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Old May 18th, 2014, 08:41 PM   #61
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Re: The Wightman Cup Thread – Reports, Results & More

1985

October 31, November 1 and 2

Venue: The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia (indoors on rubberised Supreme court)

Teams

United States: Chris Evert-Lloyd (captain), Pam Shriver, Kathy Rinaldi, Betsy Nagelsen, Anne White
Great Britain: Annabel Croft, Jo Durie, Anne Hobbs, Virginia Wade (captain)
--

United States d. Great Britain 7-0

Chris Evert-Lloyd d. Jo Durie (GBR) 6-2, 6-3
Kathy Rinaldi d. Anne Hobbs (GBR) 7-5, 7-5
Pam Shriver d. Annabel Croft (GBR) 6-0, 6-0
Betsy Nagelsen/Anne White d. Croft/Virginia Wade (GBR) 6-4, 6-1
Shriver d. Durie 6-4, 6-4
Evert-Lloyd d. Croft 6-3, 6-0
Evert-Lloyd/Shriver d. Durie/Hobbs 6-3, 6-7, 6-2
--

From The ITF “World of Tennis” Yearbook (1986)

By John Parsons

“The United States won the Wightman Cup in 1985 for the seventh successive year, with one of the most comprehensive victories in the 62-year history of this annual women’s competition against Britain. Indeed, it was not until the last of the three dead rubbers on the final day that the visitors gathered their solitary set.

“Yet in a sense that third day’s play, which began with the home team already 4-0 ahead and assured of retaining what is surely one of the most elegant trophies in world tennis, emphasised the special appeal of the Wightman Cup. No matter what the match score may be, it generally manages to evoke a great spirit of competitive and patriotic pride, combined with grace, splendour and ceremony. It was a perfect example of the Wightman Cup being more than just a tennis match but rather a piece of tennis history which an increasing number of influential voices on both sides of the Atlantic want to see preserved.

“On that last the competition went from being keen to intense, even though the scores were of no great consequence. The 6,482 crowd, bringing the total for the three days to 14,669 (an increase of 30 per cent on the previous Williamsburg fixture two years earlier) sat back and immensely enjoyed the whole occasion.

“Pam Shriver, ranked three in the world at the time, had sped the Americans towards their triumph by crushing the young and nervous British number one, Annabel Croft, 6-0, 6-0. Only twice before had a Wightman Cup singles produced such a whitewash score – when Louise Brough beat Jean Walker-Smith in a dead rubber in 1950 and Andrea Jaeger eclipsed Anne Hobbs in 1981. Having produced what the American captain, Chris Evert-Lloyd, said was ‘probably the most perfect tennis she had ever played’, Miss Shriver wondered if she would be able to lift her game again for a match that really did not matter, against Jo Durie. Not only did she win, 6-4, 6-4, but she was made to do so in a thrilling finish when Miss Durie, despite increasing pain from a racket arm, pulled back from 1-5 to 4-5 in the second set. The eighth game, as Miss Durie made it 3-5, lasted 17 minutes, involving 13 deuces, as the British player saved four match points.

“In the final doubles, which lasted almost two hours and contained much beautiful tennis, the British team of Hobbs and Durie were given a great ovation when they finally took a set. They lost in the end, 6-3, 6-7, 6-2, to Mrs Lloyd and Miss Shriver, but it was a marvellous match with some particularly fine touches from Mrs Lloyd and Miss Hobbs. The tiebreak went to 8-6 and was won on the second opportunity. On the first set point, at 6-5, Mrs Lloyd spotted Miss Hobbs crossing over a shade early and promptly drove a tremendous two-handed backhand winner past her down the line. It was one of the few times Miss Hobbs was outwitted. Miss Durie clinched the second set point with a smash.

