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Old Dec 14th, 2002, 02:38 PM   #1
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Best Team Sports in the World

I thought about discussing some team sports

BASKET

Not really one of my favorite sports out there. It has become a typical American sport, we could even call it a typical black american sport cause it's most Black basketball players out there. Nothing wrong with that, but somehow i don't like the fact that it's all about just one society class and that there are friggin americans in every damn league of the world, they have either become neurtalized and used in other NT's or they just take up space in the league. OK, i know why Basket is a black sport, it's simple and you don't have to be rich to play it, all you need is a ball and a court and as we know almost every street got one, so it's just to go out and play. Last good white american was Larry Bird in the 80's, however there are some interest for basket in europe. Yugoslavia is good, so is Spain, Turkey, Germany, Italy, Greece and a few others, the WC victory for Yugoslavia Vs cocky Usa was so great. It made me watch some Euro League Basket on TV, still i would prefer if it could be a more global sport and not all about NBA. Vote: 2/5

FOOTBALL

Football is simply the best and most globalized sport in the world, it's played all around the world and that's the passion of it. You don't have to be rich, you don't even need a field, all you need is a ball, so it's also a simple sport which can be played everywhere. Football is fun playing, Fun watching and Fun discussing. And it's growing very quick, not many americans played it before 1994, now it's the most played sport in America. Japan didn't even have a league in 1990, now they have a decent NT and many Japanese players are going abroad to play. African football was not considered very good 20 years ago but now they have players everywhere and a few very good NT's too. Other upcoming nations are Australia, China, Korea and hopefully India too soon. Football has got more class then Basket and Hockey for example, Cause when it is a world cup the best players will be there, not that their club teams refuse to let them go. It's like the world can re-unite with football sometimes. Another thing is that for once America is not the Centre, It's Europe. The best clubs, players and Leagues are here and it's not controlled by a mafia like NHL or NBA. Football is simply the best and most loved team sport on earth. Vote: 5/5

American Football

Oh well, it's the most popular sport in Usa, but not played much in Europe, we got Rugby which is simulat but it's mostly played by Anglo-Saxan countries anyway. American Football is quite expensive to play unless you don't wanna get every bone in your body broken. I watch it sometimes and have played a little too but it's not very entertaining i think. It's all about 2 things. Tackles and Speed. Each team got some big guys that just tackles and some smaller guys that delivers the ball. If you got these 2 things your team is complete. All the interruptions in the game is quite annoying too. A player runs too yards get tackled town, the game stops, they re-stars, he runs another 2 yards and they are back at one. Nah nothing for my taste 2/5

Baseball

It's huge in America ofcourse, also Cuba and Japan are good, but the rest of the world really couldn't care less. I have played some Baseball too, so im not exactly clueless about the sport and it's rules. What i miss here it's the fact that if you're not a thrower or a slugger (or what you call it) There not much too do. It's a bore when you're the team playing "Outside". I hardly get sweaty playing this sport. The only moment that you need physical strenght is when you have to run, and that's not often unless you hit the ball very hard. I don't watch much baseball, and i don't see the sport become very popular in Europe in a lifetime either. It's quite expensive too for the record. 2/5

Hockey

Hockey is mostly popular in the colder countries, Canada, some parts of the USA, Finland, Sweden, Chech Rep. and Russia, well that's about it. The rest are just fillers. If you have seen a wc you know what i mean, right? It's like we're waiting for Finland, Russia, Sweden and the Chech's to reach the semi's anyway. Usa and Canada never used thier best players anyway, so they just suck mostly of the time. Every 4 year in the Olympics there's a chance to see the best players, well if the Olympics are beeing played in North America, otherwise i doubt they would care. Hockey is so much funnier to watch and play then most American sports but the fact that so few nations play it makes it rather dull somtimes. The only diffrence between Basket and Hockey is that their aren't that many Americans playing abroad, and the few one's playing aren't good enough to get neautralized anyway. Still i like Hockey sometimes but it's expensive. 3/5

Handball

This sport is so fun, and quite easy too. It's fun to watch atleast, quite difficult to play actually since it's alot about defending and a sport where small mistakes can cost you the game. I think it's a sport that could be very popular everywhere. Only problem is that you need to play in a team to play the game cause it's played in a stadium. It's not that you can go out and play for fun. In Sweden for example there are many stadiums, you just join a team and then you play, but in Countries like Italy this possability is extended and that create problems for the sport, it gets little attention to the media and very few people plays it. But i have no doubt Italy or any country could be good at it, it just have to got more attention and more interest. In Usa handball is not played at all i think, I have seen Cuba play and i know it's huge in Egypt for example. The sport is growing fast so watch out, it's here to stay. 4/5

This has to be the longest post in non tennis ever, do i get any price
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Old Dec 14th, 2002, 02:53 PM   #2
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nasty nick #2,
I like the tone of the way you broke the sports down.

Question? You have issues because of the fact that basketball "appears" to be predominately Black in the USA, but you don't have those same issues with the other sports that are predominately white? Hockey?
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Old Dec 14th, 2002, 03:49 PM   #3
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The only one of those I actually enjoy watching (or playing) is handball. When I was in school we would alway play it (and nothing else - except a little volleyball).

Of course I would watch our national team play football, but they suck (and since the last world championship everybody knows it).

And for baseball and A. football I don't even know the rules, but then they are not really played or shown on TV in our country (hockey is, but is a bit too brutal for me).
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Old Dec 14th, 2002, 03:51 PM   #4
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Usa and Canada never used thier best players anyway, so they just suck mostly of the time. Every 4 year in the Olympics there's a chance to see the best players, well if the Olympics are beeing played in North America, otherwise i doubt they would care.
Well up untill 1998 we weren't allowed to use our best players. I have a hunch that if Wayne Gretzky and gang could have played the Oympics their whole careers, that they would have.

By the way - I can't speak for the USA, but people here certaintly DO care.

Let me elaborate on that - in 98 when we lost in a shoot out, which ended out chances of getting a Gold - it was considered a major dissapointment here! Then in 2002 when we won it, people here went damn nuts! I've never seen anything like it... (though if i lived ina country where REAL football was popular, i would have).
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Old Dec 14th, 2002, 03:57 PM   #5
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I'm sorry to go on about this... but that really was an understatement you put hehe...

I hate to take away from our other atheletes, byt hypothetically if Canada had won NO medals except for Hockey Gold in Salt Lake City - I am fairly comfortable to predict that a majority would still have considered it a successful Olympics....

In fact, I don't want to boldly suggest that no one cares about it as much as us, but...
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Old Dec 14th, 2002, 04:25 PM   #6
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Originally posted by clocker
nasty nick #2,
I like the tone of the way you broke the sports down.

