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Old Aug 26th, 2013, 05:25 PM   #586
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Re: 1986

Tennis: Champion keeps on her feet
The Times
London, England
July 7, 1986
REX BELLAMY

Martina Navratilova beat Hana Mandlikova 7-6, 6-3 in an hour and twelve minutes in the women's singles final at Wimbledon on Saturday.

This was Miss Navratilova's fifth consecutive win, a feat matched only by Suzanne Lenglen, and her seventh altogether, which equals the tally of Dorothea Lambert Chambers and has been surpassed only by Helen Wills Moody, champion eight times. As in 1983 and 1984, Miss Navratilova won the title without conceding a set.

There were probably three main reasons why Miss Navratilova recovered from 2-5 down to win. One was the superiority of her serving (her first service was remarkably consistent) and the related superiority of her service return. A second was the greasiness of the court. Miss Navratilova kept her feet better and had an advantage in strength when the balls became heavy.

A third was the fact that Miss Mandlikova, possibly deluded by her early success, carefully persisted in playing pianissimo - too often pushing the ball instead of whacking it, which meant that she gave Miss Navratilova fractionally more counter punching time than was wise. Miss Navratilova's anticipation was sharp enough without that indulgence.

Miss Mandlikova achieved a 5-2 lead because whereas Miss Navratilova (expecting an early storm) began the match tentatively, Miss Mandlikova was hitting all the time, even with mishits and skidding improvizations. Once Miss Navratilova had settled down she transformed 2-5 into 5-5 at the cost of only 2 points and, thereafter, was always in charge - much to the satisfaction, no doubt of her housekeeper, five dogs and a cat, who were watching it all on television back home in Texas.
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Old Aug 26th, 2013, 05:26 PM   #587
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Re: 1986

Tennis: Game, set but no match for the Wimbledon losers
The Times
London, England
July 8, 1986
PAUL MARTIN

As at Rome's Colosseum, Wimbledon's centre court salutes only those of its gladiators who survive and conquer in their final encounters. A few All-England finalists return, hardened by past battles, and emerge triumphant. Most, though, receive an imperial thumbs-down and are doomed to oblivion in tennis history.

Ivan Lendl is so good a player that it is hard to imagine that he will not hold up that golden trophy one day, as Boris Becker has done twice. Yet if he never does, Lendl may at least take some cold comfort in the list of tennis thoroughbreds who have also stumbled at the final hurdle, sometimes more than once.

Ken Rosewall lost four finals spanning 20 years; Baron von Cramm lost three in succession, as did Fred Stolle. All losers in Wimbledon's last round bear the mental scars; none can banish the memory of their lonliness as they towelled down, waiting to receive the words of commiseration from the royal party, like extras obliged to play a role they would have spurned just hours before.

'Photographers just rushed past me, they shoved me aside and trampled all over my bags and rackets,' Dennis Ralston says. He was beaten 6-4, 11-9, 6-4 in 1966 by Manuel Santana. 'I was furious but impotent; it was the lowest moment in my life.' In retrospect, he bitterly regrets his self-satisfaction at reaching the final and lack of real determination to win it at all costs.

For Ralston, as for so many others, a reversal of that one match result would have changed his standing in the game. Now Chris Lloyd's coach, a television commentator and a college tennis instructor, he is unrecognized by Wimbledon's hierarchy to this day. He has never been inside the members' enclosure at Wimbledon (though he could have gone to last Thursday's reception with the newly formed Last Eight Club). Yet the winners have all been accepted honorarily into the ranks of the Club's holy of holies.

Ken Rosewall, in 1971, became a unique exception. Kurt Nielsen has followed. The Dane reached two finals, in 1953 and 1955, but, like Lendl, did not come close to winning. A Wimbledon title then, might have produced a Danish tennis explosion on a Borg-like Swedish scale.

Who knows? Nielsen strikes me as a rather sad figure these days, having retired two years ago as a Grand Prix supervisor, probably because he was just too nice to tame the likes of John McEnroe. Like many near champions, he would have been more successful, according to Rosewall, had he bothered to become fitter, Australian style.

Some players kept on trying in vain. Rosewall came so close in 1954 and 1956, had a tough five-setter again John Newcombe in the 1970 final, and at the age of 39 'amazed' himself by getting through again, only to be devastated by Connors.

Another Australian, Fred Stolle, was nurturing his prodigy, Mary-Jo Fernandez, aged 14, at Wimbledon this year. Stolle lost his first final in 1963 to Chuck McKinley (now ill with a brain tumour and inducted this week into the Tennis Hall of Fame). Stolle beat McKinley the following year, but in the final ran into his nemesis, Roy Emerson (6-4, 12-10, 6-3), as he did again in the 1965 final.

Of course there have been tales of dashed hoped for women stars, Christine Truman being one, though her injury in the final against Angela Mortimer has, her detractors suggest, become worse and worse with the passage of the years.

One who might well have been champion, but for injury, was Vera Sukova, who died in 1984. She tripped down the stairs of her hotel just before her final, badly damaging an ankle. Her foot and leg heavily strapped, she was no match for the American, Karen Susman, losing 6-4, 6-4. The charming Czech had earlier defeated Angela Mortimer, herself the victim of a torn hamstring which would have led her to scratch were she not defending champion.

For the Sukova family, all is not lost. Vera's daughter, Helena, who played so marvellously in this year's quarter-final against Mrs Lloyd, may restore its honour. Another loser with a tale of woe was Baron von Cramm, who in his 1936 final against the great Fred Perry, pulled a thigh muscle after the first game, which went to deuce 10 times. He lost 6-1, 6-1, 6-0.

The man who came closest to winning the title without actually doing so was an Australian, John Bromwich. Serving at 5-3, 40-15 in the final set against Bob Falkenberg, the hard-hitting American, Bromwich was beaten three times by desperate full-blooded returns of service. Bromwich did not win another game.

For every disappointed finalist there have, of course, been two defeated semi-finalists. For Ramanathan Krishnan, simply getting that far twice (losing to Fraser in 1960, and Laver in 1961), made him a national hero in India. Perhaps it is just as well he went no further.

Still, his success bred Vijay Armitraj, the Wimbledon junior champion, whose family were inspired to build a court in Madras, one mile away from the Krishnan's. Ramanathan's son Ramesh, reached the quarter-finals this year.

Some finalists fade into obscurity fast. Chris Lewis, of New Zealand, found reacing the 1983 final to be something of a curse, though a cherished memory. Unable to live up to the vastly increased expectations, his tennis has slipped to a point where he declined this year to compete at Wimbledon, where he would have had to play in the qualifying event.

