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Old Jan 12th, 2013, 12:52 AM   #31
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Re: 1983

EVERT MASTERS JAEGER
The Miami Herald
Monday, February 7, 1983
JIM MARTZ

Chapter 15 of Chris Evert Lloyd and the Dwarfs reached its conclusion Sunday, and there was another happy ending for the heroine.

Evert continued her mastery of the world on Florida clay courts as she won her 15th tournament without a loss on the surface since turning pro in 1973. The victim this time was Andrea Jaeger, 6-3, 6-3, before a sellout crowd of 3,726 in the final of the $150,000 Murjani Cup women's tennis tournament at the windswept PGA National Resort in Palm Beach Gardens.

"She's awfully good on this stuff," said Jaeger. "When she's playing well and I'm not, I might as well not come out."

Jaeger knows the feeling all too well. She lost the final of the last four tournaments in South Florida to Evert. A cynic might say this is getting monotonous and boring, but others might reply, "How can perfection be boring?"

And Evert on clay in Florida is a perfect 70-0 since becoming a pro. Her last loss on the surface in her native state came in 1972 to Nancy Richey at St. Petersburg. The last person to beat her on clay in South Florida was Denise Carter in 1971.

Can anyone ever beat her again on clay in the state before she retires?

"Yes, but don't ask me who," said Jaeger, who managed to defeat Evert on the surface last year in the French Open and at Hilton Head, S.C. "I've had some close ones, and she almost lost in the Citizen Cup here last year to Evonne Goolagong. But if she's playing well, it's tough for her to lose."

The 70-0 mark wasn't the only staggering statistic Evert improved to Sunday. Consider these:

* Her career record on clay is 253-7.

* The tournament championship was her 121st on all surfaces.

* The $28,000 check for first place boosted her career winnings to $4,393,810.

But money and records weren't on Evert's mind Sunday. She wanted to get off to a strong start in her first tournament of 1983, and she felt that she succeeded.

"I'm happy because I don't feel I lost that much from last year," Evert said. "I wanted to continue the good end of the season I had.

"But the conditions were tough. The wind was unpredictable and swirling. You had to hang in there every point. It inhibits you playing your game.

"I think I handled it better than Andrea and cut down on the errors. In the wind, you have to aim for the middle and not go for the lines."

Jaeger went for the lines a lot. She also saw a few of her lobs almost sail into the lake beyond the north stands.

In the first set, Evert broke Jaeger's serve for a 4-2 lead. Jaeger broke back but then lost her own serve with four forehand errors. Evert broke twice for a 5-1 advantage in the second set before Jaeger broke back. But the 17-year-old who is ranked No. 3 in the world couldn't gain momentum and dropped
serve in the next game to lose the match.

Evert now will aim at regaining the No. 1 ranking from Martina Navratilova and winning the French Open and Wimbledon titles to complete the so-called Grand Slam of tennis. The International Tennis Federation has declared that the Grand Slam (French, Wimbledon, U.S. and Australian tournaments) doesn't have to be won within a calendar year. They can simply be won four in a row, and Evert captured the last two, the U.S. and Australian at the end of 1982.

"Obviously, I'm in favor of the new rule since I have a chance," said Evert. "It's a lot tougher to win it now. In the olden days, if you won Wimbledon, you got a bye the next year until the final."

But Evert disagrees with a new ruling by the Women's Tennis Association that the winner of the season-long points standings will be declared the undisputable No. 1 player in the world.

"I'm in the minority in disagreeing," said Evert. "But I feel you can win the Grand Slam and still be ranked fourth in the world if you play only 10 tournaments. They tried to set it up so the Grand Slam events get a lot more points. If they really load the majors, it could work out. This is just a ploy to get the top players into more tournaments."

Evert's next tournament will be the first week in March in Los Angeles. She also will play in the four-player Citizen Cup at PGA National April 1-3. Navratilova, who didn't win a game against Evert the last time they met on Florida clay, has been invited but hasn't made a commitment yet.

