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Old May 28th, 2014, 12:28 AM   #31
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Re: 1984

Baseball Playoffs Start at Bellevue
Omaha World-Herald
Thursday, May 10, 1984
Associated Press

[...]

Tracy Austin of the United States has informed organizers she will not compete in the French Open tennis championships, organizers said Wednesday. No reason was cited for Miss Austin's decision not to attend the competition scheduled from May 28 to June 10.

Miss Austin is the second top U.S. player to forego the Grand Slam event. Pam Shriver announced earlier she will not play singles at the championships, but will team with Martina Navratilova in doubles play.

[...]
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Old May 28th, 2014, 12:28 AM   #32
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Re: 1984

IF IT'S SUNDAY IT MUST BE THE FIFTH DAY OF HER 3-MONTH EUROPEAN TOUR
The Miami Herald
Sunday, May 13, 1984
Herald Staff

If this is Sunday, it must be England for Ronni Reis, Sunset High's two-time state singles champion who embarked on a three-month tour of Europe Tuesday.

Reis will play in a variety of junior and pro tournaments during her swing through France, Italy, Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands and Great Britain, including qualifiers for the French Open and Wimbledon.

"We'll play in a lot of small, $10,000 tournaments, too," Reis said. "I hope to get some points and move up in the rankings."

The 18-year-old senior is missing the last month of school, but her teachers agreed to let her take final exams when she returns in August. She will attend the University of Miami on a tennis scholarship.

"Graduation is fun and I'll miss it," Reis said. "But I think this is more worthwhile."

Reis will be accompanied by her coach, Patricio Apey, as well as 10 other players, most of whom are Apey's students from South America.

"This is something we've been planning all year," Apey said. "We did it last summer, but Ronni couldn't come then. The girls gain a lot of experience from international competition."

Reis has been to Japan, but never Europe.

"Italy," she said. "That's the country I can't wait to see."
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Old May 28th, 2014, 12:29 AM   #33
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Re: 1984

MCENROE BONES UP FOR FRENCH TEST
Philadelphia Daily News
Monday, May 14, 1984
United Press International

Even while thrashing Ivan Lendl yesterday, John McEnroe had a faraway gleam in his eyes.

The battling New Yorker has ended all debate about the identity of the No. 1 tennis player in the world, and by winning the $500,000 Tournament of Champions for the second year in a row, he has proven his ability to play on clay.

Now, there are bigger stakes ahead for McEnroe.

It has been 29 years since an American man has won the French Open , the world's premier clay-court championship, and it is a prize McEnroe wants dearly when the competition begins May 28.

"I feel better now about my chances going to the French," McEnroe said after beating Lendl, 6-4, 6-2, at Forest Hills. "The French wasn't that important in my mind five or six years ago. I don't think people realize how the French has changed within the last couple of years as far as prestige is concerned."

Although he is unbeaten in 32 matches this year, with seven tournament titles to his credit, McEnroe doesn't believe he'll go into the French Open as the favorite.

"I think I'm one of six," McEnroe said. "There's no clear-cut favorite right now."

McEnroe lost in the quarterfinals of the French Open last year to Mats Wilander.

Playing an aggressive, gambling style, McEnroe attacked the net whenever possible against Lendl and achieved the only break of the opening set in the 10th game.

McEnroe, earning the $100,000 first prize, boosted his earnings for the year to $343,250. Lendl won for $40,000.

David Dowlen and Nduka Odizor, former teammates at the University of Houston, won the doubles title from Ernie Fernandez and David Pate, 7-6 (7-3), 7-5.
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Old May 28th, 2014, 12:29 AM   #34
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Re: 1984

McEnroe honors mom by destroying Lendl
The San Diego Union
Monday, May 14, 1984
From News Services

John McEnroe, employing his relentless attacking style to perfection, gave his mother something special for Mother's Day.

"I gave her this match," the New York left-hander said after defeating Czechoslovakia's Ivan Lendl 6-4, 6-2 yesterday to successfully defend his title in the $500,000 Mercedes Tournament of Champions at the West Side Tennis Club in New York.

Then he backed up a little.

"Well, (I gave her) one-tenth of this match."

That works out to $15,000 of his $150,000 first-place purse for the mother of the world's No. 1 tennis player.

"Today I was aggressive, and I stayed back and played the points out, too," McEnroe said. "I think I'm playing the best ever I have in my career, but I still think I can improve as a player."

Lendl, who pocketed $40,000, said McEnroe taking the ball on the rise caused him problems.

"The ball comes back much faster," said Lendl, who won this tournament in 1982. "If someone can do that and keep going, it's just too hard to beat. Yesterday, I just pushed the ball back, but today I had to put something on the ball. But John just did something better."

It was McEnroe's seventh tournament victory of 1984, his 32nd consecutive match win and boosted his 1984 earnings to $443,250.

In winning this unique champions-only event for the second straight year, McEnroe proved that he can play on clay.