Lewis had to be prised off a beach in Australia earlier this year for a Davis Cup match, in which he performed disastrously. He then relinquished the world circuit for the comforts of club tennis in West Germany.

Kevin Curren, 1985 finalist, is struggling to find the motivation for another onslaught on his favourite surface, grass, here next year.

Still, despite the degree of indifference with which losing finalists are treated here, all remain adamant that the Wimbledon traditions must not be sacrificed. The old hands complain that many players think they are, in Ralston's words, bigger than the game, and show scant respect for Wimbledon's glorious past. Clearly for these great Wimbledon finalists, the game on what might have been their day of glory turned out bigger than they could cope with.
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Old Oct 29th, 2013, 09:27 PM   #588
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Re: 1986

LADY FOUND LIBERTY IN U.S. BUT REMAINS A LONE STAR OF TENNIS
Daily News of Los Angeles
Monday, July 7, 1986
Joe Jares

WIMBLEDON, England -- Martina Navratilova is probably never going to become an American tennis heroine in a class with Chris Evert Lloyd, Billie Jean King or -- going back to the 1920s and '30s -- Helen Wills Moody.

First, Navratilova is an import. She defected from Czechoslovakia in 1975 and became a U.S. citizen in 1981.

Second, she is an admitted lesbian. Her sex life shouldn't have anything to do with her popularity, but nevertheless it does.

(A lesbian relationship in King's life was publicized, too, but it has been mostly overshadowed by her court achievements and pioneering efforts for women's tennis.)

American heroine or not, Navratilova, 29, is on the way to establishing herself as the most dominant, if not the best, woman player of all time.

On Saturday she won her seventh Wimbledon singles. Only Moody has won more (eight).

On Sunday she won her seventh Wimbledon doubles, bringing her total of titles here (singles, doubles and mixed doubles) to 35, five short of King's record.

And just to make this month even more memorable for her, she returns to her native Prague July 21-27 for the first time since she flew the Communist coop.

SHE WILL PLAY for the U.S. team that will try to deny Czechoslovakia its fourth straight victory in the Federation Cup, a one-week, one-city, female version of the Davis Cup.

Navratilova insists she is not considered a villain in her native land, hasn't been "shunned" and, in fact, has been asked to appear on Czech TV with Prague's mayor during Federation Cup week.

"They write about me more than (Ivan) Lendl," she says of Czech newspapers.

Navratilova should be something of a curiosity in and around Prague's Wenceslas Square -- a peroxide-blonde, stocky Slav-Texan.

After she beat Hana Mandlikova in the women's final, the "home" Martina yearned to see was Fort Worth, not Prague.

"I can't wait to go home first," she said, "and then I'll be ready to go to Czechoslovakia."

THE ALL ENGLAND Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club the last two weeks should have replaced warm British beer with cold pilsener from Martina's old country.

This had to be the most Slavic Wimbledon in history.

Yes, Czech Jan Kodes won men's singles in 1973, over a Soviet, but that was the year most of the top male players were on strike. And '73 had nowhere near the Slavic depth of '86.

You've read about the feats of Navratilova, probably the best Czech- American athlete since basketball player John Havlicek. Czech Mandlikova was runner-up in both singles and doubles. Another Czech made the quarterfinals of singles. Three other Slavic women, a Czech and two Bulgarians, got as far as the third round.

Czech Lendl was runner-up in men's singles. Yugoslav Slobodan Zivojinovic made men's semifinals, a Czech made the quarters, two more Czechs made round three.

Even down in the juniors, Czechs Petr Korda and Radka Zrubakova made the boys' and girls' quarterfinals, and Natalia Zvereva won the girls' over fellow Soviet Leila Meski.

The rise of Europeans -- Slavs, Swedes, West Germans and even French -- has been extraordinary, with the Czechs leading the way.

"Czechoslovakian tennis has sought out and developed the best young athletes they have," wrote ex-Wimbledon champ Arthur Ashe in his London Sunday Times column.

"It is also the legacy of Jan Kodes; with two French Open wins and his Wimbledon title of 1973, he did for them what (Bjorn) Borg did for Sweden and Becker is doing for Germany."
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Old Oct 29th, 2013, 09:28 PM   #589
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Re: 1986

A Defector's Will Drives Martina
THE SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE
Monday, July 7, 1986
Skip Bayless, Special to the Dallas Times Herald

Wimbledon, England - The difference between Martina Navratilova and Hana Mandlikova is that one defected and one didn't sweat it.

Martina Navratilova had the guts in 1975 to tell her communist chaperons she was not going back to Czechoslovakia. No, she was staying in the America she had daydreamed about in geography class back in Prague.

Martina could have been world-famous while remaining a Czech, as Hana Mandlikova has been. But Martina, at 17, wanted to be rich, and she realized that could happen only in America.

She risked never seeing her family again to be a capitalist. Maybe she even risked her life. She suspects she was followed for a couple of years, hotel to U. S. hotel, by communist agents.

I doubt many Americans truly accept her as an American star, although many of our forefathers shared her plight and dream. She isn't a product of our system, but to me, she'll always be an example of why we live in the world's greatest country. Only in America could the ultimate product of the Czech tennis assembly line be allowed to live like a queen.

I'll always see Martina as one of the world's luckiest people. She was born with a world-beater body into a socialist system that all but forced her to develop her physical genius. Then she escaped to Oz, where no one tells her how to spend her millions or what lifestyle to lead.

Whatever you think, don't forget that it took nerve to defect in New York, to admit publicly in 1981 that she is bisexual and to overcome her emotions and everyone's All-American girl, Chris Evert.

It took the cold-blooded will with which she terminated Mandlikova in Saturday's Wimbledon final. Hana doesn't have that will. Martina made things too easy for Hana, who's five years younger.

Hana came out Saturday flicking winners as if she were playing with a magic wand. Effortless, emotionless winners. In the first set, Hana led, 5-3 and 15-love.

Martina said, "She was just blasting - falling down, getting up, hitting lines. What can you do?"

You say, "Enough." Martina won the next four points for a service break. She won four more to hold her serve at love. She won the first-set tiebreaker, 7-1.

And suddenly, NBC's "Breakfast at Wimbledon" became "Breakfast at McDonald's." Hana was Egg McMuffin in the 6-3 second set. No guts. No nerve. No drive. No will.

Hana can pull off shots no woman ever has, and that includes the best woman player ever, Martina. But Hana isn't as strong - physically or mentally - as Martina.

Martina is now 7-0 in Wimbledon finals. She won this year without losing a set. On court, Martina is a killer. Hana is not.