“One of the recurring dilemmas of the Wightman Cup is that the event, especially when it is being staged in the United States, needs the support of the top American players to build up and sustain the degree of enthusiasm in Williamsburg, where Dick and Cynthia Anzolut, the professional promoters, and Millie West, the honorary chairman in charge of a veritable army of eager volunteers, do such a magnificent job. When the Americans are at strength, as in 1985, the matches will always be one-sided until Britain also has a crop of players genuinely pressing to be at the very top. The 7-0 result was not entirely unexpected for, apart from having the first- and third-ranked players in the world, both playing two singles matches and later a doubles together, even the third American singles competitor, Kathy Rinaldi, in eleventh position was some 17 places ahead of Britain’s highest-ranked player, Miss Croft.

“Probably the best Britain could have hoped for was a 5-2 defeat. Miss Hobbs was clearly fitter than at any other time in a year which had largely been sacrificed to overcoming a debilitating attack of shingles, and it was felt she might upset Miss Rinaldi. There was optimism, too, about the first doubles. In the event, even those modest dreams evaporated and Britain’s team manager, Sue Mappin, was left to observe at the end of the first day, with the Americans 2-0 ahead, ‘Anything we won would have been a bonus – and in the end we didn’t get anything.’ With just a tiny slice of luck for Britain it could have been 1-1. On the other hand, the remark remained apt throughout the three days.

“On that last day, the British contingent clutched at straws. After the superbly staged opening ceremony, colourful and dignified, Miss Durie won the first six points, four of them with outright winners, in the first rubber against Mrs Lloyd. It was a heady moment, Mrs Lloyd nodding in that appreciative yet menacing manner she has in acknowledging fine shots. Yet it was too much to hope that it would last. Miss Durie rushed headlong into costly errors in the third game and thereafter, although she played reasonably well and fought for all she was worth, Mrs Lloyd was now superbly in command.

“Miss Hobbs, for her part, was nearly able to take advantage of the undoubted nervousness felt by Miss Rinaldi. Despite losing, 7-5, 7-5, the British player broke back to 5-5 in both sets, but she used so much mental, as well as physical energy simply staying in the match, saving six match points in that second set, that she did not have enough left to capitalise on the fresh opportunities she created for herself.

“The second day was one Britain – and especially Miss Croft – would rather forget. Perhaps it might have been different had Miss Croft taken the break point she held in the first game. But I doubt it. Three times in that opening game Miss Shriver played crunching forehand volleys which immediately illustrated her confidence and resolve, and in next to no time she was on the rampage. She allowed Miss Croft only 10 points in the first set and a meagre 14 in the second. Indeed, not just then, but also against Miss Durie and then in the final doubles with Mrs Lloyd, there was tangible evidence of an altogether sharper Miss Shriver. She was reaching shots with so much time to spare that, particularly on the volley, her response was infinitely more effective than it has been in the past.

“After that singles débâcle for Miss Croft, it was hardly surprising that the teenager was still not in the happiest frame of mind of form when she and team captain Virginia Wade, playing her 21st Wightman Cup, were entrusted with the task of trying to keep the contest alive into day three. They stayed with Betsy Nagelsen and Anne White for a while, but drifted to a 6-4, 6-1 defeat against opponents whose record together was worthy of a higher reputation.

“So once again it was all painfully predictable for Britain, yet the enthusiasm for the event of Miss Shriver and Mrs Lloyd in particular remained undiminished. Both stressed how much they enjoyed the chance to represent their country in an event with such history and tradition, which brought a welcome change from the normal tournament atmosphere in which they solely play for themselves.