"I've been relatively healthy," McEnroe said in explaining his remarkable year. "Everything's been falling into place. The fact that I beat two good clay-court players here will help my chances over there (at the French Open, which is played on slow, red clay)."

Besides Lendl, who reached the final of the French Open in 1981, McEnroe eliminated Jimmy Arias, the reigning U.S. Clay Courts and Italian Open champion, in the semifinals.

Lendl had advanced to yesterday's title match by handing reigning U.S. Open champion Jimmy Connors his worst-ever loss, 6-0, 6-0.

o o o

Bjorn Borg scored a 6-2, 6-2 victory over top-seeded Bill Scanlon to win a $200,000 tennis tournament at Osaka, Japan, yesterday.

Borg, who retired from major tournaments in 1981, won $30,000 and Scanlon took home $15,000.

Carling Bassett, the 16-year-old from Canada, routed Bettina Bunge of West Germany 6-2, 6-4 in the women's finals and won $30,000. Bunge received $15,000.

Scanlon teamed with American Pam Shriver to beat compatriots Greg Holmes and Beth Herr 6-2, 3-6, 6-2 in the mixed doubles final. The winners shared $16,000 and the losers $8,000. Eight men and eight women players took part in the five-day tournament.

o o o

The top-seeded UCSD team of Eugene Jones and Dan Beers downed Raman Jayapathy and Riley Horan of Gustavus Adolphus 6-0, 6-3 yesterday in the doubles final of the NCAA Division III men's championship at Emory University near Atlanta, Ga.

Sixth-seeded Scott Moore of the University of Redlands won the singles championship, beating Alex Palladino of Kalamazoo College 6-1, 7-6 (7-4). Jones and Beers qualified for entry in the Divison I individual tournament starting Thursday at the University of Georgia.

o o o

Francesco Cancellotti of Italy defeated American Jimmy Brown 6-1, 6-4 and captured the $15,000 first prize in the Roger and Gallet Grand Prix Tournament on the clay courts of the Cascine Tennis Club at Florence, Italy.

In defeating the 19-year-old Brown, Cancellotti became the first Italian in four years to win the Grand Prix title at the $75,000 tournament, considered a warmup for the Italian Open beginning today at Rome's Foro Italico.

o o o

Unseeded Juan Aguilera of Spain outlasted Sweden's Henrik Sundstroem in a five-set marathon to win the $250,000 West German Open at Hamburg.

The 22-year-old from Barcelona took 3 hours and 27 minutes for his 6-4, 2-6, 2-6, 6-4, 6-4 victory in front of a a crowd of 10,000 at Hamburg's Rothenbaum arena. The win was worth $42,500 to Aguilera.
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Old May 28th, 2014, 12:30 AM   #35
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Re: 1984

'Wunderkind' knocks off Gadusek
The San Diego Union
Friday, May 18, 1984
Associated Press

Steffi Graf, at 14 the youngest West German competitor, yesterday eliminated top-seeded Bonnie Gadusek 6-0, 6-4 in the $150,000 German Women's Open Tennis Tournament in Berlin.

The unseeded Graf beat Gadusek, ranked No. 10 in the world, 6-0, 6-4 before a crowd of 2,000 in only 88 minutes to advance to the quarterfinals.

Graf previously had beaten Pat Medrado of Brazil, and Gadusek defeated fellow American Jamie Golder.

Meanwhile, eighth-seeded Kathy Rinaldi beat Ivanna Madruga-Osses of Argentina 7-5, 6-2 to advance to the quarterfinals, and Andrea Leand defeated Andrea Temesvari of Hungary 6-3, 6-2.

Catherine Tanvier of France ousted West German Sylvia Hanika 6-1, 6-4 in only 70 minutes, and Claudia Kohde of West Germany eliminated Mima Jausovec of Yugoslavia 6-1, 6-2 in 57 minutes.

o o o

Third-seeded Yannick Noah of France became the latest upset victim at the $315,000 Italian Open Tennis Championships in Rome, dropping a tough third-round match to Diego Perez of Uruguay 3-6, 6-2, 6-4.

The victory by the unseeded Perez over Noah, rated sixth in the world, leaves only two of the top 10 seeded players still competing on the clay courts of Rome's Foro Italico.

Eighth-ranked Jose-Luis Clerc of Argentina made easy work of Gianni Ocleppo, beating the Italian 6-1, 6-1 in an afternoon match, and No. 5 Andres Gomez of Ecuador advanced to the quarterfinals with a 3-6, 6-4, 6-1, victory over Sweden's Anders Jarryd, seeded ninth.

"I really played to win this time," said Perez, 22, who lost to Noah in Monte Carlo in April. "I went to the net because he doesn't have a good backhand passing shot."

Noah, complaining of an abdominal strain, said he was feeling the effects of having played two tough matches on Wednesday.

