Winifred Slocock McNair ? An Early English Lawn Tennis Player - TennisForum.com
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 1 (permalink) Old Jan 17th, 2017, 06:08 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 13,200
                     
Winifred Slocock McNair – An Early English Lawn Tennis Player

By Mark Ryan

Winifred Margaret Slocock was born on 9 August 1877 in Donnington, a village in the south-eastern county of Berkshire. She was the eighth and last child of Charles Samuel Slocock, a landowner and banker (b. 1821 in Donnington) and Mary Slocock (née Goddard; b. 1828 in Donnington). They had married each other on 13 June 1860 in Saint Luke’s Church in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire.

Winifred’s seven siblings were Evelyn Lucy Sophia (b. 1860 in Donnington); Mary Isabel (b. 1863 in Donnington); Ethel Ann (b. 1865 in Donnington); Mabel Janey (b. 1867 in Donnington); Charles Edward (b. 1868 in Donnington); Francis Samuel Alfred (b. 1869 in Donnington); Wilfred Wingfield Slocock (b. 1873 in Donnington).

When Winifred was growing up in Donnington, the Slocock family lived in a large house in Oxford Road, not far from the ruins of the historic, medieval Donnington Castle, founded in 1386. In the 1881 Census of England, taken on 3 April 3, 1881, Winifred, her parents and five or her siblings were present in the family home together with a retinue of eight servants including a butler, a coachman, a nurse and two nursemaids – an indication of the Slocock family’s wealth.

By the time of the 1901 Census of England, which was taken on 31 March 1901, the 23-year-old Winifred had moved from Donnington and was living at an address in Kensington, London, with her 79-year-old father and one of her sisters, Mabel, who was 33. Two female servants were also present. Charles Slocock, Winifred’s father, was a widower by then, Mary Slocock having died in London in 1898.

The 1901 Census of England also provides an occupation for both Winifred and her sister Mabel. Although the latter’s occupation is illegible, Winifred’s appears to be ‘Private Secretary and Worker’. It is not exactly clear what her work involved, but it is interesting to discover that both she and one of her sisters appeared to be earning a living outside of the home, something unusual for women from their background at that time.

Winifred Slocock appears to have come relatively late to the sport of lawn tennis. According to ‘Ayres’ Lawn Tennis Almanack’, Winifred took part in her first lawn tennis tournament in 1904 and won her first open event in 1906, in Reading. This is somewhat unusual because Winifred turned 27 in 1904 and would therefore have nearly been 30 years old when she won the event in 1906 mentioned in ‘Ayres Lawn Tennis Almanack’.
According to the same lawn tennis almanack, the event in question was the mixed doubles and she won it with Roderick McNair. The tournament appears to have been the Berkshire Championships, which in those days was usually held early in the lawn tennis season, in May. However, the records show that a different pair won the mixed doubles event at the Berkshire Championships in 1906, and that Winifred McNair did not take part in that tournament although it was held in her native county.

Winifred really started to enjoy success on the lawn tennis scene towards the end of the first decade of the twentieth century. Her first title in the women’s singles event came in early August of 1909, around the time of her thirtieth birthday, at the Rochester tournament in Kent where she easily defeated her countrywoman Mildred Coles in the final, 6-0 6-2. By August of 1909, Winifred had married, her husband being the aforementioned Roderick McNair, himself a lawn tennis player who took part in a large number of tournaments, but with less success than Winifred. They married each other on 24 April 1908.

Roderick McNair had been born on 25 November 1870 in Surbiton in south-west London. He was the eldest of the five children of Nathaniel McNair, a produce broker (b. 1840 in Scotland) and Lilias Pringle McNair (née Bigland; b. 16 March 1846 in Liverpool). Roderick McNair was a stock jobber by profession, a type of market maker on the London Stock Exchange.

When the 1911 Census of England was taken, on 2 April 1911, Winifred and Roderick McNair were living in a house at 9 Chislehurst Road in Richmond, Surrey. Also present were three visitors: Alice Maude Slocock (a native of , listed as a ‘sister-in-law’, but only 22 years old, so not a sister of Winifred; and her two children, 1-year-old Richard and a baby boy called Charles. The details of three female servants are also recorded on the census form. In the census return Roderick McNair listed his profession as ‘stock jobber/employer’ and that of Winifred as ‘journalist/worker’. It is not clear exactly what type of journalism work Winifred did.