* *

Barbara Potter and Sharon Walsh won the doubles final over Kathy Jordan and Paula Smith, 6-4, 4-6, 6-2.
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Old Jan 12th, 2013, 12:54 AM   #32
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Re: 1983

EVERT LLOYD BEGINS SEASON WITH A WIN
Philadelphia Daily News
Monday, February 7, 1983
United Press International

Chris Evert Lloyd won her debut tournament of 1983 yesterday, defeating Andrea Jaeger, 6-3, 6-3, in the finals of a $150,000 tournament.

The event was known as the Murjani Cup Women's Tennis Tournament.

Evert Lloyd, the No. 1 seed in the event, won $27,500. Jaeger, the world's third-ranked women's player - one behind Evert Lloyd - and ranked No. 2 in the tournament, took $14,000.

"I'm happy the way I played because I don't think I lost much from the way I was playing at the end of last year," Evert Lloyd said.

The match was played in a strong wind that negated one of Jaeger's favorite weapons. She attempted six drop shots in the first set, but the wind carried all but two of them out of bounds.

"Chris adapted to the wind better than I did," Jaeger said.

Evert Lloyd might have made quicker work of the match if she had been able to convert one of four break points she held in the 16-point fourth game. Jaeger held on. Evert Lloyd then broke service in the sixth game and was one point from 5-2, leading 40-15 in the seventh.

Jaeger took advantage of two errors by Evert Lloyd and broke service with two more errors from Evert Lloyd. But the champion broke back in the eighth and held in the ninth when two wind-destroyed drop-shot efforts by Jaeger ended each game.

Evert Lloyd then won five straight games to reach 5-1 in the second set. Jaeger delayed the inevitable by winning two games, but then her service was broken in the final game.

Evert Lloyd, who has now beaten Jaeger in the final of five straight Florida tournaments, said she plans to rest until March.

"I'm determined this year," she said. "I wasn't as committed early last year as I am this time. I was more committed to tennis the last six months."

Evert Lloyd stopped queries about possible retirement if she wins the French and Wimbledon titles this year which, added to the U.S. Open and Australian championships she won in 1982, would give her four-in-a-row and a Grand Slam over two years.

"Ask me after I win the French Open," she said.

The doubles title went to Barbara Potter and Sharon Walsh when they defeated Kathy Jordan and Paula Smith, 6-4, 4-6, 6-2.
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Old Jan 12th, 2013, 08:30 AM   #33
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Re: 1983

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms. Anthropic View Post

But Evert disagrees with a new ruling by the Women's Tennis Association that the winner of the season-long points standings will be declared the undisputable No. 1 player in the world.

"I'm in the minority in disagreeing," said Evert. "But I feel you can win the Grand Slam and still be ranked fourth in the world if you play only 10 tournaments. They tried to set it up so the Grand Slam events get a lot more points. If they really load the majors, it could work out. This is just a ploy to get the top players into more tournaments."
Evert should have thanked her lucky stars that she never had to play under the additive and Best N ranking systems. All those two-month breaks during the indoor circuit would have sent her ranking spiraling down.
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Best left-right combination by a German (and that includes Max Schmeling): Steffi Graf. All she did in 1987 was knock Navratilova out of #1 and try to knock Evert out of the sport. (Mike Lupica in "The Best and Worst of Tennis in 1987", World Tennis)

"A couple of years ago, we nicknamed Steffi Graf's forehand 'Jaws'. And that music would go perfectly when she starts running in to the net, swarming on that little ball." (JoAnne Russell, during the 1988 Wimbledon final between Graf and Navratilova)
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Old Jan 12th, 2013, 11:52 AM   #34
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Re: 1983

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Originally Posted by Ms. Anthropic View Post
TEMESVARI MASTERS HOSTILE FANS, RINALDI

"just because she's 15th in the world doesn't mean she's that good" ... "She should be doing centerfolds, not playing tennis."
Some of the quotes in this thread are (unintentionally) hysterical. I also enjoyed the report on the Maleeva match, when her opponent almost hit Julia Maleeva in the face.
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Old Jan 14th, 2013, 03:12 PM   #35
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Re: 1983

Quote:
Some of the quotes in this thread are (unintentionally) hysterical. I also enjoyed the report on the Maleeva match, when her opponent almost hit Julia Maleeva in the face
I agree Sumarokov-Elston!

