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Old Jan 18th, 2011, 04:23 AM   #1
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Daphne Akhurst Articles

I'm hoping that somebody will find some articles of which the Australian Open's trophy is named after. Here is one:

http://strathfieldhistory.org/people...aphne-akhurst/


Daphne Akhurst
by Cathy Jones

On Australia Day, 26 January 2006, 1920s and 1930s tennis champion Daphne Akhurst was inducted into the Australian Tennis Hall of Fame at a ceremony held at Rod Laver Arena in Melbourne. Akhurst was one of Australia’s greatest tennis champions, but her life was tragically cut short dying at age 29. At the time of her death, she lived in Strathfield with her husband Royston Cozens.

Akhurst trained as a music teacher at the State Conservatorium of Music but was a self-taught tennis player. She won the NSW schoolgirls singles championship in 1917-1920, the first in a long series of titles. Akhurst dominated Australian women’s tennis throughout the 1920s, winning the Australian Women’s Open in 1925 and 1926 and then, three in a row from 1928-1930. In the women’s doubles, she won five Australian titles with three different partners – Sylvia Lance [later Harper] in 1924 and 1925, Esna Boyd in 1928 and Louie Bickerton in 1929 and 1931. Akhurst won the mixed doubles four times, partnered by John Willard, Gar Moon and in 1928 by Frenchman Jean Borotra.

In 1925, Akhurst and team mates Esna Boyd and Sylvia Harper [formerly Lance] were the first Australian women’s tennis team to travel abroad. The trip was financed by a series of exhibition matches organised by tennis enthusiasts, rather than the Lawn Tennis Australian of Australia [now known as Tennis Australia] . Trips abroad for Australians to compete in events in Europe and America were often financed from fund-raising or sponsorship. The ability of Australians to compete for overseas sporting titles became more accessible in later decades by improvements in air travel.

When Akhurst competed at Wimbledon in 1925, she was considered an outsider. She reached the quarter finals taking a set off Joan Fry, the eventual runner-up. In 1928, the Australian women’s team was sent overseas winning all thirteen matches. In the same year, she reached the singles and women’s doubles semi-finals at Wimbledon. With Jack Crawford as her partner, she was runner up in the Mixed Doubles finals. Her achievements at the time earned her a ranking by Ayres’ Almanac of No.3 in the world. The Referee claimed she was the best all-round player in the world.

On 26 February 1930, Akhurst married Royston Stuckey Cozens of Strathfield. Cozens [1902-1998] was the son of Arthur Cozens, a tobacco manufacturer, who lived at Albert Rd Strathfield. Like his father, Royston Cozens was a tobacco manufacturer, employed by the British-American Tobacco Company. Following their marriage, they lived at ‘Wahgumgah’ 111 Homebush Road on the south-west corner of Albyn Road, Strathfield, which Cozens had purchased in October 1929 for £2900.

After her marriage, Daphne Akhurst continued to compete in competitive tennis and her name is occasionally recorded as Daphne Akhurst Cozens or Daphne Cozens. She won the Australian Women’s Open in 1929 and 1930 but retired from serious competition after winning the Australian women’s doubles championship in 1931.

Daphne Akhurst had one son, but died on 9 January 1933 aged 29 of an ectopic pregnancy. She was cremated following a funeral service at St Anne’s Anglican Church Strathfield. The death of Mrs R S Cozens of Homebush Road Strathfield was acknowledged at the meeting of Strathfield Council January 1933 .

Daphne Akhurst was also associated with the Strathfield Recreation Club, Morwick St Strathfield. In the 1950 Strathfield Recreation Club Jubilee Guide, Floris Conway recalled:

‘Who does not remember seeing, but yesterday, lovely Daphne Akhurst, acclaimed by England’s Press ‘the shy lady of Wimbledon’. Surely no finer tribute could be paid to a great champion, one who earned and held the love and affection of all with whom she came in contact, both on and off the Courts, until the sad hour of her early death. Strathfield was the scene of many of her triumphs’ .

