Forest Hills 1933: Helen Wills loses by default - TennisForum.com
 
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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old Aug 22nd, 2016, 11:15 AM Thread Starter
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Forest Hills 1933: Helen Wills loses by default



The infamous final. So there is actually footage of this.

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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old Aug 23rd, 2016, 12:34 PM
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Re: Forest Hills 1933: Helen Wills loses by default

Thank you Sam!

This was the first newsreel where it is evident Wills is in distress when she leans on her racquet at about 1:17.

It also shows her strategy of hitting someone off the court by going crosscourt to run a player ragged. Al Laney once wrote something to the effect of "silly girls, why don't they make Helen run?" Then he realized it was all most could do just to get the ball back into court, usually as a defensive shot.

This is illustrated in the clip by Jacobs slicing that forehand back into court. Her backhand is a lot flatter and penetrating.

Grand it is too to hear her voice at the end being so gracious to "Mrs Moody." In private things were quite different!

After defaulting Moody wanted to go back on court to play the doubles final with Elizabeth Ryan. Some attribute this to a misplaced sense of duty to her doubles partner, others to such a hate and dislike of Jacobs that she wanted to get off court and was perfectly capable of going back on for the doubles.

Elizabeth Ryan refused to speak about this episode candidly in public. Fearing pandemonium if she went on court with Wills-Moody, it was Ryan who pulled the plug on the doubles final.

There is no doubt that the "Queen of Ice" was in serious pain that day. She would not compete again for almost two years. Whether or not she could have (or should have) stayed on court was a hot topic for years.


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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old Aug 27th, 2016, 08:37 PM
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Re: Forest Hills 1933: Helen Wills loses by default

That document is of great quality! Some pieces are missing, but it looks like Wills retired without going to her opponent at all. To the contrary, we see Helen Jacobs going to her around the chair umpire. Was Wills that cold?
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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old Aug 28th, 2016, 02:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hugues Daniel View Post
That document is of great quality! Some pieces are missing, but it looks like Wills retired without going to her opponent at all. To the contrary, we see Helen Jacobs going to her around the chair umpire. Was Wills that cold?
Wills was considered "socially awkward" and she herself admitted to being too focused (read: monomaniacal) when playing. Added to that, as Rollo pointed out, the two Helens did not get along. The clashing egos and personality disorders that we all know and love in modern era tennis have been with the game forever.
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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old Aug 28th, 2016, 11:22 PM
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Re: Forest Hills 1933: Helen Wills loses by default

Quote:
Wills was considered "socially awkward" and she herself admitted to being too focused (read: monomaniacal) when playing.
Would agree 100%. Wills was not prone to let distractions get in her way.


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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old Aug 28th, 2016, 11:54 PM
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Re: Forest Hills 1933: Helen Wills loses by default

What is posted below comes from Ted Tinling's book Love and Faults. More than any other writing it was this book that drew me in to tennis history and the tale of the two Helens.

Teddy knew both women personally, giving his take of them an extra layer of veracity not found in other sources.

Chapter 14 The Two Helens (1)

Fate, coincidence,chance,call it what you will, the story of the two young girls with the same first name, who were reared on the same street, were educated at the same school and college, were coached by the same man, who lived, at different times, in the same house, and were to both become American and World champions, is one of the strangest of all tennis sagas

Outside their tennis, however, Helen Wills and Helen Jacobs, of Berkeley, California, had little in common. On or off the court they exchanged only a few dozen words in fifteen years of treading parallel paths on the international circuit.

The fact that Helen Wills ruled the circuit unchallenged was accepted by the girls except Helen Jacobs and her refusal to pay homage to Queen Wills lent credibility to a picture of antagonism.

There were also dark rumors of religious differences and differences in sexual preferences. [end of page 124] In the '2os such things were not publicly referred to.....

Helen Jacobs has said, "There as no feud", but the lack of outward communication between the two Helens put an obvious question mark over their relationship. For those who wished to accentuate their differences some evidence of a deep rift was not difficult to discern.