My chuckle for today (and I suppose this WAS meant to be funny) is:

Quote:
Chapter 15 of Chris Evert Lloyd and the Dwarfs reached its conclusion Sunday, and there was another happy ending for the heroine
As for Andrea Temesvari-the lipstick lolita of topsin tennis-gave her both her centerfold and centre court
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Old Jan 14th, 2013, 03:32 PM   #36
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Re: 1983

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Posted by Samn Evert should have thanked her lucky stars that she never had to play under the additive and Best N ranking systems. All those two-month breaks during the indoor circuit would have sent her ranking spiraling down.
I've always agreed up to a certain point with Evert about the majors. The #1 ranking has become a joke after 1997 for many years and is no way to promote the sport IMO.

But getting back to Evert and her two month breaks: Because of her drawing power Chrissie's decision to cut back on indoor events dramatically changed women's tennis.

The first year she cut back was in 1978-and that very year Virginia Slims was dropped as tour sponsor. Avon took up sponsership in 1979, and for 1 golden year had Evert, Navratilova and Austin in the mix, with big names like King, Goolagong and Wade in supporting roles.

Then Chris went AWOL again. The Avon tour was ok in 1980, but in 1981 both Evert AND Austin were absent, and by 1982 Chris was permanently ceding the indoor season to Martina. Poor Martina could hardly carry the tour alone, so when Avon pulled the plug after the 1982 season.

That brings us to 1983. Virginia Slims signed on to lead a united world tour-a first for the women. They COULD have chosen to keep it indoors. Of course an indoor tour would have meant no Chris, so I think it is no coincidence that from 1983 the women played in outdoor Floridian conditions liked.

Viewed in this way we can say Evert killed the indoor tour and helped to shape the tour calendar in a way we can still recognize today. From 1983 the tour was a mix of indoors and outdoors. This allowed Bill Bucholtz to put together the first nonslam megaevent-the "Lipton". The huge success of this event-largely supported by the women-fed into the start of having mens' and women's events reunited. The other thing it did was make hard/cement courts even more prominent.

I see both positives and negatives to all this, but one thing is clear to me-Evert's influence on the way the 1983 looked was huge, just as it was the deciding facotr in keeping the women from breaking away from the US Open in 1980.

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Old Jan 14th, 2013, 04:32 PM   #37
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Re: 1983

Once upon a time, the International Tennis Hall of Fame and Museum had one of Tracy's gingham dresses on display next to Serena's cat suit. I could not figure out which one was more kinky.


AT AGE 20, AUSTIN PREPARES HERSELF FOR 2nd COMEBACK
The Philadelphia Inquirer
Sunday, January 30, 1983
Knight-Ridder News Service

Tracy Austin sat at a luncheon table at the San Francisco Tennis Club, looking as skittish and coy as she was when she turned professional five years ago.

She ate the lemon chicken but declined the French bread. She is in training for her second comeback.

She may look as demure as ever, but she is not the same young woman, physically or mentally.

The braces disappeared long ago, along with the gingham tennis dresses. The public shyness gradually has been replaced by a modest assertiveness.

Her blond hair, which once bounced about her head in pigtails at Wimbledon and the U.S. Open, now is styled simply but full, falling over her shoulders as if from an early Lauren Bacall publicity photo.

No longer an unstylish teen-ager, Austin is 20 years old. Her clothes are chaste but fashionable; Marie Osmond, not Cher.

But the biggest change is in Austin's state of mind, which has been made tougher, more hardened to the unpredictable knocks of life by two potentially debilitating back injuries that shut her out of 10 months of the tennis tour the last two years.

ON THE ROAD TO THE TOP

Despite the setbacks, she has returned, once again in quest of the No. 1 ranking in women's tennis, an honor that has escaped her since she turned professional at the age of 15.

Few who know her doubt that she will make it. What she has going for her is something you can't measure on a meter or calculate with a computer. She is neither as big nor as strong as Martina Navratilova, the best player in women's tennis today.

Yet she possesses a near-flawless baseline game and an unswerving mental makeup that carried her through the early years and now seems to be guiding her through the crises.

"My injuries are past history," she said. "I really would prefer not to talk about them. If I do my exercises and stretching, I should never have to worry about them again."

Austin's life with pain began on Jan. 12, 1981, a day after she won the Colgate Series championships, a season-ending tournament involving the eight best players on the tour.