Yet Hana doesn't spend much more time in Prague than does Martina, who's scheduled to return soon, for the first time since '75, for a Federation Cup match.

Hana hasn't had to think deeply about her political plight. That's because Hana is allowed to live in Boca Raton, Fla. She still pays her dues to the Czech Tennis Federation and uses a Czech passport and says she has no intention of becoming an American citizen.

She has the best of both worlds - her family and friends behind the Iron Curtain, her fame and fortune beyond it. In winnings alone, she has amassed $2.5 million.

For all this she can thank Martina, who opened the barbed-wire gates for Hana and Ivan Lendl, now the richest man in tennis.

Said one Czech journalist, "After Martina, the government loosened up a lot with Hana and Ivan." Hana and Ivan aren't forced to give most of their winnings to the Czech federation. You might say that Martina died for them. In Czechoslovakia, Martina became a non-person when she renounced her homeland."

But that hasn't bothered her. If anything has bothered her, it's that America hasn't embraced her as the next Evert. For all her great fortune, Martina still has a jarringly Slavic face and accent coupled with a jarring sexual preference.

Maybe that's why she has several homes, roots all over America - in Palm Springs, Miami and New York. She wants to be loved everywhere. She wants to make it nearly impossible to be uprooted.

Martina will see her parents again in a week, back home, and the international media is making a bigger deal of the Federation Cup match than Martina and Hana are.

"If I anticipated any trouble," Martina said, "I wouldn't be going. Czechoslovakia is not Russia, and I was not a criminal before or after I left."

No, Martina will have the nerve to go home again, as America's star. Hana will play for the Czechs. If Martina plays No. 1 for the United States, she may play Hana.

And the American will win, naturally.
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Old Oct 29th, 2013, 09:29 PM   #590
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Re: 1986

Tennis: Navratilova goes back to her roots
The Times
London, England
Wednesday, July 16, 1986

Martina Navratilova, on her return to Prague for the first time since she defected in 1975, will lead the United States, the top seeds, into an opening tie against China or Isreal in the Federation Cup, starting next Monday.

The supporting cast for the 29-year-old Wimbledon champion and world No. 1 makes impressive reading, the team including Chris Lloyd, Pam Shriver and Zina Garrison. With such strength in depth there is every chance the Americans will bring to an end Czechoslovakia's three-year supremacy in the tournament.

But with the hosts, who have shared an 11-year domination of the event with the United States, calling upon the likes of Hana Mandlikova - beaten by Navratilova in the Wimbledon final - Helena Sukova, Andrea Holikova and Regina Marsikova, the Americans will need to be on top form. And despite 24-year-old Mandlikova's 7-6, 6-3 defeat by Navratilova at the All England Club, she goes into the tournament lifted by an impressive victory over Mrs Lloyd, the world No. 2, in the semi-final.

Officials yesterday made the draw for the seedings, qualification round and the opening round, with Czechoslovakia seeded second and West Germany third. In all 42 countries, a record entry, will be competing, with 20 teams playing in a preliminary round on Sunday to earn places in the first-round proper.

Other top players competing in the week-long event include Gabriela Sabatini, of Argentina, Wendy Turnbull, of Australia and Carling Bassett of Canada. West Germany's seeding is justified by the presence of Steffi Graf, Claudia Kohde-Kilsch and Bettina Bunge in the team.

It will be the first time the pounds 200,000 tournament has been held in a Soviet-bloc country, and the finishing touches are still being put to a modern tennis stadium. The complex is located on the island of Stvanice, in the Vltava River that bisects the Czechoslovak capital. It seats 7,000 spectators around the centre court of clay and has nine outside courts. The old Stvanice tennis courts closed in 1983 to make way for the new facility.

DRAW: Greece v Czechoslovakia; N Zealand v Italy; France v Sweden; Soviet Union v Bulgaria; Japan v Austria; Netherlands v Canada; Britain v Denmark; Hungary v Australia; United States v China or Israel; Spain v Chile or Indonesia; W Germany v Belgium or Finland; Brazil v Romania or Ireland; Argentina v Philippines or Uruguay; Switzerland v Taipei or Malta; Yugoslavia or Norway v Mexico or Poland; Egypt or Senegal v South Korea or Luxembourg.
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Old Oct 29th, 2013, 09:30 PM   #591
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Re: 1986

PRAGUE WAITS EAGERLY FOR NAVRATILOVA
The Dallas Morning News
Saturday, July 19, 1986
Stephanie Nebehay, REUTER

PRAGUE -- Despite official silence about Martina Navratilova's return to Czechoslovakia 10 years after defecting to the United States, Prague residents know all about it and are excited about it.

"There has been no news of her in the press,'' said a taxi driver. "But we know she is coming home. I think she is still more popular than Hana Mandlikova, the best Czechoslovak player.''

"People were even saying how nice it was that 'two of our girls' were in the Wimbledon final,'' said a Western diplomat.

Navratilova, 29, who won her fifth straight Wimbledon singles crown two weeks ago by beating Mandlikova, 7-6, 6-3, will head the top-seeded U.S. team in the Federation Cup opening on Monday.

Czechoslovakia is second seed in the 42-nation women's tennis event, which is being held for the first time in a Communist country.

"She's very excited to be coming back to play here and see friends and family after so long,'' Navratilova's coach, Mike Estep, told Reuters at Prague airport today.

"It will be more than just a big sporting event for her. Tennis will be the least of her problems here.''

Chris Evert Lloyd, who arrived Friday from London, told Reuters: "This is my first time in Prague. I have to check with the U.S. team officials about how much I can say about Martina here.''

Young girls at Prague airport wearing red and blue Communist Youth uniforms, asked the 31-year-old American for her autograph. Lloyd obliged.

Estep and his wife, Barbara, said they would stay tonight at the home of Navratilova's parents in Revnice, 20 miles southwest of Prague.

The Czechoslovak communist authorities, who have allowed virtually no coverage of Navratilova since her defection, permitted her parents to travel to Wimbledon this year to watch her play.

Navratilova, who made the bold decision to defect at age 18 while playing at the U.S. Open, is expected to visit her parents' home. Her younger tennis-playing sister, Jana, is also due to be in on the reunion.

All eyes will be on Navratilova when she plays on the red, soft clay courts at the new complex at Stvanice in central Prague and is reunited with the Czechoslovak tennis fans.

The contrasts will be stark. Navratilova earned $1.3 million last year, while the average Czechoslovak annual income is $3,600. Her career winnings now exceed $11 million.