Helen Wills was extremely class conscious and highly discriminating from everything from friends to fashions. She alwaysalignd herself with all the "right" people, famous politicians, royalty, the top names in the art world. In hotels only the London Dorchester and the Goerge V in Paris were good enough.

She was a talented painter herself and her works were exhibited in galleries from coast to coast. Beyond all this, Helen Wills father was a doctor, whereas Helen Jacobs father was "in trade."

Helen Wills had a natural ability to excel and projected the impression that everyone should automatically recognize her superiority in whatever area of life she chose to favor.

With the exception of Garbo, I have seen all the best-looking women in the world face-to-face and in the beauty stakes, Helen Wills was very definitely in the top league.

I sat opposite her one evening ...when we were both playing the '32 Dutch Championships. She has a flawless complexion. Her facial bone structure and and her finely chiseled features gave an inescapable impression of serene classic sculpture. In dramatic contrast she had the Marlene Dietrich technique of fixing her beautiful eyes with sudden intensity at the exact climax of a conversation, and I remember thinking how truly lovely she was.

Wills was certainly the Garbo of tennis, always wanted to be alone and away from her fellow competitors. This, combined with her determinedly detached nature and unchanging countenance, gave the world's sportswriters a field day. Arthur Guiterman wrote in Life magazine in '29.


The Journalists, A Ribald Race
Have named her Little Miss Poker Face


As she grew up the "little" was dropped, but "Miss Poker Face" stuck appropriately throughout her career.

As if by intent, Helen Jacobs was one of the world's friendliest souls, and I often thought that the more Helen Wills became distant and [end of page 125] aloof the more Helen Jacobs wanted to please.

to be continued.....


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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old Aug 29th, 2016, 12:41 AM
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Re: Forest Hills 1933: Helen Wills loses by default

Wow, so many spectators. Good old times when one could light a fag even at sporting events. Was drinking alcoholic beverages common too?
I didn't realize that tennis was so popular back then. How big was the attendance at the most popular slams? Was it similar to football matches from that century where spectators didn't care for seats, so the stadiums were overcrowded because most people were standing?

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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old Aug 29th, 2016, 10:56 PM
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Wow, so many spectators. Good old times when one could light a fag even at sporting events. Was drinking alcoholic beverages common too?
Not only in the crowd, but players were known to imbibe during a match, with varying results. Some men even played with a tobacco pipe clenched between their teeth.

Quote:
I didn't realize that tennis was so popular back then. How big was the attendance at the most popular slams?
Reportedly, a crowd of 12000 watched Budge in the 1938 Forest Hills final, and the stadium wasn't even full because a lot of people expected a rout (or half-hearted effort from Mako).

There were 4000 people who showed up to brave the rain for the semis.

Back in the day, players like Lenglen, Wills, and Tilden were international celebrities and drew the corresponding crowds.

Quote:
Was it similar to football matches from that century where spectators didn't care for seats, so the stadiums were overcrowded because most people were standing?
Don't think so. Wouldn't fit with the "Quiet, please" etiquette of tennis. Maybe they crammed in a few more in the upper tiers of the stadiums, but not in the reserved seats levels.
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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old Sep 8th, 2016, 03:25 AM
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Re: Forest Hills 1933: Helen Wills loses by default

Jacobs and Wills at Wimbledon in 1929. Stockings were slowly going out of style by this point, but both women are wearing then.





Jacobs and Wills coming down the brick stairs at Forest Hills for the 1929 final.Earlier in the year the USTA funded two women to go overseas. Oddly they left the pick of the second women up to Wills. She bypassed Jacobs and toured with the US #3 Edith Cross.

Angry supporters of Jacobs raised money privately for her to tour Europe that year.



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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old Sep 8th, 2016, 03:37 AM
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Re: Forest Hills 1933: Helen Wills loses by default

Grainy footage of the 1933 Foret Hills final. Inferior to the other film posted by Sam but it gives a different perspective as it was shot from inside/under the tented enclosure



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