As stated above, Winifred McNair did not really start to enjoy success on the lawn tennis scene towards the end of the first decade of the twentieth century, by which time she was nearly thirty. (In those days this was not a particularly old age for someone to be taking part in lawn tennis tournaments.) An indication of Winifred’s level of play came at Wimbledon in July of 1910. From a draw of 33 players she won three matches to reach the semi-final, where she was overwhelmed by Dorothea Lambert Chambers, the top British player of the day, 6-1, 6-0.

Three years later, in 1913, also at Wimbledon, the same two players met one round later, in what was then known as the All-Comers’ Final, the penultimate round held before the Challenge Round, where the defending champion would take on the winner of the All-Comers’ event. The match in question, which would actually turn out to be the final match in the women’s singles event at Wimbledon that year, was described as follows in the British publication ‘Lawn Tennis and Badminton’ on 3 July 1913:

“Dorothea Lambert Chambers has come into her own again; by her defeat of Winifred McNair she won the final round of the ladies’ singles, and on the day’s play she thoroughly deserved her victory. That in doing so she showed her super excellent form of two years ago we hesitate to say, but her game was good enough to dispose of any opposition that was encountered.

“Mrs McNair is a proverbially bad starter, and in this match she made no exception to her usual rule; throughout the first set she did not get going at all, as even when she had plenty of time to make the shot, time and again she hit the ball into the net or yards out of the court; but she did not always have much time, as Mrs Lambert Chambers was placing the ball with great accuracy from corner to corner, and varying these strokes with short-length, oblique drives. The pace was not very great, and Mrs McNair was often able to reach the ball and, strangely enough, on many occasions she was making the return better when hard pressed than when the stroke could be made in comparative leisure. The first set, owing to Mrs McNair’s bad start, was soon over, the score reading 6-0 in favour of Mrs Lambert Chambers.

“It was in the second set that the fight began; Mrs McNair’s ground shots improved out of all knowledge, and when she came to the net, and her judgement in picking out the right ball to come in on was very sound, she made some fine winning volleys. The games went with service until three-all was called, the fourth game with Mrs McNair serving being a tense affair, with the issue long in doubt; however, she secured it in the end by combined pluck and play, and then she secured the lead for the first time in the match at 4-3 with her service to follow; if only she could annex this she was in the happy position of holding a winning lead, and desperately she strove to secure it; she reached 40-30, and was in position for a winning volley.

“Mrs Lambert Chambers returned the ball, but it came within easy reach, and Mrs McNair, to her own evident disgust, ‘foozled’ the shot, the ball hit the net and the chance was lost. Desperately anxious to win this game she went all out for the two points necessary; twice she secured the ‘vantage, but on each occasion she was pulled back by her opponent, whose only trace of unsteadiness throughout the match occurred in the previous two games, and eventually the game – and what a game! – went to the ex-champion. After that it was all comparatively plain sailing for Mrs Lambert Chambers, the sea which had previously been ‘choppy’ calmed down, and with careful pilotage she reached port a popular winner.”

There was a consolation of sorts for Winifred McNair at Wimbledon in 1913 when in an all-English women’s doubles final, she and her partner, Dora Boothby, ended up the winners after an unfortunate injury suffered by Charlotte Sterry, one of the members of the opposing team. ‘Lawn Tennis and Badminton’ of 3 July 1913 referred to this incident as follows:

“Dorothea Lambert Chambers and Charlotte Sterry looked to be winning this match easily against Winifred McNair and Dora Boothby, for the latter had a bad day and was no match for Mrs Lambert Chambers in baseline duels; neither did she provide her volleying partner with the necessary openings for securing a winning ace. Throughout the match Mrs Lambert Chambers and Mrs Sterry always looked to have the match in hand, and it was the hardest of hard luck that, after winning the first set at 6-4, and leading at 4-2, 40-15, in the second the regrettable accident to Mrs Sterry (referred to in ‘Varia’) compelled them to retire.”