Claudio Panatta, younger brother of retired Italian star Adriano Panatta, continued to thrill the partisan fans by advancing to the quarterfinals. He downed Stefan Simonsson of Sweden 6-4, 7-5. In the only night singles match, Francesco Cancellotti of Italy, who upset No. 1 seeded Mats Wilander Wednesday, ousted 12th-seeded Chris Lewis of New Zealand 6-3, 7-5.

o o o

Four days after suffering the worst defeat of his career, Jimmy Connors has withdrawn from the Bank of Oklahoma Tennis Classic in Tulsa, citing a severe sinus infection. Connors lost to Ivan Lendl 6-0, 6-0 on Sunday. It was the first shutout of his professional career.
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Old May 28th, 2014, 12:30 AM   #36
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Re: 1984

16-year-old Krickstein reaches Italian final
The San Diego Union
Sunday, May 20, 1984
From News Services

Sixteen-year-old Aaron Krickstein overpowered Diego Perez of Uruguay 6-4, 6-0 in Rome yesterday to become the youngest finalist in the history of the Italian Open Tennis Championships.

The hard-hitting high school student from Grosse Pointe, Mich., will face fifth-seeded Andres Gomez of Ecuador today in the final of the $315,000 tournament.

Gomez, 24, a winner here in 1982 and ranked seventh in the world, beat Argentina's Jose-Luis Clerc 6-3, 6-2 in yesterday's other semifinal.

Keeping his composure before the packed center court crowd at the Foro Italico, Krickstein ousted Perez with a strong serve and a stinging forehand on the clay. But he said he expects a difficult match against Gomez, who is expected to go to the net against his young opponent to neutralize Krickstein's powerful ground strokes from the baseline.

"If he's serving well, it will be tough for me," Krickstein said.

Between the semifinal matches, Sweden's Bjorn Borg, twice the Italian champion, was greeted with a standing ovation when he came to center court. Borg, here for a promotional appearance, was the youngest player to win in Rome when he took the Italian title for the first time in 1974 at 17.

Krickstein, who will be 17 on Aug. 2, plans to finish his junior year in high school this year, studying between matches. He also will enter the French Open and Wimbledon.

"My books are here, but I haven't opened them," he confessed.

o o o

Second-seeded Kathy Horvath and sixth-seeded Claudia Kohde of West Germany will meet today in the final of the $150,000 German Open in Berlin.

Kohde beat Kathy Rinaldi 6-4, 6-0 in only 55 minutes of the semifinals Saturday, and Horvath defeated eighth-seeded Catherine Tanvier of France 6-3, 7-5.

o o o

Fourth-seeded Michael Pernfors of Georgia edged No. 2 Jonny Levine of Texas 1-6, 7-6, 6-2, and third-seeded Lawson Duncan of Clemson dispatched unseeded Barry Moir of Auburn 6-0, 6-4 to reach the final of the 100th annual NCAA Tennis Championships, in Athens, Ga.

The match today will bring the NCAA's individual singles title to a Deep South school for the first time since Jose Aguero of Tulane won the championship in 1956. Neither Georgia nor Clemson has ever had an NCAA singles titlist.

In doubles competition, the top-seeded team of Jerome Jones and Kelly Jones of Pepperdine and sixth-seeded Rick Leach and Tim Pawsat of USC advanced to the final by winning their quarterfinal and semifinal matches yesterday.

o o o

Fifth-seeded Lisa Spain of Georgia fought off three match points in the second set and upset second-seeded Gretchen Rush of Trinity 3-6, 7-6 (12-10), 6-3 to advance to the final of the NCAA women's individual championships in Los Angeles.

Spain will face fourth-seeded Linda Gates of Stanford, who beat SMU's Ann Hulbert 6-7, 7-6, 7-5, for the singles title.

The San Diego State University doubles team of Cynthia MacGregor and Linda Howell was eliminated yesterday in the semifinals.

MacGregor and Howell, seeded No. 3, won their quarterfinal match 6-3, 6-4, over Christina Rozwadowski and Lauri MacGill of South Florida. They then lost to Stanford's unseeded team of Elise Burgin and Linda Gates 6-2, 6-4.

By making it to the quarterfinals, MacGregor and Howell earned All-America status. MacGregor, a sophomore, was eliminated by Gates in the singles quarterfinals Friday. MacGregor is now a two-time All-American in singles and doubles.

o o o

Saddleback's David Salmon lived up to his top seedings yesterday.

Salmon captured the California Community College singles title at Grossmont, then teamed with Jim Stephens to give Saddleback the doubles title.

Salmon, winner of the Pacific Coast Conference, Ojai and Southern California Regional tournaments, downed Shawn Hayes of Delta Community College 6-2, 6-2. He and Stephens beat a team from Long Beach Community College 6-3, 6-4.
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Old May 28th, 2014, 12:31 AM   #37
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Re: 1984

NCAA finals go to the 'Dogs'
The San Diego Union
Monday, May 21, 1984
From News Services

It was a banner day for the University of Georgia Bulldogs yesterday in the NCAA Division I tennis championships.