“Few have represented the United States with greater dignity or success than Mrs Lloyd who, when not in action herself, was always to be seen leading her team with much animated gusto from the players’ box, while coach Tom Gorman provided what advice was necessary at courtside. She now has a 26-0 singles record over 13 Wightman Cup years to go with her 28-0 record in the Federation Cup.”
-----

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Old May 18th, 2014, 08:41 PM   #62
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Re: The Wightman Cup Thread – Reports, Results & More

1986

October 30 and 31, November 1

Venue: Royal Albert Hall, London (indoors on rubberised Supreme court)

Teams

United States: Kathy Rinaldi, Bonnie Gadusek, Stephanie Rehe, Elise Burgin (captain), Anne White
Great Britain: Jo Durie, Annabel Croft, Sara Gomer, Anne Hobbs

Non-playing British captain: Virginia Wade
--

United States d. Great Britain 7-0

Kathy Rinaldi (USA) d. Sara Gomer 6-3, 7-6
Stehpanie Rehe (USA) d. Annabel Croft 6-3, 6-1
Bonnie Gadusek (USA) d. Jo Durie 6-2, 6-4
Gadusek/Rinaldi d. Croft/Gomer 6-3, 5-7, 6-3
Gadusek d. Anne Hobbs 2-6, 6-4, 6-4
Rinaldi d. Durie 6-4, 6-2
Elise Burgin (USA)/Anne White (USA) d. Durie Hobbs 7-6, 6-3
--

From The ITF “World of Tennis” Yearbook (1987)

By Laurie Pignon

“Not long ago the young looked at you with a sort of amazed incredulity if you told them that announcers on the wireless used to war dinner jackets when they read the evening news. But no longer, for nostalgia is back in business; sentimental revivals are back in vogue. Yet one thing which has never changed is the Wightman Cup.

“True, the event has moved from the elegant lawns of the All Engand and West Side Clubs to London’s much-loved Albert Hall and America’s historic Williamsburg, which seems to have been preserved in pristine condition in a deep freeze of time. True, the event is genteely sponsored by Nabisco, who bring us Shredded Wheat for breakfast and chocolate biscuits for tea. But little else has altered. Even the results keep favouring the United States, who recorded their eighth consecutive victory in November, with same score that they achieved in Virginia the previous year: 7-0.

“Britain has never been short of vultures ready to pick at the bones of British lawn tennis, and again in 1986, as after every depressing defeat, moaning media minnows were calling for at least a change in the format of the Wightman Cup, or for it to be scrapped altogether. This, of course, is nonsense, and the players of both nations want it to continue in the same spirit in which it was first played in 1923. Judging by their enthusiastic support, the public enjoy it, too. The obvious joy of watching Anne Hobbs giving her all, from comfortable seats on a cold, wet winter’s afternoon, was dismissed by many writers as of no account because America had already won the Cup and it was a ‘dead’ rubber. Yet if public interest depended only on the success of the British, there would not be too many people hungering for Wimbledon tickets!

“The loyalty of British tennis followers is remarkable, and they deserve more from the players than they have been given in recent years. It is not entirely to do with stroke-playing, but involves mental and physical toughness too and, as the American girls keep showing us, a pride both in personal performance and in one’s country.

“The Americans were without Martina Navratilova and Chris Evert-Lloyd, unbeaten in her 26 Wightman Cup singles, who was having treatment on an injured knee, but if world form is anything to go by, their 7-0 success should have been the expected result and not the humiliation claimed by some critics.

“Britain’s biggest hope was that Bonnie Gadusek, Stephanie Rehe and Elise Burgin – all playing their first Wightman Cup contest – might crack under the patriotic pressure that the Albert Hall crowd were only too willing to exert; but we always seem to underestimate the extreme depth of character the Americans have when the honour of their flag is in question. The Lawn Tennis Association did everything they could, in an emotional and brilliantly staged opening ceremony, to whip up the ‘Land of Hope and Glory’ fervour for which the elegant old Hall is renowned: from on high the Royal Trumpeters blasted their inspiring fanfares, and all the red-cassocked boys of the Westminster Abbey choir added the Elgar ingredient by singing ‘Rule Britannia’. All the while the American team kept their eyes firmly on the American flag.