Her injury was diagnosed as a pinched sciatic nerve, which caused her lower back to spasm under stress.

She looks back at it now as if it were a message from some divine source. ''My life up until then was just too perfect," Austin said.

EYE-OPENER

"I had won the national girls 18 title at the age of 14. I won the U. S. Open at 16. I was ranked No. 2 in the world when I was 18. Everything was going my way.

"Maybe it (the back injury) was meant to happen as a way of opening my eyes. I know this: It made me realize how much I loved tennis."

A succession of expensive and well-known doctors produced no long-lasting cure to her back problems.

Finally, a friend urged her to see Dr. Leroy Perry, a Pasadena, Calif., chiropractor who has worked with numerous athletes.

"When Tracy came to me, she was pretty well down, frustrated and unsure about chiropractic, like a lot of people," Perry said.

"But even when she was down, she was much more positive than the average athlete."

When Austin was felled by back problems in 1981, she might have written it off as an aberration. In fact, she came back eight months later to win the U. S. Open.

But when her back went out again in January 1982, she realized she had a chronic problem.

'ONE-SIDED ATHLETE'

"I saw four doctors, and none of them could solve it," Austin said. "But Dr. Perry was brilliant. Five days after I finished therapy with him, I was hitting tennis balls again. Not too well, but I was hitting.

"I didn't care if I hit those balls into the next county. I was just happy to be on the court again."

Perry diagnosed Austin as a typical "one-sided athlete" whose body was unbalanced by years of putting too much emphasis on the right side.

She got back on the circuit in May but lost in the quarterfinals of the French Open to Hana Mandlikova. She was to go no further either at Wimbledon in June or at the U. S. Open in September. But in late September, she reached the semifinals of the U. S. Indoor.

Austin had won a $125,000 tournament in July in San Diego with a straight set win over teen-ager Kathy Rinaldi. It wasn't historic, but it was her only tournament win of 1982.

She was far from top form.

Now it's time to start afresh. "She's in a great state of mind," said Peggy Gossett, public relations director for the Women's Tennis Association. "I think she decided at the end of 1982 to put it all behind her and learn from it."

She has begun the first of three weeks of intensive training with her two pros, Marty Riessen, the former men's star who travels with her, and Robert Lansdorp, the Los Angeles pro.

If she never plays another match, Austin will have left her mark on women's tennis. Two years after turning pro, in 1979, she made her big breakthrough by defeating Navratilova at the Avon championships in Washington,
D.C..

A few months later, in winning the Italian Open, her first major title, she broke Chris Evert Lloyd's 125-match winning streak on clay.

That year she became the youngest player ever to win the U. S. Open and was voted the Associated Press female athlete of the year for 1979, an honor she won again in 1981.

In August 1980, she became the youngest athlete to earn $1 million in her career.

If the next three weeks of fine-tuning her body go as well as she predicts, Austin will emerge to play the Virginia Slims of Chicago the week of Feb. 14.
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Old Jan 14th, 2013, 04:33 PM   #38
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Re: 1983

NAVRATILOVA ANXIOUS TO START PLAY
Philadelphia Daily News
Wednesday, February 9, 1983
United Press International

For almost an entire month, Martina Navratilova enjoyed the luxury of not having to do the one thing she does better than any woman in the world.

She kept herself in shape by playing basketball with former Olympian Nancy Lieberman and by running, and didn't miss at all the drudgery of serious practice.

Navratilova was enjoying her liberty so much, in fact, she was a little wary about how she would feel when the time came to return to serious business.

Not to worry, though. Unlike Bjorn Borg, who at the same age of 26 decided he no longer was interested in continuing his tennis career, Navratilova is more than eager and, if anything, overanxious to renew her quest for further glory.

"It's so easy not to have to be playing," Navratilova said yesterday during a visit to New York to promote a $350,000 championship to be played in Madison Square Garden next month. "It wasn't bad traveling around without rackets. I knew I wanted to play, but I wasn't so sure I wanted to go back to work.

"But I've been practicing for three days now and it felt great. I enjoyed the time away, but I also got the itch and I'm eager to play again."

The hardest chore for Navratilova simply will be to live up to her own standards. In what was the most incredible year ever enjoyed by a woman tennis player, Navratilova won 90 of 93 matches last year for official earnings of just under $1.5 million.

