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Old Sep 24th, 2013, 10:10 PM   #2941
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Re: Steffi Graf Admiration Thread Vol 2

I personally would have like Gaby to win more majors whatever the player who actually won them, even Steffi! Sorry, being the Steffi forum, but anyway coming from a Graf fan, to say that about Sabatini is a great compliment and speaks of how Gaby is liked by most tennis fans, nice.
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Old Sep 25th, 2013, 12:36 PM   #2942
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Re: Steffi Graf Admiration Thread Vol 2

Just a brief mention of Steffi getting to go to the men's 100 meters (and they are still asking her who she thinks will win even ten minutes before the race). An article loaded with unintentional alarm bells and foreshadowing about Johnson and his methods, but also important in the Zeitgeist of the 1988 Olympics because I think when they caught Johnson and some of the other "amateur" athletes, many pundits and athletes who were irate about the presence of the tennis professionals realized that "amateurs" were capable of violating the spirit of the Games in worse ways than openly earning money playing sports.

JOHNSON SMASHED LEWIS AND EXPECTATIONS FOR RACE
Richmond Times-Dispatch
Sunday, September 25, 1988
Bill Millsaps

Even in repose, Ben Johnson's eyes are agate-hard and feral. His smiles are rare and fleeting. He always seems wary.

In the starting block, he takes his mark like a pit bull in an attack stance. He gives all the outward signs of a man ready to explode.

Here yesterday, in what should have been the best foot race of the 24th Summer Olympics, Johnson blew up a great field in the final of the 100 meters.

The 26-year-old Canadian ran the distance in 9.79 seconds and broke the world record of 9.83 he had established 13 months ago in Rome. He won easily over Carl Lewis, who set an American record running a 9.92, and Linford Christie of Great Britain, who set a British and European record by running a 9.97.

Usually, Johnson wins his races by firing out of the blocks much faster than anyone else. This time, he got away, by electronic measurement, only .04 ahead of Lewis, but by the 30-meter mark, he was in command.

"I eased up over the last three or four meters or I would have run a 9.75," said Johnson, rubbing it in a little.

He does not like Lewis, a 27-year-old who is his major challenger on the international sprint scene.

Lewis has lost seven of his last eight races against Johnson, and in his postrace press conference, Lewis tried to convince listeners that failing to become the first man to repeat as Olympic 100-meter gold medalist really didn't hurt.

"It wasn't my best start," he said, "but after that, it was a pretty good race for me. I'm pleased with my performance. I was able to set the American record, and I'm pleased with the way I ran my race."

Lewis' only reference to Johnson was a brief, "He ran a great race," but he quickly added, "I'm pleased with my time."

Lewis also said the outcome would not affect his efforts in the long jump, 200 meters and the 4x100-meter relay, events in which he also won gold medals in the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics. "The party," he said, "has just begun."

Lewis kept insisting, "I did the best I could do. The Olympics is about performance and doing the best you can. I was pleased I ran the best I could."

Six weeks ago, Lewis' best was enough to beat Johnson over 100 meters in a meet in Zurich. Johnson insisted after the race that he had been hampered by a left hamstring injury.

This time around, there were obviously no physical problems for Johnson. "I was lucky that the Olympic 100 meters was late in September so I could come back and get ready for this race," he said.

There had been some doubt in the 24 hours leading up to the final that Johnson was ready mentally. He had done a couple of strange things in heats -- such as let slower sprinters catch him in the last 15 to 20 meters. He did not break 10 seconds in any of the three races that qualified him for the final.

Lewis, meanwhile, had gotten faster in his heats, running 9.99 and 9.97 in his last two qualifying rounds.

Still, there was the feeling that Johnson had been sandbagging. The word had gotten around that, in workouts, Johnson had been running watch-breaking times.

Tennis star Steffi Graf rushed into Olympic Stadium 10 minutes before the 100- meter final and asked an American newspaperman how she might find her way to her seat. He told her, then asked her to make a choice in the 100.

"I hope it's Lewis," she said, "but I think it's going to be Johnson."

It was . . . smashingly.

The only thing Johnson did slowly this day was provide a urine specimen for the required drug test. He was in doping control, where he drank three post-race beers, for two hours before coming to a press conference nearly 2 1/2 hours after the race.