Question? You have issues because of the fact that basketball "appears" to be predominately Black in the USA, but you don't have those same issues with the other sports that are predominately white? Hockey?
Oh well it's true about Hockey, but that's ofr other reasons, its a expensive sport and it's mostly played in northern areas where not many black ppl live. Basket use to be a sport where there actually were some white ppl participating too apart from Hockey where very few black ppl ever played. But lately it seems there's no interest for Basket among white ppl, are could it be they simply and not good anymore? i dunno, just think it's kinda sad.
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Old Dec 14th, 2002, 04:30 PM   #7
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Yes Rebecka, that might be true somehow. I remember i 94 when Sweden beat you, there weren't the best players on the ice. But my point is that if the olympics would be played some other where, im not sure Canada/Usa would care, (the best players were there in Nagano though) But as soon as it is played in North America they just have to win and NHL can take a break too for a change. U don't know how many "world cups" i have seen with Amateur players from North American nations.
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Old Dec 14th, 2002, 05:21 PM   #8
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nasty nick - you do have some issues dealing with race, don't you. The NBA is made up of people from 51 COUNTRIES whether these people are Black Africans, White Europeans, Asians, Latin Americans, Carribeans, Canadians, etc. UNLIKE the European soccer leagues, there is no quota to how many foreigners you can have on your teams. In the NBA, you can have as many foreigners as you can if they are good enough. Also, the Europeans are treated with respect and love by the fans, teamates and the league.

However in Europe, it's downright UGLY if you happen to be a Black player. For the last ten years I have read about the ugly and nasty treatment given the Black players throughout Europe. In fact, it has gotten so bad that an organization was formed just to combat this ugly racism by the crowds and other players.

I'm surprised nick you didn't mentioned this in your analysis.
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Old Dec 14th, 2002, 06:34 PM   #9
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I know someone would accuse me for something

You still don't get my point do you? I don't care how many diffrent nationalities there is in NBA, it's rather homogene anyway. Still there isn't much interest for White Americans it seems, since there haven't been any good one's since the 80's. Basketball in America is more or less a black sport for black people, and i think that's sad. But i do understand why.

So now you acccuse Europe for beeing racistic against black players too? come on. What do you know about Euro Basketball anyway?

In football there are some black players in almost each team and they have been treated well, so i doubt there is any diffrence with basket when there are actually alot of Black players in each team.
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Old Dec 14th, 2002, 06:54 PM   #10
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No one is accusing you of anything. You indicte yourself with your lack of knowledge and ignorance. Obviously you don't follow the NBA because if you did, you would know that there are White stars in the NBA. There were White star baskeball players long before Larry Bird came into the league and there are White stars after he left the NBA.

Are you accusing the White NBA owners of being racist nick?

Also, if you looked at the audiences in the arena nick, you would notice that 80 percent is White. So the sport is for EVERYONE. Maybe you don't have a tv or you don't watch the NBA like millions around the world.
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Old Dec 14th, 2002, 06:58 PM   #11
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Photo: Lazio players Roberto Mancini (R) and Yugoslavian Dejan Stankovic (L) lead their team onto the pitch with tee-shirts which read “NO to anti-semitism, violence, racism” prior to their Series A match against Juventus, November 28, 2000. The Italian government said the country's top soccer clubs might be forced to play behind closed doors if they did not clamp down on racist chants.


Racism on the Soccer Pitch in Europe

By Miranda Pyne

Miranda Pyne is a writer based in London.

Die-hard fans of football (or soccer, as it’s called only in America) warn against making too much of racist taunts on the pitch. “You gotta be really careful not to jump to hasty conclusions,” says Mr. Grove, a journalist, friend and ardent football devotee. He meets with me because player Patrick Viera won’t, and because he is one of the few people I know who has attended matches every weekend for the past twenty-odd years. “All men play rough with each other, say nasty things to each other. Its part of the game,” he goes on. “I take my nine-year-old daughter to a game every weekend and sometimes you get a few taunts, but its not all that it’s cracked up to be.” He orders us two watery teas in the small cafe. “Racism! We use that word without knowing its meaning anymore.”

It’s the sort of argument football fans like to make. Athletic manager Dave Bassett wrote in the Guardian last year that verbal abuse was part and parcel of the game. “It’s human nature and doesn’t just apply to football,” he wrote. “If I walk into a pub and I’ve got a great big spot on the end of my hooter, then I expect my mates to take the piss out of me. The same kind of thing happens in the football field.” He hastened to add, however, “Football has become so multicultural that the players don’t even think about race.”

Dino Zoff, coach of Italy’s Lazio team, echoes this sentiment: “I don’t know whether you could call this racism. I think it could just be a question of people making fun of someone. It’s something that happens at football stadiums. Fans pick on a particular player because he’s short, or because he’s tall or because he’s got gray hair.” But the Italian Newspaper Corriere della Sera had a different spin on Zoff’s pronouncements: “It’s a shame that he didn’t explain why, in Italian football grounds, the only ones who are made fun of nowadays are black players.”

Sometimes manifestations of racism are described in terms of sectarian rivalry. A black player on one’s own team will be adored and encouraged, but a black player on the opposite team will be abused specifically in terms of his color. In an article by sports sociologists Les Back, Tim Crabbe and John Solomos, black footballer Tony Witter describes a game in 1995 in which he was matched against another black player, Ian Wright: “The amount of racist abuse that came from the Millwall fans in the lower stand was incredible: ‘black this, black,’ monkey chants and the rest. Basically, I am standing not more than 5 feet away from Ian. I sort of looked at them, looked at Ian and Ian shrugged his shoulders. Then I hear this voice from the crowd – ‘Not you Tone, you’re all right—its Wrighty.’ I think they just see a blue shirt when they look at me. But with Ian Wright they see a red shirt, then they see a black face. Do I wear this shirt over my head?”

It’s not just England. Last month’s Champions League match in Rome between Italy’s team Lazio and England’s Arsenal saw black footballers again the target of racist abuse from Lazio’s far-right fans, the hard-core Irriducibili (unshakeables), whose headquarters boast swastikas. As fans hurled debris at black players, it seemed to many that years of anti-racist initiatives in Italy had proven fruitless.

Lazio president Sergio Cragnotti apologized profusely and insisted the trouble comes from the work of “a hundred imbeciles” – who tend to infiltrate football terraces in search of fresh recruits – but his noble sentiments were undermined by the on-field imbecility, which saw Yugoslav Sinisa Mihajilovic calling 26-year-old Frenchman Patrick Viera “a black bastard” and a “f****** black monkey.” He says he did so only after Vieira called him a “gypsy shit.” “He called me a gypsy shit, and so I answered back with black shit. And so because I am proud of being a gypsy and I wasn’t offended, I don’t think he can be offended because I said he was black. I did call him a black bastard, but I didn’t call him a monkey. He doesn’t look like a monkey, but if he did I would probably have called him that,” said Mihajilovic at a press conference.

Viera spoke shortly afterwards. He said that the abuse began two weeks earlier in England, when Arsenal played Lazio and Mihajilovic determined to undermine Viera on the pitch. “It was the worst abuse I have ever heard and it never stopped from the moment the teams were shaking hands at the start,” explained Viera “You could see in his eyes that he was really thinking about what he said. It was very hurtful and difficult to accept when another pro player says things like that. I feel I have to speak out about this and do something you have to tell the truth,” Viera added. “You know I have had some stuff like this in England and have got into trouble by my reaction, but that was mainly about me being French, This time it was all just about my color.