She suffered only one real major disappointment, losing to doubles partner Pam Shriver in the quarterfinals of the U.S. Open, the one big title that continues to elude her.

"It's going to be hard to match that kind of record, and I might not be able to do it," Navratilova said, nevertheless leaving a very strong impression that she believes she can do it. "If I can stay mentally sharp, physically I can do it."

Navratilova has won her first two tournaments of the year, at Houston and Washington, and returns to action next week at Chicago. The Chicago stop on the indoor circuit will be a significant one for Navratilova as it marks the introduction of the Martina Youth Foundation.

The promoters of the Chicago event will donate a couple of hundred tickets to needy youngsters for the semifinals, and Navratilova will give the kids a clinic on tennis.

TORONTO - Tennis star Bjorn Borg, still ailing from a stubborn infection in his hands, yesterday was forced to withdraw from the $250,000 Tennis Challenge, making him the second casualty in the special eight-man event.

The news of Borg's absence followed Monday's withdrawal of defending champion Ivan Lendl, who was replaced by American Gene Mayer after bowing out with an inflamed tricep in his right arm.

Borg originally was slated to face Vitas Gerulaitis in opening play in the five-day tournament, but will now be replaced by ninth-ranked Yannick Noah of France.
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Old Jan 14th, 2013, 04:34 PM   #39
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Re: 1983

A GIRL FROM THE GABLES GROWS UP WITH WINNING WAYS
The Miami Herald
Monday, February 14, 1983
BRIAN BLANCHARD

Give Caroline Kennedy credit for a nice smile and charisma from the cradle.

Nor is there any denying the blue-chip appeal of someone who has no need for a last name, like Princess Stephanie of Monaco.

But for the man whose fancy this Valentine's Day runs to star quality that is won, not inherited, there may be more appeal in the thin, impish-looking blonde who wears a watch she won with sweat and poise on the tennis court.

Bettina Bunge is a quiet 19-year-old who sometimes stays with her parents in their modest home on Valencia Avenue in Coral Gables -- between dates on courts around the world.

Bunge ended up on United Press International's list of the 10 most eligible women in the world, with Kennedy and Stephanie, because she pretty and rich and well-traveled and single.

Not to mention the former national champion of Peru and the ninth best woman tennis player in the world, according to the experts. She won $245,598 in official prize money in 1982, which doesn't include the extras like the new copper-colored Volvo she drives. It was given to her for what they call "promotional considerations."

Bunge (generally pronounced "Bung-ee" by Americans) is thin -- about 5-foot-7 and 150 pounds. She holds the racket in her right hand.

She was born in Adliswick, Switzerland, grew up in Lima, Peru, and speaks German, English, Spanish and a little French. She does not have any of her mother Margaret's distinct German accent.

She is friendly but retiring.

"She is just a person who doesn't want to lay it on very thick," says her father, Gables businessman Siegfried Bunge.

"She's not very outgoing, I guess, but friendly," said a Gables neighbor. "A real sweetheart."

So is she free Saturday night?

Bunge was too busy even to comment, practicing in Mexico last week, then flying with her only sibling, 21-year-old Henry, to Chicago Friday. This week she competes there in the Virginia Slims Tournament.

But Siegfried Bunge, an amiable broker who deals in fish meal, says she's "friendly with a few." Boys, that is.

Bunge's current address is Monte Carlo; her citizenship is German. She lived in Coral Gables from the age of 13 until a few years ago, when world-class tennis competition made her parents' house only a stopover on travels that are often made on her own.

She has a degree from the private Deerborne High in the Gables, but she "basically skipped" her final year there, her father said.

These days, she drops by every few months and calls a lot.

"She spends more and more time in Europe," says her father. "She likes the European lifestyle."

But if a hazy Valentine's dream places you at a Paris cafe with Bettina, imagine yourselves in the corner booth.

Reports her father: "She likes her privacy."
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Old Jan 14th, 2013, 04:35 PM   #40
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Re: 1983

JAEGER WINS EASILY
Philadelphia Daily News
Thursday, February 17, 1983
United Press International

When 17-year-old Andrea Jaeger won a tough point and heard a cluster of extra-loud applause, she flashed a big smile at the stands.