Johnson said he was not concerned about Lewis' qualifying times. "I think that Carl was just trying to impress me," he said.

"This was my moment. This is the moment that I've waited for the last four years." In 1984 in Los Angeles, Johnson was the bronze medalist in the 100- meter final.

Now that he has won the gold, new financial vistas may open to Johnson. The Canadian magazine, MacLean's, estimated recently that if Johnson were to win the 100 meters in Seoul, it might be worth as much as $10 million to him over the next five years.

He is almost certainly Canada's richest and (now that the Edmonton Oilers have traded Wayne Gretzky to the Los Angeles Kings) most famous athlete.

Johnson already has a number of endorsement arrangements, but he is not likely to become a television spokesman for any product or service. He speaks almost as fast as he runs, and he occasionally has a slight stutter.

As long as he can run this fast, it won't matter. His speed has enabled him to accumulate enough money to build a $750,000, six-bedroom house in a Toronto suburb. He has on order a $245,000 Ferrari Testarossa. And he now has a firm grasp on the title, "The World's Fastest Man."

In his postrace elation, Johnson said he thought his record might last "for 50, maybe 100 years." It's more likely it will last only until Johnson breaks it again.
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Old Sep 25th, 2013, 12:40 PM   #2943
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Re: Steffi Graf Admiration Thread Vol 2

And far from being the spoiled, whining brats that some people expected them to act like, most of the tennis pros, especially the women, Get It, or at least Say The Right Things. Here you have internationally famous multimillionaires sharing experiences with people who will return home to anonymity and never earn a cent from their sport -- and the internationally famous multimillionaires are saying "Wow!" And there are examples of shamateurs and even true "pure" amateurs who are aloof, haughty, selfish, inconsiderate, tunnel-visioned, greedy, ungrateful, who are bad losers and bad winners, who are acting like ruffians, or who are being just plain idiots.

Tennis stars seek a different kind of gold
St. Petersburg Times
Sunday, September 25, 1988
HUBERT MIZELL

SEOUL, South Korea - Tennis, a born-again Olympic sport, is just another sideshow on the Seoul midway. Big names like Steffi Graf, Stefan Edberg and Chris Evert spice the marquee, but it'll be a generation or so before we know how well the game fits on this crowded stage.

''I'm not yet sure if I really feel included in the Olympics,'' said Evert, a Wimbledon-U.S. Open legend who's but a rookie here. ''For four years, so many athletes point totally for the Olympics. In tennis, we have four Grand Slam showcases every year. I just wonder how hungry our players can be.''

It's like Baryshnikov being invited to a square dance. Even if you're rich, talented, famous, secure and confident, there's no way to tell how you'll mix with such a different crowd.

''To me, it's a magical opportunity,'' said Australia's Darren Cahill, a U.S. Open semifinalist two weeks ago. ''Winning the Olympic gold medal in tennis would be second only to holding up the championship trophy at Wimbledon.''

Tennis was last contested for Olympic medals at Paris in 1924, where facilities were so wretched for Helen Wills, Rene Lacoste and other darlings of the day that the International Lawn Tennis Federation opted to withdraw the game from the Games.

But now, tennis is back.

''I'm glad I'm here,'' Evert said. ''Tennis players are missing a beautiful experience if they pass on coming to an Olympics. Mixing with people from different countries, and cultures - even from nations you've been at war with - well, that's what it's all about.''

At 33, Evert speaks with certain tennis-elder authority. Winner of six U.S. Opens, three Wimbledons and 140 other championships, the aging but enduring artist came to Seoul with a far-fetched dream of icing her layers of accomplishments with Olympic gold. Though that dream ended Saturday night (Sunday in Seoul) when she was defeated by Italy's Rafaella Reggi, 2-6, 6-4, 6-1, Evert was thrilled simply by representing her country.

''It meant a lot to me, putting on a U.S.A. jacket, and a tennis skirt with an American flag on it; walking onto Center Court to play my first Olympic match,'' she said after breezing 6-2, 6-2 against Italy's Anna Maria Cecchini.