Helena Sukova, ranked No. 7, will be the other pillar of the Czechoslovak team, said non-playing captain Jiri Medonos.
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Old Oct 29th, 2013, 09:31 PM   #592
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Re: 1986

NAVRATILOVA'S HOMECOMING - It's an 11-year reunion Czechs mob to glimpse tennis star
Daily Breeze
Sunday, July 20, 1986
Iva Drapalova, Associated Press

PRAGUE, Czechoslovakia -- Martina Navratilova was hugged by her family and mobbed by newsmen and bystanders Saturday, as she ended an 11-year absence from her native Czechoslovakia and arrived for the Federation Cup tennis tournament.

It was her first visit to her home country since she defected to the United States in 1975, and American tennis officials had kept tight-lipped on when she would arrive in an attempt to avoid crowds.

Their effort was in vain.

Friday, family members let the cat out of the bag, setting up the airport scene.

Photographers and reporters surged toward Navratilova as soon as she cleared the arrival hall. They were quickly joined by an estimated 400 others in the airport, some holding aloft children for a glimpse of her.

Navratilova, dressed in a beige pantsuit, appeared overwhelmed by it all.

As she pushed her way through the crowd, clearing a path for herself, Navratilova said, "I feel like Moses."

She spoke in words of one syllable to reporters and family members who greeted her with gerberas and roses.

Asked by newsmen how it felt to be back, she told newsmen, "terrific."

She and family members hugged and exchanged "ahoys," a casual greeting here used normally by those trying to avoid sentimentality.

She scolded photographers for pushing in the car park, before apologizing quickly: "I'm sorry, I'm just nervous.''

Coincidentally, the official greeting was made by Cyril Suk, president of the Czechoslovak tennis association. It was Suk's late wife Vera Sukova who was Navratilova's coach and chaperone when she defected. Their daughter Helena is a member of the Czechoslovak team seeded to meet the United States in next Sunday's Federation Cup final.

The 42-nation competition formally opens today after a premilinary round scheduled to pare the number of participating countries to 32. Play for the cup itself starts Monday.

Much of the interest focuses on how Navratilova, the world's top-ranked woman player, will perform in her first tourney in Prague since she fled, gave up Czechoslovakian citizenship and became an American.

"She is emotional," Chris Evert Lloyd said of Navratilova before her friend and teammate arrived. "But with me playing, it helps to take the pressure off her. And there's going to be pressure simply from her returning home to play."

The crush of people jostling for a glimpse of Navratilova allowed West German stars Steffi Graf and Bettina Bunge to slip through the crowd relatively unnoticed. The three arrived on the same Lufthansa flight.

Miroslav Navratil, her father, said before the plane landed that he hoped she would live with the family at their home in Revnice, near Prague.

After piling into the family car driven by her father, Navratilova first went to the Intercontinental Hotel, home to the U.S. team during the week-long tourney.

A few hours later, Jana Navratilova, her mother, told The Associated Press that her daughter was at home and sleeping.

"I am full of joy," she said on the telephone.

Since her daughter's defection, she said, "I have seen her several times . . . but to see her at home, that is a terribly nice feeling."

Navratilova's parents have visited her in the United States and elsewhere. Her sister defected to West Germany last year.

Despite the pressure, Navratilova was confident his daughter would do well.

"She is going to win," he said.
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Old Oct 29th, 2013, 09:31 PM   #593
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Re: 1986

Tennis: A non-person rechecks into Prague
The Sunday Times
London, England
Sunday, July 20, 1986
ROB HUGHES

Ruzyne airport in Prague has never seen anything quite like yesterday when Lufthansa flight LH350 touched down at 10.30 am. Immediately more than 100 members of the Western media turned the staid arrivals lounge into a frenetic Fellini film set.

Martina Navratilova was home again in Czechoslovakia, which had deleted her as a person when, 11 years and seven Wimbledon singles titles and many millions of dollars ago, she chose to defect. Now she was back, as a representative of the United States, to do battle in the Federation Cup with women's teams from 42 other countries and most particularly Czechoslovakia itself, for they are the holders.

In terms of human emotion as well as politics the story was irresistible. Her mother Jana, who bears a striking facial resemblance to her, was besieged in an upstairs cafeteria as she attempted to take a quiet coffee with her husband, Martina's stepfather, an aunt and uncle and a schoolfriend of Martina's. As the plane touched down, five minutes late, Mrs Navratilova, dressed in a stylish beige suit, went across to the window, the tears flowed and the Leica shutters clicked.

We saw across the tarmac the first and only break in protocol. Cyril Suk, president of the Czechoslovak Tennis Association, went across to greet her. He had known her since her childhood. They kissed and he offered his umbrella against the rain which had broken a week's sunshine.

After that Martina the American had to go through the customary passport and baggage routines of any foreign visitor and the press gathered outside the customs lounge.

The guard opened the door marked 'Arrivals', stared into the faces of the cameramen and the harsh TV lights, frowned, and closed it. The whole welcoming party shuttled across to an adjacent door marked 'Prilety', taking Martina's parents and friends with him. 'Who is it? Who's coming in?' bewildered Czechoslovaks asked.

Steffi Graf and Bettina Bunge, the stars of West Germany, came through the barrier first and were ignored by the German television crew. Eventually at 10.52 the door opened and there was Martina, alone, two paces from her mother and stepfather. For a few seconds the sublime joy of homecoming - the defector allowed back because of sporting achievements - was there on her face. Her eyes were open but unseeing and her features were squeezed between the faces of Jana and Mirek Navratilova. But then suddenly she saw the great rugby scrum of the media, her expression hardened and she and her family attempted to shove through.

Marty Reissen, the US captain and Mike Estep, her coach, tried and failed to reach her. Suk stood in the background and outside in the rain she finally turned to the press: 'OK, that's enough. No more, no more, no more. '

Would she talk? Sure, she'd be around the tennis centre like everyone else. Finally her stepfather was able to drive up in his modest Ford Sierra, she got into the back alone, the pink roses she had been given were crushed on the seat and next to them was the blue American passport. And before they drove off, photographers in pursuit, there was a lot of relief mixed with obvious disappointment that any dignity in the homecoming, any emotion had been trampled not by the alienation of the state but by the Western media into whose arms she had willingly gone shortly after Wimbledon in 1975.

She had left here as a teenager chasing a dream. She returns the richest woman in sport, a dollar millionairess 30 times over, the most muscular, most dominating blonde tennis has known instead of the brunette 'Pilsner barrel' as one unkind American christened the teenaged Martina.

They do not recognise her photograph in Czechoslovakia these days, they have not been told and will not be told what she has achieved, even if she peaks here during the next seven days and deprives Czechoslovakia of a fourth straight win in the women's world team title.