Her fans were friends from Stevenson High School, who came to Chicago 's International Amphitheater last night to watch their classmate overpower Helena Sukova of Czechoslovakia, 6-1, 6-2, in a second-round match of the $150,000 Virginia Slims Championship of Chicago .

"It did not matter that there were not a lot of people to watch me," the world's third-ranked women's tennis player said. "These friends of mine didn't even ask me for tickets, but they wanted to see me play. And to me, that was the biggest thrill of the evening."

That kind of support "makes playing tennis worthwhile, since I have to give up normal activities such as dances and parties, and even have to miss school once in a while," Jaeger said.

One of those tennis absences came yesterday. "My teachers have been very understanding," Jaeger said. "And, since I am a senior, they are making sure I can take exams at other times so I can graduate."

Jaeger graduated to the quarterfinal round in exactly one hour, in a match she called, "so easy I really couldn't believe it.

"Helena is almost 6-2, and has a great reach. When her serve is on, she is really tough," Jaeger said.

But Sukova "was not only off her game, but appeared to take a lot of chances that backfired," added Jaeger, the tournament's second seed.

Another winner was fifth-seeded Wendy Turnbull of Australia, who was ahead of Candy Reynolds, 6-2, 3-2, when the Knoxville, Tenn., woman pulled a thigh muscle and retired.

Earlier, seventh-seeded Bettina Bunge disposed of Rosalyn Fairbank, 6-2, 6-0.

In today's quarterfinals, fourth seed Pam Shriver will face Claudia Kohde of West Germany, and No. 6 Sylvia Hanika will take on fellow West German Eva Pfaff.

Top-seeded Martina Navratilova will meet Iva Budarova of Czechoslovakia, while No. 3 Tracy Austin will face Anne Smith.

MEMPHIS, Tenn. - Two upsets last night give unseeded players a mental edge going into today's third round of the $315,000 U.S. National Indoor Tennis Championship.

Fritz Buehning downed No. 2 Mats Wilander at The Racquet Club, 7-5, 7-5, and Mike DePalmer upset No. 7 Steve Denton, 6-4, 6-3.

Top seed Jimmy Connors meets Raul Ramirez in third-round action today, and No. 3 Gene Mayer will play Henri LeConte.

Buehning, who had taken the lead, let Wilander grab a 5-4 advantage, but rescued the match by keeping cool.

"After that, I just said to myself, 'You let him off the hook,' " Buehning said. "Those are the things that usually throw me off, but today I didn't let them.

"I can beat a lot of guys one set. Now I'm working on beating them two sets. I'm trying to go out there and not let anything bother me. If I start yelling and screaming, it takes more out of me than hitting a tennis ball."

Wilander, a clay-court specialist, said he was uncomfortable on the Supreme Court surface.

"I don't feel confident on this surface," he said. "I can play maybe two good games at a time on it, and then I'll have a bad game. I still have a lot to learn on this surface."

Ramirez beat Jan Gunnarson of Sweden, 6-2, 6-4, in the second round. Mayer defeated Eddie Dibbs, 6-3, 6-2; No. 5 Peter McNamara took Mel Purcell, 6-4, 6-4, and Yannick Noah, No. 4, defeated Mark Dickson, 7-6, 6-3.

Brian Gottfried beat Guy Forget of France, 7-5, 6-0; Buster Mottram of England defeated Terry Moor of Memphis, 6-4, 6-2; No. 8 Eliot Teltscher downed Tony Giammalva, 6-3, 7-6, and 11th-seed Brian Teacher beat Anders Jarryd of Sweden, 6-3, 6-4.
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Old Jan 14th, 2013, 04:38 PM   #41
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Re: 1983

An excerpt....


ANTI-UNLV VOTERS ARE IDENTIFIED
The Miami Herald
Thursday, February 17, 1983
DICK HELLER

[...]

Telling tales out of school

Who says you can't put a price on education? Andrea Jaeger can: something less than $1 million a year. The 17-year-old high school senior says she had considered dropping off the circuit to attend college before her family talked her out of that foolish idea.

"It wouldn't be smart at all," insisted her father Roland. "She makes $1 million a year between earnings and endorsements. Not only that, her ranking would go down. It would be very tough to get back on top."