The injury in question was a torn tendon in the calf of one of Charlotte Sterry’s legs. Interestingly, 1913 was the year in which both the women’s doubles and mixed doubles events at Wimbledon acquired Championship status for the first time. Strangely, the mixed doubles final that year was also won by default when one of the participants, Ethel Larcombe, was accidentally hit in the eye by a ball from one of the other player’s rackets and was forced to retire as a result. This must have been doubly disappointing for Ethel Larcombe because she was the defending champion in the women’s singles event and was due to play Dorothea Lambert Chambers in the Challenge Round after the latter player had defeated Winifred McNair in the All-Comers’ Final.

Although Winifred McNair (and Dora Boothby) won the women’s doubles final at Wimbledon in 1913 by default, their ultimate success was in fact proof of how good Winifred was as a doubles player and that she was able to finish off a point at the net with a volley when the opportunity presented itself. Appendix I below includes a list of her main successes not only in singles, but also in women’s doubles and mixed doubles events.

In late July 1914, at the Midland Counties Championship tournament, held in the suburb of Edgbaston in Birmingham, Winifred McNair achieved the ‘triple crown’ by winning the women’s singles, women’s doubles and mixed doubles events. In the women’s singles final she defeated Helen Aitchison, from Sunderland, after a very close match, 4-6, 6-3 9-7. Her partners in the other two events were her compatriots Dora Armstrong and Albert Prebble. Two weeks later Great Britain declared war on Germany and all lawn tennis tournaments were gradually cancelled in most of Europe for the duration of the war.

It is not clear exactly how Winifred McNair spent the war, although she and some of the other top British lawn tennis players did sometimes take part in charity matches to raise funds for the British war effort. Being a keen golfer and someone who sometimes took part in golf tournaments as well as being active on the administrative side, she might occasionally have played this less strenuous sport during the war.

In the years leading up to World War One Roderick McNair, Winifred’s husband, had been closely involved in the administrative side of lawn tennis, at one point being Vice-President of the British Lawn Tennis Association and the Surrey Lawn Tennis Associatuion. In 1913, he captained the British Davis Cup team for the Challenge Round tie at Worple Road, Wimbledon, when the British Isles, the holders, led by the Irishman James Parke, lost narrowly to the United States, by three rubbers to two. When the war began Roderick McNair, who had previously been a Captain in the East Surrey Regiment (Territorials), resumed his commission; in 1918, he was appointed Major.

After World War One had ended and lawn tennis tournaments had resumed, Winifred McNair returned to play in May 1919 at the Surrey Championships tournament, held in the London suburb of Surbiton. She reached the quarter-finals of the women’s singles event there before losing to Dorothea Lambert Chambers in three sets and won the mixed doubles event with the Australian Stanley Doust. Over the next four to five years Winifred continued to win titles at a number of lawn tennis tournaments, particularly smaller ones. However, her greatest lawn tennis success during this period arguably came outside of Great Britian, in August 1920, at the Olympic Games in Antwerp, Belgium.

At the Olympiad in question, the first to be held since the end of World War One two years earlier, Winifred, who had just turned 43, was partnered by Kathleen McKane, a future Wimbledon singles champion, from Bayswater in London. In the gold medal match in the women’s doubles event Winifred and Kathleen defeated two of their countrywomen, Geraldine Beamish and Dorothy Holman, 8-6, 6-4, after being within a point of losing the first set when 2-5 down.

However, the key match in the women’s doubles event at the Olympic Games in 1920 was arguably the semi-final between Winifred and Kathleen McKane and the French pairing of Suzanne Lenglen and Elisabeth d’Ayen. By the summer of 1920 Suzanne Lenglen was the undisputed world champion and holder of the singles, women’s doubles and mixed doubles titles at Wimbledon. However, although she was considered virtually invincible in singles, she was vulnerable in a women’s doubles and mixed doubles match when her partner was not of the highest calibre and she and her partners’ opponents were. This was the case in the semi-final of the women’s doubles event at the Olympic Games in Antwerp in 1920 where Elisabeth d’Ayen was the least experienced and the least skilful player on court, and therefore the most vulnerable to attack from her opponents.