The Daphne Akhurst Memorial Cup was donated by the New South Wales Lawn Tennis Association and was first used by the Australian Tennis Open in 1934. This trophy is given to the winner of the Australian women’s singles each year. At the 2006 Hall of Fame Ceremony a bronze bust of Akhurst was unveiled. This bust will be installed alongside other tennis champions in Garden Square in Melbourne Park.
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Old Jan 27th, 2011, 08:49 PM   #2
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Re: Daphne Akhurst Articles

"Mrs. Cozens Dead," The Brisbane Courier, 11 January 1933:

Tennis players throughout Australia will learn with sincere regret of the sudden death of Mrs. Roy Cozens, formerly Miss Daphne Akhurst, at a private hospital in Burwood. Mrs. Cozens competed with Miss L. Bickerton in the women's doubles championship at Pratten Park as late as January 2, and they won the event.

Mrs. Cozens established a wonderful record as a player. In addition, however, her charm of manner, her sunny disposition and smile, and her graciousness to her opponent won for her a wonderful name not only in Australia, but in Great Britain and Europe.

Mrs. Cozens, then a very small child in short frocks, won the schoolgirls' singles championship of New South Wales in 1917 at the old Double Bay ground. She repeated this success in 1918, 1919, and 1920. Her ability was unusual, and her future seemed assured. Her first major victory was her success in the Victorian women's doubles championship with Miss Sylvia Lance (now Mrs. R. Harper) in 1923, a feat they repeated in 1924. She achieved her ambition in 1925 when she won the Australian title at Sydney, and that year she also won the women's doubles and mixed doubles.

Mrs. Cozens left Australia in April, 1925, with the first Australian women's team to go to Europe. She did well on the tour, and was graded in the world's first 10. She went abroad again with the second women's team in 1928, and again performed with distinction, reaching the semi-finals of the women's singles and doubles and the final of the mixed doubles at Wimbledon. She also established a splendid record at Brussels, Cologne, and Deauville.

Mrs. Cozens won the Australian title for the fifth and last time in 1930, and shortly afterwords she was married. Thereafter she did not compete in singles, and played only in women's doubles and mixed doubles. Her place was never filled and her absence lowered the standard of play in Australia.
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Old Jan 29th, 2011, 09:29 PM   #3
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Re: Daphne Akhurst Articles

The aptly named "Trove" website is a treasure trove of Australian newspapers stretching right back to the nineteenth century, before the dawn of lawn tennis, and onward through and past the career/life of Daphne Akhurst. All of the early newspapers can be accessed free of charge. The URL is http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper
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Old Jan 31st, 2011, 11:31 PM   #4
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Re: Daphne Akhurst Articles

Quote:
Originally Posted by austinrunner View Post
"Mrs. Cozens Dead," The Brisbane Courier, 11 January 1933:

Tennis players throughout Australia will learn with sincere regret of the sudden death of Mrs. Roy Cozens, formerly Miss Daphne Akhurst, at a private hospital in Burwood. Mrs. Cozens competed with Miss L. Bickerton in the women's doubles championship at Pratten Park as late as January 2, and they won the event.
Was January 2, the week before her death? If so, wow!
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Old Feb 1st, 2011, 12:37 AM   #5
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Re: Daphne Akhurst Articles

Daphne's friendship with Louie Bickerton was very close. After Daphne's death Louie went on to become the second Mrs Cozens in 1995. She lived to a ripe old age of 95!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louie_Bickerton
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Old Feb 1st, 2011, 12:40 AM   #6
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Re: Daphne Akhurst Articles

Below is Daphne's biography as it appears in the online Australian Dictionary of National Biography.

http://www.adb.online.anu.edu.au/biogs/A070028b.htm


Akhurst, Daphne Jessie (1903 - 1933)

AKHURST, DAPHNE JESSIE (1903-1933), tennis-player, was born on 22 April 1903 at Ashfield, Sydney, second daughter of Oscar James Akhurst, lithographer, and his wife Jessie Florence, née Smith. She showed promise as a pianist and won prizes at eisteddfods as a child. After schooling at Miss E Tildesley's Normanhurst until 1920 and at the State Conservatorium of Music (D.S.C.M., 1922), she became a music teacher and performed at concerts and music clubs.


At school Daphne had shown natural ability at tennis. Although self-taught, she won the New South Wales schoolgirls' singles championship in 1917-20. Her first major win in the County of Cumberland ladies' singles in 1923 was the beginning of a long series of victories at State and national levels. In 1925 she defeated her Victorian rival Miss E. F. Boyd in the Australasian championships; women's matches were not usually popular, but her determined play in the final brought cheers which delayed the men's championship event on an adjoining court. She dominated this event for the next five years, winning in 1926, 1928, 1929 and 1930, when she retained permanently the Anthony Wilding Memorial Cup. She won the Australasian ladies' doubles title five times and the mixed doubles four times, partnered in 1928 by the Frenchman Jean Borotra.


