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post #1 of 24 (permalink) Old Feb 24th, 2004, 10:59 AM Thread Starter
 
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lleyton speaking dutch

on the abnamro site is said that lleyton has worked on his dutch but he thanked the public in english wonder how he sounds in dutch

lijkt me wel lachen als lleyton in het nederlands zou spreken. Ik hoop niet dat hij als de paus klinkt "bedankt voor die bloemen"hihihihi Als mijn uit australie zou komen dan zou ik hem de vloekwoorden leren zonder te zeggen wat die betekenen. voor een paar duizend man nedrelands spreken en dit nog niet echt de knie hebben lijkt mij inderdaad zeer eng

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post #2 of 24 (permalink) Old Feb 24th, 2004, 11:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madelief
on the abnamro site is said that lleyton has worked on his dutch but he thanked the public in english wonder how he sounds in dutch

lijkt me wel lachen als lleyton in het nederlands zou spreken. Ik hoop niet dat hij als de paus klinkt "bedankt voor die bloemen"hihihihi Als mijn uit australie zou komen dan zou ik hem de vloekwoorden leren zonder te zeggen wat die betekenen. voor een paar duizend man nedrelands spreken en dit nog niet echt de knie hebben lijkt mij inderdaad zeer eng

Don't be too hard on him - I think that people who have English as their first language find it particularly difficult to speak foreign languages and we have to assume that when Lleyton was growing up in Adelaide he probably had NO exposure to Dutch, so that it is a complete unknown quantity for him. Being a linguist myself, I know how vulnerable it makes you feel trying to speak a foreign language at first!!

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post #3 of 24 (permalink) Old Feb 24th, 2004, 01:13 PM
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Originally Posted by fifiricci
Don't be too hard on him - I think that people who have English as their first language find it particularly difficult to speak foreign languages and we have to assume that when Lleyton was growing up in Adelaide he probably had NO exposure to Dutch, so that it is a complete unknown quantity for him. Being a linguist myself, I know how vulnerable it makes you feel trying to speak a foreign language at first!!
True.

That's why I admire the Dutch crown-princess (a lady from Argentinia) who learned to speak Dutch in a very short time and quite well too. (Of course, she probably had a lot of hard coaching, as future queen-to-his-king )

She didn't have English as first language - but South-American Spanish isn't anything like Dutch: English is much closer...
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post #4 of 24 (permalink) Old Feb 24th, 2004, 01:50 PM
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Speaking from a point of view as an Australian it seems that most Europeans can speak one or two langauges very fluently.
In Australia we are so isolated & although I think they are promoting it more in schools than they used to very few people would say they are fluent in another language unless they migrated here.
I heard a little bit of dutch growing up from my Oma & Opa & their dutch friends but very few people would've.
If people learn languages in school its usually Indonesian or French tho some learn Italian.
It still amazes me that so many people here speak dutch & English. That would be an impossible dream come true for me!

We will miss you Kim!.


Best of Luck in 2007 to: Kim & Bryan, Lleyton, Alicia, Todd, Sam, Chris, Casey, Wayne, Kirsten & all the other Aussies & injured players.
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post #5 of 24 (permalink) Old Feb 24th, 2004, 05:42 PM
 
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you can do it mandy... you allready amaze me too when you write some words in dutch to me!!! You're doing great!!!
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post #6 of 24 (permalink) Old Feb 24th, 2004, 06:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynx
True.

That's why I admire the Dutch crown-princess (a lady from Argentinia) who learned to speak Dutch in a very short time and quite well too. (Of course, she probably had a lot of hard coaching, as future queen-to-his-king )

She didn't have English as first language - but South-American Spanish isn't anything like Dutch: English is much closer...
her dutch is even better than Mathilde's and Claire's

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post #7 of 24 (permalink) Old Feb 24th, 2004, 09:50 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Aussie_Kim
In Australia we are so isolated & although I think they are promoting it more in schools than they used to very few people would say they are fluent in another language unless they migrated here.
I think this is the problem with the States, as well. The two closest countries are Canada and Mexico -- so most of the time the second language that catches on is Spanish, but this country and Canada are so big that there's really no exposure to a different language. Mexico is treated as a vacation destination, not really a place to live.

In Europe, the countries are like an individual state in the US; the difference is, not all the countries in Europe speak the same language! So there is more of a need, IMO, that Europeans can speak more than one language. There is also much more opportunity to practice and retain it, especially on the continent proper.

I, too, am always impressed with the posters here and on other boards who use near-native quality English when it isn't their mother tongue I only wish I could be so fluent in another language, but I was "lucky" enough to be born in an English-speaking country
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post #8 of 24 (permalink) Old Feb 25th, 2004, 01:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TennisHack
I think this is the problem with the States, as well. The two closest countries are Canada and Mexico -- so most of the time the second language that catches on is Spanish, but this country and Canada are so big that there's really no exposure to a different language. Mexico is treated as a vacation destination, not really a place to live.

In Europe, the countries are like an individual state in the US; the difference is, not all the countries in Europe speak the same language! So there is more of a need, IMO, that Europeans can speak more than one language. There is also much more opportunity to practice and retain it, especially on the continent proper.

I, too, am always impressed with the posters here and on other boards who use near-native quality English when it isn't their mother tongue I only wish I could be so fluent in another language, but I was "lucky" enough to be born in an English-speaking country
I feel your pain!
My did my grandparents decide to immigrate
I could've been born in the Netherdlands or Belgium & could speak more than one language!
But your right. There's just no need to speak another language here.

We will miss you Kim!.