The English journalist and author Arthur Wallis Myers, himself an occasional participant in lawn tennis tournaments, witnessed what must have been a fascinating match, which was eventually won by the English pair, 2-6, 6-3 8-6. The following report on the match was carried in ‘The Daily Telegraph’ newspaper, for which Wallis Myers was the lawn tennis correspondent, on 23 August 1920:

“Antwerp, Saturday.–There was a full and strenuous day on the stadium courts today. Play was made difficult by the wind, bad visibility, and soft surface, but the spectators saw several exciting matches, and, as a great rarity, the defeat of Mlle Suzanne Lenglen in the ladies’ doubles. The champion was partnered by Mlle Elisabeth d’Ayen against the English pair Mrs Winifred McNair and Miss Kathleen McKane, in the semi-final. Mlle d’Ayen is new to international lawn tennis, and, though a plucky player, with a good forehand drive, not in the same class as the other three.

“Mrs McNair could scarcely set a ball into court in the first set, which the French team took easily with the loss of only two games. The turn of the tide came when Mrs McNair, anticipating the low drives of Mlle d’Ayen, began to use her strong backhand volley, and when Miss McKane, who throughout played with sound judgement, though not always with the best of luck, dropped her overhead balls short, instead of attempting a full smash.

“Mlle Lenglen has seldom been seen to better advantage, for she was handicapped by possessing a partner who could not lob, and therefore she had to wage single against two experienced volleyers. If Mrs McNair had been playing well, the champion must have been cut off from her base after several of her excursions. As it was, Mlle Lenglen came within two points of victory at 5-4 in the final set. She was then serving, and put tremendous energy into this critical game. Exciting rallies followed, Mlle d’Ayen showing amazing pluck, and she more than once saved the ace by a fine recovery. But in the end Mlle Lenglen overreached herself, and the English team went out at 7-5 [8-6]”.

Winifred McNair continued to take part in lawn tennis tournaments until 1926, the year in which she turned 49. ‘Ayres’ Lawn Tennis Almanack’ for 1927 notes that she and Roderick McNair were living at an address in Lexham Gardens in Kensington, London. In that particular year he was also Chairman of the Lawn Tennis Association Council. He had continued taking part in lawn tennis tournaments up until the early 1920s. Like Winifred, he was also a keen golfer.

By 1938, Winifred and Roderick McNair, who did not have any children, were living at an address in Philbeach Gardens, London, close to Earl’s Court. This was still their address when Roderick died on 18 November 1944, exactly one week before what would have been his seventy-fourth birthday. The following is the entry for him featured in the National Probate Calendar for England and Wales: “McNair, Roderick James, of 42 Philbeach Gardens, Kensington, London S.W. 5, died 18 November 1944 at Knaresborough Nursing Home, 7 Knaresborough Place, Kensington, London. Probate: Llandudno, 27 January to Winifred Margaret McNair, widow. Effects: £1,402 17s.”

Six days later, on 24 November 1944, ‘The Times’ of London carried the following notice: “A memorial service was held yesterday at Saint Philip’s, Earl’s Court Road, for Mr Roderick James McNair. The Reverend H.C. Thomas officiated. Among those present were representatives of the Stock Exchange, the International Lawn Tennis Club, the All England Lawn Tennis Club, and Kensington Company, Home Guard.”

Winifred McNair outlived her husband by nearly ten years, dying in London on 28 March 1954 at the age of 76. Her death was recorded as follows in the National Probate Calendar for England and Wales: “McNair, Winifred Margaret of The Leicester Court Hotel, 41 Queens Gardens, Kensington, London W. 5, widow, died 28 March 1954 at The Knaresborough Nursing Home, Knaresborough Place, London, S.W. 5. Probate London 21 May to Lilian Davenport, spinster. Effects: £4,360 16s 4d.”
--

Appendix I

Main successes of Winifred Slocock McNair in singles and women’s doubles events at lawn tennis tournaments in years 1897-1905 (alphabetical by tournament; chronological by year within a tournament)

A. Singles

Berkshire Championships, Reading

1911 Winifred McNair d. Helen Aitchison 8-6 6-4
1912 Dorothy Holman d. Winifred McNair 7-5 6-1
-----

Cinque Ports Championships, Folkestone, Kent

1912 Winifred McNair d. Dora Boothby 6-3 4-6 7-5
1913 Winifred McNair d. Dora Boothby 7-5 6-1
--

1919 Winifred McNair d. Dorothy Shepherd 6-0 6-2
1920 Geraldine Beamish d. Winifred McNair 6-3 7-9 6-3
1921 Geraldine Beamish d. Winifred McNair 6-4 6-3
1922 Geraldine Beamish d. Slocock McNair 6-3 6-4
-----