Although described as shy and self-effacing, Daphne Akhurst was a keen competitor with a 'temperament that treats tennis as purely a game'. Her consistency in match play was no doubt developed in practice with local players Norman Peach, Jack Crawford and J. O. Anderson at her home club, The Western Suburbs Association, Pratten Park.


In 1925 the New South Wales Lawn Tennis Association had financed the first overseas tour by an Australian women's team. They succeeded against Wales, Scotland, Ireland and Holland but could not match the experience of England and the United States of America. Akhurst, rated as an outsider at the All England Lawn Tennis Club championships at Wimbledon, reached the quarter-finals of the ladies' singles, losing to English player Miss J. Fry 6-2, 4-6, 3-6. The Times noted her effort against a hard-hitting opponent by recalling 'those early Australian stonewallers who seemed to have no strokes, but who never got out'. Another Australian women's team was sent overseas in 1928; this time they won all thirteen matches. At Wimbledon, Akhurst outdid her previous success and reached the singles and doubles semi-finals and, partnered by Crawford, the mixed doubles final. She performed better than any of the Australian men and was ranked by Ayres' Almanac third in the world after Helen Wills and Senorita E. dé Alvarez. The Referee, more generous, claimed she was the best all-round player in the world.

On 26 February 1930 at St Philip's Church of England, Sydney, Daphne Akhurst married Royston Stuckey Cozens, a tobacco manufacturer, and retired from serious competition soon after winning the Australian ladies' doubles championship in 1931. They had one son. She died on 9 January 1933 of an ectopic pregnancy and, after a service at St Anne's, Strathfield, was cremated.


Her capacity to retrieve and 'ability to run about like a gazelle untiringly' had been responsible for her success and for an Australian-title record that lasted until broken by Nancy Bolton in 1951.
Select Bibliography

New South Wales Lawn Tennis Assn, Tennis Handbook (Syd, 1933); New South Wales State Conservatorium, Prospectus (Syd, 1963); J. Pollard, Ampol's Australian Sporting Records, 2nd ed (Syd, 1969); Woman's World, 1 Mar 1926; Argus (Melbourne), 2 Feb 1925; 'Lawn Tennis: The Championships', Times (London), 30 June 1925, p 6, and 5 July 1928, p 7; Referee (Sydney), 1 Feb 1928; private information.

Author: Kerry Regan

Print Publication Details: Kerry Regan, 'Akhurst, Daphne Jessie (1903 - 1933)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 7, Melbourne University Press, 1979, pp 25-26.

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Old Feb 1st, 2011, 12:45 AM   #7
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Re: Daphne Akhurst Articles

Akhurst's Grand Slam record


Daphne's wiki entry has a performance timeline:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daphne_Akhurst


She won the Australian 5 times in 7 attempts, falling only in her first attempt in 1924, when she reached the semis, and falling in the 2R in 1927. The second round result is misleading, as Akhurst actually defaulted due to illness rather than going down to defeat.

A detailed summary of her Aussie results may be found at:
http://www.australianopen.com/en_AU/...ayers/131.html

In singles she was 19-1 (Winning 5 times overall)
In doubles she was 12-2 (Winning 4 times overall)
In Mixed she was 17-2 (Winning 4 times overall)

She competed once at the French, reaching the QF in 1928.

At Wimbledon she reached the QF (1925) and the semis in 1928.

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Old Feb 1st, 2011, 12:53 AM   #8
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Re: Daphne Akhurst Articles

From the Aussie Open website:

http://www.australianopen.com/en_AU/...champions.html



Daphne Akhurst---Australian Champion 1925, 1926, 1928, 1929, 1930
Born in Sydney on 22 April 1903, Daphne Akhurst achieved much during her tragically short life, winning five Australian singles titles and nine Australian doubles titles between 1924 and 1931.
Making her debut at the tournament in 1924, Akhurst reached the second round where she fell to Esna Boyd. That match saw the dawning of a rivalry that spanned five years until Boyd's retirement in 1928.

Akhurst exacted revenge over her adversary the following year, claiming her first Australian Championship title after a nervous start 1-6 8-6 6-4 in the pre-tiebreak era.

