of injuries.

"I always told myself that if I had to play qualifying rounds I would give it away," she said after the match.

"I don't really know why I changed my mind.

"I think it came down to the fact that I wanted to play one more year. My future is still in tennis, but in which direction I am not sure just yet."

Walsh-Pete gave her rival a real lesson with Thompson hitting the ball as if she was trying to win every point with a single shot.

She hit some good shots but found it difficult to string them together and eventually bowed to Walsh-Pete's greater consistency, clever returning and more accurate volleying.

Former titleholder Dianne Balestrat, who was persuaded to play in the event only at the last minute, also scored an impressive 6-1 7-6 (7-2) win over Gigi Fernandez.

Balestrat originally intended overlooking the NSW Open to concentrate on training for the Ford Australian Open, which starts at Kooyong next Monday.

It was only after her disappointing display in Brisbane last week that she accepted a wild card entry to the NSW event.

Balestrat still trains harder than most other women on the circuit, working out in the gym with weights, repetition work and lots of sprinting.

At present she is ranked 25th in the world but has an aim to make it into the top 15 before the end of the year.

The way she handled the swirling conditions on centre court yesterday Balestrat is on course to fulfil her ambition.

Nicole Provis had one of the most important wins of her career with a 6-2 3-6 6-0 win over the current Australian junior champion, Jenny Byrne.

Provis, another of the army of young women with a double-handed backhand, was far too consistent for the erratic Byrne.

Provis looked to have control of the match in the second set but she began missing returns and allowed Byrne to lift her game. Byrne subsequently won the set but again she found her opponent's revitalised form in the third set too much to handle.

Another young Australian, Michelle Jaggard, could easily have scored an upset had she been able to hold service.

But in an incredible final set against former titleholder Jo Durie only one service was held in 10 games.

Jaggard, 19, played some superb tennis but could not capitalise on her chances and she lost 6-3 3-6 6-4 to Durie, who hit some great shots on critical points.

Durie, ranked 12th for the NSW title, was playing her first tournament yesterday after a seven-week lay-off. Although Britain's No 1 player she can thank her greater experience for her first-round win.

From the start she had to battle against Jaggard's aggressive play.
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Re: 1987

Headline unavailable
UPI NewsTrack
January 6, 1987

Etsuko Inoue of Japan upset fourth-seed Claudia Kohde-Kilsch 6-4, 6-2 Tuesday in the second round of the $150,000 New South Wales Women's Open tennis tournament.

It was the first time the diminutive Inoue, ranked 80th in the world, beat the lanky West German in four meetings. Inoue earned her victory with a low-mistake performance from the back of the court.

Second-seed Pam Shriver of Lutherville, Md., blitzed Britain's Sara Gomer 6-1, 6-2 to steam into the third round.

Shriver was down break point only once in the match, and her powerful serve-volley game was well into the groove as she prepares for next week's Australian Open at Melbourne.

Anne Smith of San Antonio, Texas, eliminated 13th-seed Carling Bassett of Canada in straight sets, 6-4, 6-4, in the first round, while Australian Diane Balestrat was forced to default her second-round match against Elise Burgin of Baltimore because of dehydration and a virus that required hospitalization.

Zina Garrison of Houston was untroubled as she slipped past Molly Van Nostrand of Brightwaters, N.Y., 6-3, 6-2, while Australia's Federation Cup captain Wendy Turnbull dispatched Terry Holladay of Del Mar, Calif., 6-1, 6-1.

Fifth-seeded Manuela Maleeva of Bulgaria and No. 7 seed Lori McNeil of the U.S. also made the final 16.

Maleeva belied her lack of grass-court experience in crushing Julie Richardson of New Zealand 6-1, 6-3. McNeil, a resident of Houston as is Garrison, had to struggle for her 6-3, 4-6, 7-6 triumph over West German Eva Pfaff.