East of England Championships, Felixstowe, Suffolk

1911 Dorothy Holman d. Winifred McNair 6-3 3-6 6-2
--

1913 Winifred McNair d. Elizabeth Ryan (US) 7-5 7-5
-----

Midland Counties Championships, Edgbaston (Birmingham)

1914 Winifred McNair d. Helen Aitchison 4-6 6-3 9-7
--

1919 Ethel Larcombe d. Winifred McNair 4-6 6-2 7-5
-----

Hertfordshire Championships, Harpenden

1913 Winifred McNair d. Phyllis Satterthwaite 6-1 5-7 6-1
-----

Kent Championships, Beckenham

1912 Winifred McNair d. Dora Boothby 6-1 6-4
--

1920 Elizabeth Ryan (US) and Winifred McNair 7-9 3-2 divided
-----

Kent Coast Championships, Hythe

1912 Winifred McNair d. Elizabeth Ryan (USA) 3-6 6-1 6-3 [also valid as Championships of Europe]
-----

Rochester, Kent

1909 Winifred Slocock McNair d. Mildred Coles 6-0 6-2
-----

Skegness, Lincolnshire

1909 Winifred McNair d. Kathleen Clements 6-1 6-3
-----

Wimbledon

1913 ACF: Dorothea Lambert Chambers d. Winifred McNair 6-0 6-4
-----

Winchester

1914 Winifred McNair d. Mrs E. Wilkinson 6-4 6-2
-----

B. Women's doubles and mixed doubles results

1908

London Covered Court Championships, Queen's Club, London

XDF: Winifred McNair/Robert Powell (Can) d. Dora Boothby/Albert Prebble 1-6 6-4 6-3
-----

1910

Northumberland Championships, Newcastle

DF: Dora Boothby/Winifred McNair d. Kathleen Aitchison/Alice Hudleston 6-4 6-4
-----

Kent Coast Championships, Hythe

DF: Dora Armstrong/Winifred McNair vs Mildred Coles/Mabel Parton divided the score at one set-all.
-----

1911

Surrey Championships, Surbiton

DF: Dora Boothby/Winifred McNair d. Charlotte Sterry/Beryl Tulloch 6-2 8-6
-----

London Championships, Queen's Club, London

XDF: Winifred McNair/Roderick J McNair d. Dora Armstrong/Stanely Doust (Aus) 6-3 7-9 6-4
-----

Berkshire Championships, Reading

DF: Dora Armstrong/Winifred McNair d. Helen Aitchison/Dorothea Lambert Chambers 6-1 6-8 8-6
-----

Northumberland Championships, Newcastle

DF: Dora Boothby/Winifred McNair d. J Green/Ethel Larcombe 6-4 7-5
-----

East of England Championships, Felixstowe, Suffolk

DF: Dorothea Lambert Chambers/Winifred McNair d. Dorothy Holman/Edith Johnson 6-1 3-6 6-3
-----

Kent Coast Championships, Hythe

DF: Dora Armstrong/Winifred McNair d. Evelyn Dillon/M. Dillon 6-4 6-3
-----

London Covered Court Championships, Queen's Club, London

XDF: Winifred McNair/Stanely Doust (Aus) d. Hilda Lane/Arthur H. Lowe 7-5 6-2
-----

1912

Berkshire Championships, Reading, Berkshire

DF: Dora Armstrong/Winifred McNair d. Jessie Coles/Alice Hudleston 3-6 6-3 6-1
-----

South of England Championships, Eastbourne

DF: Dora Boothby/Winifred McNair d. Ethel Larcombe/Beryl Tulloch 4-6 7-5 6-3
-----

1913

Surrey Championships, Surbiton

DF: Dora Boothby/Winifred McNair d. Dorothea Lambert Chambers/Charlotte Sterry 8-6 2-6 6-1
-----

Hatfield, Hertfordshire

XDF: Roderick McNair/Winifred McNair d. “R. Bull”*/Dora Armstrong 6-0 6-2
-----

Kent Championships, Beckenham

DF: Dora Boothby/Winifred McNair d. Dorothea Lambert Chambers/Charlotte Sterry 7-5 2-6 6-4
------

Wimbledon

FI: Dora Boothby/Winifred McNair d. Dorothea Lambert Chambers/Charlotte Sterry 4-6 2-4 retired
-----