The New South Welshwoman backed up her win in 1926 with a more straightforward 6-1 6-3 victory, illness partially to blame for her three-set concession of the 1927 final that afforded Boyd her only Australian title.

The pair's 1928 final showdown was described by the Argus newspaper as "as fine an exhibition of women's tennis as has been seen in Australia for some time." Akhurst's steady style of play comprehensively outfoxed hard-hitting Boyd, earning her a 7-5 6-2 victory and her third Australian title. She became the first Aussie woman to reach the world top 10 the same year, peaking at No.3.

Scoring finals victories over Louie Bickerton in 1929 and Sylvia Harper in 1930, Akhurst cemented her status as Australia's most prolific champion of the era. Today she ranks third on the Australian all-time singles champion list behind Margaret Court and Nancye Wynne Bolton.

Married, Akhurst won her last Australian title - the women's doubles with Bickerton - in 1931 as Mrs Roy Cozens. Two years later, in 1933, she suffered an ectopic pregnancy and died aged 29.

The Australian Open women's singles trophy is named the Daphne Akhurst Memorial Cup in her honour.
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Old Feb 1st, 2011, 12:58 AM   #9
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Re: Daphne Akhurst Articles

This action photo is at Wimbledon in 1928

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Old Feb 1st, 2011, 01:01 AM   #10
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Re: Daphne Akhurst Articles




British National Portrait Gallery photo from 1925
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Old Feb 1st, 2011, 03:41 AM   #11
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Re: Daphne Akhurst Articles

We have another thread about her:
http://www.tennisforum.com/showthread.php?t=282894
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Old Feb 1st, 2011, 04:47 PM   #12
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Re: Daphne Akhurst Articles

Thanks for bringing the other thread to our notice AR. I have indexed this thread as it is the larger one.

This image from the other thread was found by Sam L. The male in the middle is Jack Crawford, with Akhurst on the right. The lady on the left could be Esme Boyd.


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Old Feb 2nd, 2011, 03:32 PM   #13
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Re: Daphne Akhurst Articles

From the "Sydney Morning Herald", August 13, 1923:

"The Akhurst-Smith recital

"Miss Daphne Akhurst, a one-time popular juvenile piano prodigy, who has now secured her Conservatorium diploma, and Miss Molly Smith, a young violinist favourably regarded in concert circles, will join in Beethoven's 'Sonata in F' and Schubert's 'Rondeau Brillant' at their concert in the Conservatorium tomorrow evening. Both players will contribute attractive solos, and Mr Clem Williams (baritone) will sing."
-----

From the "Sydney Morning Herald", August 15, 1923:

"Amusements

"The Akhurst-Smith recital

"A great deal of interest was taken in the recital given at the Conservatorium last night by Miss Daphne Akhurst and Miss Molly Smith. Outside admirers were largely reinforced thereat by musicians and students ardent in the support of those talented young players. Miss Akhurst, at one time an infant-prodigy pianist, much applauded by the public, has now sobered down, under Miss Myrtle Meggy's teaching, into a diploma'd student with serious claims to attention. Miss Molly Smith has similarly acquired a goodly proportion of Miss Jenny Cullen's cultivation as a violinist, besides knowledge as an orchestral player.

"Their concert last night was highly appreciated, and the more so because they relied on the old classic repertoire, and showed acquaintance with its traditions. Miss Smith and Miss Akhurst opened with Beethoven's 'Sonata for Violin and Pianoforte in F' (Op. 24), and proved at once that a celebrity standard is not necessary in order to charm an audience with such music. The very first theme of the allegro is so enchanting that it seems (if the paraphrase may be excused) 'to bind up the unravelled sleeve of care' by the grace of its melody; and each time it recurred the violinist voiced it with caressing animation, and the pianist made sparkling response. Each movement in turn was rendered with taste right up to the spirited termination of the final allegro.

"Miss Molly Smith's principal solo was Vieuxtemps' 'Ballade and Polonaise' (Op. 38), in which an excellent tone was revealed, with freedom of style, correct execution of the bravura passages, and sympathy with the varying nature of the matter in hand. Applause and heaps of flowers led to the addition of Cesar Cui's mysterious echo from the deserts and steppes, 'Orientale'. Miss Ada Brook accompanied with skill.

"Miss Daphne Akhurst's chief success was in Brahm's 'Rhapsodie in E Flat', the impressive character of which was well realised, and floral gifts and sustained enthusiasm resulted in a double encore, remarkable for the pianist's sparkling neatness of technique in Lavelle's 'The Butterfly'.