'I can't wait,' Navratilova had said when she faced Hana Mandlikova, the current Czechoslovak champion at Wimbledon in 1981. 'Now the Czechs will have to report the result. Because I am playing Hana they cannot pretend I no longer exist.' But she was more or less wrong.

If she and Hana meet here, probably in next weekend's final, the game will be televised, unlike each of the Wimbledons Navratilova has won. Presumably her victory, if she achieves it, will merit more than the two paragraphs, sometimes less, that winning Wimbledon has brought in the state press. I am assured the games will be recorded in very correct, bland terms and that only if Navratilova should lose to Mandlikova would the past be raised in any detail.

That she is here at all shows the confidence and maturity of the Czech authorities, and the importance placed on sport.

When she drives through the magnificent baroque and renaissance buildings of Prague and reaches the new tennis stadium on Stvanice Island in the Vltava River she will find a surprise - the name Navratilova recorded in the tables of past success; this in direct contrast to the official history of Czechoslovak tennis which at no point mentions her name or her achievements, even among the near misses of Vera Sukova, Ivan Lendl and Hana Mandlikova.

But her photographs have been stripped from the walls of the Sparta club where she learned her tennis. Her younger sister's recent defection to West Germany is not mentioned, her mother and stepfather's aborted attempt to settle down in America and all the idolatory and the pre-tournament publicity here is built around Mandlikova and Helena Sukova. They after all, have helped Czechoslovakia to win the Federation Cup for the last three years and it is 11 years since Mandlikova was the number one winning the same tournament for Czechoslovakia.

There remains a small misconception which Navratilova might relish tackling here in Prague. We have seen time and again that whatever the challenge, she has been competitor enough to rise on the court. Yet speaking to a teenage girl in the Cedok national travel agency the name Navratilova means nothing whatsoever.

'No, no,' said the girl. 'She cannot be number one in the world, that is Mandlikova. Look, I will write it for you.'

Eventually the Cedok girl agreed this other person, this American, had been seen once on television here. Tennis said the girl, was not her hobby. No, but it is the obsession which has consumed Navratilova throughout her lifetime and which now has brought her back to a city she never expected to see again and which clearly has no conception of what she has done for it.
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Old Oct 30th, 2013, 07:37 PM   #594
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Re: 1986

NAVRATILOVA HOLDS UP UNTIL PLAYING OF CZECH ANTHEM
San Jose Mercury News
Monday, July 21, 1986
Mercury News Wire Services

Martina Navratilova stood tall for the Czechoslovak anthem Sunday in Prague and wept.

It was the emotional high point for the U.S. tennis ace since returning to her native Czechoslovakia on Saturday after an absence of more than 10 years.

Navratilova, the world's top-ranked woman player, assumed U.S. citizenship after defecting in 1975. She is the mainspring of the American team at the Federation Cup tournament that formally opened Sunday with ceremonies.

Teams were introduced in alphabetical order, and U.S. team members Navratilova, Chris Evert Lloyd and Zina Garrison were among the last to walk into the center of the Stvanice tennis stadium. The applause increased.

Navratilova, wearing red high-heeled shoes, a tight white skirt and a white jersey with the U.S.A. team logo, appeared happy and composed for most of the 30-minute ceremony but later told newsmen that she lost her composure for several minutes.

''What really got me was when they played the national anthem," she said. The 29-year-old Navratilova said she also was moved by Hana Mandlikova's greeting to her and Evert in Czech.

''It was my weak moment. I have told myself often, 'Don't cry,' but I don't listen," she said of her tears. ''I can't deny where I came from - this is my homeland - but my home is in the States."

Navratilova's return came on the fifth anniversary of the day she received her American citizenship.

In a gesture of friendship, Czech tennis player Hana Mandlikova welcomed Navratilova as she surrendered the Federation Cup to Philippe Chartrier, president of the International Tennis Federation, on behalf of the defending champion Czechs.

Speaking first in English and then in Czechoslovakian, Mandlikova said: "We are pleased to welcome all the teams here, especially the No. 1 and 2 players in the world, Martina Navratilova and Chris Evert Lloyd."

Navratilova has been mobbed by curious Czechs several times since her arrival and said she was overwhelmed by the interest and by memories.

''I didn't know what to expect,'' Navratilova said afterward. ''It shows that people here like me and appreciate what I've done in tennis. It was something special.'' She defected in 1975.

"People still remember me and like me," she said. "They couldn't be nicer. They want me to come back."

Of her first impressions of Czechoslovakia on returning, she said, "I kept pinching myself to see if it was real or if I was dreaming.

"I would like to walk alone - maybe ride a bicycle" through Prague, said Navratilova. "That's what I used to do."

But she said there were some jarring differences between then and now.

"There is a Czech team and I'm an American," said Navratilova of her change in citizenship. "It really hits you."

In an interview with the state-run CTK news agency, Navratilova expressed some trepidation about playing on clay for the tournament.

Has some doubts

"I practised for the Federation Cup on a clay court only three days," she said. "I am not yet absolutely sure about my strokes, but I believe that I'll be well prepared."

The Federation Cup is considered the most exacting women's tennis tournament. While Czechoslovakia is the defending champion for the third consecutive year, the U.S. team is considered the favorite because of Navratilova, ranked as the world's best, and Chris Evert Lloyd, ranked second.

Seeded teams at the week-long event are the United States, Czechoslovakia, West Germany, Canada, Bulgaria, Britain, Argentina and Italy.

Today, Hana Mandlikova beat Angeliki Kanellopoulou of Greece 6-1, 5-7, 6-3 to help Czechoslovakia advance to the second round. Helena Sukova beat Olga Tsarbapoulou 6-2, 6-0.

The biggest upset of the first day was Denmark ousting Britain. Lone Vandborg beat Anne Hobbs 3-6, 7-5, 6-3, and Tine Scheurer-Larsen topped Jo Durie 6-3, 6-1.

Argentina topped Uruguay behind Gabriela Sabatini's 6-1, 6-1 defeat of Fiorella Bonicelli.

ETC.: Top-seeded Pam Shriver, who will join her Federation Cup teammates today, defeated No. 5 seed Lori McNeil 6-4, 6-2, to win a $150,000 tournament in Newport, R.I.

U.S. ADVANCES: The U.S. Davis Cup team, playing without John McEnroe and Jimmy Connors, is still managing to win, but not without a struggle.

Tim Mayotte rallied to defeat Mexican Leonardo Lavalle 7-5, 4-6, 0-6, 6-4, 9-7 in Mexico City to clinch a victory for the United States in the Davis Cup zone quarterfinals.