Jaeger apparently became enamored of campus life after visiting her sister Susy at Stanford. Sound the alarm, folks -- family crisis.

"Susy told Andrea that you have to work in college, and there isn't time for tennis," Dad said. "Susy said that if Andrea really wanted to go to college when she was 23 or 24, she would go back with her."

First things first, anyway. Andrea will graduate from Adlai Stevenson High in suburban Chicago in June. She won't be there, of course. Coincides with the French Open, don't you know?

[...]
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Old Jan 14th, 2013, 04:38 PM   #42
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Re: 1983

NAVRATILOVA LOVES CHICAGO
Philadelphia Daily News
Monday, February 21, 1983
United Press International

Martina Navratilova says she is going to miss the Chicago International Amphitheatre, which brought down the curtain after more than three quarters of a century of operations yesterday.

Navratilova has been nearly unbeatable in the facility and again demonstrated her invincibility in Chicago when she breezed past local favorite Andrea Jaeger, 6-3, 6-2, for an unprecedented sixth consecutive women's professional tennis tournament victory in the "Windy City" yesterday.

"I like this place; it's very intimate and there's plenty of room to move around," said Navratilova, who overcame a slow start to pick up the $30,000 first prize.

"It's closer to the action here. You can play before 15,000 in a bigger building and you don't feel it."

The amphitheatre is closing this week after being home to the women's tennis tour as well as various professional sports, including boxing and wrestling.

Navratilova will have a chance to defend her title at the new Illinois-Chicago Pavilion in 1984.

In disposing of Jaeger, Navratilova said she led her opponent into unforced errors.

"I was a little rushed at the beginning, but overall I thought it was a solid performance," said Navratilova, who won her third tournament of the year. "I lost my serve only two times in the tournament, so it seemed."

Jaeger, who reached the final of the Chicago tournament for the first time in her career, said Navratilova did not play one of her best matches.

"She played well enough to win, she didn't play great," said the 17-year-old Jaeger from Lincolnshire, Ill. "But I didn't play great either. I wasn't patient."

Jaeger started fast and led midway through the first set before Navratilova took command.

"I started well, broke her service, but then I didn't hold mine," said Jaeger, who lost to Navratilova for the sixth consecutive time and for the ninth time in 13 meetings.

"Then I got discouraged, I started to play streaky."
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Old Jan 14th, 2013, 04:40 PM   #43
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Re: 1983

CITIZEN CUP TENNIS IS POSTPONED
The Miami Herald
Saturday, February 26, 1983
JIM MARTZ

The $250,000 Citizen Cup tennis tournament, featuring Chris Evert Lloyd and Martina Navratilova and scheduled for April 1-3 at Palm Beach Gardens, was postponed Friday because of "insufficient national television coverage."

Tournament director John Korff, reached in Palm Springs, Calif., said commitments for the four-player event at the PGA National Resort had been received from defending champion Evert, Navratilova, Andrea Jaeger and Billie Jean King. But no national television network, including PBS and the cable networks, would commit to carrying the tournament.

"We're very disappointed," said Korff. "I have no idea why the networks wouldn't pick it up." Last year's tournament was telecast by the USA cable network.

"Without network television, the cost of the tournament cannot be justified solely in terms of cable or PBS coverage, in combination with actual attendance and local media coverage," said Bob Weltzien, president of Citizen Watch Co., sponsor of the tournament.

Korff said ticket prices would have had to be raised to $25 to make up for the lack of national television. He said no new date had been set, "but it will be held next winter, in nine to 12 months."

The players were to receive $200,000 of the $250,000 purse, with $50,000 going to the Women's Tennis Association. Korff said both the players and the WTA refused to reduce those amounts to keep the tournament alive.
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Old Jan 14th, 2013, 06:19 PM   #44
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Re: 1983

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Originally Posted by Rollo View Post
But getting back to Evert and her two month breaks: Because of her drawing power Chrissie's decision to cut back on indoor events dramatically changed women's tennis.

The first year she cut back was in 1978-and that very year Virginia Slims was dropped as tour sponsor. Avon took up sponsership in 1979, and for 1 golden year had Evert, Navratilova and Austin in the mix, with big names like King, Goolagong and Wade in supporting roles.