At Athens, Ga., Georgia's Michael Pernfors used a strong baseline game to rout Clemson freshman Lawson Duncan 6-1, 6-4, for the singles title in the 100th annual NCAA Men's Tennis Championships.

Meanwhile, at Los Angeles, Georgia senior Lisa Spain captured the NCAA Division I women's singles title with a 7-5, 3-6, 6-2 victory over Linda Gates of Stanford.

Spain, seeded fifth, used a powerful forehand to keep the fourth-seeded Gates off balance. A three-time All-American, Spain will now play in the French Open and the qualifying rounds of Wimbledon.

Pernfors, a 20-year-old native of Sweden playing on his home court, became the first representative of a Southern school to win the NCAA singles crown in 29 years and the first ever from Georgia.

The 85-minute match was a battle of baseline players that featured long rallies. Pernfors, a 5-foot-8, 150-pounder, refused to say if he would return to Georgia and try to defend his title next year or join the pro circuit.

In the doubles championship, top-seeded Jerome Jones and Kelly Jones of Pepperdine -- the latter a former San Diego resident and junior champion -- defeated Southern California's Rick Leach and Tim Pawset 6-3, 7-6 (7-4). The Joneses, who are not related, easily won the first set and came back to win the second in a tiebreaker after trailing 5-2.

In the women's doubles final Gates and her Stanford partner, Elise Burgin, breezed to a 6-3, 6-4 victory over UCLA's Elizabeth Minter and Lynn Lewis. Lewis is from San Diego.

o o o

Andreas Gomez of Ecuador won the Italian Open yesterday, defeating 16-year-old Aaron Krickstein of Grosse Pointe, Mich., 2-6, 6-1, 6-2, 6-2 in a wind-marred final at Rome.

Krickstein, the youngest finalist ever here, proved no match to the fifth-seeded Gomez, who won his second Italian title.

Throughout the match, wind gusts churned up clouds of clay, disturbing the players' vision and knocking down advertising signs lining the center court at the Foro Italico.

Krickstein raced out to a quick lead, winning the first set in 28 minutes, but Gomez, seventh-ranked in the world, then turned the match around. Gomez, who won the Italian championship in 1982, takes home $48,000 for the victory.

Krickstein said he'd never played in worse conditions before. "On a lot of the points, I could only see with one eye. With the wind I couldn't get to his backhand."

o o o

West Germany's Claudia Kohde defeated Kathy Horvath 7-6, 6-1 in the final of the $150,000 German Women's Open at Berlin. The 20-year-old West German, who had been seeded sixth, took 86 minutes to beat the second-seeded American before a crowd of 4,500. Kohde, the former West German champion, fended off four set points in the first set, which was decided 10-8 with a tiebreaker, and dominated the second set.

o o o

Libor Pimek of Czechoslovakia upset Gene Mayer 6-4, 4-6, 7-6, 6-4 to win the title in the $93,000 Bavarian Open at Munich.
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Old May 28th, 2014, 12:31 AM   #38
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Re: 1984

SPORTS PEOPLE; Serving for No. 4
Published: May 24, 1984
New York Times
Associated Press

Martina Navratilova was seeded first, Chris Evert Lloyd second and Hana Mandlikova third for the French Open tennis championships, which begins Monday.

It is the first of the year's Grand Slam events. If Miss Navratilova wins the title on the slow red clay of Roland Garros Stadium in Paris, she will have four consecutive ''slam'' titles, including the Australian, Wimbledon and United States, although not in the same calendar year. However, the achievement would be worth $1 million in bonus money.
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Old May 28th, 2014, 12:32 AM   #39
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Re: 1984

Tennis returns to Olympics; Rockets eye dream front line
The Christian Science Monitor
Thursday, May 24, 1984
Ross Atkin, Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor

As one of the most universally played sports, tennis belongs in the Olympics. Organizers of the first modern Olympics felt that way, and so too does this summer's Los Angeles host committee, which requested that tennis be placed back in the Olympics after a long absence

Few realize that tennis was one of only five sports to appear in each of the first eight Olympics, beginning in 1896. When it was eventually dropped, the Davis Cup, which had begun in 1900, was well established as a global tennis competition. The sport's present reinstatement is not exactly total, since it will only be a demonstration event in L.A., just as it was at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics. No medals will be awarded, but tennis has been approved as a competition sport for the 1988 Games in Seoul. However, that could change if the Olympics were moved from Korea to avoid potential boycott snags. The host committee reserves the right to designate two demo sports, the other being baseball this time

Because the Olympics theoretically ban professionals, their appearance in tennis will naturally come as a surprise. But officials have decided to determine eligibility by age, with 20 the cutoff point.