''In December, I decided to not come to Korea. I was concerned about security. Every night, I saw the riots on TV. But I would become sold that it was going to be okay in Seoul, and it has been tremendous. I'm so glad I changed my mind. It's great, spending two weeks playing for your country, after spending so long playing for yourself.''

Her tennis career may be into its concluding chapters, but Evert's life is unquestionably prime. On her finger, a diamond of many carats glistens. At her side is Andy Mill, the handsome former Olympic skier Chris married earlier this year.

They live part of the year in Chris' native Florida, in a villa at Boca Raton, and spend several other months at a second home in Andy's favorite Colorado mountains at Aspen.

''We tennis players can be lucky enough to have the best of many worlds,'' she said, earner of $8.4-million in her career. ''There's the Grand Slam events, plus the opportunity to win a lot of money, and now the Olympic Games.''

West Germany's Graf has raked all of tennis' major 1988 chips, sweeping the Grand Slam of Wimbledon along with the U.S., French and Australian Opens. Steffi's sundae is already made, but now she's favored to top it with Olympic gold.

''It is big,'' Graf said, ''because it's for your country. It has been so different here, and so good, living in the Olympic Village. I ride bikes with other German athletes. I eat ice cream with Chinese, Egyptians and Indians. It's an unforgettable experience.''

Evert understands.

''I'm spoiled, and I admit it,'' said tennis' grand dame. ''My life away from home is usually hotel suites and room-service food. But, in Seoul, we've lived in the Olympic Family Village, and stood in line for our food. And it's been a joy.

''I just hope the Games fit in well with tennis schedules in 1992, and in future Olympic years. I hope it becomes a must event for everybody. I came, I've loved it, and I strongly recommend it. I hope tennis players will feel more and more like they're a real part of the Olympics.''
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Old Sep 25th, 2013, 12:41 PM   #2944
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Re: Steffi Graf Admiration Thread Vol 2

Olympics `88 - Notes and quotes
Houston Chronicle
Sunday, SEPTEMBER 25, 1988
Houston Chronicle News Services

SEOUL, South Korea - Not many people can say they have had a more unusual summer job than that of Melvin Stewart of Fort Mills, S.C., who finished fifth in the 200-meter butterfly Saturday night.

Stewart is a former bellhop at Jim and Tammy Bakker's "Heritage U.S.A.'' theme park.

Brian Bennett, an American team handball player from northern California, said the Olympic athletes have a world view and a global pecking order. He noticed it when American sprinter Carl Lewis walked by West German tennis star Steffi Graf.

"Her jaw just dropped,'' Bennett said.

Cuban President Fidel Castro defended Cuba's decision to stay away from the Olympic Games and chided other communist-bloc nations for attending.

"I say it is very ugly that other socialist nations have gone to Seoul,'' Castro said on Friday at a ceremony honoring 173 Cuban athletes.

American speedster Florence Griffith Joyner is far ahead of the field in an informal Olympic Village "best dressed'' athlete survey jointly conducted by a Korean newspaper and six local fashion designers.

Polls of more than 1,700 people show Griffith Joyner with 25.4 percent of the vote. Bulgarian marksman Vessela Lecheva followed with 10.6 percent and American swimmer Matt Biondi was in third, with 7.7 percent.

Officials at the men's gymnastic competition suddenly had to come up with two extra gold medals for the three-way tie in the pommel horse event. Only one of the medals was engraved with the name of event on the bottom edge.

That one went to Bulgarian gymnast Lyobumir Gueraskov. Zsolt Borkai of Hungary and Dmitri Bilozertchev of the Soviet Union received generic gold medals.

"We'll have to take it to the engraver,'' said Borkai's coach, Dezso Bordan.

Korean citizens are sending thousands of gifts - including embroidered cushions, Korean wine, letters, poetry, books, fans, apples, flower vases - to the Olympic Village for distribution to athletes and Olympic officials.

Confucian scholar Shin Bong-woo, 80, made 160 "sticks of peace'' for chairmen of all National Olympic Committees.

French tennis player Henri Leconte, ranked 12th in the world, was so angry with Korean fans who booed him and cheered Kim Bong-Soo in their match - which Kim won - that he hit a ball at the spectators.