“The contest was opened by Sara Gomer, a tall, likeable Devon left-hander, who had had nasty dreams about the Albert Hall and had spent some of the day walking in the Hyde Park rain. This was her first Cup match and she was up against Kathy Rinaldi, who had turned professional aged 14, was the youngest player ever to win a match at Wimbledon, and had defeated Virginia Wade in 1983 and Anne Hobbs two years later. Miss Gomer’s experience may have been as green as the Devon hills, but she gave of her best. In spite of her big service letting her down in the early stages, she got her tactics right – no doubt aided by the expertise of Miss Wade in the captain’s chair – and whenever she could she sliced the ball low and short to the American’s backhand, which is always a good wheeze against a two-fisted player.

“The message of the trumpeters was still ringing in her supporters’ ears when she broke service to lead 3-1, but Miss Rinaldi, who had probably never heard of Elgar, was more accurate in her power shots, more consistent in her volleys, and won the next five games. In the second set, when there was still everything to play for, Miss Gomer launched herself with all the spirit of Drake facing an invading armada. She twice broke the service of the American, who admitted that she was getting nervous whilst Miss Gomer was getting more confident. She had three points for a 5-1 lead when a double fault completely changed the psychology of the match.

“Like a prisoner freeing herself from shackles, Miss Rinaldi thrived from her unexpected escape and, playing the sort of tennis we expect from a player in the world’s top ten, won five of the next six games. Rookie she may have been, but Miss Gomer did not intend to roll over. She had a bad start to the tiebreak, but kept the crowd yelling the scores to 6-all, when she was beaten by a forehand and drove over the baseline.

“If Britain were to have any realistic chance of success, it was vital for Annabel Croft to beat Miss Rehe in the rubber between the two number three singles players. But she was outclassed by a better and more competitive opponent, and the 6-3, 6-1 match was all over in 69 one-side minutes.

“Jo Durie had strangely had better results in previous contests against the American number one than she had against their number two, whom she had never beaten. This time, when Britain needed the sort of aggressive tennis she played in 1983 to reach the semi-finals of the French Championships, Miss Durie lost to both Americans. On the Friday she hit the ball bravely and boldly enough, but not often enough in court to put any real pressure on Miss Gadusek. Two breaks of service gave the American the first set, 6-2, in 35 minutes.

“The second set was much more exciting, for there were six breaks of service in the first eight games, with Miss Durie always leading by the odd one. But her superiority was little more than a mathematical illusion, for the American was running down balls Miss Durie expected to be winners. Also, confident enough to keep lobbing her 6ft, 2in opponent, she always had her in two minds about coming to the net.

“For the first time after 21 splendid years, Miss Wade decided to keep to her captain’s chair and not to play. What a pity, for she might have saved that vital doubles and kept Britain’s hopes alive at least to the third day. Instead Miss Gomer and Miss Croft played as if they had no idea of doubles tactics, in which the elementary plan should be to make the opponent hit the ball up to you. In spite of their high returns, they were beaten only 6-3, 5-7, 6-3, by Miss Gadusek and Miss Rinaldi, which only went to show that under more pressure the Americans would have been a very vulnerable partnership.

“It is nonsense to suggest there was nothing to play for on the third day, for pride was at stake. Anne Hobbs got the bit between her teeth and charged willy-nilly into Miss Gadusek, earning herself a set and the gratitude of the crowd. Yet the most emotional moments of the day were inspired by the honey-sweet notes from the silver-throated Welsh boy, Aled Jones, who afterwards was presented with a racket by the Duchess of Kent, whose love of the game is matched only by her enjoyment of music.”
-----

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Old May 18th, 2014, 08:41 PM   #63
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Re: The Wightman Cup Thread – Reports, Results & More

1987

October 29, 30 and 31

Venue: The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia (indoors on rubberised Supreme court)

Teams

United States: Zina Garrison, Pam Shriver (captain), Lori McNeil, Gigi Fernandez, Robin White
Great Britain: Anne Hobbs, Jo Durie (captain), Sara Gomer, Clare Wood, Valda Lake
--