Consequently, anyone 20 or under can represent his or her country, even Sweden's Mats Wilander, the 1982 French Open champion. Wilander has indicated his desire to compete, as have American pros Andrea Jaeger, Kathy Horvath, and Jimmy Arias. The three Americans will receive automatic wild card entries into the Olympics rather than be required to qualify for the US team at the May 28-June 2 tournament at the National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadow, N.Y

The basis for their qualifying exemption, made in part because of a conflict with the French Open, is that each player ranks among the world's top 20

The caliber of competition, therefore, should be quite high, and certainly light years ahead of what it was at the 1896 Olympics in Athens, when the best players stayed away. John Pius Boland, an Irish tourist in Greece that year, took advantage of the situation to win the men's singles title

[...]
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Old May 28th, 2014, 12:32 AM   #40
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Re: 1984

TENNIS PROS FACE GRUELING 2 WEEKS
The Miami Herald
Sunday, May 27, 1984
JIM MARTZ, Herald Sports Writer

Paris in the spring means love to some, but to the tennis circuit, it means the most grueling two weeks of the year.

"I've always thought the French Open is the toughest tournament to win," says Harold Solomon, a finalist in 1976. "It's the toughest mentally and physically. Day in and day out, the rallies are longer and the matches are longer because of the slow red-clay courts. And there are so many good European and South American clay-court players. The tournament used to be even tougher because there were no tiebreakers and the balls were heavier."

This year's tournament, which will begin Monday and continue through June 10, is spiced by an intriguing array of questions:

* Will John McEnroe, 32-0 this year and the recent winner of the WCT Forest Hills championship on clay, become the first American to win the men's title since Tony Trabert in 1955?

* Can Yannick Noah, who last year became the first Frenchman to win the men's championship since 1946, defend his title despite the pressure from his homeland that was so great he moved to New York to seek anonymity?

* Can Martina Navratilova win her fourth consecutive Grand Slam tournament, thus earning a $1 million bonus put up by the International Tennis Federation?

* Will Chris Evert Lloyd bounce back from her humiliating 6-1, 6-0 loss to Navratilova on Amelia Island's clay and successfully defend her title?

The key to any of these questions being answered in the affirmative is patience and perseverance. The French Open is not a slam-bam affair as is the U.S. Open on cement or as Wimbledon and the Australian Open can be on grass. It's a survival-of-the-fittest test.

Ed Rubinoff, who in 1962 was the only American to qualify and reach the first round, can attest to that.

"With all due respect, I was a strong clay-court player, and in the years I played, we had a relatively weak American group," says Rubinoff, a former University of Miami All-American and now an attorney in Miami. "Those clay courts are so tough to play on. And you have a bunch of European players used to them, names you've never heard of.

"You can't attack them, and you're out there all day long. Americans are not mentally conditioned to play two to three hours to win a match, 6-1, 6-1.

"McEnroe is perfectly capable of winning any match. He's so mentally tough, until he loses control of himself. But it's a question of temperament and knowing it's going to take 10 to 15 shots a point to win. And do it over five sets and over 14 days."

Frank Froehling, a semifinalist in 1971 and now constructing tennis courts in Florida, adds, "McEnroe certainly is the best player in the world. But I can't see him going two weeks on the slow red clay. Maybe Jimmy Arias could. He has that kind of game."

The list of players who could win the men's title is as tall as the Eiffel Tower. Favorites besides McEnroe, Noah and Arias include Ivan Lendl, 1982 French champion Mats Wilander, Jose Higueras, last week's Italian champion Andres Gomez, and Jose-Luis Clerc. Possible breakthroughs include the latest Swedish sensations, Henrik Sundstrom and Stefen Edberg, and France's Henri LeConte. Solomon believes that he and fellow South Florida clay-court specialists Brian Gottfried and Eddie Dibbs "are way long shots."

Solomon also thinks it's "a fluke" that no American has won the men's title in 28 years. And Trabert says, "It's a sad commentary, and I don't know why."

In that same period, six U.S. women have won the French singles, including Evert five times between 1974 and 1983, and naturalized citizen Navratilova in 1982. In light of Navratilova's domination of Evert (10 straight matches) and her newfound confidence and patience on clay, she is the overwhelming favorite.

"I did far better than I thought I could at Amelia Island and the next week at Orlando when I beat Laura Arraya, 6-0, 6-1," says Navratilova. "I feel very comfortable on clay. I know what shots to hit, and I know when to slide.

"I should do even better on red clay. I grew up on red clay, and I'm playing better on clay now than I did two years ago when I won the French."

Last year, Navratilova was upset in the fourth round by Kathy Horvath, her only loss of the year. Since then, Martina the Magnificent has won the next three legs of the Grand Slam -- Wimbledon, the U.S. Open and the Australian Open.

Now comes the battle of the traditionalists against the International Tennis Federation, which is changing the ground rules for winning the Grand Slam. Traditionally, that has meant winning all four major tournaments in the same calendar year.

Only four players have accomplished the feat -- Don Budge in 1938, Maureen Connolly in 1953, Rod Laver in 1962 and '69, and Margaret Court in 1970. But last year, ITF President Philippe Chatrier decreed that any player who captures all four Grand Slam titles in a row, in any time frame, wins the Grand Slam.