"We don't give anything special to the Soviet delegation,'' insists Kim Sam Hoon, director general of international relations for the Seoul Olympic Organizing Committee.

Yet Aeroflot planes land at Kimpo Airport. A Soviet cruise ship is moored at Inchon. A member of the Soviet Union's Olympic party has been given consular status here. None of that has happened since Korea was vivisected after World War II and the Kremlin cast its lot with the North.

Eckhard Schultz of the West German rowing team said he has been fraternizing with rowers from East Germany.

"Yes, sure, no problem,'' Schultz said. "In the world championships last year the team officials prohibited it. But in the Olympics they are more generous. No problem to talk with the East German rowers even when an official can hear it.'' He also said he is dating an American woman, although details are "personal.''

In the Olympic Village, one person's religion is sometimes another person's sleep disturbance, such as the wake-up chant from the Buddhist worship center.

"They beat a drum from 3 to 6 in the morning,'' said Sylvia Baldessarini, an Austrian shooter. "You can't sleep.''

Tom Jager of Collinsville, Ill., who lost his world record in the inaugural 50-meter freestyle to Matt Biondi on Saturday night, mentally prepares for his races by making himself angry at his opponents. The technique is known as "hatred manifestation.'' Jager also drinks 10 to 15 cups of coffee before each race.

Wendy Williams, the American diver, said people from Arab countries in the Olympic Village like to walk up to her and touch her blond hair because they don't see much of it where they come from.

"I cannot believe all the foreigners in town,'' said Choi Ok-ja, a 65-year-old Seoul grandmother, "Seoul is now truly an international city.''
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Old Sep 25th, 2013, 12:44 PM   #2945
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Re: Steffi Graf Admiration Thread Vol 2

If anyone thinks that Steffi usually didn't/doesn't engage in wars of words because she is incapable of mounting much of a verbal assault, think again. Even at this stage, she has very much mastered the lexical equivalent of a shrug for use as a dismissive insult or as an ironic joke. It's her sense of propriety and dignity rather than lack of ability that kept her from lingually blasting them off the court.

EVERT TUMBLES OUT OF OLYMPICS
USA TODAY
Sunday, September 25, 1988
JIM TERHUNE, Gannett News Service

SEOUL - Does the demise of Chris Evert make it easier, Steffi Graf?

"Didn't bother me too much," said the West German, top-ranked in the Olympic tennis tournament. "It makes it easier for (Gabriela) Sabatini."

Easier to win gold, Gabriela?

"Still difficult," the third-seeded Argentinian said. "Maybe a little."

Evert is gone from the Olympic Park courts and, three months from age 34, probably gone from the Olympiad for good.

Second-seeded, she had motored onto the Olympic team in a belated and controversial committee decision that pushed Elise Burgin off it. Now, Sunday, Evert had driven herself out of the event by losing a sloppy 2-6, 6-4, 6-1 match to unseeded Raffaella Reggi of Italy.

She committed 62 unforced errors.

"At this point in my career, I'm not as consistent," Evert said. "Mentally, it was one of those days where I couldn't get myself to run around and work hard. I had a bad day today, and at my age I'm going to have a few more."

Teammate Pam Shriver was watching. "Usually she gets angry and goes on a tear," she said. "She was having trouble getting fired up."

Reggi, 24th on the Women's International Tennis Association computer to Evert's No. 3, was surprised.

"I've definitely seen her play better. I think I deserve a little bit of credit, but I also think that if we play again tomorrow she makes just two mistakes instead of 62."

Perhaps Evert's elimination eased the route for Graf and Sabatini.

But the top remaining seeds must still battle concentration problems in a competition that doesn't have the pizazz of the big tennis events nor the appeal of the traditional Olympic sports.

"Everybody has their trouble here," Graf said. "It's not difficult to concentrate because you're participating for your country. But it's not easy coming off the (U.S.) Open."

Sabatini was bombarded 6-1 in the first set by West German Sylvia Hanika, then rallied to win 6-4, 6-3.

The other two U.S. women advanced Sunday to the quarterfinals. Shriver, the No. 4 seed, needed three sets to defeat Bulgaria's Katerina Maleeva 6-3, 3-6, 6-2, while No. 8 Zina Garrison eliminated Austria's Barbara Paulus 6-4, 6-3.