The U.S. also won the meaningless final match when Brad Gilbert defeated Francisco Maciel 7-5, 1-6, 7-5.

At Wimbledon, England, Australia defeated Great Britain 4-1 to advance. The Aussies meet the American team next.

At Bastad, Sweden, Sweden swept Italy 5-0 and will meet Czechoslovakia in the semifinals in Prague in October.
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Old Oct 31st, 2013, 01:38 AM   #595
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Re: 1986

MANDLIKOVA WINS IN FEDERATION
Lexington Herald-Leader
Tuesday, July 22, 1986
Associated Press

Hana Mandlikova overcame home-court jitters yesterday to lead Czechoslovakia into the second round of the Federation Cup in Prague while sixth-seeded Britain was eliminated on the tennis tournament's opening day.

Unseeded Denmark ousted the British team by taking all three matches.

The United States is seeded No. 1 in the women's team event and opens play today against China, with the series on Court No. 1 marking the return of Martina Navratilova to her homeland.

She and the rest of the U.S. team received a huge ovation at Sunday's opening ceremonies, but yesterday's newspapers and television reports in Prague made no mention of her. In a welcoming speech, Czechoslovakia captain Hana Mandlikova said it was an honor to welcome "all of the world's top tennis players, including No. 1 and No. 2 Martina Navratilova and Chris Evert Lloyd." The state-run press paraphrased Mandlikova, simply saying she "welcomed the world's top tennis players."

Lone Vandborg of Denmark, ranked 340th in the world, upset Anne Hobbs, ranked 42nd, 3-6, 7-5, 6-3 to start the British slide. Tine Scheurer-Lasen then clinched the triumph for the Danes with 6-3, 6-1 victory over Jo Durie, before Anne Moeller and Scheurer-Larsen teamed to beat Durie and Hobbs in doubles, 7-6, 6-2.

"It's a bit of a kick in the pants," said Sue Mappin, the British team manager. "It's a shock. I thought's we'd make the quarterfinals."

Canada, the fourth seed in the international team event that ranks as the women's version of the Davis Cup, barely beat the Netherlands. The Canadians rallied to win the second singles match with Carling Bassett and the doubles after dropping the first set.

Mandlikova, the third-ranked player in the world, took three sets to beat Angeliki Kanellopoulou of Greece 6-1, 5-7, 6-3, and said afterward that she was nervous at playing on the center court clay of the Stvanice Tennis Center.

''It's hard to play a match in front of my home crowd," Mandlikova said. Prague is not on the women's tennis circuit, and Czechoslovakian players on the tour usually play there only in club matches.

In the first match on center court, Mandlikova's teammate, Helena Sukova,
beat Olga Tsarlapoulou 6-2, 6-0, and Regina Marsikova and Andrea Holinova
wound up the sweep with a 6-3, 6-0 doubles victory over the two Greeks.

Bassett, ranked 13th in the world, beat Annemarie Van Der Torre of the Netherlands 6-2, 6-2, to even Canada's series after teammate Helen Kalesi had lost to Hellas Ter-Riet 6-2, 7-6. Bassett then teamed with Jill Heatherington to defeat Tier-Reit and Van Der Torre 3-6, 6-3, 6-1.

Other results on the opening day included Argentina, the seventh seed, beating Uruguay 3-0, with Gabriela Sabatini downing Fiorella Bonicelli 6-1, 6-1, and teaming with Mercedes Paz for a doubles victory. Paz won her singles match, too, beating Silvana Casaretto, 6-1, 6-0.

Switzerland eliminated Malta and South Korea blitzed Egypt, both 3-0.
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Old Oct 31st, 2013, 01:39 AM   #596
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Re: 1986

Tennis: Britain knocked out by Denmark
The Times
London, England
Tuesday, July 22, 1986
From RICHARD EVANS

PRAGUE - Britain, seeded sixth, were defeated by Denmark in the first round of the NEC Federation Cup here at the new Stvanice Stadium when Anne Hobbs lost 3-6, 7-5, 6-3 to Lone Vandborg, and Jo Durie went down 6-3, 6-1 to Tine Scheuer-Larsen.

So, in the space of four days, Britain's tennis players have managed to win just one 'live' set while competing at home on grass in the Davis Cup, and abroad on clay in the leading women's team competition. If British tennis has suffered a double blow of more humiliating proportions in such a short space of time, I cannot remember it.

The defeat here on a beautiful summer's day in Prague was even less excusable than the men's efforts against Australia at Wimbledon. Denmark has only once got as far as the quarter-final of the Federation Cup in 17 attempts, and Miss Vandborg is ranked 288 places below Miss Hobbs on the WTA computer.

Even when Miss Hobbs failed to maintain a bright start, losing the second set after fighting back from 0-4 to 5-4, Miss Durie should really have been able to force the Danes into the deciding doubles by beating Miss Scheuer-Larsen.

Miss Durie, however, was in one of her most exasperating and listless moods. Time and again she squandered good work with clumsy forehands that sailed yards behind the baseline, and in three consecutive service games she double-faulted at crucial moments. Clay might not be her best surface, but this was ridiculous.

Miss Hobbs's demise was equally inexplicable. Her opponent had only managed to qualify for one of four tournaments on this year's British satellite circuit, and then lost in the first round. At 24, Miss Vandborg can hardly be touted as a budding star of tomorrow, possessing as she does an ordinary sort of game with a big, exaggerated forehand.

Wisely, her team-mates had not even told her that Miss Hobbs had defeated Zina Garrison, the world's Np 8 at Wimbledon. But both Danish girls deserved their success because they battled hard and used their knowledge of clay-court tennis to full advantage.

At least Sue Mappin, the British team manager, spared a thought for the folks back home. 'The British public will probably think we lost to a second-class tennis nation,' she said icily, 'and they will be right. Last year it was Bulgaria and now this. The only thing I can say is that we are as sick as they will be.'
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Old Oct 31st, 2013, 01:39 AM   #597
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Re: 1986

Navratilova a hit in homecoming
Daily Breeze
Tuesday, July 22, 1986
Associated Press

PRAGUE, Czechoslovakia -- If the trains ran a little late around Prague Tuesday, the station masters knew why.

After 11 years, Martina Navratilova was playing tennis in Czechoslovakia once again.

Several rail lines carrying passengers run along the backside of Court No. 1 at the Stvanice Tennis Stadium, and it was there Tuesday that Navratilova made her first on-court appearance in her homeland since defecting in 1975.

Whenever a train went by, it slowed, the passengers and crew hanging out the windows to watch.