Fault! says the U.S. Tennis Writers Association, which voted overwhelmingly against the ITF plan and said it wouldn't recognize a non-calendar-year sweep of the four majors as a Grand Slam.

"I will call it a Grand Scam or Grand Sham," says columnist and commentator Bud Collins, who will be part of NBC's crew telecasting the tournament. Adds Tennis magazine Managing Editor Alexander McNab, "The ITF's move is an unfair and unnecessary dilution of the game's greatest challenge, and a denigration of the accomplishments of the four previous Grand Slam winners . . . It's essentially a PR gimmick."

Nevertheless, Navratilova will accept the Grand Slam crown if she wins, not to mention the extra $1 million. "To me, it counts if they say it counts, and the ITF and Women's Tennis Association say it does," she said.
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Old May 28th, 2014, 12:33 AM   #41
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Re: 1984

A NEW NOAH SETS OUT TO KEEP FRENCH TITLE
The Philadelphia Inquirer
Sunday, May 27, 1984
Associated Press

The French Open begins tomorrow with all eyes on defending champion Yannick Noah, the first Frenchman in 37 years to win the coveted Grand Slam event.

Much has changed since Noah delighted his countrymen by beat Sweden's Mats Wilander in an emotion-packed finale at Roland Garros Stadium.

His dreadlocks are gone, replaced by a much shorter hairstyle. Bachelorhood has been succeeded by marriage. Even his address had changed. Noah, 24, moved to New York last year, saying he needed a break from the goldfish-bowl life that Paris had become for him.

But some things, he hopes, remain the same. The two-week contest on the famed red clay courts will give Noah a chance to prove that fame and fortune have not undone his unique blend of athleticism and shot-making ability.

Noah will be the No. 6 seed, with American John McEnroe seeded first.

The top-seeded woman is Martina Navratilova, chasing her first Grand Slam - the French, Wimbledon, U.S. Open and Australian Open titles in the same year. Last year, hard-hitting American Kathy Horvath beat Navratilova in the quarterfinals here.

Defending champion Chris Evert Lloyd, a five-time champion on the sticky surface where she has reigned for more than a decade, is seeded No. 2. Though Navratilova crushed Lloyd in their last clay match, the two have not met here since 1975, when Lloyd won easily.

Noah, in a bit of a slump this season, may face a strong challenge from McEnroe and Jimmy Connors, the best hopes for the first American men's victory at the French Open in 29 years.

While Noah has been fending off the French press, adjusting to married life and getting over the recent death of his grandfather during a coup attempt in Cameroon, McEnroe has been injury-free and full of confidence.

The 25-year-old New Yorker has won every tournament he has played since January, including the Grand Prix Masters, the U.S. Pro Indoors, Madrid, the World Championship Tennis Finals in Dallas and the WCT Tournament of Champions at Forest Hills.

But the temperamental lefthander, baffled by the slow clay in Paris, has never made it past the quarterfinals there. Last year, McEnroe lost to 1982 champion Wilander in a tough four-set dual.

With its 128-man draw, the 1984 edition of the French Open , at the ever- expanding Roland Garros near the Bois de Boulogne, has drawn all but two of the world's top male players. Eliot Teltscher of the United States and Kevin Curren of South Africa have withdrawn with injuries.

Most of the women were at the Italian Open in Perugia, and open play Tuesday and Wednesday. Clay-court specialist Tracy Austin of the United States, again the victim of injuries, has again postponed her long-awaited comeback. Pam Shriver, never at her best on clay, will play doubles with Navratilova.

Connors, 32, thrashed last year by France's Christophe Roger-Vasselin in the semifinals, is seeking victory in the only Grand Slam event he has never won. Connors is the third seed, behind McEnroe and Ivan Lendl of Czechoslovakia.

Connors' participation was thrown into question by a sinus condition, but the man who holds 103 Volvo Grand Prix titles arrived in Paris last week to practice and attend numerous festivities in his honor.

The French Open purse has been increased by $250,000 over last year, to a total of $1.8 million. The men's singles, which many players call the hardest tournament to win, pays about $131,250 to the victor. The losing finalist will collect about $65,000.

Other top contenders for a berth in the June 10 finals include Lendl, the No. 2 seed. The 25-year-old righthander, who has never won a Grand Slam event, has reached five finals since January, but he won only at Luxembourg. He crushed Connors in the semifinals on clay at Forest Hills but was no match for the aggressive McEnroe, who won handily.

Like Noah, Wilander, 19, seeded fourth, has made a less-spectacular showing this season. Though always a threat on clay, three major losses have recently come at the hands of fellow Swedes Henrik Sundstrom and Stefan
Edberg.

Sundstrom, 20, ranked No. 11 in the world, has posted one of the best records on the men's circuit this season with wins at Bari, Tunis and Monte Carlo, where he trounced Wilander.

Other clay-court masters expected to fare well at this stadium named for a World War I ace include seventh-seeded Andres Gomez of Ecuador, Jimmy Arias of the United States and Argentina's Guillermo Vilas and Jose Luis Clerc.