Racism in sports is old news. Jesse Owens raced despite intimidation. Jackie Robinson developed stomach ulcers from the stress racist taunts caused him. When Hank Aaron surpassed Babe Ruth’s home run record he received so many death threats the FBI investigated. Even the great Pele, as invincible as he was, must have come across the banana skins and the ape imitations. It is no surprise then to see black soccer players in teams and clubs all over Europe face racism in a passionately rivalrous soccer culture centered on locality and identity.

Here, racism uneasily coexists with adulation of football players. Black European stars like the English Sol Campbell, French Patrick Viera and Dutch Ruud Gullit have their pick of women and fancy cars. These footballers are national heroes, albeit heroes who have to endure verbal abuse every time they take the field. Today’s superstars are increasingly vocal in their condemnation of racism, breaking taboos by discussing race on the pitch and in the press. Says Ian Wright, “I couldn’t even imagine what it would be like in Cyril Regis and Laurie Cunningham’s day because I wouldn’t take it, but I suppose it was harder for them to speak out then – and that is why I’d now take any opportunity to speak that I can.”

There is a lot to speak against, all throughout Europe.

Italian football especially has earned a notorious reputation. Earlier this year fans booed whenever Parma’s black players touched the ball. The same abuse was handed out to Venezia’s black French defender, Bruno N’Gotty, in an Italian Cup semi-final. Roma Fans taunted Perugia’s French player Ibrahim Ba. Holland’s Ruud Gullit, France’s Marcel Desailly (AC Milan) and Former England captain Paul Ince were targeted when they played for Inter Milan.

After a particularly vicious game in 1996, Ince told the Italian press, “If things continue like this, if things get worse, the top black players won’t come to Italy. They’ll go to countries where this doesn’t happen…. I remember what happened in England seven years ago. It got to the point when the Football Association realized that the problem of racism was becoming really serious, given that there were so many black players in the championship. The FA got tough. When a fan shouted a racist slogan, he was banned from the ground. And because of that, in my last five years in England, when I was with Manchester United, I never had this problem.”

My journalist friend, Mr. Grove, blows cigarette smoke in my face but his grin is slowly replaced by a look of consternation. “Ah, Miranda, you don’t know anything about football,” he says. “If you did, then you’d know that Patrick Viera is a trouble-maker, always whining on about some petty problem, and he’s got an explosive temper.”

That’s true, I concede. If football is all about passion, Patrick Viera’s not wanting. He has received six red cards during his Arsenal career, a six-match ban for spitting at a referee. He was caught on camera making a V-sign (the English equivalent of a raised middle finger) to opposing fans, and once even ripped the prized team shirt off his back in a temper and flung into the ground, walking off the pitch.

But he’s not doing these things in a vacuum. British fans, white and black, are well known for pursing their lips to make the sound of bomber planes, wave banners touting their World War II victory and complain of garlic and frogs when either Germany or France dare to play Britain. And black players here have borne a silent load of race-based insults. Roddy Forsyth, who worked on the BBC documentary It’s only a Game --The Story of Scottish Soccer, says that “Whenever Barnes [a black player] had the ball he was met with monkey noises from the crowd. Our footage clearly showed well-dressed, middle-aged men getting up from their seats to perform ape impersonations and taunt Barnes. Several of them were almost adjacent to the director’s box where Scottish football Association bearers sat with their FA equivalents. Afterwards, none of them had anything to say about the degrading sight, which had taken in place in front of them. It was decided to drop the footage because it did not fit with the homely tone of the series.”

Several football organizations have campaigned against racism, from the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA), to private programs such as Kick it Out and Show Racism the Red Card Campaign. But how to fight it? Paul McGrath, who played with Manchester United and Aston Villa, argues for a change at the top: “there are so many black players in the game today, including those I have played with, who are well qualified to use their knowledge of the game in coaching. If they could infiltrate the top jobs then it would be easier to put across the point about racism creeping back into football. The game needs black people at the top level to provide a better insight and stamp out the problem.” “Racism is not only a problem in football; it’s a problem in society,” former player John Barnes has said. “If you are in the stand and you hear racism, you say something about it.”

I tell Mr. Grove about an incident that happened to me when England and Germany played back in early October, as I passed a throng of soccer fans outside a pub. One of them, a man, called out as I went by “Stephen Lawrence deserved it.” He was referring to the black teenager killed seven years ago in a brutal attack. I was shocked at the ingenuity of the insult. For my American brothers and sisters it would have been something like, “Diallo deserved it.” How could he ever have deserved it? It was strangely effective because it came out of the blue. That poor drunk man had me staring at him, wordless, for about thirty seconds. The crowd he was with smiled regretfully, embarrassed. To a passerby it must have looked like a scene out of High Noon. (Ironically, on November 26 the Guardian ran a report linking a gang of neo-nazi hooligans who are targeting black soccer stars to the killers of Stephen Lawrence, who are still on the loose.)

“Yeah, yeah, yeah, ” says Mr. Grove “that’s weird.” He is respectfully silent for about ten seconds. But then starts again. “In a way you’re right. Course there’s racism in the game, but when all is said and done they play for the love of the game and because they’re bloody good and the game wouldn’t be the same it they were not in it.”

“And if everybody loves it so much,” I ask, “why do they have to be driven away from the pitch?”

We scowl at each other. The waitress comes over. “More tea?”
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Old Dec 14th, 2002, 07:02 PM   #12
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The 'Ugly Face' of Racism Bedevils Soccer
Rob Hughes International Herald Tribune

The authorities are aware of the problem but do not know how to combat it, other than through seminars and threats.

The soccer stadiums of Europe have become cauldrons of racial hatred, and soccer authorities seem unable to agree on what to do about the problem - or even if there is a problem at all.
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Racism forms part of the weekly sporting action across Europe. But soccer's tribal culture has become a catalyst to increasing xenophobic hatred spread by extremists who infiltrate the crowds, with sinister implications for society at large.

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When pressed by the International Herald Tribune to comment for this special report, FIFA and UEFA, the governing bodies of world and European soccer, agreed that racism posed a threat but seemed unsure what action to take. The attitudes of the national soccer federations are less consistent. Some are trying to address the problem. Others accept that it exists but say it is society's responsibility, not theirs. Others pretend the danger does not exist at all.
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Soccer, nominated for the 2001 Nobel Peace Prize by a Swedish lawmaker because it fosters understanding, may now be doing the opposite in Europe. A billion-dollar business whose statutes in theory ban all prejudice, soccer is threatened by assaults from neo-Nazis and other far-right extremists. As the number of African, Arab and Asian players increases, so do the racial taunts and attacks.
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"Racism is showing its ugly face all over the place," said Lennart Johansson, the president of UEFA. "We all tend to do what is expected and no more. We don't do enough to hinder it, and governments don't do enough. We know what happened in Nazi history; we must now analyze all these signs and do what is necessary."
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In Oslo last month, Benjamin Hermansen, a budding 15-year-old player of mixed African and Norwegian parentage, was hunted down and stabbed to death in the street, for no apparent reason other than his skin color - and perhaps because he dared to speak out against racism.
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In England, two acclaimed soccer players are currently on trial, accused of taking part in the mob beating of an Asian student outside a nightclub. In Italy, overt discrimination, on and off the pitch, persists like the jarring noise of a broken CD.
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The rise of xenophobia is everywhere in modern society - in politics, in pop music, and inevitably in sports. This week's example: A rightist rally is planned at a prison in Nottingham, England, on Saturday, even as anti-racist groups are calling for "mobilization" against it.
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With sport imitating life, European soccer is fertile ground for extremists. In too many stadiums, excitable crowds can be roused quickly to a nationalist fever. The authorities know it; but they do not know how to combat it, other than through seminars and threats to close stadiums.
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The signs of racism in soccer are visible across Europe. Here is a disturbing summary:
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AUSTRIA: "Zick zack Zigeunerpak!" crowds have hissed at visiting Jewish or African players in stadiums from Vienna to Tyrol. Zigeunerpak translates as the "Gypsy rabble."
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Crowds tell Polish and Jewish players: "We shall build a track to take you as far as Auschwitz."
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Anthony Yeboah, a Ghanaian center-forward, was hounded out of Salzburg. Turkish amateur players, migrant workers in Austria, are perpetual targets.
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Two months ago, Hannes Kortnig, president of the Austrian champion, Sturm Graz, said on television, "We lost because we played against Manchester United - not against any Negermannschaft," which translates as "****** team."
.
DENMARK: Apparently harmless remarks or actions can become fuel for racist elements.
.
Kristian Andersen, coach of Farum Boldklub, said: "The African and Brazil players, black players in general, we are offered by agents almost every day don't have the quality to improve the team. So it would be a bad investment. I would love African and Brazilian players in my team if we could afford to sign the best ones."
.
But a Danish tabloid quoted Andersen as saying he wouldn't sign any black players, because they only created problems and could never adapt to the discipline and the culture.
.
The Danish soccer association insists that racism does not exist in its sport. But observers report that supporters have started abusing nonwhite players. Last week Elsebeth Gerner, the Danish minister for sport, criticized the soccer authority and warned that if it did not immediately take serious action against racist fans, the government would intervene.
.
ENGLAND: The xenophobic hysteria that greeted the appointment in January of Sven-Goran Eriksson, a Swede, as national team coach came largely from the media and professional club coaches. Spectators around the country have applauded the Swede.
.
However, the Home Office, in a report jointly produced with the Football Supporters Association, condemned "the xenophobic culture among some white young male members who display offensive and distorted perceptions of patriotism" while purportedly supporting England abroad.
.
"The game at Stade de France last September may as well have been a Nuremberg rally," said Paul Thomas, the FSA international coordinator. "There were people 'Sieg-heiling' during 'God Save the Queen' and racist abuse throughout the match, not just directed at the French players but also at England players like Sol Campbell. The level of racism has worsened over the last couple of years." Campbell is black.
.
The Football Association, the governing body of English soccer, is disbanding the England Members' Club, its 27,000-strong official fan base. It will be rebuilt under strict vetting in hopes of exorcising the British National Party, Combat 18 and other racist groups that have traveled abroad to England matches as team supporters.
.
Last autumn, Andy Frain and Jason Mariner, were jailed for seven and six years, respectively, after an undercover television exposé of their incitement of serial soccer-crowd hooliganism. They were "officers" of Combat 18, and Frain was unmasked as a Ku Klux Klan officer.
.
Major grounds have closed-circuit TV monitoring the crowds, and 32 people were arrested for racism at stadiums last year. New government legislation allowing the police to prevent known or suspected hooligans traveling abroad with the England team were hastily introduced (despite civil libertarian objections) after Johansson, the UEFA president, phoned the British prime minister, Tony Blair, during last year's fighting in Charleroi, and warned that the English team and its supporters faced expulsion from the European Championship and deportation from Belgium.
.
FRANCE: Since Jean-Marie Le Pen's slur that Les Bleus, the multiracial team of 1996, were "not worthy" of representing France, the team has won the 1998 World Cup and Euro 2000, and Le Pen's rightist politics have become less fashionable.
.
That has not stopped the extremists who support Paris Saint Germain matches. Their racial taunting of Stephane Dalmat, a young and expensive black midfielder, was one reason he moved in midwinter to AC Milan.
.
Fode Sylla, a member of the European Parliament and president of SOS Racisme International, has struggled to rid the Parc des Princes of neo-Nazis who operated a whites-only area behind one goal.
.
Sylla said the racists systematically beat up immigrants in the streets. A judge pronounced that a stadium should be a place of conviviality and fraternity, and in April last year a sign appeared: "There is a place for everyone at Paris St. Germain, except for racists."
.
SOS Racisme acclaimed this as the face of new cooperation; Dalmat was evidently not convinced.
.
Nor was Claude Le Roy. While his team struggled near the foot of the French league,
.
Le Roy was subject to some savage racist abuse concerning his Jewish origins. Anti-Semitic graffiti was also daubed on stadium walls and black players were heckled by the crowd. Le Roy, who was fired as coach at the end of November, said he planned to begin an anti-racist campaign in France.
.
"Anti-racism is more important than victory," said Le Roy who used to coach the Cameroon national team.
.
GERMANY: In response to oppression of Turkish, black and Jewish players and spectators - and shocked by the Nazi views espoused by German thugs jailed for maiming a Lens policeman, Daniel Nivel, at the 1998 World Cup - fans have formed their own vigilant anti-racism groups.
.
Bodo Berg, representing Schalke against Racism, told a 1999 Council of Europe seminar in Vienna: "Opposing racism is not the only problem. We also face an enemy that sits in the clubs, in the Deutscher Fussball-Bund, and in UEFA. They are interested only in turnover. Sometimes they pay lip service to us, and sometimes they sabotage our campaigns."
.
Ironically, Berg's team, Schalke, became the new employer a year ago of Thorsten Legat, a player dismissed by VfB Stuttgart after writing "****** Juice" on the wall as his teammate Pablo Thiam, a German-born Guinea international, was drinking from a water bottle. Legat's star has waned at Schalke; Thaim's is rising. He is due to move to Bayern Munich next season.
.
The DfB denies apathy toward racism. The social page on its Web site features a photograph of Rudi Voeller, the national team coach, holding in each arm a Mexican child, beneficiaries of a charity sustained by Egidius Braun, the DfB president, since the 1986 World Cup in Mexico. At the 1990 World Cup in Italy, Voeller was accused of a racial jibe when Frank Rijkaard, a Dutch player who is black, spat in his face, and both were sent off.
.
GREECE: Rashidi Yekini, a Nigerian center-forward who has plied his trade across Europe, felt forced to quit Olympiakos Piraeus, close to the Olympic city of Athens. The racial taunts he suffered on Greek grounds pursued him to Spain, where the Basque supporters of Sporting Gijon greeted their new striker with repulsive regular chants.
.
HUNGARY: In 1995, black Ajax Amsterdam players were subjected to jungle noises from the first whistle to the last when they played against Ferencvaros in Budapest. The Dutch soccer association protested to UEFA. A journalist recorded the 90-minute abuse, but UEFA's observer at the match neither saw nor heard anything untoward.
.
What is ignored is unlikely to be cured. In May last year, the Hungarian Foreign Ministry called for government action after MTK Budapest was repeatedly the target of chants saying "the train is leaving for Auschwitz." MTK used to have Jewish owners.
.
ITALY: If any country is the epicenter of racial abuse in soccer, it is Italy. Despite the fact that the Dutch-Suriname pair Rijkaard and Ruud Gullit gave a fresh style to Italian soccer, barely a week goes by without hostility toward other minority players attempting to follow in their footprints.
.
"We have the least habitable, the most uncivilized and poorly educated stadiums in the world," said Arrigo Sacchi, the coach who brought Rijkaard and Gullit to Milan. "The sporting culture here is broadly deficient."
.
Even England's association protested to UEFA after the relentless hounding of Emile Heskey, a black center forward, at Stadio delle Alpi in Turin during a friendly international match last November.
.
Weeks earlier, Sinisa Mihajlovic, a Yugoslav defender with Lazio, and Patrick Vieira, a black French midfielder who plays for Arsenal, finished a Champions League game locked forehead to forehead like feuding stags. The referee took no disciplinary action, but UEFA banned Mihajlovic for two Champions League matches after what it found to be "sustained racist insults directed at Arsenal players."
.
Mihajlovic, who is of mixed Serbian and Croatian parentage, told the press: "I called him black shit, I didn't call him black monkey. He called me Gypsy shit - it's part of football."
.
Seven days after the white Mihajlovic and the black, Senegalese-born Vieira admitted trading insults, Lazio was fined $40,000 for repeated crowd violence at its Olimpico stadium.
.
Three days after that, Pope John Paul II received the Lazio players and was photographed with Mihajlovic. And three weeks later, the Italian Senate ordered police to investigate Mihajlovic's behavior. He could face a maximum of three years' imprisonment.
.
When that news reached London, Arsene Wenger, the coach of Arsenal, said: "Sometimes things are said in the heat of the game. You cannot go to prison for that! If Patrick wants to take legal action, then yes. Personally, I prefer things to remain in the hands of football authorities. I can't see why police should get involved."
.
Legislators argue that sport in a public place is subject to the law. Lazio, a team once favored by Benito Mussolini, attracts extremists to its Curva Nord who ritually revile opposing players, and even their own.
.
Aron Winter, a Dutchman who was the last black player in their lineup, was greeted on the day he arrived in 1992 by graffiti calling him "****** Jew." The racists were ill-informed. Winter's middle name: Mohammed.
.
The ultra-extremists of Lazio, calling themselves the Irriducibili (Unmovables), unfurled a banner that read "Auschwitz, your country - ovens your home" at the 1998 Roman derby match against Roma.
.
When Lazio was fined $2,250 last season after the Irriducibili, harangued Bruno N'Gotty, a black defender who plays for Venezia, Dino Zoff, who was then assistant to Lazio's club president, said: "I don't know whether you could really call that racism. It's more a question of people making fun. Fans pick on someone tall, short, gray-haired." The pre-match ritual of racial, anti-Semitic, or just plain geographical abuse prevails throughout Italy. Theirs is a history of anti-Jewish taunts from Juventus fans to Fiorentina, and widespread disparaging of Neapolitans.
.
Verona accumulates small fines from the Italian league for the habitual derision its fans heap on such renowned visiting players as Lilian Thuram, a black French defender with Parma.
.
The club's full name is Hellas-Verona because it was founded by Greek scholars. Writers and philosophers are attracted to the club, and the latest gentleman president, Giambattista Pastorello, went on TV last month to explain why he could not consider employing Patrik M'bomba, Africa's player of the year, much as Verona needs a goal scorer.
.
"You need to draw your own conclusions," said Pastorello. "Our supporters have behaved badly, at least in regard to black players."
.
Giovanna Melandri, Italy's culture minister with responsibility for sport, wrote an open letter to the Italian Olympic Committee expressing her "disappointment and concern in the light of recent episodes of violence and racism in the stadiums."
.
Disapproval, said Michael Fanizadeh, a researcher at Vienna Institute for Development and Cooperation, is insufficient. In his role as a coordinator of Football Against Racism in Europe, which combines the efforts of 40 human rights and actively anti-racist organization, Fanizadeh watched Lazio play Inter Milan in Rome recently.
.
"Jungle noises aimed at Inter's Dutch player Clarence Seedorf were not just coming from right-wing, male skinheads," Fanizadeh said. "The problem is worse than that. A lot of women and children were joining in the abuse."
.
NETHERLANDS: For two decades, Dutch players with ties to Suriname have made up half the Dutch team, often the most creative element in European football. Yet the successors to Gullit, Rijkaard and Co. still feel the sting of race discrimination in their homeland. Patrick Kluivert, young, gifted and rich, returned from his Barcelona club to play in a testimonial in Den Haag last year - and left abruptly after being reviled by notorious racists attached to FC Den Haag.
.
NORWAY: After the stabbing of Hermansen, 30,000 people, including the king and the prime minister, joined a rally in the capital. At the local Valerenga Fotball club, Havard Lunde, the marketing director and second team trainer, said: "We have two young players, from Ghana and Morocco, breaking into the team, and a younger one from Pakistan in the youth team. The membership of Valerenga involves 70 nationalities, and it was the supporters themselves who determined to take a stand against the rise of extremists."
.
Since 1997, when Valerenga was infiltrated by racists wearing "White Power" T-shirts and espousing aims akin to Norway's infamous "Boot Boys," a neo-Nazi group, the club adopted as its slogan, "Valerenga Against Racism."
.
That might help John Carew, who was at Valerenga and is now in Spain with Valencia. It did not help Benjamin Hermansen.
.
POLAND: In October last year, Emmanuel Olisadebe, a black playing for Polonia Warsaw in a league match in Lubin, scored the only goal against Zaglebie and was pelted with bananas. Olisadebe has taken Polish nationality, and his goals for the national team have made him the hero of the true followers of Polish soccer.
.
ROMANIA: Dumitru Dragomir, who according to the Council of Europe was once the owner of a nationalist tabloid newspaper, has been re-elected president of the Romanian soccer league.
.
No apology or action of any kind was reported after Manchester United played a Champion's League match in Bucharest, where United's Trinidadian striker Dwight Yorke was booed throughout the game.
.
SCOTLAND: Religious sectarianism has both blighted, and financially enhanced, the two main Glasgow clubs for more than a century. The blue of the Rangers represents Protestantism, the green of Celtic is Irish and Roman Catholic. Despite decades of attempts to water down the bigotry, their encounters are still accompanied by nationalist and religious songs and threats.
.
The stadiums are suitably fortressed and the crowds segregated by police, but at the last count, eight murders in Glasgow on the night of Rangers vs. Celtic "games" have occurred in the past five years. "Nil by Mouth," an anti-sectarian movement started by the girlfriend of one of the victims, is gathering pace in schools and junior soccer circles.
.
SPAIN: Like its Iberian neighbor Portugal, Spain built its soccer glories on imports - Spain by naturalizing Alfredo Di Stefano from Argentina, Portugal by adopting Eusebio from Mozambique.
.
Jacques Songo'o, the spectacular Cameroon goalkeeper of Deportivo la Coruna, has claimed he was twice racially insulted by Fernando Hierro, the Real Madrid captain.
.
At the start of February, Luis Aragones, the 62-year-old trainer of Real Mallorca, had to be dragged away from a Celta Vigo fan who racially abused Mallorca's Cameroon international, Samuel Etoo.
.
"I just could not stand there and listen to the insults," said Aragones.
.
TURKEY: The trial began Monday in Istanbul of Turks accused of stabbing to death two fans of the English team Leeds in an Istanbul city square on the eve of a UEFA Cup match last April.
.
Two years ago, Kevin Campbell, the black English player, became depressed and isolated after joining Trabzonspor whose home fans chorused at him, "We bought a cannibal who thinks he can be a forward." Campbell has returned to English soccer.
.
YUGOSLAVIA: Although Red Star Belgrade was ordered to play its UEFA Cup "home" match against Leicester City of England on neutral territory last September, Serbian fans followed the team to Vienna and a core of them heckled Leicester's black players, Ade Akinbiyi and Andrew Impey, from the first whistle to the last.
For Related Topics See:
Special Reports

< < Back to Start of Article The authorities are aware of the problem but do not know how to combat it, other than through seminars and threats.

The soccer stadiums of Europe have become cauldrons of racial hatred, and soccer authorities seem unable to agree on what to do about the problem - or even if there is a problem at all.
.
Racism forms part of the weekly sporting action across Europe. But soccer's tribal culture has become a catalyst to increasing xenophobic hatred spread by extremists who infiltrate the crowds, with sinister implications for society at large.
.
When pressed by the International Herald Tribune to comment for this special report, FIFA and UEFA, the governing bodies of world and European soccer, agreed that racism posed a threat but seemed unsure what action to take. The attitudes of the national soccer federations are less consistent. Some are trying to address the problem. Others accept that it exists but say it is society's responsibility, not theirs. Others pretend the danger does not exist at all.
.
Soccer, nominated for the 2001 Nobel Peace Prize by a Swedish lawmaker because it fosters understanding, may now be doing the opposite in Europe. A billion-dollar business whose statutes in theory ban all prejudice, soccer is threatened by assaults from neo-Nazis and other far-right extremists. As the number of African, Arab and Asian players increases, so do the racial taunts and attacks.
.
"Racism is showing its ugly face all over the place," said Lennart Johansson, the president of UEFA. "We all tend to do what is expected and no more. We don't do enough to hinder it, and governments don't do enough. We know what happened in Nazi history; we must now analyze all these signs and do what is necessary."
.
In Oslo last month, Benjamin Hermansen, a budding 15-year-old player of mixed African and Norwegian parentage, was hunted down and stabbed to death in the street, for no apparent reason other than his skin color - and perhaps because he dared to speak out against racism.
.
In England, two acclaimed soccer players are currently on trial, accused of taking part in the mob beating of an Asian student outside a nightclub. In Italy, overt discrimination, on and off the pitch, persists like the jarring noise of a broken CD.
.
The rise of xenophobia is everywhere in modern society - in politics, in pop music, and inevitably in sports. This week's example: A rightist rally is planned at a prison in Nottingham, England, on Saturday, even as anti-racist groups are calling for "mobilization" against it.
.
With sport imitating life, European soccer is fertile ground for extremists. In too many stadiums, excitable crowds can be roused quickly to a nationalist fever. The authorities know it; but they do not know how to combat it, other than through seminars and threats to close stadiums.
.
The signs of racism in soccer are visible across Europe. Here is a disturbing summary:
.
AUSTRIA: "Zick zack Zigeunerpak!" crowds have hissed at visiting Jewish or African players in stadiums from Vienna to Tyrol. Zigeunerpak translates as the "Gypsy rabble."
.
Crowds tell Polish and Jewish players: "We shall build a track to take you as far as Auschwitz."
.
Anthony Yeboah, a Ghanaian center-forward, was hounded out of Salzburg. Turkish amateur players, migrant workers in Austria, are perpetual targets.
.
Two months ago, Hannes Kortnig, president of the Austrian champion, Sturm Graz, said on television, "We lost because we played against Manchester United - not against any Negermannschaft," which translates as "****** team."
.
DENMARK: Apparently harmless remarks or actions can become fuel for racist elements.
.
Kristian Andersen, coach of Farum Boldklub, said: "The African and Brazil players, black players in general, we are offered by agents almost every day don't have the quality to improve the team. So it would be a bad investment. I would love African and Brazilian players in my team if we could afford to sign the best ones."
.
But a Danish tabloid quoted Andersen as saying he wouldn't sign any black players, because they only created problems and could never adapt to the discipline and the culture.
.
The Danish soccer association insists that racism does not exist in its sport. But observers report that supporters have started abusing nonwhite players. Last week Elsebeth Gerner, the Danish minister for sport, criticized the soccer authority and warned that if it did not immediately take serious action against racist fans, the government would intervene.
.
ENGLAND: The xenophobic hysteria that greeted the appointment in January of Sven-Goran Eriksson, a Swede, as national team coach came largely from the media and professional club coaches. Spectators around the country have applauded the Swede.
.
However, the Home Office, in a report jointly produced with the Football Supporters Association, condemned "the xenophobic culture among some white young male members who display offensive and distorted perceptions of patriotism" while purportedly supporting England abroad.
.
"The game at Stade de France last September may as well have been a Nuremberg rally," said Paul Thomas, the FSA international coordinator. "There were people 'Sieg-heiling' during 'God Save the Queen' and racist abuse throughout the match, not just directed at the French players but also at England players like Sol Campbell. The level of racism has worsened over the last couple of years." Campbell is black.
.
The Football Association, the governing body of English soccer, is disbanding the England Members' Club, its 27,000-strong official fan base. It will be rebuilt under strict vetting in hopes of exorcising the British National Party, Combat 18 and other racist groups that have traveled abroad to England matches as team supporters.
.
Last autumn, Andy Frain and Jason Mariner, were jailed for seven and six years, respectively, after an undercover television exposé of their incitement of serial soccer-crowd hooliganism. They were "officers" of Combat 18, and Frain was unmasked as a Ku Klux Klan officer.
.
Major grounds have closed-circuit TV monitoring the crowds, and 32 people were arrested for racism at stadiums last year. New government legislation allowing the police to prevent known or suspected hooligans traveling abroad with the England team were hastily introduced (despite civil libertarian objections) after Johansson, the UEFA president, phoned the British prime minister, Tony Blair, during last year's fighting in Charleroi, and warned that the English team and its supporters faced expulsion from the European Championship and deportation from Belgium.
.
FRANCE: Since Jean-Marie Le Pen's slur that Les Bleus, the multiracial team of 1996, were "not worthy" of representing France, the team has won the 1998 World Cup and Euro 2000, and Le Pen's rightist politics have become less fashionable.
.
That has not stopped the extremists who support Paris Saint Germain matches. Their racial taunting of Stephane Dalmat, a young and expensive black midfielder, was one reason he moved in midwinter to AC Milan.
.
Fode Sylla, a member of the European Parliament and president of SOS Racisme International, has struggled to rid the Parc des Princes of neo-Nazis who operated a whites-only area behind one goal.
.
Sylla said the racists systematically beat up immigrants in the streets. A judge pronounced that a stadium should be a place of conviviality and fraternity, and in April last year a sign appeared: "There is a place for everyone at Paris St. Germain, except for racists."
.
SOS Racisme acclaimed this as the face of new cooperation; Dalmat was evidently not convinced.
.
Nor was Claude Le Roy. While his team struggled near the foot of the French league,
.
Le Roy was subject to some savage racist abuse concerning his Jewish origins. Anti-Semitic graffiti was also daubed on stadium walls and black players were heckled by the crowd. Le Roy, who was fired as coach at the end of November, said he planned to begin an anti-racist campaign in France.
.
"Anti-racism is more important than victory," said Le Roy who used to coach the Cameroon national team.
.
GERMANY: In response to oppression of Turkish, black and Jewish players and spectators - and shocked by the Nazi views espoused by German thugs jailed for maiming a Lens policeman, Daniel Nivel, at the 1998 World Cup - fans have formed their own vigilant anti-racism groups.
.
Bodo Berg, representing Schalke against Racism, told a 1999 Council of Europe seminar in Vienna: "Opposing racism is not the only problem. We also face an enemy that sits in the clubs, in the Deutscher Fussball-Bund, and in UEFA. They are interested only in turnover. Sometimes they pay lip service to us, and sometimes they sabotage our campaigns."
.
Ironically, Berg's team, Schalke, became the new employer a year ago of Thorsten Legat, a player dismissed by VfB Stuttgart after writing "****** Juice" on the wall as his teammate Pablo Thiam, a German-born Guinea international, was drinking from a water bottle. Legat's star has waned at Schalke; Thaim's is rising. He is due to move to Bayern Munich next season.
.
The DfB denies apathy toward racism. The social page on its Web site features a photograph of Rudi Voeller, the national team coach, holding in each arm a Mexican child, beneficiaries of a charity sustained by Egidius Braun, the DfB president, since the 1986 World Cup in Mexico. At the 1990 World Cup in Italy, Voeller was accused of a racial jibe when Frank Rijkaard, a Dutch player who is black, spat in his face, and both were sent off.
.
GREECE: Rashidi Yekini, a Nigerian center-forward who has plied his trade across Europe, felt forced to quit Olympiakos Piraeus, close to the Olympic city of Athens. The racial taunts he suffered on Greek grounds pursued him to Spain, where the Basque supporters of Sporting Gijon greeted their new striker with repulsive regular chants.
.