What they saw was more a family reunion that a tennis match, a love feast on red clay, featuring Navratilova's power game at its peak as she crushed Xinyi Li of China, 6-1, 6-0, in just 40 minutes in the first round of the Federation Cup.

Each point by Navratilova brought a cheer from the crowd, which packed five-deep around the rim of the 800-seat court.

People pressed so tightly it was hard to move, and one fight broke out between a man and a woman jostling over a good viewing spot.

It all made Navratilova feel very much at home, and she blew kisses to the crowd as she walked off court.

"They were fantastic today," she said of the fans, who last saw her live when she was a pudgy teenager already making a mark on tennis.

"I was nervous when I got ready to go out on court. I was ready and very psyched up."

Navratilova's match was the second of the day. Teammate Zina Garrison opened with a straight-set victory over China's Ni Zhong, and among the spectators was Navratilova.

It was hard to tell which was getting more attention, the match on court or the player in white warmups and sunglasses in the stands.

Fans snapped pictures and peered through binoculars.

One shouted "Hooray, Martina," during a changeover.

The introduction of this ex-Czechoslovak star-turned-multimillionaire in America was extraordinary. The applause was loud and lengthy.

Fans watching the Bulgaria-Soviet Union match on center court next door suddenly became much more interested in what was happening on No. 1.

Those around the rim of tiny arena were packed so tightly it was hard to move, but they always found a way to get their hands above their heads and applaud when Navratilova won a point.

And throughout the crowd were smiling faces, beaming at her play, giving "oohs" and "aahs" as her shots zipped around court.

They seemed to say, "Welcome back."

"The reception was so great after every point," Navratilova said. "I just wanted to show them what I could do."

An American citizen since 1981, Navratilova has been back in her hometown since Saturday.

"I still haven't seen all my relatives. I want to see my grandmother, an aunt and uncle, a great aunt, a great uncle. Everybody wants time with me. I can't slice myself up a thousand times. But I'm still enjoying it."

In 11 years, she said, things had not changed that much.

"I'm getting familiar with the city again," she said. "It doesn't seem I've been away so long. The places look the same and the stadium is beautiful."

The Stvanice complex is formally opening with the Federation Cup. Work on it started 2 1/2 years ago, and it replaced an old tennis center where Navratilova played club matches for Sparta, the Czechoslovak tennis mecca.

When Navratilova defected, she suddenly went from superstar to no-show in the state-run news media here.

The newspapers through Tuesday morning had carried no direct mention of her, and television newscasts had not contained any footage of her arrival or of Sunday's opening ceremonies, where she and her U.S. teammates received a big ovation. She said it did not disturb here.

"They've been reporting on the matches equally," Navratilova said. "By having the Federation Cup here, they were ready to have me back, and they're not avoiding it. They are reporting the matches equally and fairly."

The match was scheduled for the smaller court, officials said, because center court is reserved in early rounds for teams whose national TV systems are carrying the contests. Such is the case in both the Soviet Union and Bulgaria, they said.

Some spectators, however, were angry at not being able to see the U.S.-China match and Navratilova's return, and several shouted abuse at Antonin Himl, the head of the Czechoslovak physical-training union and one of the nation's top sports bosses.

The victories by Navratilova over Xinyi and Zina Garrison, 6-3, 6-2 over Ni Zhong, enabled the United States to advance to the second round. Garrison played instead of Chris Evert Lloyd, who is bothered by tendinitis in her left knee and chose to rest.

Among other teams advancing were third-seeded West Germany, with Steffi Graf beating Belgium's Ann Devries, 6-3, 6-1, and Claudia Kohde-Kilsch beating Sandra Wasserman, 4-6, 6-1, 6-1; fifth-seeded Bulgaria, with Manuela Maleeva beating the Soviet Union's Larissa Savchenko, 6-1, 6-2, and her younger sister Katerina beating Natassia Zvereva, 4-6, 6-1, 6-2; and eighth-seeded Italy beating New Zealand.
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Old Oct 31st, 2013, 01:40 AM   #598
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Re: 1986

Tennis: Politics takes second place to appeal of Navratilova
The Times
London, England
Wednesday, July 23, 1986
From RICHARD EVANS

PRAGUE - A match of very little consequence was elevated to a different plateau of importance by a strange mixture of emotional and political significance here yesterday as Martina Navratilova celebrated her homecoming with a victory.

Eleven years after a podgy teenager had run away to seek fame and fortune in America, Miss Navratilova emerged to cheers and prolonged applause on the newly built number one court at the Stvanice tennis complex, ready and eager to show the Czech people just what kind of athlete she had become.

In beating Xinyi Li, of China, 6-1, 6-0, she did not disappoint them. Nor did the fact that she was playing in this Federation Cup competition under the American flag seem to affect the great glow of warmth and appreciation that poured down on her from every corner of the little arena. Pride and happiness were the overriding emotions of this memorable afternoon.

There was humour, too, as both the crowd and Martina laughed at the umpire when he called out, 'Game, Miss Navratilova' instead of 'Game, United States' and had to correct himself.

But perhaps the loveliest touch of all was provided by the delightful Miss Xinyi, who, having accepted her role as outclassed loser with a happy smile, demurely asked Martina to pose with her while the Chinese coach took their photograph. It was an act of heartwarming simplicity which also revealed a clear understanding of just how rare a snap it would make for the family album back home in Canton.

The crowds stood three or four deep around the perimeter of number one court in anticipation of Martina's appearance. Others leaned over the concrete balustrades of the taller stadium and hung from the windows of passing trains which rolled by with, one suspected, deliberate torpitude along an elevated track that runs parallel to one side of the court.

Miss Navratilova did her best to treat the crowd to some supremely athletic smashes and the occasional lightning reflex on the half-volley.

For much of the past 11 years the Wimbledon champion has been classified as a non-person by the Czechoslovak media. But now the Czech people have seen that great big happy smile and all those thunderous serves and volleys and the whispered legend has come alive. Just for a brief moment or two, Martina Navratilova is back in her homeland and politics is losing 6-0, 6-0.
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Old Oct 31st, 2013, 01:42 AM   #599
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Re: 1986

NAVRATILOVA CRUISES IN FEDERATION CUP
The Wichita Eagle
Wednesday, July 23, 1986
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Martina Navratilova blew away China's Xinyi Li, then blew kisses to the crowd as she ended an 11-year-long chapter in her life Tuesday during the Federation Cup in Prague, Czechoslovakia.

Navratilova's 6-1, 6-0 victory over China's top women's player was her first match in Czechoslovakia since she defected to the United States in 1975. This trip is her first time back since then, and the crowd that overflowed the No. 1 court at Stvanice Tennis Stadium cheered her every shot.