"Mr Clem Williams used his light baritone with cultivated buoyancy and restraint in Lemaire's graceful gavotte-song 'Vous Dansez, Marquise' and his refined and musical timbre added to the charm of de Fontenaille's 'Obstination'. The encore was Homer's fine setting of R.L. Stevenson's 'Requiem', rendered with tender buoyancy, and admirable restraint."
-----

From the "Sydney Morning Herald", November 5, 1923:

"Amusements

"Mr Clem William's recital

"An interesting programme of songs was presented by Mr Clem Williams at his recital in the Conservatorium Hall on Saturday night.

[...]

"Assisting Mr Williams were Miss Daphne Akhurst, who played the inevitable Chopin Scherso in C sharp minor, showing power in the rugged octaves, but occasionally falling into vagueness in the lighter treble work..."
-----

From the "Sydney Morning Herald", May 23, 1924:

"University Concert

"There was a large audience in the Great Hall of the University on the occasion of the War Memorial Gala Concert, the proceeds of which will be devoted to the University carillon. The concert was under the patronage and held in the presence of the Chancellor and Lady Cullen, the Premier [of New South Wales], Sir George Fuller, and the Attorney-General, Mr T.R. Bavin. Miss Daphne Akhurst played a number of piano solos, and 'The Water Wagtail' (Cyril Scott) was particularly well received..."
-----

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Old Feb 2nd, 2011, 04:31 PM   #14
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Re: Daphne Akhurst Articles

From the "Sydney Morning Herald", October 20, 1924:

"Lawn Tennis

"Strathfield Open

"[...]

"Not for many years has there been a better attendance of spectators at a Strathfield than that of Saturday, which saw the completion of the Metropolitan Championships of this year.

[...]

"Miss Daphne Akhurst won the ladies' singles championship from Miss Marjorie Cox in a match which, although contested mainly by groundstrokes, was never wearisome, for the severity of the drives of Miss Cox, and the manner in which Miss Akhurst retrieved them were equally admirable. Miss Akhurst has greater tactical knowledge than her adversary, and this helped her to win [6-3, 6-3]..."
--

Daphne Akhurst followed up this win in Strathfield by taking the singles title at the 1924 Victorian Championships, held in Melbourne at the end of November/beginning of December (this was her first singles title in a state championship; she beat Sylvia Harper 6-1, 0-6, 7-5 in the final). In early 1925, Akhurst retained her singles title at the Cumberland County Championships, held at Pratten Park in Sydney, beating Marjorie Cox 9-7, 7-5 in the final (in January of 1924, Akhurst had won her first significant singles title at this Cumberland County Championships, beating Patricia Meaney 6-0, 6-1 in the final).

Daphne's next big tournament would be the 1925 Australasian Championships, also held in Sydney.
-----

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Old Feb 2nd, 2011, 04:48 PM   #15
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Re: Daphne Akhurst Articles

From the "Sydney Morning Herald", February 2, 1925:

"Lawn Tennis

[...]

"Miss Akhurst's Success

"In the presence of the largest gathering of spectators that has yet assembled at the Rushcutter Bay ground, the Australasian lawn tennis championships were completed on Saturday under conditions as favourable as they were unexpected, because the rain clouds of the preceding day had given place to a clear sky, the courts were firm and true, and the atmosphere resembled that of a spring or autumn day.

"In such circumstances, and with so attractive a list of events as that set down for decision, it is not surprising that the large new grandstand and that on the western side were filled. Many spectators obtained a splendid view by looking over the sight screens at the northern end of the match courts, and others found view points on the high bank between the main and western stands.

[...]

"The official estimate of the number present was 7,000, including ground members and special seat owners, and the gate receipts £700.

[...]

"Jack Willard and Daphne Akhurst retained the mixed doubles title when opposed by Robert Schlesinger and Sylvia Harper. They overwhelmed their opponents at the outset of the match, Willard doing amazing things successfully. Schlesinger and Mrs Harper were carried off their feet for a time by the impetuousity of the attack, but when they steadied they offered better resistance, but insufficient to prevent their opponents from winning both sets. [6-4, 6-4]

"Miss Akhurst had previously [earlier in the day] won the ladies' singles championship, her final opponent being Esna Boyd. Nothing better than Miss Boyd's play in the first set has been seen for a long time. She found Miss Akhurst slightly inaccurate, and made capital from that fact by going to the net, where she killed lobs with certainty and forced her opponent into errors. Relaxing her pressure early in the second set, Miss Boyd allowed Miss Akhurst to acquire touch, and although she pulled up from 1-4, to 4-4, Miss Akhurst took the lead again and won the set. It was Miss Boyd's turn to lead 4-1 in the deciding set, but her efforts were telling on her, and Miss Akhurst, now playing without error and placing cleverly, went out with a run of five games. [Final score: 1-6, 8-6, 6-4].