Then Chris went AWOL again. The Avon tour was ok in 1980, but in 1981 both Evert AND Austin were absent, and by 1982 Chris was permanently ceding the indoor season to Martina. Poor Martina could hardly carry the tour alone, so when Avon pulled the plug after the 1982 season.
Evert certainly was a superstar and her absence might well have killed the indoor circuit, but I thought the departure of Avon was related not to Evert's sabbatical but to BJK's Marilyn Barnett "galimony" scandal followed by Navratilova's coming out of the closet in the summer of 1981. Navratilova said in her book (iirc) that she was warned about Avon pulling the plug on women's tennis if she talked about her relationship with Rita Mae Brown.

Although I suppose it could have been a combination of both factors. Avon might have chosen to ignore the double whammy of BJK's and Navratilova's revelations as long as it could trot out Chris America as the face of women's tennis, but with Evert being MIA, they might have decided to withdraw their sponsorship altogether.
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Best left-right combination by a German (and that includes Max Schmeling): Steffi Graf. All she did in 1987 was knock Navratilova out of #1 and try to knock Evert out of the sport. (Mike Lupica in "The Best and Worst of Tennis in 1987", World Tennis)

"A couple of years ago, we nicknamed Steffi Graf's forehand 'Jaws'. And that music would go perfectly when she starts running in to the net, swarming on that little ball." (JoAnne Russell, during the 1988 Wimbledon final between Graf and Navratilova)
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Old Jan 15th, 2013, 05:21 PM   #45
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Re: 1983

Quote:
Evert certainly was a superstar and her absence might well have killed the indoor circuit, but I thought the departure of Avon was related not to Evert's sabbatical but to BJK's Marilyn Barnett "galimony" scandal followed by Navratilova's coming out of the closet in the summer of 1981. Navratilova said in her book (iirc) that she was warned about Avon pulling the plug on women's tennis if she talked about her relationship with Rita Mae Brown.

Although I suppose it could have been a combination of both factors. Avon might have chosen to ignore the double whammy of BJK's and Navratilova's revelations as long as it could trot out Chris America as the face of women's tennis, but with Evert being MIA, they might have decided to withdraw their sponsorship altogether.
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Hi Samn

I enjoyed reading your post. Your last sentence connects the two dots and addresses the issue in way I wasn't.

To me the Evert issue was more paramount, but there is no doubt the emergence of the King/Navratilova stories had an impact, and perhaps more than I think. I believe Martina when she says she was warned about it. It wasn't just a matter of her or King-but opening the closet, so to speak, might have resulted in a string of players being outed.

Last night I reread parts of Tracy Austin's book Beyond Center Court. Austin,without in any way knocking Martina or King, mentions how important to the tour Evert was overall for being "feminine" and such a star. So clearly Tracy is thinking there was a connection in the same way you are.

Austin also wrote about how in the winter of 1982 Peachy Kellmeyer kept telling her to enter events even if she thought she would withdraw due to her injuries. The reason according to Tracy? Avon wanted 1 of the big 3 (Evert, Austin, Navratilova) at each event, or prize money would be reduced.Tracy did withdraw and got heavily criticized for it. In her words she was "a dumb bunny". With Evert AWOL and Tracy injured it was left to Martina to carry the tour alone. Even the supporting cast from the late 70s was gone-Wade faded, Goolagong gone after 1980-Hana injured in 1982-and really only Andrea Jaeger to pick up the slack.

Surely the sex scandals gave Avon pause for thought, but with Evert playing enough indoor events it wouldn't have been a big deal. After all Virginia Slims had no problems signing on in 1983, when Martina was dominant. And Martina drew well IMO. Dallas, her hometown, always had good crowds. Chicago too, though it helped that Jaeger was from Chicago.

But after the glowing reception Martina got at the 1981 US Open (everyone was crying) and the open letters of support from Evert and Austin could anyone doubt that people would come out to see Martina? Of course they would. The problem was Martina could only enter so many events indoors. And there was no Evert or Austin to pick up the slack. it was the tour stops with no Navratilova or other name that really suffered and, in my view, led to the plug being pulled on the tour.

I'll see if I can dig up info on when the decision was made to stop sponsership and others views on it.
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