On Tuesday, however, Shriver and Garrison play each other.

"We're rooming together, and the room's about this big," Garrison said, grinning and holding her hands a foot apart. "We're real close, but one of us will reach the semifinals and it'll help us (America) win more medals."

Does that mean the Olympic spirit has grabbed Garrison a bit? "Oh, yeah," she gushed. "I went to boxing and I'm like totally turned into a boxing fan. I watched Todd (Foster) somebody knock a guy out, and I'm up screaming 'USA!' with everybody. Almost got beat up."

The top-seeded U.S. men's doubles team of Ken Flach and Robert Seguso advanced to the quarterfinals with a 6-4, 6-4, 6-4 decision over Laszlo Markovics and Gabor Koeves of Hungary.

The men's singles quarterfinals are set for Monday with two Americans, No. 2 seed Tim Mayotte and No. 5 Brad Gilbert still alive. Mayotte meets Carl-Uwe Steeb of West Germany, and Gilbert, who battered teammate Seguso on Saturday 6-2, 6-1, 6-2, takes on Martin Jaite of Argentina.
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Old Sep 25th, 2013, 12:47 PM   #2946
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Re: Steffi Graf Admiration Thread Vol 2

59 minute match => time to hit the practice court.

ITALIAN ENDS EVERT'S MEDAL HOPES
September 25, 1988
Sydney Morning Herald

SEOUL, Sunday: For Chris Evert, an Olympic medal would have been the icing on the cake of a 17-year career regarded as one of the greatest in tennis history.

However, the 32-year-old American had her hopes dashed in the Olympic tennis competition when unseeded Italian Rafaella Reggi beat her 2-6 6-4 6-1 in the third round yesterday.

"Mentally, I was definitely below par," Evert said.

"I didn't feel that eagerness that I have felt here, but Raffi played great tennis and I have to give her a lot of credit."

Reggi, who had not taken a set in three previous meetings with Evert, dug deep to take charge of the match.

"I just decided to go out there and play my match," Reggi said. "Even though I lost the first set I just kept going."

Evert made 62 unforced errors, an alarmingly high number for someone normally as consistent as she is.

Her return of serve let her down when she needed it and she never looked in control of the match.

"I had to work really hard to win a point. I just think, mentally, it was one of those days when I just couldn't get myself to run around and work hard,"she said.

The Italian, 24, who was ranked as high as 13 in the world last May, played a patient match and waited for her opportunities.

The demise of Evert has left Steffi Graf with an even clearer passage to the gold medal.

The West German teenager trounced France's Catherine Suire 6-3 6-0 and then went out and practised for another 15 minutes because her match was over so quickly.

Gabriela Sabatini and Pam Shriver, the third and fourth seeds, both dropped sets but finished strongly.

After losing the first set 1-6 Sabatini rallied to beat Sylvia Hanika 6-4 6-2. Shriver stopped Katerina Maleeva 6-3 3-6 6-2.
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Old Sep 27th, 2013, 11:18 AM   #2947
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Re: Steffi Graf Admiration Thread Vol 2

She wobbles, but refuses to tip over. Considering Steffi's record of being able to self-right even from 180 degrees, this isn't such a big deal in retrospect. Although I'm sure the remaining competitors saw a glimmer of hope.

Graf keeps Golden Slam hopes alive
Houston Chronicle
Tuesday, SEPTEMBER 27, 1988
Associated Press

SEOUL, South Korea - Steffi Graf hadn't had that losing feeling for a long while.

But with the first ever "Golden Slam'' of tennis in grave danger of melting in the Seoul sun, Graf found inner reserves of strength and stamina and grasped a place in the semifinals of the Olympic tennis tournament.

She knew it had been close.

"I could easily have lost if she had continued to play so well,'' Graf said after her 6-2, 4-6, 6-3 victory over Larissa Savchenko of the Soviet Union. "I have not had that feeling for some time. Only my fight kept me in the match.''

In the semifinals, the 19-year-old West German will play Zina Garrison, who overcame Pam Shriver 6-3, 6-2 in an all-American battle.