United States d. Great Britain 5-2

Zina Garrison d. Anne Hobbs (GBR) 7-5, 6-2
Lori McNeil d. Sara Gomer (GBR) 6-2, 6-1
Pam Shriver d. Jo Durie (GBR) 6-1, 7-5
Gigi Fernandez/Robin White d. Gomer/Clare Wood (GBR) 6-4, 6-1
Shirver d. Hobbs 6-4, 6-3
Durie d. Garrison 7-6, 6-3
Durie Hobbs d. Garrison/McNeil 0-6, 6-4, 7-5
--

From The ITF “World of Tennis” Yearbook (1988)

By Barry Wood

“Great Britain went into the Wightman Cup with the somewhat dubious cushion of knowing that they could not possibly do worse than people’s expectations of them. For they had already been written off before they left for Williamsburg, and a third successive 7-0 whitewash seemed to be a foregone conclusion. Once again calls were being made for a European team to replace the British squad, especially in view of the recent victory of the Ryder Cup team in America. Pam Shriver pondered the idea of a Commonwealth team, while Britain’s coach, Warren Jacques, suggested, after the first results had gone against them, that it might be a better idea to play the event every other year, in order to give the British team time to build.

“All the negative talk actually served to make the task easier in the minds of the players, because it lifted much of the pressure from them. They were also grateful to be play away from home and far from the critical gaze of Fleet Street. While the American team, under the guidance of Shriver, featured four new members – Zina Garrison, Lori McNeil, Robin White and Gigi Fernandez – Britain relied on the experience of Jo Durie and Anne Hobbs, together with Sara Gomer and Clare Wood, who was making her senior international debut. Valda Lake also travelled with the team but did not play.

“The only really disappointing British performance came from Gomer, who completely crumbled against McNeil, losing 6-2, 6-1. The others performed with credit, their persistence eventually paying off as they won the last two rubbers. It may have been too little too late, but no one should suggest that with victory assured the Americans were no longer trying. The tears from Garrison, who lost, 7-6, 6-3, to Durie and then with McNeil lost, 0-6, 6-4, 7-5, against Durie and Hobbs, left no doubt in anyone’s mind how important it still was to win. What stung most of all was Britain’s comeback in the doubles – from 0-6 in the first set and 1-4 in the third. The American team afterwards seemed surrounded by the aura of a defeated nation.

“When the computer rankings of the players currently concerned are examined, Britain should never in theory have won a match at all. The fact that occasionally they are able to do so is therefore a bonus. The reasons behind Britain’s inability to produce top players is another subject entirely and has, of course, been the centre of much discussion over the years. But Jacques sees hope for the future. ‘The material is definitely there to work on,’ he said. ‘I think you have to wait for two or three years, but British tennis is on the upswing. There are a lot of good young girls coming up and I’m quite excited about it.’
----

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Old May 19th, 2014, 12:42 PM   #64
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Re: The Wightman Cup Thread – Reports, Results & More

1988

November 3, 4 and 5

Venue: Royal Albert Hall, London (indoors on rubberised Supreme court)

Teams

United States: Zina Garrison (captain), Lori McNeil, Patty Fendick, Betsy Nagelsen, Gigi Fernandez
Great Britain: Jo Durie, Sara Gomer, Monique Javer, Julie Salmon, Clare Wood

Non-playing British captain: Ann Jones
--

United States d. Great Britain 7-0

Zina Garrison (USA) d. Jo Durie 6-2, 6-4
Patty Fendick (USA) d. Monique Javer 6-2, 6-1
Lori McNeil (USA) d. Sara Gomer 6-7, 6-4, 6-4
McNeil/Betsy Nagelsen (USA) d. Gomer/Julie Salmon 6-3, 6-2
Garrison d. Clare Wood 6-3, 6-2
McNeil d. Durie 6-1, 6-2
Gigi Fernandez (USA)/Garrison d. Durie/Wood 6-1, 6-3
--

From ITF “World of Tennis” Yearbook (1989)

By John Parsons

“The credibility of the Wightman Cup, even as a specially staged tennis event, was inevitably called into question again after Britain’s 7-0 thrashing by what, in ranking terms, was only a second-best United States team at the Royal Albert Hall. For the fifth time since the Union Jacks had last been waved in triumph in 1978, Britain failed to win even a single rubber, extending the United States’ lead in this annual meeting of old friends to 50-10.