Norwood Park, London

XDF: Winifred McNair/Roderick McNair d. Geraldine Beamish/Alfred Beamish 6-3 6-4
-----

Northumberland Championships, Newcastle

DF: Dora Boothby/Winifred McNair d. Mildred Coles/Mary Welsh 6-3 6-4
-----

East of England Championships, Felixstowe,

DF: Dora Armstrong/Winifred McNair d. L. Fison/E. Nash 6-3 6-2
--

XDF: Winifred McNair/Stanley Doust (Aus) d. Agnes Morton/Herbert Roper Barrett 4-6 8-6 7-5
-----

Cinque Ports Championships, Folkestone

DF: Dora Boothby/Winifred McNair d. Dora Armstrong/Lilian Davenport default
--

XDF: Winifred McNair/Charles P. Dixon d. Mabel Parton/Theodore Mavrogordato 6-3 6-3
-----

1914

Midland Counties Championships, Edgbaston, Birmingham

DF: Dora Armstrong/Winifred McNair d. Geraldine Beamish/Lilian Davenport 6-3 6-2
--

XDF: Winifred McNair/Arthur Prebble d. Helen Aitchison/William Clements 6-3 7-5
-----

1919

Surrey Championships, Surbiton

XDF: Winifred McNair/Stanley Doust (Aus) d. Mabel Parton/Gerald Patterson (Aus) 6-3 6-2
-----

Norwood Championships, Norwood, London

DF: Geraldine Beamish/Kathleen McKane and Dora Geen/Winifred McNair divided the prizes
-----

Midland Counties Championships, Edgbaston (Birmingham)

XDF: Winifred McNair/Pat O'Hara Wood (Aus) d. Ethel Larcombe/Stanley Doust (Aus) 6-3 7-5
-----

Cinque Port Championships, Folkestone

XDF: Winifred McNair/Stanley Doust (Aus) d. Mrs Spoor/BJ Majendie 6-0 6-3
-----

Kent Coast Championships, Hythe

DF: Kathleen McKane/Winifred McNair d. Phyllis Howkins/Phyllis Satterthwaite 6-2 6-4
-----

Hurlingham Club, Hurlingham, London

XDF: Winifred McNair/Stanley Doust (Aus) d. Madeline O'Neill/ Major Ritchie 6-2 6-1
-----

1920

Frinton-on-Sea, Essex

DF: Dorothea Lambert Chambers/Winifred McNair d. Kathleen McKane/Phyllis Satterthwaite 3-6 6-1 7-5
-----

Olympic Games, Beerchot Lawn Tennis Club, Antwerp

SF: Kathleen McKane (GB)/Winifred McNair (GB) d. Elisabeth D'Ayen (FRA)/Suzanne Lenglen (FRA) 2-6 6-3 8-6
--

FI: Kathleen McKane (GB)/Winifred McNair (GB) d. Geraldine Beamish (GB)/Dorothy Holman (GB) 8-6 6-4
-----

Cinque Ports Championships, Folkestone

XDF: Winifred McNair/Albert Prebble d. Geraldine Beamish/Alfred Beamish 6-4 6-4
-----

1921

London Championships, Queen's Club, London

DF: Dora Geen/Winifred McNair d. Mrs Atkey/Miss Foulger 6-4 6-3
-----

Cinque Ports Championships, Folkestone

DF: Geraldine Beamish/Winifred McNair d. Lilian Davenport/Mabel Parton 6-1 6-4
--

XDF: Winifred McNair/Alfred Prebble d. Geraldine Beamish/Hon. Cecil Campbell 8-6 6-2
-----

1922

Cinque Ports Championships, Folkestone

DF: Geraldine Beamish/Winifred McNair d. Mildred Coles/Miss Dillon 6-2 6-1
-----

1923

North of England Championships, Scarborough

DF: Winifred McNair/Phyllis Satterthwaite d. Mabel Parton/Dorothy Shepherd-Barron 6-0 6-2
-----

1924

Roehampton Hard Court Tournament, Roehampton, Surrey

DF: Dorothea Lambert Chambers/Winifred McNair d. Edith Clarke/Mrs Bruce May 3-6 6-1 6-2
-----

Last edited by newmark401; Jan 17th, 2017 at 06:31 PM.
newmark401 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the TennisForum.com forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome