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Old May 14th, 2013, 12:41 AM   #121
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Re: 1983

ALLEN LEAVES ENGLAND
The Miami Herald
Tuesday, June 7, 1983
UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL

Leslie Allen, a promising black tennis player formerly of the University of Miami, withdrew Monday from this week's Edgbaston Cup women's tournament in Birmingham, England.

An official of the tournament said Allen went home to Cleveland because men's pro Eliot Teltscher supposedly made racist remarks about her during the mixed doubles final of the French Open Saturday in Paris. But others who talked to Allen denied that and said she went home to recover from a minor knee injury.

Allen, 26, and Charles Strode lost the French Open final to Teltscher and Barbara Jordan, 6-2, 6-3. What Teltscher allegedly said has not been made public, but the incident apparently occurred during a line-call dispute in the second set.

Georgina Clark, referee of the Edgbaston Cup, said, "She has not mentioned the circumstance of withdrawing, but I would assume they [the remarks] had something to do with it."

Allen was not available for comment, but a spokesman for International Management Group, which represents Allen, was asked if what Teltscher said had anything to do with Allen's withdrawing.

"Oh God, no," she said. "You know how athletes are. She has an injury and doesn't want to take a chance of aggravating it. She'll be playing tennis in a week or two."

A spokesman for the Women's Tennis Association who spoke to Allen earlier also said that Allen returned home because of the injury. The spokesman said Allen, who was to have been the No. 14 seed in Birmingham, did not mention the Teltscher incident.

"In a player's mind, these are things that are done with when they leave the court," the spokesman said. "It's something they forget about, or would like to forget about."

Also Monday, Ann Smith announced her retirement from tennis at age 23. Smith and Kathy Jordan are former winners of doubles titles in all four Grand Slam events.
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Old May 14th, 2013, 12:43 AM   #122
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Re: 1983

So apparently he called her the c-word instead of the n-word...

Tennis
The Miami Herald
Wednesday, June 8, 1983
From Herald Wire Services

Leslie Allen, who was contacted by The Associated Press for clarification on why she took a temporary leave from the women's tennis tour, said the remarks made by men's pro Eliot Teltscher about her during the French Open were sexist, not racist, as earlier reported.

Allen said she did not remember everything Teltscher had said during the mixed doubles final, but the remarks she called sexist occurred during the second set. Teltscher could not be reached for comment.
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Old May 14th, 2013, 12:44 AM   #123
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Re: 1983

ANNE SMITH GIVES UP TENNIS
The Miami Herald
Wednesday, June 8, 1983
UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL

Professional tennis player Anne Smith has decided to retire to pursue education and business opportunities, her agent said Tuesday.

The agent, Steve Corey, said Smith, 23, had been considering such a move for about three months. She played in the French Open tennis tournament last week, losing in the doubles final.

"Her reasons are pretty well thought out," Corey said. "She feels that at 23 to 24 years old she had a very good professional career. She has become financially secure, but she also realized that the best years of life are passing her by."

He said Smith decided that if she continued to play until she was 30 or 35 that "she would be giving up too much: an education, business opportunities."

Smith holds 23 U.S. titles. Her best efforts in major international competition has been in doubles and mixed doubles competition.

She has been ranked as high as 12th by the Women's Tennis Association, but due to recent illness has dropped to 18th.
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Old May 23rd, 2013, 12:44 PM   #124
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Re: 1983

Retrospective on the Horvath v. Navratilova match.

http://espn.go.com/tennis/french13/s...vratilova-lost
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Old May 27th, 2013, 04:22 PM   #125
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Re: 1983

Excerpting about Birmingham...

TEXAS TAKES BASEBALL TITLE
The Philadelphia Inquirer
Sunday, June 12, 1983
From Inquirer Wire Services

[....]


TENNIS

LONDON - Jimmy Connors and John McEnroe won in straight sets and surged into the final of the Stella Artois tennis tournament, their last grass-court event before Wimbledon.

Top-seeded Connors whipped Ivan Lendl, who says he dislikes grass, 6-0, 6-3. The No. 2-seeded McEnroe had a tougher time, edging Kevin Curren of South Africa, 7-5, 7-6.

BIRMINGHAM, England - Defending champion Billie Jean King and Alycia Moulton advanced to the final of the $94,000 Edgbaston Cup tournament. Top-seeded King defeated Anne White, 7-5, 6-2, and Moulton beat Zina Garrison on a default. King has not lost a set all week. "I had trouble with my return of service in the earlier stages," she said, "but once I got that under control I had no further trouble."

The East, featuring New York-area players, won the Church Cup for the second straight year by defeating New England, 6-3, in the 68th annual grass- court final at Merion Cricket Club. The Middle Atlantic team, from Maryland and Virgina, won the consolation by beating Middle States, a Philadelphia-area team, 6-3.

[....]
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Old May 27th, 2013, 04:24 PM   #126
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Re: 1983

EDGBASTON CUP: KING KEEPS TITLE
The Miami Herald
Monday, June 13, 1983
From Herald Wire Services

Billie Jean King retained the $90,000 Edgbaston Women's Tennis Cup Sunday with a straight-set triumph over American compatriot Alycia Moulton in Birmingham, England.

It took the 39-year-old King, still ranked 10th in the world, just 58 minutes to defeat her fellow-Californian, 18 years her junior, 6-0, 7-5.

In the first set, Moulton seemed awed and unable to come to terms with the champion's full arsenal of weapons.

The second set brought a marked improvement, with Moulton managing to control her first service. However, her first double fault of the set allowed King the crucial break, and the champion followed up to take her own service for the match.

King lost only 13 points on her nine service games as she prepares for another challenge at Wimbledon. Indeed, King retained one Wimbledon trophy, and in a manner which suggests that she is still capable of winning the tournament for a seventh time. King's victory Sunday allowed her another year's possession of the Edgbaston Cup, the original Wimbledon women's trophy, won in 1884 by Maud Watson.

The triumph also gave King $18,000, compared to Moulton's $9,000, the biggest prize of her career.

The loser's performance may well project her several places higher than the world ranking of 42nd she held at the start of the week. Although the challenger had chances to win both the third and fifth games, she could clinch neither.

"I'm quite depressed about the way I played, particularly in the first set," said Moulton. "I made a lot of unforced errors and didn't get my first serve in enough.

"Another big thing was that Billie Jean doesn't give you any free points. Even people ranked around 20th do that occasionally."
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Old Jun 14th, 2013, 12:37 AM   #127
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Re: 1983

GARRISON SETS WIMBLEDON SEED STRAIGHT
Philadelphia Daily News
Friday, June 17, 1983
United Press International

Zina Garrison, claiming another Wimbledon seed, scored a straight-sets victory yesterday over West German Bettina Bunge to reach the semifinals of a $150,000 tennis tournament.

Garrison, a 19-year-old product of the Houston public parks program, showed some sparkling touches in defeating the No. 6 Wimbledon seed, 6-3, 6-2.

Her victory followed Wednesday's third-round triumph over Czechoslovakia's Hana Mandlikova, who was a losing Wimbledon finalist in 1981 and is seeded eighth this year.

Garrison, stockily built and aggressive, gave a magnificent display and never trailed after breaking Bunge's serve in the opening game. The West German managed to hold Garrison to 2-2 in the second set but Garrison then pulled away, winning the next four games.

In the second quarterfinal, Britain's Jo Durie, whose promotion to No. 13 seed for Wimbledon caused Garrison to miss a place in the favored 16, lost, 6-2, 6-1, to an impressively strong Martina Navratilova.

Durie, a semifinalist in the recent French Open, claimed Wednesday she could defeat the world's No. 1 woman player but instead lost in just 53 minutes.

"I'm very happy with the way I played although the game was closer than the score would suggest," Navratilova said.

Navratilova broke service in the first game and had no trouble the rest of the way. She did drop service in the seventh game and also in the first game of the second set.

"It was a good lesson for me because she showed exactly what a top class player really is," Durie said. "I don't think it will affect my confidence for Wimbledon . . . I've just got to start out again next week."

Seedings for the women's singles at Wimbledon followed world rankings except in the case of Durie, ranked 17th in the world but seeded above Hungarian Andrea Temesvari, American Kathy Rinaldi and West German Claudia Kohde, with Garrison, ranked 16th on the computer, not seeded at all.

BRISTOL, England - Tom Gullikson beat Hank Pfister, 3-6, 6-2, 10-8, in the second round of a $117,000 Volvo Grand Prix tournament yesterday in a match in which Pfister bitterly criticized the umpire.

Pfister, the second seed, questioned the competence of Edward James, whose performance may have cost him an officiating role at next week's Wimbledon championship. James was labeled "the pits" by John McEnroe at Wimbledon two years ago.

"How can we play tennis with somebody in the chair who does not know what is going on?" Pfister asked.

Grand Prix supervisor Bill Gilmour said James would not be umpiring any more matches at this tournament and would almost certainly not chair any matches at Wimbledon.

Gullikson was joined in the last eight by Chilean Ricardo Acuna, who defeated Nigeria's Nduka Odizor, 6-3, 6-1, and Brazilian Marcos Hocevar, a 7-6 7-6 winner over Mike Bauer.

Lloyd Bourne, ranked 91 places lower than Brian Teacher in the world rankings, scored a 6-3, 6-7, 11-9 upset. Bourne meets the winner of the quarterfinal match between top seed Johan Kriek and Acuna in the semis.

Pfister, ranked 19th in the world and seeded 15th for Wimbledon, was given a code of violation warning from James for racket abuse in the first set. Midway through the second set a linesman made a late "out" call. Pfister, incensed by the call, looked to James. He overruled it, claiming Pfister's backhand return was good.

But when Pfister and Gullikson asked him how clear a view he had, the umpire admitted, "I didn't see the ball - let - play two."

Gilmour then was summoned and said later: "The man definitely made a procedural error. He will not be working at this tournament again."
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Old Jun 14th, 2013, 12:37 AM   #128
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Re: 1983

Tennis
The Miami Herald
Saturday, June 18, 1983
From Herald Wire Services

Martina Navratilova and Wendy Turnbull reached today's final of the $150,000 BMW grass-court championships in Eastbourne , England. Navratilova, the defending champion, beat 19-year-old American Zina Garrison, 6-2, 6-3, in exactly one hour. Turnbull won her semifinal when her opponent, Tracy Austin, defaulted with a back muscle injury 72 hours before the start of the prestigious Wimbledon tournament. "I'm positive I'll be able to play by then," said Austin, who won only 14 points against the 30-year-old Australian before pulling out when she was trailing, 6-1, 1-0 ... U.S. Davis Cup captain Arthur Ashe, who underwent quadruple-bypass surgery in 1979, said he may undergo another heart operation. A former Wimbledon champion who quit the pro tennis circuit when he first experienced heart problems, Ashe said he was recently hospitalized for a week to undergo tests. "I'm having some problems," he said. "It's not decided yet when I'll re-enter a hospital, but it will be sooner or later." ... Top-seeded Johan Kriek, the South African-born American, overcame a second-set lapse to reach the semifinals of the West of England Grass Courts Championships at Bristol, England. Kriek, 25, beat unseeded Ricardo Acuna of Chile, 6-4, 6-7, 6-4. In Friday's other quarterfinal, American Tom Gullikson ousted seventh-seeded Marcos Hocevar of Brazil, 6-4, 6-4.
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Old Jun 14th, 2013, 12:38 AM   #129
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Re: 1983

TOP SEED TUNES UP WITH WIN - NAVRATILOVA SET FOR WIMBLEDON
The Philadelphia Inquirer
Sunday, June 19, 1983
Associated Press

Martina Navratilova won the $150,000 BMW women's grass court tennis championship yesterday by defeating Wendy Turnbull of Australia, 6-1, 6-1 in 36 minutes.

"Every time I've won here, I've gone on to win Wimbledon. So let's hope it's a good omen," said Navratilova, who will be top-seeded in Wimbledon, which will begin Monday.

The world's No. 1-ranked woman tennis player retained her title in just 36 minutes to collect the first prize of $23,000. Turnbull picked up $12,000 as the runnerup.

The 30-year-old Australian won just 21 points in the entire match and only six in the second set, which lasted just 15 minutes.

Navratilova, who has been in devastating form all week, saved her very best for the final and Turnbull, who had beaten the Czech-born naturalized American only four times in 27 previous meetings, never stood a chance.

It was the 43rd victory in 44 matches this year for Navratilova and the perfect tune-up before she begins defense of her Wimbledon title tomorrow.

"I think this was one of my best matches ever on grass," said a relaxed Navratilova afterwards. "It was the best possible dress rehearsal for Wimbledon."

Turnbull, the fifth seed, said she was disgusted with the way she played. ''I should be taken out and shot," she said.

But she paid tribute to her opponent. "Whenever I did anything right, she came back with something better," Turnbull admitted.

Last year, Navratilova won at Eastbourne and went on to take her second Wimbledon singles crown.

"I think I'm playing more of a grass court game than last year when I tended to stay back more and play safer," she said.

Turnbull, a grass court specialist, reached the final when Tracy Austin, ranked fourth in the world, was forced to retire early in the second set of their semifinal match because of a back injury.

WIMBLEDON, England - Gene Mayer, seeded No. 6 in the men's singles at Wimbledon, pulled out of the tournament yesterday because of injury.

The All-England Club gave Mayer's place in the draw to Brice Kleedge, a Californian, who drew a lucky loser's spot after playing in the qualifying tournament at Roehampton.

Kleedge steps into a tough first-round match tomorrow against Vic Amaya, the big-serving American who is a dangerous competitor on Wimbledon grass.

Mayer's withdrawal meant that only 14 of the 16 men's seeds will go into the first round. Jimmy Arias, the No. 10 seed, pulled out earlier this week with a strained stomach muscle.

Wimbledon fills vacant places from the qualifying tournament, but does not revise seeding positions if seeded players withdraw.
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Old Jun 14th, 2013, 07:00 AM   #130
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Re: 1983

It's worth re-discovering Turnbull on YouTube. She had a play of the Goolagong style, great touch and sliced backhand, graceful footwork on clay.
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Old Jun 20th, 2013, 05:59 PM   #131
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Re: 1983

Admirable as these programs are/were, 30 is/was an awfully small number of NYC kids to be reaching out to.

YOUNG TURN TO TENNIS AS WAY OUT OF POVERTY
The Philadelphia Inquirer
Sunday, July 24, 1983
United Press International

Tennis long has had an upper-class, country-club aura, that of a social game played by ladies and gentlemen in a serene, rich setting.

Much of the image has changed, of course, partly because a city boy named John McEnroe has proved that one needn't be a gentleman to be the best tennis player in the world.

Now, thanks to money that has become available in the last decade, tennis more and more has become a lifeline of hope for the poor. Numerous programs have developed in inner-city areas, giving youngsters an opportunity to grasp at salvation. Even for those who fall short of becoming professionals, there is the increasing possibility of at least earning a college scholarship.

"This is a way out for me, a chance to escape," said Karen Perez, a 17-year-old New Yorker who is an excellent example of the doors that have been opened for talented youngsters as the result of urban tennis programs.

Perez first became aware of tennis after watching a made-for-TV movie about Maureen Connolly, a poor girl who persevered to become the first woman to capture tennis' Grand Slam.

"I saw myself as being in the same situation, and I got inspired," Perez said. "But my father died in 1977, and we were very bad off. It was frustrating, trying to learn a sport and not having the money to do so. I couldn't take any paid lessons, so all I could do was play outdoors on a wall. I'd be out there every day, hitting the ball against a wall, until
the snow came.

"There was a point where I wanted to give up, and even my mother asked me why I was doing this. I saw friends who had coaches and could afford lessons, and it was frustrating. I didn't think I'd get anywhere. But I wouldn't quit."

Finally, Perez was told about the Peugeot Urban Youth Tennis Academy, which was started three years ago and accepts only 30 of New York City's most talented tennis players under 18 years of age. The program offers 15 1/2 hours of professional coaching each week, virtually on a year-round basis.

In addition to the coaching, the sponsor provides travel and tournament expenses, as well as rackets.

"It was an answer to my prayers," Perez said of her introduction to the academy three years ago. "I see a lot of my old friends who just hang out on the streets. That's a good way to get into trouble.

"Tennis has given me something to do. It's given me a goal. Tennis gives me the determination and drive to do something for myself, and it's given me somewhere to go."

Although she still has a year remaining at the High School of Arts and Design, where she is a photography major with an interest in journalism, Perez already has been offered a full tennis scholarship by St. John's University. She has progressed to the point where she is recognized as one of the top juniors in the area, and later this year, she is expected to receive a high ranking from the Eastern Tennis Association.

In three years of high school, Perez is unbeaten as the No. 1 player on the boys' varsity team.

"The boys I play against, they have this attitude when they see a girl that it's going to be easy, and they get cocky," she said. "That gives me even more drive to beat them, and it's a lot of fun." The director of the Peugeot program is Denise Jordan, a former touring pro whose initiation to tennis while growing up in New York was even more difficult than was Perez's.

"I started basically the same way as Karen, although I didn't have a program like this," she said. "I didn't have the money, and many times, I wanted to quit. It wasn't until I got to college (Syracuse University) that I was able to get the kind of training Karen is receiving now."

As for Perez's chances of succeeding in tennis, Jordan said, "She's a very good player, and I think she has the potential to make it. She's a gutsy player - a quality women don't always have - and she's aggressive and very powerful. She's also become a better sportsman."

"I used to have a temper," Perez said, "but now I have learned to accept it when other people make good shots. I've learned to respect others enough that I'm a good sport, but I'm mad when I lose.

"Even when I was a kid I was very persistent. If I wanted something, I got it. It means everything to me to be a success at tennis, and I can only be grateful I was given this kind of chance."
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Old Jun 21st, 2013, 12:42 PM   #132
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Re: 1983

AT THE READY - WIMBLEDON IS WAITING TO SUPPLY SOME ANSWERS
The Philadelphia Inquirer
Sunday, June 19, 1983
Steve Goldstein

Though the mercury hovers near 60 degrees, it is summertime in England. There is racing at Royal Ascot, World Cup cricket at Lord's. Shortly, there will be the Royal Regatta at Henley.

And there will be Wimbledon.

No English summer really begins until Wimbledon does. No event is more synonymous with a sport, and no tennis tournament so draws the attention of an entire nation.

Indeed, the very threat this week that Wimbledon may be blacked out because of a labor dispute at the venerable British Broadcasting Corp. has the locals in a tizzy. No Wimbledon on TV? Sheer heresy.

But there will be tennis on the lawns of the All England Club, and beautiful lawns they are this year, thanks to groundskeeper Jim Thorne, who, despite 37 straight days of rain recently, has those green rectangles rock- hard and smartly cut.

All evidence is that the competition that will begin tomorrow and conclude on July 3 will live up to the grass. Both the men's and women's fields are outstanding, despite the loss of Yannick Noah to a suspension and Bjorn Borg to the broadcasting booth.

Among the questions to be answered at The Championships - that is the official title - are whether a seemingly reborn Jimmy Connors can defend the crown no one expected him to win over John McEnroe last year; whether Ivan Lendl can conquer his fear of grass; whether Martina Navratilova can end Chris Evert Lloyd's Grand Slam aspirations, and whether the recent epidemic of poor on-court behavior in tennis will be quarantined for the fortnight.

London's "turf accountants" - the bookies - have made Connors a 5-4 favorite, and if any had seen him practice this past week, they might have made him even money. On

Thursday, Connors picked up where he left off at Queen's Club last Sunday, outclassing McEnroe in a "friendly" session. On Friday, Connors looked devastating in winning a practice match against eighth-seeded Vitas Gerulaitis.

"I have to hit six winners to win one point," Gerulaitis said at one juncture.

Connors allowed that he was playing "pretty well for an old fool." The top seed was loose, joking with the small army that watched him practice. Switching his racket to his right hand for a couple of shots, he said, "I could be in the top 10 of the women like this."

Connors, who likes to improve his level of play gradually as a tournament unfolds, looked almost too good.

"Maybe you should pull in the reins a bit," someone told Jimmy's brother, John, who serves in his brother's corner.

But there is no stopping an express train.

"I played well at Queens," Connors said, referring to his 98th career victory in a Grand Prix tournament. "I'm so damn eager to play tennis, it's amazing."

Perhaps his recent breakup with his wife, Patti, has Connors trying to bury himself in his work. But fair weather or foul, Connors normally needs no motivation to go all out.

Connors is hot

"Last year, I won when no one expected me to, and everyone became my friend again," he said. "This year, everyone expects me to win. It's like you're damned if you do and damned if you don't.

"I've been in both positions - favorite and underdog. I can tell you, I'm going to play good tennis, no matter what."

At Queens, Connors rolled over Lendl in the semifinals, 6-0, 6-3, and, as someone who witnessed the slaughter said, "Lendl never knew what hit him."

But Lendl had played well on the grass until that point, and he said that he had gained confidence from his showing.

"I've never won so many matches on grass in a row - and good matches," he said.

Last year, Lendl did not enter Wimbledon, using the excuse that he was allergic to grass. (He does receive shots for his allergies, but he is a devoted golfer.) And in 1981, he lost a first-round match to unheralded Charlie Fancutt of Australia.

Lendl's aversion to grass developed, surprisingly, in 1978, the year he won the Wimbledon junior tournament.

"I was so much better than the other guys (in the tournament) that it didn't matter," Lendl recalled.

Early disaster

At the end of 1977, Lendl had been ranked 15th in Czechoslovakia, but he soon won the championship of his country. So impressed were the Czechoslovaks that they thrust the inexperienced 18-year-old onto their Davis Cup team for its match against England - on English grass. Lendl lost in straight sets to both Buster Mottram and Mark Cox.

"That's where it (apprehension about playing on grass) is coming from," Lendl said.

Nevertheless, Lendl knows that he won't be regarded as a great player until he wins a major championship, and Wimbledon is a good one to win. He has been practicing every day at the All England Club with his mentor and manager, Wojtek Fibak, and under the watchful eye of his father, Jiri.

"I am concentrating on three shots - the serve, return of serve and the volley," said Lendl, who is seeded third. "You take a volley instead of a half-volley when you can because you cannot depend on the bounce on grass."

Much of Lendl's success derives from his fierce serve, but he said that he was going to take something off his first serve here and use some spin to get the ball in.

"I would rather get my first serve in, because it is easier to get passed on my second serve or to not get a good volley from the return," Lendl said.

Key is confidence

Fibak said that the key to his protege's serve was confidence.

"If you start thinking it won't go in, then it won't go in," he said.

Lendl, whose quarter of the draw includes fifth-seeded Mats Wilander and 11th-seeded Johan Kriek, was not looking beyond his first-round encounter with Bernard Mitton, an aging but wily South African.

"I would like to do well here," Lendl said. "There is certainly no pressure on me, since no one is expecting me to do well."

Pressure will be Navratilova's constant partner as she seeks to defend her title and win her fourth Wimbledon.

At the recent French Open, as is her habit, she found someone to blame for her losing, so Renee Richards is out as her coach in favor of Mike Estep, 33, a former touring pro from Texas.

But Navratilova played well in the Eastbourne tuneup this past week and will be well-prepared for Wimbledon. She will need the confidence, because her quarter of the draw includes the ever-dangerous Hana Mandlikova, and Tracy Austin and Pam Shriver lurk in her half.

Lloyd, the French Open champ, has an easier draw - Billie Jean King in her quarter, Andrea Jaeger and Bettina Bunge in her half - and can advance easily to the final. But she could have trouble beating Navratilova there on the fast grass.

Lloyd, the second seed, has the added motivation of the chance to gain a second leg on the Grand Slam, and this might be her last good shot at that elusive goal.

One thing Wimbledon doesn't want to be is the second leg of the Groan Slam. The behavior at the French Open was far from major-championship standards, particularly in the case of McEnroe, who drew $3,300 in fines. Other players did their share of griping and moaning, however, and the bad temper has carried across the English Channel.

This past week, there were two notable incidents during the West of England Championships in Bristol.

In one, Hank Pfister got into a row with umpire Edward James, whom McEnroe made famous two years ago with his "incompetent fool . . . pits of the world" diatribe. Pfister was correct in his argument, and James was removed from the chair for making a procedural error, placing his Wimbledon status in jeopardy. But Pfister made such a show of it that he garnered little sympathy.

The other incident involved Lloyd Bourne and Drew Gitlin. During their match, Bourne objected to the gold medallion around Gitlin's neck, terming it a distraction. Words ensued, and the players vowed to get one another when the match was over. After losing, Gitlin waited in the dressing room for 30 minutes, but Bourne didn't show up.

"There would have been trouble," Gitlin said. "I've been wearing this thing for eight years, and no one has ever complained."

New Zealand's Chris Lewis, who hadn't witnessed the match, said Bourne and other players often used an aggravating kind of gamesmanship on court.

"Some players are sick of all . . . that goes on," Lewis said, adding that it seemed to him that the officials were going to be forced to crack down on bad behavior.

Alan Mills, the new tournament referee at Wimbledon, said drawn-out objections by players would not be tolerated at Wimbledon.

"I think it's up to the umpire to get a dispute resolved as quickly as possible," he said. "What I don't like is a player arguing with the umpire, because it's affecting his opponent more than himself."

Mills said there would be strict adherence to the rule allowing only 30 seconds between points.

"I'd like to keep a low profile and have a trouble-free tournament ending on July 3," the final arbiter of discipline said as he gazed out an office window onto the courts. "The ideal situation would be for me to stay in my office for two weeks."
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Old Jun 21st, 2013, 12:43 PM   #133
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Re: 1983

TRADITIONAL FINAL FOUR EXPECTED TO CLOSE WIMBLEDON FORTNIGHT
The Miami Herald
Sunday, June 19, 1983
JIM MARTZ

At the Lawn Tennis Championships beginning Monday at the All-England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, the odds-on favorites to reach the gentlemen's and ladies' finals during the fortnight are J.S. Connors, J.P. McEnroe, Mrs. C.M. Lloyd and Miss M. Navratilova.

American translation: Jimbo, Super Brat, Chrissie and Martina are the players to beat at Wimbledon. And pass the strawberries and cream.

The British insist on using proper names on the scoreboard at the All-England Club, all the better to keep tradition at the forefront. And it's the gentlemen's and ladies' divisions, not the men's and women's.

Whatever the terminology, the fact remains that this two-week tournament appears to be a four-player race in a 256- player field. The brash bashers, Jimmy Connors and John McEnroe, are solid choices to reach the men's final as they did last year when Connors prevailed, 3-6, 6-3, 6-7, 7-6, 6-4, in four hours and 14 minutes.

Evert and Navratilova, who dominate the women's game as Michigan and Ohio State hog the Big Ten football title, also should reach the final for the second consecutive year. Navratilova won last year, 6-1, 3-6, 6-2, but Evert has captured every major championship since -- the U.S. Open and Australian Open (on grass against Navratilova) last year and the French Open two weeks ago.

If Evert wins her fourth Wimbledon title, she'll become only the third woman to hold all four Grand Slam championships concurrently. She also will unwittingly be the center of a controversy.

The International Tennis Federation has decided that winning the four Grand Slam tournaments in a row qualifies as an official Grand Slam. But the United States Tennis Writers' Association has issued a statement indicating that it will recognize a Grand Slam only if the events are won in the same calendar year -- a tradition started in the 1930s. Only four players have won the traditional Grand Slam: Don Budge (1938), Maureen Connolly (1953), Rod Laver (1962 and '69) and Margaret Court (1970).

British bookmakers list Connors as a 5-4 favorite to win his third title, and McEnroe is 6-4 to regain the title he won in 1981. Oddsmakers make Navratilova a 4-6 choice to win her fourth Wimbledon crown, with Evert at 5-2.

"McEnroe was my pick the last four years, and he still is," says veteran NBC commentator Bud Collins. "He has the game for grass -- his serve and volley are made for it. But Connors can be tough.

"Navratilova also has the game for grass, but Chrissie will be awfully tough. I don't agree with the ITF's statement on the Grand Slam, and I don't think many Americans do, but she has the right to think that way. More power to her."

Collins, who will be part of NBC-TV's broadcast team, added, "Among the men, Johan Kriek is my darkhorse. And it will be interesting to see what Ivan Lendl will do. He has never done well there and he ducked last year.

"It will be a better Wimbledon. Last year there was a lot of rain. Billie Jean King [a surprise semifinalist at age 38] and the men's final were all last year's tournament had."

Since tennis became "open" in 1968, the lowest-rated player to win the Wimbledon men's title has been sixth-seeded Arthur Ashe in 1975. The top-seeded man has won seven of the last 15 years, and the second seed has won five times.

Thus, Connors and McEnroe have to be the overwhelming favorites, especially because of their grass-court experience and their ability to rise to the occasion. Bjorn Borg, a player who could have challenged them but is now retired, will be watching the tournament from the NBC-TV booth as a commentator.

Barring an injury or colossal upset, can anyone else challenge? Consider the other top seeds: No. 3 Lendl has won only two matches in three Wimbledon appearances, No. 4 Guillermo Vilas has never advanced past the quarterfinals at Wimbledon, and No. 5 Mats Wilander is too inexperienced on grass.

Gene Mayer, the sixth seed, withdrew Saturday because of an undisclosed injury. No. 7 Jose-Luis Clerc is a clay-court specialist, and No. 8 Vitas Gerulaitis has passed his prime, though he's a good grass-court player.

Look for No. 9 Steve Denton and No. 11 Kriek to be stronger threats than the Nos. 3-7 seeds. Both have performed well on grass. They reached the Australian final in 1981 and '82, with Kriek winning each time.

Yannick Noah, the French Open champion who has a strong serve and volley so advantageous on grass, has stuck to his pre-French Open plans not to enter Wimbledon because he doesn't like playing on the surface. And Jimmy Arias, the Italian Open champ who was seeded 10th, has withdrawn because of stomach- muscle problems.

Connors might have the edge over McEnroe. Consider the fact that Connors romped, 6-3, 6-3, over a scowling McEnroe last week in the Stella Artois tournament, a Wimbledon tuneup on grass. That gave Connors a 4-1 lifetime record on grass against Super Brat. McEnroe also aggravated his sore left shoulder during last week's final.

And what about the women? Can anyone derail Evert or Navratilova?

Even Chrissie concedes that the two are "head and shoulders above the rest at the moment. In time, someone will come through, but right now, it seems to be between Martina and me."

Alarmists who wrote off Evert after she was drubbed by Navratilova early this year in Dallas, 6-4, 6-0, and New York, 6-2, 6-0, were premature. Both matches were played indoors on carpet, Evert's poorest surface.

Remember that Evert is a vengeful player. She hasn't forgotten those love sets against Navratilova. Besides, Martina simply hasn't played as well in major tournaments as Evert has.

While Evert has won the Australian, U.S. and French titles, Navratilova has reached the final only in the Australian. And her latest split with her coach, Renee Richards, could be a negative factor.

Richards again has resigned as Navratilova 's coach, citing "personal reasons, very negative ones." Martina was quoted as attributing her loss to Kathleen Horvath during the French championships to "poor coaching."

Don't count on No. 3 Andrea Jaeger or No. 4 Tracy Austin to challenge. They feel out of place on grass.

King, seeded No. 10, prepped for Wimbledon by winning at Beckenham on grass a week ago. "A year ago in January, I told myself I would play at least another year and a half, two years, and so last year was really in preparation for this year," she said. "I'm in pretty good shape. I feel good."

Look for King, the Grande Dame of tennis, to pull off some more miracles.
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Old Jun 21st, 2013, 12:44 PM   #134
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Re: 1983

Wimbledon -- high-stakes showcase of reflex tennis
The Christian Science Monitor
Monday, June 20, 1983
John Allan May, Special to The Christian Science Monitor

At stake are the trophies the best have to win to crown their claim to excellence. . .the future of grass-court tennis. . .the place of sportsmanship in this now much-monied game.

Prize money this year has been greatly increased - �66,000 sterling ($100,000) to the winner of the men's singles, �60,000 to the winner of the women's. Dozens of other sums have risen proportionately. Increased too are the expectations of the amateur tennis world here which profited last year to the tune of �1.5 million.

Amateur tennis now depends heavily on the professionals. They set the standards. With the game so fast and the rewards for winning so enormous what standards of behavior will they set.

Jimmy Connors starts as the favorite to retain the title he won last year. His chief rival, John McEnroe, is having problems with one of his shoulders. There is a feeling he may not last through the championships, either because of his physical condition or because of some final explosion of frustration.

Ivan Lendl is of course the leading dark horse in the race. His recent form has been uncertain. He has little love for Wimbledon, for grass, for officialdom, for amateur organizations. But he is capable of great tennis and knows he must win here if he is ever to claim to be the best.

Among the women, Martina Navratilova and Chris Evert Lloyd stand out as almost certain finalists. They have played for the championship three of the last five years, including last year, when Martina won in three sets.

Navratilova has played some devastating games in her warm-up matches - powerful, relentless, merciless. Evert Lloyd, the reigning US, Australian, and French champion, has herself been at the top of her game - cool, classy, efficient. A victory here would make her only the third woman in history to hold all four Grand Slam titles concurrently, and the first since Australian Margaret Court in 1970.

For Britain one woman in particular, Jo Durie, has shown herself to be a player on the way up, despite a decisive loss to Navratilova at Eastbourne last week.

Although unseeded in Paris on clay, Durie thrust aside Kathy Rinaldi, Pam Shriver, and Tracy Austin to reach the semifinals. She is a tall, amusing young woman, whose philosophy is summed up in an answer she gave under pressure to a sports reporter: ''I can't see any reason why you can't be a champion and a nice human being.''

The sentimental favorite is once again Bille Jean King, who has won 20 Wimbledon titles of one variety or another and is playing extremely well. A year ago, playing in her 21st Wimbledon, she turned in a surprising performance, reaching the semifinals, before losing to Evert Lloyd.

Watching Connors tame McEnroe at Queens Club in London in the final of the Stella Artois warmup tournament, many felt that they had rarely seen such efficient power displayed on a grass court. Old-timers shook their heads and remembered Ellsworth Vines.

McEnroe, however, is not yet playing at his best. The big question here is whether or not John will contain his temper if things go wrong for him and what the new referee, Alan Mills, will do about it if he doesn't.

Only one Wimbledon umpire that we know of, a former sea captain called ''Trader'' Horn, has cooled McEnroe after being sworn at by the young star. ''Look,'' he is reputed to have said to John, ''I was at sea for 42 years and for every cuss word you know for me, I know 10 for you.''

But now that McEnroe has reached the top, even such an approach as Trader Horn's may be out of court.

McEnroe himself is determined to play it straight and to show himself to be of true championship caliber. And a true Wimbledon champion at that.

Many people do not understand the difficulties players of this class must face at Wimbledon.

The game has become not only more powerful, but also faster. It is essentially a game of explosively fast reactions. Incredible shots are played as pure reflex actions and cannot be explained any better than a player's personal reactions to them can be.

Then when competing on grass in England the player has to contend with subtle changes in the reactions of the court itself. The grass which favors spin one day may put a premium on pace the next. The weather may be fickle, the temperature change in half an hour, and the atmospheric pressure rise or fall.

There may be bad bounces. And with the ball traveling at such speeds, the very fact that eyes do not pan like cameras can explain bad calls.

On top of this there is the fact that tennis is developing specialists who play at their best only on certain surfaces, whether clay, cement, synthetics, or whatever. But they cannot claim to be the very best unless they can also play here at Wimbledon in the first and most prestigious grass-court championship in the world. It is tantalizing.

Some people have questioned how long this can last. One day perhaps, they say, some new surface will be used for all the supreme championships and Wimbledon will lose its appeal.

One doubts it. Wimbledon is not only a tennis tournament, it is an occasion. A duchess in the royal box. . .overnight queues for tickets... scalpers. . . buskers. . . strawberries and cream. . .

And the names on the trophies. . .Helen Wills Moody, Suzanne Lenglen, Maria Bueno, Rod Laver, Bill Tilden, Fred Perry and the man who won five in a row, Bjorn Borg. Yes, indeed, great things are at stake here in the next two weeks.
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Old Jun 21st, 2013, 07:04 PM   #135
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Re: 1983

More from 1983 Birmingham (and monkey business on the men's side).

VILAS'S PENALTY STRICTEST EVER
Philadelphia Daily News
Thursday, June 9, 1983
United Press International

Argentine tennis star Guillermo Vilas was banned for a year and fined $20,000 yesterday for accepting an illegal payment at a tournament.

The Men's International Professional Tennis Council ban is the strictest penalty ever imposed upon a player.

The punishment relates to the Grand Prix tournament in Rotterdam, Holland, in March. Vilas was a last-minute substitute for Jimmy Connors, who withdrew.

The Argentine has 30 days to appeal the decision, MITPC administrator Marshall Happer said.

The Rotterdam organizers were found guilty of making "under the table" payments and were fined $10,000.

A council spokesman in New York said Vilas still can play in exhibitions and World Championship Tennis events but was unsure whether he can compete in Davis Cup matches.

Meanwhile, Yannick Noah, who two days after being crowned French Open champion was
suspended from tournament tennis for three months and fined $20,000 for walking out on the French team during last month's World Team Cup competition in Duesseldorf, West Germany, says he will not appeal.

Noah left without telling organizers, forfeiting his scheduled match the following day.

He announced through his agent that he will not appeal and would accept the MITPC's full ruling of 42 days - between June 13 and July 25 - rather than choose for a reduced six-week suspension with no exhibition games or tournaments outside the council's control.

BIRMINGHAM, England - Billie Jean King scored a 6-2, 6-1 victory over Ann Kiyomura yesterday in the third round of the $90,000 Edgbaston Tennis Cup.

Zina Garrison, the 19-year-old Texan whom King is seeded to meet in Sunday's final, progressed to the last 16 with a 6-2, 6-4 decision over Japan's Etsuko Inoue, who is 102nd in the computer rankings.

In the two major upsets in singles yesterday, Rafaella Reggi, a 17-year-old Italian, survived two match points at 4-5 in the second set to eliminate the No. 7 seeded Andrea Leand, 5-7, 7-5, 6-2, and Sharon Walsh defeated No. 5 Kathy Jordan, 6-2, 1-6, 6-1.

Also, Australian Elizabeth Sayers downed Sherry Acker, 6-3, 6-4, and Christiane Jolissaint of Switzerland qualified to become Garrison's next opponent by edging Elise Burgin, 6-4, 6-4.

Late Tuesday, Kim Steinmetz and Kate Latham eliminated the doubles top seeds Rosemary Casals and Hana Mandlikova, 7-6, 7-6.

In assessing her chances of a winning a seventh Wimbledon singles title, King said: "I feel in better shape than I did last year when I reached the semifinals. As a matter of fact, I feel better than I have since 1975. I had such good condition then that I won Wimbledon when I had a 101-fever for eight days.

"I gave up caffeine in December - no coffee, no tea, no chocolate. I miss them all. I've cut right down on dairy products and I don't drink tap water anymore.

"I found out through trial-and-error that I'm allergic to these things and that this was interfering with my training program. I would do about three-quarters of the work I would want to do and would get a reaction so that I would have to stop. Now that I have cut these things out I have found I can work at full capacity."

King said she realizes other women have a better shot at the crown.

"I have earned the right to think that I have as good a chance at Wimbledon as Martina (Navratilova) or Chris (Evert Lloyd)," she said. "But I have realistic thoughts of winning and I feel that I have at least an even chance with anyone else.

"To beat Martina or Chris, someone has to have a particularly good day or they have to have a bad one.

"I'm only 10th on the computer at the moment but on results from December to now I would be much higher. I still have three or four first- and second-round losses from last year which still affect my ranking."
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