Shriver, who lost 15 straight points in the middle of the match, said it had been hard to get in shape mentally to play her compatriot, even though a bronze medal was at stake.

"I was disgusted with my attitude,'' Shriver said. "I could not get it all together for more than one and a half minutes.''

The other semifinal will be between Manuela Maleeva of Bulgaria and Argentina's Gabriela Sabatini, the only player to beat Graf this year.

Maleeva put out unseeded Italian Raffaella Reggi, the third-round conqueror of Chris Evert, 6-3, 6-4. Sabatini's groundstrokes were too strong for 17-year-old Soviet Natalia Zvereva and the Argentine, trying to win her country's first gold medal of the Games, went through 6-4, 6-3.

All of today's winners were guaranteed at least a bronze medal.

Ken Flach and Robert Seguso reached the semifinals of the men's doubles with a straight sets win over Morten Christensen and Michael Tauson of Denmark, and with Garrison's win that assured the United States of five tennis medals in the sport's first full-scale Olympic event since 1924.

But the defeats of Zvereva and Savchenko meant the Soviet Union left the tournament empty-handed, with all its players out of the medals hunt.

Graf, who became only the fifth player to achieve the coveted Grand Slam when she won the U.S. Open earlier this month, came dangerously close to having her hopes of a singles gold medal - or a medal of any other color - wrecked by Savchenko.

After racing through the opening set in 23 minutes and losing just two points on her serve, Graf moved ahead 4-3 in the second set.

She seemed to be coasting when things started going wrong.

After serving eight double faults, Savchenko sent down service winners to Graf's backhand, and, after breaking the gold medal favorite for a 5-4 lead, served out the set.

Pressuring the Graf serve by charging the net, Savchenko continued to worry the West German and moved up 3-1 as she broke through again in the final set.

Two games later, Savchenko was up 30-0 on serve and poised for a 4-2 lead, but she double-faulted twice and let Graf back in.

Graf's driving forehands and unrelenting aggression took over from there.

"I'm very happy I came out of this match,'' said Graf, who has only lost twice this year and extended her winning streak to 34 matches. "I wasn't choosing the right shots. Sometimes I went for slice, sometimes topspin. It always seemed to be the wrong choice.''

Shriver began brightly against Garrison, taking the first seven points of the match. But when Garrison saved three break points to level at 1-1, her opponent's game crumbled.

Shriver, who was seeded fourth, said being part of a team with the eighth-seeded Garrison had affected the way she approached the match.
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Old Sep 27th, 2013, 11:19 AM   #2948
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Re: Steffi Graf Admiration Thread Vol 2

Love the contrast between Steffi fighting through a bad patch and Shriver indulging herself with a did-she-really-just-say-that? excuse.

Savchenko close to toppling Graf - Tennis
The Times
London, England
Wednesday, September 28, 1988
From Richard Evans

Even losing a set is becoming something of an event in Steffi Graf's career and being 3-1 down in the third is so rare that it is difficult for the young West German not to hit the panic button.

Being the kind of champion she is, Graf merely got angry with herself when she lost her serve to Larisa Savchenko, of the Soviet Union, in the quarter-finals of the women's singles and soon got back on track for an Olympic medal, a bronze at the very least, by reeling off five successive games to win 6-2, 4-6, 6-3.

But it had been close; close enough at one stage for a cautionary ruffle through the record books to verify when Graf had suffered her last defeat. It was about six months ago, in the semi-final of a Virginia Slims event at Amelia Island, Florida, when she lost to Gabriella Sabatini.

Defeat at the hands of Savchenko would have been less comprehensible because the stocky 22-year-old from Lvov is known for not being able to sustain bursts of free-hitting stroke-play and, sure enough, errors started to creep into her game just when she should have been making the Grand Slam winner fight for every point in windy conditions.

After admitting that she had not been so near to defeat for a long time, Graf can now look forward to a semi-final against Zina Garrison, who defeated Pam Shriver 6-3, 6-2 in a match that was bound to give the United States another medal.

Shriver, who is emotional at the best of times, found the task of playing a team-mate and a doubles partner all too much for her. "We have been rooming together for over a week and then suddenly we were opponents which is something that does not happen in most Olympic sports," Shriver said. "I'm not used to that and I got really confused and mixed up emotionally and just lost my way."