“British Car Auctions, sponsoring the match for the first time, played their part with the Lawn Tennis Association in making the sixtieth staging of the match one of the most memorable in the event’s history. The Royal Albert Hall looked at its colourful, resplendent best as everyone waited for the Queen to arrive for the opening ceremony, while the scarlet-robed choristers from Westminster Abbey and the trumpeters from the Royal Military School of Music at Kneller Hall brought lumps to many throats.

“Yet once the tennis started it was again all too swiftly an occasion for the British supporters to think wistfully, ‘If only we played tennis as well as we stage it...’ To be fair, several of the matches were enjoyable, and a few were reasonably competitive, not least the first singles on the second night between Lori McNeil and Britain’s Sara Gomer. Miss Gomer, then ranked 52, compared with Miss McNeil in twelfth place, produced one of her most courageous and determined performances as she went so close to registering what would have been Britain’s first victory in a live match since 1984.

“She persisted well to take the first set tiebreak, 7-5, then had two points to lead 4-2 in the second set and three chances to lead 5-3 in the third, but still the tall left-hander let it slip away, 6-7 (5-7) 6-4, 6-4. On the second of Miss Gomer’s points for 5-3, Miss McNeil escaped with the shot of the match – a magnificently disguised backhand cross-court which dropped just over the net and died. Then, with a golden opportunity to move to game point a fourth time, Miss Gomer smashed wide and British spirits sagged again.

“There was some hope for the future in the performance of Clare Wood, deputising for the injured Miss Gomer against Zina Garrison in one of the dead rubbers, but the only other British comfort came in the words of the lively American, Patty Fendick, when she said: ‘If something so different as this event didn’t continue, it would certainly be missed.’”
-----
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Old May 19th, 2014, 12:43 PM   #65
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Re: The Wightman Cup Thread – Reports, Results & More

1989

September 14, 15 and 16

Venue: The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia (indoors on rubberised Supreme court)

Teams

United States: Lori McNeil (captain), Mary Joe Fernandez, Jennifer Capriati, Betsy Nagelsen, Patty Fendick
Great Britain: Jo Durie, Sara Gomer, Clare Wood, Anne Hobbs

Non-playing British captain: Ann Jones
--

United States d. Great Britain 7-0

Lori McNeil d. Jo Durie (GBR) 7-5, 6-1
Jennifer Capriati d. Clare Wood (GBR) 6-0, 6-0
Mary Joe Fernandez d. Sara Gomer (GBR) 6-1, 6-2
Mary Joe Fernandez/Betsy Nagelsen d. Gomer/Wood 6-2, 7-6
McNeil d. Gomer 6-4, 6-2
Fernandez d. Durie 6-1, 7-5
Patty Fendick/McNeil d. Durie/Anne Hobbs (GBR) 6-3, 6-3
--

From ITF “Word of Tennis” Yearbook (1990)

By Andrew Longmoore

“There was a pathetic inevitability about the Britain’s defeat in the 61st, and quite probably the last, Wightman Cup. Britain lost 7-0 to the USA in Williamsburg, suffering their fourth whitewash in five years and their eleventh defeat in a row. Not only did the British girls fail to win a rubber against an American second team; they failed to win a set for the first time since 1981. They did not even have any set points. The one memory of an otherwise forgettable three days was the astonishing performance of 13-year-old Jennifer Capriati, who in her first senior match beat Clare Wood, 6-0, 6-0, in 42 mesmeric minutes. ‘I have never been in a hurricane,’ said Miss Wood, ‘but I imagine that is about as close as I will ever get.’