HUNGARY: In 1995, black Ajax Amsterdam players were subjected to jungle noises from the first whistle to the last when they played against Ferencvaros in Budapest. The Dutch soccer association protested to UEFA. A journalist recorded the 90-minute abuse, but UEFA's observer at the match neither saw nor heard anything untoward.
.
What is ignored is unlikely to be cured. In May last year, the Hungarian Foreign Ministry called for government action after MTK Budapest was repeatedly the target of chants saying "the train is leaving for Auschwitz." MTK used to have Jewish owners.
.
ITALY: If any country is the epicenter of racial abuse in soccer, it is Italy. Despite the fact that the Dutch-Suriname pair Rijkaard and Ruud Gullit gave a fresh style to Italian soccer, barely a week goes by without hostility toward other minority players attempting to follow in their footprints.
.
"We have the least habitable, the most uncivilized and poorly educated stadiums in the world," said Arrigo Sacchi, the coach who brought Rijkaard and Gullit to Milan. "The sporting culture here is broadly deficient."
.
Even England's association protested to UEFA after the relentless hounding of Emile Heskey, a black center forward, at Stadio delle Alpi in Turin during a friendly international match last November.
.
Weeks earlier, Sinisa Mihajlovic, a Yugoslav defender with Lazio, and Patrick Vieira, a black French midfielder who plays for Arsenal, finished a Champions League game locked forehead to forehead like feuding stags. The referee took no disciplinary action, but UEFA banned Mihajlovic for two Champions League matches after what it found to be "sustained racist insults directed at Arsenal players."
.
Mihajlovic, who is of mixed Serbian and Croatian parentage, told the press: "I called him black shit, I didn't call him black monkey. He called me Gypsy shit - it's part of football."
.
Seven days after the white Mihajlovic and the black, Senegalese-born Vieira admitted trading insults, Lazio was fined $40,000 for repeated crowd violence at its Olimpico stadium.
.
Three days after that, Pope John Paul II received the Lazio players and was photographed with Mihajlovic. And three weeks later, the Italian Senate ordered police to investigate Mihajlovic's behavior. He could face a maximum of three years' imprisonment.
.
When that news reached London, Arsene Wenger, the coach of Arsenal, said: "Sometimes things are said in the heat of the game. You cannot go to prison for that! If Patrick wants to take legal action, then yes. Personally, I prefer things to remain in the hands of football authorities. I can't see why police should get involved."
.
Legislators argue that sport in a public place is subject to the law. Lazio, a team once favored by Benito Mussolini, attracts extremists to its Curva Nord who ritually revile opposing players, and even their own.
.
Aron Winter, a Dutchman who was the last black player in their lineup, was greeted on the day he arrived in 1992 by graffiti calling him "****** Jew." The racists were ill-informed. Winter's middle name: Mohammed.
.
The ultra-extremists of Lazio, calling themselves the Irriducibili (Unmovables), unfurled a banner that read "Auschwitz, your country - ovens your home" at the 1998 Roman derby match against Roma.
.
When Lazio was fined $2,250 last season after the Irriducibili, harangued Bruno N'Gotty, a black defender who plays for Venezia, Dino Zoff, who was then assistant to Lazio's club president, said: "I don't know whether you could really call that racism. It's more a question of people making fun. Fans pick on someone tall, short, gray-haired." The pre-match ritual of racial, anti-Semitic, or just plain geographical abuse prevails throughout Italy. Theirs is a history of anti-Jewish taunts from Juventus fans to Fiorentina, and widespread disparaging of Neapolitans.
.
Verona accumulates small fines from the Italian league for the habitual derision its fans heap on such renowned visiting players as Lilian Thuram, a black French defender with Parma.
.
The club's full name is Hellas-Verona because it was founded by Greek scholars. Writers and philosophers are attracted to the club, and the latest gentleman president, Giambattista Pastorello, went on TV last month to explain why he could not consider employing Patrik M'bomba, Africa's player of the year, much as Verona needs a goal scorer.
.
"You need to draw your own conclusions," said Pastorello. "Our supporters have behaved badly, at least in regard to black players."
.
Giovanna Melandri, Italy's culture minister with responsibility for sport, wrote an open letter to the Italian Olympic Committee expressing her "disappointment and concern in the light of recent episodes of violence and racism in the stadiums."
.
Disapproval, said Michael Fanizadeh, a researcher at Vienna Institute for Development and Cooperation, is insufficient. In his role as a coordinator of Football Against Racism in Europe, which combines the efforts of 40 human rights and actively anti-racist organization, Fanizadeh watched Lazio play Inter Milan in Rome recently.
.
"Jungle noises aimed at Inter's Dutch player Clarence Seedorf were not just coming from right-wing, male skinheads," Fanizadeh said. "The problem is worse than that. A lot of women and children were joining in the abuse."
.
NETHERLANDS: For two decades, Dutch players with ties to Suriname have made up half the Dutch team, often the most creative element in European football. Yet the successors to Gullit, Rijkaard and Co. still feel the sting of race discrimination in their homeland. Patrick Kluivert, young, gifted and rich, returned from his Barcelona club to play in a testimonial in Den Haag last year - and left abruptly after being reviled by notorious racists attached to FC Den Haag.
.
NORWAY: After the stabbing of Hermansen, 30,000 people, including the king and the prime minister, joined a rally in the capital. At the local Valerenga Fotball club, Havard Lunde, the marketing director and second team trainer, said: "We have two young players, from Ghana and Morocco, breaking into the team, and a younger one from Pakistan in the youth team. The membership of Valerenga involves 70 nationalities, and it was the supporters themselves who determined to take a stand against the rise of extremists."
.
Since 1997, when Valerenga was infiltrated by racists wearing "White Power" T-shirts and espousing aims akin to Norway's infamous "Boot Boys," a neo-Nazi group, the club adopted as its slogan, "Valerenga Against Racism."
.
That might help John Carew, who was at Valerenga and is now in Spain with Valencia. It did not help Benjamin Hermansen.
.
POLAND: In October last year, Emmanuel Olisadebe, a black playing for Polonia Warsaw in a league match in Lubin, scored the only goal against Zaglebie and was pelted with bananas. Olisadebe has taken Polish nationality, and his goals for the national team have made him the hero of the true followers of Polish soccer.
.
ROMANIA: Dumitru Dragomir, who according to the Council of Europe was once the owner of a nationalist tabloid newspaper, has been re-elected president of the Romanian soccer league.
.
No apology or action of any kind was reported after Manchester United played a Champion's League match in Bucharest, where United's Trinidadian striker Dwight Yorke was booed throughout the game.
.
SCOTLAND: Religious sectarianism has both blighted, and financially enhanced, the two main Glasgow clubs for more than a century. The blue of the Rangers represents Protestantism, the green of Celtic is Irish and Roman Catholic. Despite decades of attempts to water down the bigotry, their encounters are still accompanied by nationalist and religious songs and threats.
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The stadiums are suitably fortressed and the crowds segregated by police, but at the last count, eight murders in Glasgow on the night of Rangers vs. Celtic "games" have occurred in the past five years. "Nil by Mouth," an anti-sectarian movement started by the girlfriend of one of the victims, is gathering pace in schools and junior soccer circles.
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SPAIN: Like its Iberian neighbor Portugal, Spain built its soccer glories on imports - Spain by naturalizing Alfredo Di Stefano from Argentina, Portugal by adopting Eusebio from Mozambique.
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Jacques Songo'o, the spectacular Cameroon goalkeeper of Deportivo la Coruna, has claimed he was twice racially insulted by Fernando Hierro, the Real Madrid captain.
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At the start of February, Luis Aragones, the 62-year-old trainer of Real Mallorca, had to be dragged away from a Celta Vigo fan who racially abused Mallorca's Cameroon international, Samuel Etoo.
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"I just could not stand there and listen to the insults," said Aragones.
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TURKEY: The trial began Monday in Istanbul of Turks accused of stabbing to death two fans of the English team Leeds in an Istanbul city square on the eve of a UEFA Cup match last April.
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Two years ago, Kevin Campbell, the black English player, became depressed and isolated after joining Trabzonspor whose home fans chorused at him, "We bought a cannibal who thinks he can be a forward." Campbell has returned to English soccer.
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YUGOSLAVIA: Although Red Star Belgrade was ordered to play its UEFA Cup "home" match against Leicester City of England on neutral territory last September, Serbian fans followed the team to Vienna and a core of them heckled Leicester's black players, Ade Akinbiyi and Andrew Impey, from the first whistle to the last. The authorities are aware of the problem but do not know how to combat it, other than through seminars and threats.