Third-seed Helena Sukova of Czechoslovakia had plenty in reserve in her second-round match against Ann Henriksson of Mahtomedi, Minn., winning 6-1, 6-2, and Swede Caterina Lindqvist downed Sharon Walsh-Pete of Novato, Calif., with an identical scoreline.

The tournament was rocked by the close, but tantrum-marred, first-round match between Britain's Anne Hobbs and Helen Kelesi of Canada. Kelesi lashed out at the umpires, suggesting they ''shape up or ship out,'' after she fell 7-6 (7-4), 6-7 (4-7), 6-4 in a three-hour contest that included racquet-throwing, scowling and swearing by both players.

Kelesi was upset by a number of umpiring decisions late in the match and a series of line calls that went against her.

''It was ridiculous out there,'' she said after storming off the court. ''This was the worst linejudging I have ever come across and if I ever get that umpire again I'll default.''

Both players received official warnings from umpire Peter Deacon, and tournament officials were meeting overnight to determine whether disciplinary action should be taken against either player.
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Re: 1987

Why is it that the quality of the officiating seems to get worse when the hotheads play?

OPEN PAIR REPORTED FOR SWEARING
Alan Clarkson
January 7, 1987
Sydney Morning Herald

Two players in the $230,000 Family Circle NSW Women's Open at White City yesterday were reported for swearing during a fiery match.

The players, England's Ann Hobbs and Canada's Helen Kelesi, exploded after some very doubtful decisions during their three-set second-round match.

Tournament referee Bill Gilmour was at the end of the court when Hobbs yelled out to a group of English supporters in the stand.

She was serving for the match when two serves which appeared to be clean aces were both called faults.

"That's two f---ing aces I have served that have been disallowed," she yelled.

Gilmour went on to the court at the end of the game. He told the umpire, Peter Duncan, what had happened and Hobbs was issued with a code violation.

At the end of the game, which she lost, Hobbs yelled at the supporters again.

In the tense finish, Kelesi lost the match on another doubtful call.

With the crowd yelling, the umpire did not hear the call of "out". He asked the linesman to repeat the call. The linesman said the ball was "out", which gave Hobbs the match 7-6 6-7 6-4.

It was a very doubtful call and Hobbs probably reasoned that it made up for the two services that were called faults in the previous game.

With tears streaming down her face, the Canadian girl stormed off the court without shaking hands.

Hobbs went over and shook hands with Kelesi, who was sitting and fuming.

Kelesi said later she would consider forfeiting if she was ever drawn in a match umpired by Duncan.

As Kelesi walked off the court she yelled at Duncan: "You are f---ing incompetent."

That was also reported.

In the second set Duncan was advised that Kelesi could be receiving some outside coaching.

Duncan soon after warned Kelesi about receiving coaching from a male spectator.

The incidents are now in the hands of Pam Whytcross, the new tour director who has a tough situation in this, her first major tournament since her appointment.

Both players were highly critical of the standard of umpiring and line calling and it seemed that there was some justification for their complaints.

It was a day of high drama.

The major upset of the day was the 6-4 6-2 defeat of the fourth-seeded Claudia Kohde-Kilsch by the improved Japanese player Etsuko Inoue.

Inoue, who is ranked 80th in the world and is on her fifth trip to Australia, had to finish off an uncompleted match before going into her second-round clash against the tall West German.

With the scores locked at one set all when bad light stopped play on Monday night against Ann de Vries, Inoue had to battle to take out the deciding third set 7-5 to win the match 7-6 4-6 7-5.

The gritty Japanese player was far too consistent yesterday for Kohde-Kilsch, who was very tentative and at no stage seemed likely to produce the quality of tennis to win.

It was the first time in four matches that Inoue had beaten Kohde-Kilsch, the highest ranked player she has beaten.

For Elizabeth Smylie it was a disappointing day when she was eliminated in three gruelling sets by the tall South African Elna Reinach, 6-2 3-6 6-3.