“The Wightman Cup has always been David against Goliath. Britain lost the first match in 1923, 0-7, did not manage a win from 1931 to 1957, and trail 10-51 overall. But while there was still honour even in losing for your country, there was still some point in continuing to search for an elusive victory. Now, partly because there is so much international tennis anyway, the honour has gone. Defeat brings only embarrassment and no amount of traditional flag waving or trumpet blowing in what Virginia Wade has described as the ‘best-presented non-event in the world’ can disguise the fact. As Sue Mappin, the national women’s team manager, has said, ‘We all love the Wightman Cup; we just hate the matches.’

“Nothing was more apparent than that during the three days. There were glimpses of a fighting spirit, notably in the doubles when Sara Gomer and Clare Wood fought back from one set and 0-3 down to level the second set at 6-6 against Mary Joe Fernandez and Betsy Nagelsen. But the American pair won the tiebreak, 7-3, establishing a decisive 4-0 lead in the competition.

“Capriati alone disturbed the predictability. The British team had hoped that the French and US junior champion from Florida might be stricken with nerves, but when she won 12 of the first 15 points even that vain hope evaporated. To her eternal credit, Wood tried her hardest and did not play badly, but like most of the crowd of 2,136 in the William and Saint Mary Hall, she was utterly bemused by the power and accuracy of Capriati’s ground strokes.

“Capriati’s future looks bright – far brighter than that of the Wightman Cup. There are moves to postpone it for a year while some of the younger British players develop. Perhaps it would be kinder to drop it altogether before all vestiges of dignity vanish from the oldest competition in women’s tennis.”
-----
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Old May 19th, 2014, 12:43 PM   #66
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Re: The Wightman Cup Thread – Reports, Results & More

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Old Jun 14th, 2014, 08:30 PM   #67
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Re: The Wightman Cup Thread – Reports, Results & More

I've added details of some Wightman Cup stalwarts to section #3 above.
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Old Jun 14th, 2014, 10:51 PM   #68
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Re: The Wightman Cup Thread – Reports, Results & More

Thank you! Lots of fun to read through.

The only Whightman matches I saw were from 1986 at the Royal Albert Hall. It was an impressive ceremony and impressive arena. No one does pageantry like the British!

The matches were fun too. This is where I discovered Sara Gomer, whom I thought was great fun to watch. I always love and appreciate Kathy Rinaldi too so I enjoyed the matches.
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Old Jul 10th, 2014, 03:31 PM   #69
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Re: The Wightman Cup Thread – Reports, Results & More

I started following tennis in 1982, when I was 15, so saw only two or three Wightman Cup ties (on television), and only ties held in London. I remember Chris Evert-Lloyd beating Jo Durie in 1984 (7-6, 6-1). Otherwise I don't really have any memories of the competition, but it does have a long, rich history, which is what I was trying try to show by posting the above reports.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HanaFanGA View Post
Thank you! Lots of fun to read through.

The only Whightman matches I saw were from 1986 at the Royal Albert Hall. It was an impressive ceremony and impressive arena. No one does pageantry like the British!

The matches were fun too. This is where I discovered Sara Gomer, whom I thought was great fun to watch. I always love and appreciate Kathy Rinaldi too so I enjoyed the matches.
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Old Sep 24th, 2014, 12:50 PM   #70
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Re: The Wightman Cup Thread – Reports, Results & More



Wightman Cup Team 1928

Seated, left to right: Eleanor Goss, Molla Mallory
Up, left to right: Helen Jacobs, Helen Wills, Penelope Anderson

Thanks to Jimbo for identifying these ladies in another thread
and to our departed (but not forgotten) Alfajeffster for scanning it to begin with.
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