Last edited by CHOCO : Dec 14th, 2002 at 07:13 PM.
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Old Dec 14th, 2002, 07:07 PM   #13
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...and the original topic has been completely lost...

Racism is in sport, yes, but it doesn't effect how good each sport is to watch... so back to the start.

I've never seen a game of handball in my life, what is it?
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Old Dec 14th, 2002, 07:09 PM   #14
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nasty nick#2 is just really nice nasty nick#2 is just really nice nasty nick#2 is just really nice nasty nick#2 is just really nice nasty nick#2 is just really nice nasty nick#2 is just really nice nasty nick#2 is just really nice nasty nick#2 is just really nice nasty nick#2 is just really nice nasty nick#2 is just really nice nasty nick#2 is just really nice
OK, smartass if you're not capable of reading im gonna tell you for the last time now.


My point is that the majority of the basketball players are black american, yes there are white american players too but not so many. Since the 60's this % has decreased, there are no longer many "good" white basketball players around. I would guess over 90's of the american players in NBA are black. I watch NBA basket too btw.

The Audience comment is just a cheap shot. You know it costs to watch live games. And not every black man has the money, even if they would have there would always be white fans of the game aswell. Same in Football.

About all the articles you dug up. I said it like Jesse Owen. "Racism in sports are old news" Try to find the positive things about it instead
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Old Dec 14th, 2002, 07:10 PM   #15
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nasty nick#2 is just really nice nasty nick#2 is just really nice nasty nick#2 is just really nice nasty nick#2 is just really nice nasty nick#2 is just really nice nasty nick#2 is just really nice nasty nick#2 is just really nice nasty nick#2 is just really nice nasty nick#2 is just really nice nasty nick#2 is just really nice nasty nick#2 is just really nice
Oh CHOCO i think u missed a few articles from 1997
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