Best of Luck in 2007 to: Kim & Bryan, Lleyton, Alicia, Todd, Sam, Chris, Casey, Wayne, Kirsten & all the other Aussies & injured players.
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post #9 of 24 (permalink) Old Feb 25th, 2004, 12:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by majo
her dutch is even better than Mathilde's and Claire's
Yes it is .

Hey majootje, long time no see .
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post #10 of 24 (permalink) Old Feb 25th, 2004, 12:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aussie_Kim
Quote:
Originally Posted by TennisHack
I think this is the problem with the States, as well. The two closest countries are Canada and Mexico -- so most of the time the second language that catches on is Spanish, but this country and Canada are so big that there's really no exposure to a different language. Mexico is treated as a vacation destination, not really a place to live.

In Europe, the countries are like an individual state in the US; the difference is, not all the countries in Europe speak the same language! So there is more of a need, IMO, that Europeans can speak more than one language. There is also much more opportunity to practice and retain it, especially on the continent proper.

I, too, am always impressed with the posters here and on other boards who use near-native quality English when it isn't their mother tongue I only wish I could be so fluent in another language, but I was "lucky" enough to be born in an English-speaking country
I feel your pain!
My did my grandparents decide to immigrate
I could've been born in the Netherdlands or Belgium & could speak more than one language!
But your right. There's just no need to speak another language here.
English IS the international language of today (like French was 2 centuries ago) - so that's another reason why a lot of Europeans speak it.

But you get a much too flattered impression of us Europeans here ... because the many people who don't understand English will never come to WTAworld .

PS: yes, TH, consider yourself lucky : as a native English-speaker you have a lot of opportunities others don't have. For instance: you could easily get a job in Thailand, teaching the Thai English - the fact that it's your milk-language will suffice. That way you could stay there a year or longer, paying your stay in that beautiful country...

Edit: surprisingly enough, not one Thai is interested in learning Dutch

Last edited by Lynx; Feb 25th, 2004 at 01:01 PM.
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post #11 of 24 (permalink) Old Feb 25th, 2004, 04:32 PM
 
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I'd love to learn some European languages like German, Dutch and stuff but the problem is I don't know where and how to learn. I suppose they are much easier to learn when you speak English...for me I'm still trying to learn English
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post #12 of 24 (permalink) Old Feb 25th, 2004, 07:11 PM
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Originally Posted by LleytonKimRULE
I'd love to learn some European languages like German, Dutch and stuff but the problem is I don't know where and how to learn. I suppose they are much easier to learn when you speak English...for me I'm still trying to learn English
i thought it's very easy to learn any language (west european) if you know perfectly english all those languages are similar. Well, may be that's only for me becoz my native language is russian and it's absolutely different one Since childhood i've learned Estonian, then started English and when i finally started to learn german, it was not that hard
anyway now my dream is to learn french but i'm not allowed

So guys i don't understand why you told that it's hard for Lleyton
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post #13 of 24 (permalink) Old Feb 25th, 2004, 10:29 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Lynx
But you get a much too flattered impression of us Europeans here ... because the many people who don't understand English will never come to WTAworld .
Sure, but even the dumbest among you have better English than my Spanish or Russian

Quote:
PS: yes, TH, consider yourself lucky : as a native English-speaker you have a lot of opportunities others don't have. For instance: you could easily get a job in Thailand, teaching the Thai English - the fact that it's your milk-language will suffice. That way you could stay there a year or longer, paying your stay in that beautiful country...
See, that has absolutely no appeal to me. Why would I want to go live in a different country for a year or more and try to teach the natives English? That seems a bit imperalistic (though of course I know that's not what you're talking about, as the job of teaching English would take me there in the first place ) Even while I was in your hypothetical Thailand, I wouldn't be able to get around since I don't know the language, and that is certainly a very different language than English. It goes both ways

My point was not to lament that I was born in the US, but just to say that there is little need for my fellow Americans to learn another language, which consititutes being well-cultured in my eyes (being multilingual, that is) And even when the chance is there, it's often 8th-12th grades and college -- in other words, way too late for we non-linguistically talented folk to pick up a second language with any hope of being fluent in it.
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post #14 of 24 (permalink) Old Feb 25th, 2004, 10:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nica
i thought it's very easy to learn any language (west european) if you know perfectly english all those languages are similar. Well, may be that's only for me becoz my native language is russian and it's absolutely different one Since childhood i've learned Estonian, then started English and when i finally started to learn german, it was not that hard
Well, English is the most difficult language to learn, but it doesn't necessarily mean that all English-speakers will have an easier time picking up another language, even a Western-European one. English is a Germanic language; French, Italian, Spanish are Romance (though it is true that if you learn to speak one, picking up the other two isn't hard). The Slavic languages are a different matter altogether, of course. You can argue whether Russia is Western Europe, but certainly the former Yugoslav republics are

It all depends on a person's capacity to learn. It also helps if you learn young. You can master a language after puberty, but it takes a lot more effort.

Quote:
So guys i don't understand why you told that it's hard for Lleyton
LOL, I don't know if I cleared anything up or not but basically I'm giving away a major interest of mine in my field of study
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post #15 of 24 (permalink) Old Feb 26th, 2004, 01:49 AM
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TH
I agree with everything you said. There's no point in us learning a second lanuage cos when will we use it. How often in my life am I going to speak to a Belgian, French, or German person here in Australia. And it is so expensive to travel to Europe!

We will miss you Kim!.


Best of Luck in 2007 to: Kim & Bryan, Lleyton, Alicia, Todd, Sam, Chris, Casey, Wayne, Kirsten & all the other Aussies & injured players.
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