The two players had a tough match in Brisbane last week but on that occasion Smylie won 6-4 in the third set.

She thought she had a better chance if she stayed back and rallied with the South African, but it did not work.

Reinach, who hits a double-handed backhand with unerring accuracy, relished the opportunity to play the match from the back court and generally outrallied the Australian girl.

Smylie trailed 2-0 in the second set but fought back and took the set. Her failure to get her returns back at critical stages in the third set was a match decider.

Pam Shriver, second seed for the tournament, looked in excellent touch when she crushed Sara Gomer 6-1 6-2 to go into the third round.

Shriver is enjoying her tennis, and while there is the usual intensity in her play she is not as demanding of herself off the court.

She has other diversions from her sport. She is involved in projects in her home city of Baltimore, she is promoting her book and her holiday home has just been completed.

Over the Thanksgiving weekend Shriver organised a tennis weekend which raised about $180,000 for one of her favourite charities.

"In my weeks off I don't feel I have to practise three hours a day," she said.

"If I have 10 days off I won't hit for five days and I know if I stay in shape by riding a bike or doing my weight work then it takes only three or four days to get my eye in.

"I find that I don't get sick of it as much. That's what Martina (Navratilova) does.

"She will go ski-ing for two weeks then about five days before the event she will start to hit again.

"You get a little smarter as you get older, fortunately."

Wendy Turnbull had a strong 6-1 6-1 win over Terry Holladay and was pleased with the result of some hard work she has done since the disappointment of being beaten early in the Brisbane tournament.

Twelfth-seeded Jo Durie, a former titleholder, double faulted on match point to lose to Camille Benjamin 7-5 6-4, while another seed, Dianne Balestrat, was forced to withdraw from the singles and doubles.

Balestrat was taken to hospital yesterday with a viral infection but she was released and expects to play in the Ford Australian Open starting at Kooyong next Monday.
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Re: 1987

Tennis: Tantrums delays Hobbs win
The Times
London, England
January 7, 1987
From BARRY WOOD, SYDNEY

Anne Hobbs reached the second round of the Family Circle New South Wales women's open tournament here yesterday but in controversial circumstances. Her 7-6, 6-7, 6-4 win over Helen Kelesi, aged 17, from Canada, was marred by a number of disputed line calls which first conspired to delay the British player's victory and then gave her the match.

In a dramatic struggle lasting nearly three hours, and with little to choose between the two contestants, Miss Hobbs found herself leading 5-3, 30-30 in the final set. She then hit what appeared to be two aces, but each time they were called out by the linesman and upheld by chair umpire, Peter Duncan. The tables were turned however, at 5-4, when a forehand from Miss Kelesi was called long and gave Miss Hobbs the match.

Miss Kelesi was stunned and argued long and hard with Mr Duncan to no avail. All she received was a warning for swearing. The crisis point for Miss Hobbs came as the second set slipped away. 'I started to get on top in the second set, but then she began to hit the ball harder and deeper and pushing me back,' the Briton said. 'I was a little tentative and my serve let me down, and I was a bit concerned going into the third set.

'Fortunately at two love, I totally relaxed and went back to serving the way I had in the first set. I'd been tossing the ball too far forward which is a mistake I tend to make. Once my serve came back I was quite confortable.'

The difference between victory and defeat were reflected in each player's opinion of the officiating. 'I feel for the umpire because he must get tired and lose his concentration' Miss Hobbs said. 'He was out there for three hours and he made three unfortunate errors right at the end of the match. '

But Miss Kelesi was scathing in her criticism. 'This match was at the worst line judging I have ever come across,' she said. 'It so frustrating it makes you not want to hit the lines because they might call it out. If I ever get that umpire again I'm going to default. '

Two other British players, Jo Durie and Sara Gomer, failed to progress, with Miss Durie putting on another disappointing performance, against Camille Benjamin, of the United States, and Miss Gomer making little impression against another American, Pam Shriver.