Gomez, 24, has victories at Nice against Sundstrom and at Rome against U.S. teenager Aaron Krickstein.

Vilas, 31, still trying to repeat the aggressive backcourt play that earned him three final berths and the championship in 1977, is No. 12 in the world rankings.
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Old May 28th, 2014, 12:34 AM   #42
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Re: 1984

U.S. team makes final
The San Diego Union
Sunday, May 27, 1984
From News Services

John McEnroe coasted to a 6-3, 6-0 victory over Jose Higueras of Spain yesterday to lead the United States into the final of the $531,000 Ambre Solaire World Team Tennis Cup, in Duesseldorf, West Germany.

In today's final, the U.S. team, which was undefeated in the Blue Group of the eight-nation tourney, will meet Czechoslovakia, which won the Red Group. McEnroe, top-ranked in the world, will face Ivan Lendl, ranked second.

The match will be the players' final test before the French Open in Paris, which starts tomorrow. McEnroe and Lendl are seeded to meet in the final.

The U.S. team took an unbeatable 2-0 lead over Spain when Jimmy Arias defeated Juan Aguilera 6-3, 6-7, 6-0. McEnroe and Peter Fleming completed the sweep with a 7-5, 6-2 victory over Aguilera and Manuel Orantes.

ITALIAN SEMIS WASHED OUT -- Rain postponed the semifinals of the $150,000 Italian Women's Open in Perugia, forcing organizers to reschedule the matches for today and move the finals to tomorrow.

Rain also postponed the end of the last quarterfinal match yesterday, leaving Manuela Maleeva of Bulgaria with a 7-6, 2-2 advantage against Virginia Ruzici of Romania.

Earlier, top-seeded Chris Evert Lloyd advanced to the semifinals when defending champion Andrea Temesvari of Hungary defaulted because of a back injury. Lloyd will face Lisa Bonder, who beat Raffaela Reggi of Italy 6-3, 6-3. In the other quarterfinal, Canadian Carling Bassett easily beat Yvonne Vermaak of South Africa 6-1, 6-2, and will face Maleeva or Ruzici.

The finals' postponement leaves Lloyd uncertain about beginning the defense of her French Open crown on schedule. The French Open begins on Monday.

The rules say the Italian Open must be completed by midnight tomorrow.
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Old May 28th, 2014, 12:34 AM   #43
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Re: 1984

People in sports
Daily Breeze
Torrance, CA
Tuesday, May 29, 1984
Associated Press

Martina Navratilova, her eyes set on her fourth consecutive Grand Slam tournament and a $1 million bonus, and Jimmy Connors, seeking to become the first American to win the men's singles title in 29 years, moved easily into the second round of the $1.8 million French Open tennis tournament in Paris.

Connors, the No. 3 seed, crushed fellow countryman Eric Fromm, 6-2, 6-3, 6-1, in under two hours on the center court at Roland Garros.

Connors, recovered from a sinus problem that sidelined him recently, won on a combination of baseline and net play. ''I was hitting the ball well and he was missing a few shots,'' the 31-year-old Connors said.

In other men's matches, 16-year- old Aaron Krickstein, beaten in the Italian final by Ecuador's Andres Gomez, routed Eduardo Oncins of Brazil, 6-0, 6-1, 6-1. Another teen-age winner was Sweden's Kent Carlsson, who downed the veteran Georges Goven of France, 6-0, 6-2, 6-0.

Top-seeded John McEnroe and second-seeded Ivan Lendl were not scheduled.

Navratilova, aiming to become only the third woman and the fifth player ever to win the coveted Grand Slam, followed Connors on court and made an equally strong start against French junior Nathalie Tauziat, winning, 6-1, 6-2.

The big surprise of the day was the elimination of fourth-seeded Andrea Jaeger in the women's singles. Jaeger forfeited her match against little-known fellow American Jamie Golder after dropping the opening set, 7-5.

Jaeger, a finalist in 1982, said she had aggravated a sore arm in the chilly, overcast weather.

''It was cold out there and the longer I stayed on the court, the worse my arm got,'' she said. ''It would have been stupid to keep on and really damage my arm.''
Navratilova, the world's top-ranked woman and the 1982 winner here, said she had never heard of Tauziat, who had to qualify. ''That kept me awake, but it didn't bother me,'' said Navratilova, who had not competed in four weeks.

In a first round match before rain halted play today, Catherine Tanvier defeated Lucia Romanov of Romania, 6-2, 7-5.

[...]
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Old May 28th, 2014, 12:35 AM   #44
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Re: 1984

EVERT LOSES FINAL OF ITALIAN OPEN
The Miami Herald
Tuesday, May 29, 1984
Herald Staff

Seventeen-year-old Manuela Maleeva of Bulgaria upset top-seeded Chris Evert Lloyd, 6-3, 6-3, to win the Italian Open tennis tournament Monday in Perugia.