"Miss Akhurst's triple success came when, with Mrs Harper, she retained the ladies' doubles championship, notwithstanding the opposition of Mrs Harper and Katherine Le Mesurier. Mrs Harper played admirably in this match, her backhand volleys across court being productive of many points. Miss Le Mesurier was accurate, but Miss Boyd, who seemed tired, made many errors." [Final score: 6-4, 6-3]
--

In 1924, Daphne Akhurst had won her first two titles at what was then called the Australasian Championships (the tournament's name was changed to the Australian Championships in 1927). Akhurst won the women's doubles with Sylvia Harper, 7-5, 6-2, over Katherine Le Mesurier and Meryl O'Hara Wood; and the mixed doubles title with Jack Willard, 6-3, 6-4, over Garton Hone and Esna Boyd. The 1924 Australasian Championships were held in Melbourne. (The tournament rotated around various venues until becoming fixed in Melbourne in 1972.) Daphne Akhurst's 1925 "triple crown" was the first ever at this major tournament. She repeated this rare feat at the Australian Championships in both 1928 and 1929.
-----

The 1925 Irish Championships

From the "Irish Times", July 20, 1925:

"Lawn Tennis

"Two Australian Wins

"To some extent this year's championship meeting at Wilton Place [in Dublin] was spoiled by a sudden change of weather and the adverse conditions which prevailed on Saturday. Rain threatened all day, and that it did not come down was mainly due to the high wind which blew from the south, and swept the courts from end to end. What made matters worse was that it blew in gusts, and made anything like accuracy very difficult. In addition, the day was cold, and as a result the attendance failed to reach the level usually seen on final[s] day.

[...]

"The singles matches were the first in court, and in both the winners came through in straight sets. [...] Esna Boyd defeating Daphne Akhurst 9-7, 6-1. At this time it was blowing really hard and in gusts, but both winners rose to the conditions much more readily than their opponents, and for this deserve full credit for their victories.

[...]

"The ladies' singles was a battle royal throughout the opening set. In the second Miss Akhurst proved unequal to the stronger all-court game played by Miss Boyd, and the latter won in the seventh game. From the start Miss Boyd was hitting the harder ball, and never had any hesitation about going to the net. These tactics gave her an initial advantage, and she led 4-1 before Miss Akhurst touched the form she had shown in earlier rounds. She made a splendid recovery, and placing well won game after game until in the ninth she actually took the lead. Subsequently it was game for game until 7-all was called and then her effort died away, and Miss Boyd's sustained attack gave her the opening set at 9-7. It seemed as if this effort had exhausted Miss Akhurst's resources. Against Miss Boyd's good length driving, backed up by accurate volleys, she was practically powerless, and although she fought out every ace she only succeeded in winning a single game in the second set.

[...]


"Considering the handicap under which they played - Sylvia Harper with an injured arm, still bandaged from wrist to elbow, and Miss Akhurst with a strained knee - the losers put up a great fight in the ladies' doubles final, and proved that the reputation the team has earned for courage and tenacity is well founded. Throughout the twenty-four games played there was very little between the pairs, and it was the individual brilliance shown by Miss Boyd that turned the scale in a close-fought match. She was easily the best of the four, driving and volleying with power and accuracy, and the way she chased and retrieved seeming winners was wonderful. Floris Saint-George gave her partner adequate backing."

[Women's doubles final: Syliva Harper/Floris Saint-George d. Daphne Akhurst/Esna Boyd 8-6, 6-4]
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It was a case of "third time lucky" for Daphne Akhurst at the 1925 Irish Championshps when, paired with Gerald Sherwell of South Africa, she won the mixed doubles title over Ireland's Vincent Allman-Smith and Esna Boyd. The final score was 3-6, 6-4, 7-5.
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Last edited by newmark401 : Oct 13th, 2011 at 02:36 PM.
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