RESULTS: First Round: E Reinach (SA), bt E Smylie (Aus), 6-2, 3-6, 6-3; W Turnbull (Aus), bt T Holladay (US), 6-1. 6-1, A Smith (US), bt C Bassett (Can), 6-4, 6-4; A Hobbs (GB), bt H Kelesi (Can), 7-6, 6-7, 6-4; E Inoue (Japan), bt A de Vries (Bel), 7-6, 4-6, 7-5; D van Rensburg (SA), bt B Nagelsen (US), 7-6, 6-2. Second round: Z Garrison (US), bt M Van Nostrand (US), 6-3, 6-2; P Shriver (US); bt S Gomer (GB), 6-1, 6-2; H Sukova (Cz), bt A Henricksson (US), 6-1, 6-2; E Burgin (U S), bt D Balestrat (Aus), (walkover); Inoue, bt C Kohde-Kilsch (WG), 6-4, 6-2; C Benjamin (US), bt J Durie (GB), 7-5, 6-4; M Maleeva (Bul), bt J Richardson (NZ), 6-1, 6-3; A Fernandez (US), bt E Minter (Aus), 7-6, 6-7, 7-5; L McNeil (US), bt E Pfaff (WG), 6-3, 4-6, 7-6; G Rush (US), bt T Mochizuki (US), 6-4, 6-3.
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Re: 1987

Their Ginny joins the committee.

Sport (In Brief): Feaver joins - Tennis
The Times
London, England
Jan. 7, 1987
*
John Feaver, the former British Davis Cup player, has replaced Mark Cox as a member of the Wimbledon management committee alongside another seasoned professional in Virginia Wade.
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Re: 1987

The regular tennis media never did quite understand that "Bild" is not exactly the most credible source.

REGULAR SHORTS
January 7, 1987
Sydney Morning Herald

[...]

Becker, Martina to team up

HAMBURG, Tuesday: Wimbledon champions Boris Becker and Martina Navratilova plan to team up to play mixed doubles at grand slam tennis tournaments this year, according to German newspaper reports.

The mass-circulation Bild said Navratilova had been in contact with Becker's manager, Ion Tiriac, on several occasions asking that he arrange for her to play mixed doubles with Becker.

According to its report, "Becker had declined" until now.

But on Saturday Tiriac called Navratilova and told her the 19-year-old West German was willing to team up with the American.

Navratilova, winner of 15 Wimbledon titles, wanted to break Billie Jean King's record of 20 titles at Wimbledon.

The newspaper said Becker and Navratilova would play mixed doubles at Wimbledon and the French and US Open championships.

Navratilova won her seventh singles title at Wimbledon last year. Becker won his second consecutive singles crown.

[...]
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Re: 1987

Tracy Awesome was slumming it...

Austin selected parade marshal
Daily Breeze
Torrance, CA
January 7, 1987

Tracy Austin, former U.S. Open Tennis women's champion and a graduate of Rolling Hills High School, will be the grand marshal of Saturday's 6th annual Youth on Parade.

The parade will wind through the business and commercial district of Rolling Hills Estates and culminate with a marching band concert on the field at Rolling Hills High.

Austin's tennis career is highlighted by numerous tournament and individual victories from the time she was 7. She played in her first women's open at 14 and was the youngest entrant ever at Wimbledon.

In 1978, she was Junior Wimbledon champion and went four rounds in the main Wimbledon draw before losing to Martina Navratilova. She ranked No. 1 in the National Girls 16 and 18 divisions while also being ranked among the world's top 10 women. That same year, at age 15, she ended Navratilova's 37-match win streak, and a year later, at the Italian Open, she stopped Chris Evert-Lloyd's six-year, 125-match clay court win streak. In October 1978, Austin turned professional and went on to win a tournament in Stuttgart, West Germany.

In 1980, she and her brother John became the only brother-sister team to win the Wimbledon mixed doufles. Her remarkable career earned her The Associated Press Female of the Year Award in 1979 and 1981.