Maleeva needed just one hour 36 minutes to down Evert, moving her opponent around the court and forcing repeated errors.

Rain has plagued the $150,000 tournament, and Maleeva played the final after completing a quarterfinal match against Virginia Ruzici of Romania, then downing Canada's Carling Basset in the semifinal on the clay courts of the Junior Tennis Club in this central Italian city.

Maleeva, who is ranked 12th in the world on the Women's Tennis Association computer, completed the final set of a quarterfinal match that had been delayed since Friday by downing Ruzici, 7-6, 4-6, 6-2. Then she defeated Bassett, 6-2, 6-2, to advance to the final. Evert defeated Lisa Bonder in the semifinals, 6-1, 6-1.

Evert has won this tournament five times, in 1974, '75, '80, '81 and '82.

* * *

Fourth-seeded Andrea Jaeger was eliminated, but Martina Navratilova and Jimmy Connors moved into the second round of the French Open in Paris.

Jaeger forfeited her match against little-known fellow American Jamie Golder after dropping the opening set, 7-5.

Jaeger said was troubled by an arm injury, could not continue and was even considering pulling out of Wimbledon next month.

Connors, the No. 3 seed who is hoping to become the first American in 29 years to win the men's singles title, crushed fellow countryman Eric Fromm, 6-2, 6-3, 6-1, in under two hours on the center court at Roland Garros Stadium.

Navratilova, hoping to become only the third woman and the fifth player ever to win the coveted Grand Slam, followed Connors on court and made an equally strong start against French junior Nathalie Tauziat. Despite a few anxious moments at the start of the second set, Navratilova, the women's top seed and champion here in 1982, overwhelmed her inexperienced opponent, 6-1, 6-2.

The Grand Slam used to mean winning all four major tournaments -- the U.S., French and Australian titles, and Wimbledon -- within the same calendar year. But two years ago, the International Tennis Federation announced it would henceforth recognize anyone who held all four titles consecutively, even if that meant overlapping into two seasons.

The ITF stressed the point by putting up a $1 million bonus to anyone who achieved the feat.

In a late match on an outside court, No. 15 Tim Mayotte lost in straight sets to Rolf Gehring of West Germany.

Mayotte, whose serve-and-volley game is perfectly suited to the grass at Wimbledon, where he consistently does well, failed to come to terms with the slow Roland Garros surface and was beaten, 7-5, 6-1, 7-6 (8-6).

John McEnroe, the top seed in the men's singles, will see his first action today, as will three other strong contenders for the title: Ivan Lendl of Czechoslovakia, Sweden's Mats Wilander and defending champion Yannick Noah of France.

No American has won the men's trophy here since Tony Trabert successfully defended his title in 1955. But Connors made few mistakes and coped confidently with the slow bounces and long rallies.

Other seeds to come through their first-round matches Monday included No 17 Jose Higueras of Spain, No. 7 Andres Gomez of Ecuador and No. 9 Henrik Sundstrom of Sweden. All won in straight sets.

In the women's singles, two West Germans, No. 14 Claudia Kohde-Kilsch and No. 11 Sylvia Hanika, both reached the second round comfortably.
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Old May 28th, 2014, 12:35 AM   #45
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Re: 1984

I bet that was a real quiet bus ride.

MALEEVA CATCHES EVERT NAPPING
The Miami Herald
Tuesday, May 29, 1984
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seventeen-year-old Manuela Maleeva of Bulgaria took a nap between matches Monday, then went out and upset top-seeded Chris Evert Lloyd, 6-3, 6-3, to win the Italian Open tennis tournament. The title was Maleeva's second in 15 days, following a victory in the Swiss Open.

After completing the last set of a quarterfinal match with Romania's Virginia Ruzici and downing Canada's Carling Bassett in a semifinal in the rain-plagued $150,000 tournament, the youngster took a rest in the locker room.

"I slept for a half-hour on a couch," she said, adding, "I never expected to win the match."

Maleeva beat Ruzici, 7-6, 4-6, 6-2, then downed Bassett, 6-2, 6-2, to advance to the final.

Evert also had to play a semifinal in the morning, beating fellow American Lisa Bonder, 6-1, 6-1.

Evert had defeated Maleeva in three prior matches this year.

The final took 1 hour 36 minutes, as Evert, seeking her sixth title here, was kept on the run by Maleeva's sharp ground strokes on the clay court. She was scoring especially with her two-handed backhand, angling the ball close to the lines. And she surprised the 29-year-old American with deft lobs the few times Evert went to the net.

Evert, who holds the record for the longest winning streak on one surface, capturing 125 consecutive matches on clay from August 1973 to May 1979, also had trouble holding serve throughout the match.

After the match, the players boarded a bus for Rome to make a plane connection for Paris, where they will compete in the French Open.

In the doubles final, the Czechoslovak team of Iva Budarova and Helena Sukova defeated Virginia Ruzici of Romania and Kathy Horvath of the United States, 7-6, 1-6, 6-4.
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