The victory and the welcome enabled Navratilova to end an unsettled era in her life.

''It was emotional, but it was happy emotion," she said. "It was like a chapter in my life that I am finally able to finish. It's been open for a long time."

The victories by Navratilova over Xinyi and Zina Garrison over Ni Zhong 6-3, 6-2 enabled the United States to advance to the second round of the national-team, single-elimination tournament that is the women's tennis equivalent of the Davis Cup.

Navratilova and Pam Shriver then completed the three-match sweep with a 6-2, 6-0 victory in doubles over Lilan Duan and Xiufen Pu.

''This is a team sport, and I'm on the American team," said Navratilova, who received her citizenship in 1981. "I'm an American and I won for America."

Although she has been back four days now, Navratilova says she is unable to get much rest because there are so many things to do and so many people to see. ''It's been busy," she said. "My adrenaline got me through the time change with no problem at all, but I haven't gone to bed till 2 in the morning.

''I haven't seen all my relatives. Everybody wants to spend some time with me. I can't cut myself up into a thousand pieces."

Among other teams advancing were third-seeded West Germany, with Steffi Graf beating Belgium's Ann Devries 6-3, 6-1, and Claudia Kohde-Kilsch beating Sandra Wasserman 4-6, 6-1, 6-1; fifth-seeded Bulgaria, with Manuela Maleeva beating the Soviet Union's Larissa Savchenko 6-1, 6-2, and her younger sister, Katerina, beating Natassia Zvereva 4-6, 6-1, 6-2; and eighth-seeded Italy, with Laura Garrone beating New Zealand's Julie Richardson 6-1, 6-1, and Raffaella Reggi downing Belinda Cordwell 6-3, 6-4.

The United States, the top seed, will face Spain in the second round today. The Spaniards eliminated Indonesia on Tuesday.

China had made the main draw through qualifying tournaments and, while Xinyi and Ni showed good speed and strength, they were no match for Garrison and Navratilova.

Especially for Navratilova, and especially on this day.

It took just 40 minutes for Navratilova, the world's top-ranked player, to defeat Xinyi, who won a total of 18 points, nine in each set.

And always, the crowd was on Navratilova's side. People hung over the back of the tall cement bleachers that surround center court, risking life and limb for a glimpse of the star come home.

Navratilova was given a long round of applause when she appeared for her match and bantered with people in the crowd during play. Early in the match, when someone clapped after an error, she called out, "Those are the Chinese."

When her last shot, a forehand service return, bounced twice to wrap up the match, Navratilova exaggeratedly wiped her brow and waved to the crowd, which erupted in cheers.

The applause and screams kept up, and as Navratilova walked off court she blew kisses to the stands.

''The reception was so great after every point," she said. "I wanted to show them what I could do."

Navratilova broke Xinyi's service in the first, fifth and seventh games of the first set, and in the second, fourth and final games of the second.

An exchange of reflex volleys ended with the American slamming a winner into the open court in the second set.

A cross-court backhand in the third game brought a gasp from the crowd, and Navratilova held. She split her time in the fourth game berating a courtside photographer for moving during a point and again breaking serve, this time with a forehand that zinged across the clay.

With a 5-0 lead, Navratilova moved to break point with a running forehand winner. The last point came on a forehand return that left Xinyi reaching for her camera. The Chinese team coach took pictures of the 24-year-old and the champ at the net.

''The Chinese are so thrilled to be here, they may have taken pictures if they had played anyone else," Navratilova said.

Garrison played in place of Chris Evert Lloyd, who had a flare up of tendinitis in her left knee.

She broke Ni's service in the third, fifth and ninth games and lost serve just once, in the sixth.

In the second set, Ni, herself a substitite for teammate Xiufen Pu, broke for a 1-0 lead, held serve for 2-0 and had Garrison within one point, at 15-40, of a second break.

But the American saved that game and did not lose another, breaking the Chinese in the fourth and sixth games and again in the eighth game for the match.
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Old Oct 31st, 2013, 01:42 AM   #600
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Re: 1986

Martina wins 'at home'
Houston Chronicle
Wednesday, July 23, 1986
Houston Chronicle News Services

PRAGUE, Czechoslovakia - For almost two hours, Martina Navratilova was a kid again. She was back home, playing tennis before a crowd that cheered her every move. The No. 1 court of Stvanice Stadium was her clay sandbox and she frolicked, showing off all the tricks she has learned in the last 11 years.

It was merely a footnote that she won her singles match in 40 minutes Tuesday and her doubles in 45 to help the United States sweep China 3-0 in the opening round of Federation Cup play.

What was most gratifying to Navratilova was that, clearly, she still is a hero to the people of the country she left behind when she defected to the United States in 1975.

She showed them all she needed to in sweeping past China's No. 1 player, Xinyi Li, 6-1, 6-0. Xinyi, who is ranked 309th in the world, was so thrilled to be on the same court with Navratilova that when the match was over, she had her captain, Mingau Gu, take a snapshot of the two of them together.

Xinyi was not the only person delighted to be in the same place with Navratilova. Long before the match started, at least 2,000 people had taken up every inch of space around the court. They pushed and shoved for position while Zina Garrison - playing in place of Chris Evert Lloyd - was winning the opening match.

Xinyi, who plays serve and volley, did her best. A loose third game gave Xinyi her only game and from that point on Navratilova overpowered her.

The only uncomfortable moment came in the postmatch news conference when a U.S. reporter asked her if she was surprised or upset at the fact that her return has not received more attention in the Czech press.

Later, as she left the room, still upset, Navratilova rhetorically asked several people, "Why did he have to do that? Why there?"

Tulasne, Jaite post wins

BROOKLINE, Mass. - Second-seeded Thierry Tulasne and third-seeded Martin Jaite scored straight-sets victories in the second round of the U.S. Pro Tennis Championships.

Both advanced easily. Tulasne needed just 53 minutes to gain his 6-2, 6-2 triumph over Barry Moir of South Africa. Jaite played longer, one hour and 39 minutes, and eliminated Roberto Arguello of Argentina 6-2, 6-4.

Masur surprises Teacher

LIVINGSTON, N.J. - Australian player Wally Masur, one point away from being down 5-2 in the second set, recovered to defeat No. 6 seed Brian Teacher 4-6, 7-5, 7-5 in an opening round match at the New Jersey championships.

Two other seeded players, fourth-seeded Matt Anger and No. 5 Ramesh Krishnan, also advanced. Krishnan won nine of the last 10 games to beat Peter Fleming 7-5, 6-1.
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