Because of a series of injuries, she played intermittently in 1982 and 1983; she was inactive in 1984 and 1985.
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Re: 1987

European women roll in USTA tournament
Chicago Sun-Times
January 7, 1987

Europeans won three of the six matches yesterday in the the first round of the $10,000 USTA Women's Circuit of Chicago tournament at Mid-Town Tennis Club.

Brenda Shultz of Holland, defeated Holly Lloyd, Deerfield, 6-3, 7-6 (7-3); Heidi Sprung, Austria, topped Katrina Adams, Chicago, 4-6, 7-6 (12-10), 6-4, and Simone Schilder, Holland, stopped Jan Blackstad, Highland Park, 6-1, 3-6, 6-4.
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Re: 1987

And once the local interest stories lost, the coverage stops.

Top 2 seeds defeated in first round
Chicago Sun-Times
January 8, 1987
Len Ziehm

Mary Lou Piatek and Evonne Vermaak, the top seeded players, were upset yesterday in the first round of the $10,000 U.S. Tennis Association women's tourney at Mid-Town Tennis Club.

Piatek, from Munster, Ind., was ousted by Lindsey Bartlett of Portola Valley, Calif., 0-6, 6-4, 6-4, and Vermaak, a South African living in Chicago, fell to Lake Zurich's Linda Harvey-Wild 6-1, 6-4.

Former Wimbledon champion Billie Jean King, a late entry into the doubles portion of the fifth annual event that concludes Saturday, will make her tourney debut today.

King and partner Ilana Kloss will face Evonne Derkinderen and Mara Eykenboom of Holland in a first-round match expected to start about 2 p.m.

Piatek and Vermaak, the top-seeded doubles team, also are scheduled to compete at that time against Erika Smith of Piedmont, Calif., and Liz Morrman of Huntsville, Ala.
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Re: 1987

King is struggling - Billie Jean set to cut weight, increase play
Chicago Sun-Times
January 9, 1987
Len Ziehm

The competitive juices were still there, but Billie Jean King didn't look the same when she returned to the tennis wars yesterday.

King, 43, played doubles at the $10,000 U.S. Tennis Association Women's Circuit of Chicago tourney at Mid-Town Tennis Club.

The tourney, which concludes tomorrow, is for pro hopefuls who want to make it onto the Virginia Slims tour that King once dominated. Yesterday King and Ilana Kloss, a doubles champion at the 1976 U.S. Open, joined forces to beat Amy Frazier, 14, and Nancy Wilson, 17, of Toronto in a first-round match.

"I'm trying to exercise again," said King, who couldn't remember the last time she played against young pros in anything other than an exhibition.

"I need to lose another 15 pounds. My goal is start playing three times a week again. The more I play, the more I enjoy it."

In addition to her surgically-repaired knees, King has another noticeable physical problem.

She's contracted a skin disease called vitiligo.

"I'm losing my pigmentation," she said. "It's an hereditary thing, and I started getting it when I was 37 or 38. It's much worse now."

To combat it she wears sweat pants and long-sleeved tops whenever she's on the court.

King has competed in senior exhibitions since her heyday, but that's about all. Last year she joined forces with Pat Freebody, Mid-Town's manager, to win the USTA Women's 40 Indoor Doubles Championship. They will defend their title in February at Mid-Town.

Before then, however, King hopes to stir some excitement in Chicago with an announcement on her Team Tennis franchise. The Chicago Fire has hung on since 1981 despite small crowds.

"Chicago is our toughest market," said King, who is the Team Tennis commissioner in addition to owning the Chicago team.

King said the monthlong Team Tennis season will begin in early July. She has dropped the franchise in Corpus Christi, Texas, but added Charlotte, N.C., and New Jersey.

"It's going to be great," she said. "It's taken a lot of work, but I can finally sit down and start to breathe." And play some more tennis.
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