In the other half of the draw Sabatini, a 6-4, 6-3 winner over the French Open finalist, Natalia Zvereva, will play Manuela Maleeva, who earned Bulgaria a medal by beating Raffaella Reggi, who could not match the consistency she displayed against Chris Evert and went down 6-3, 6-4.
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Old Sep 28th, 2013, 12:03 PM   #2949
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Re: Steffi Graf Admiration Thread Vol 2

SHRIVER, GARRISON GAIN DOUBLES FINAL
Sun-Sentinel
Wednesday, September 28, 1988
Sun-Sentinel wire services

SEOUL, South Korea -- Pam Shriver and Zina Garrison sent the United States into the women's doubles tennis final at the Olympics Tuesday, beating Australia's Wendy Turnbull and Elizabeth Smylie 7-6, 6-4.

The Americans will play for the gold against Czechoslovakia's Jana Novotna and Helena Sukova, who stopped Grand Slam queen Steffi Graf's bid to win two gold medals as they downed the West German team of Graf and Claudia Kohde-Kilsch 7-5, 6-3.

The Australians and West Germans came away from the first medal-awarding Olympic tennis event since 1924 with a bronze each. The final will decide who gets gold and silver.

After an early exchange of breaks, Shriver and Garrison found themselves faced triple set-point when Turnbull served at 5-4.

But a double fault by Turnbull followed by two sloppy errors from the Australians let the U.S. team back in and Shriver and Garrison levelled at 5-5 when Smylie netted a volley.

Shriver and Garrison moved to a 4-1 lead in the tiebreaker and served with triple-set point at 6-3. The Australians saved two of them before Turnbull put a service return long.

The Americans saved three break points on Shriver's serve in the second game of the second set, and managed to break Shriver after the Americans broke Smylie's serve for a 3-2 lead. The Australians continued to carve out chances in the second set, but failed to capitalize on three break points on Shriver's serve in the second game.

They managed to break Shriver's next service game, fighting back to 3-3 immediately after Smylie had been broken. But inconsistancy struck again and Turnbull dropped serve. Smylie saved three match points and held for 5-4 before Garrison wrapped up the match with a smash after a solid Shriver serve.

Graf and Kohde-Kilsch led 2-0 in the second set of the other semifinal but Kohde-Kilsch, who struggled throughout with her serve, was broken twice and the Germans won only one more game.

Sukova and Novotna's win kept alive the hopes of Eastern Europe after the elimination of the Soviet squad.

They came with high hopes of at least one medal. They left without even a bronze.

''I hope this will not hurt tennis our country,'' said Olga Morozova, national Soviet women's coach and a Wimbledon singles finalist in 1974. ''Of course we are upset, but the field -- especially in the women's event -- was very strong.''

The last two Soviet medal hopes, Natalia Zvereva and Savchenko, were beaten in the quarterfinals Monday, just missing the medal round. Zvereva lost 6-4, 6-3 to Gabriela Sabatini of Argentina and Savchenko lost 6-2, 4-6, 6-3 to Graf.

But Savchenko, ranked 17th in the world, extended Graf farther than anyone else has done in the past six months.

''I could easily have lost if she had continued to play so well,'' Graf said after ensuring herself of at least a bronze medal and extending her winning streak to 38 matches. ''I have not had that feeling for some time. Only my fight kept me in the match.''
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Old Sep 29th, 2013, 11:14 AM   #2950
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Re: Steffi Graf Admiration Thread Vol 2

5-2 game, first set: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HexeFR5AoRs

5-0 game, second set: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aEx3VsDUFPY

Great examples of Garrison serving, and the ball being returned "before she could take another step." Similar to the form she showed in the second and third sets of the 1988 Wimbledon final. Steffi's returns at 5-2, 0-15 and 5-0, 15-all are particularly ludicrous.

SABATINI THINKS SHE CAN BEAT GRAF TO GOLD MEDAL
CRAIG GABRIEL
September 29, 1988
Sydney Morning Herald

SEOUL, Thursday: Like a literary classic, the great new rivalry in women's tennis begins another chapter tomorrow when Steffi Graf faces Gabriela Sabatini for the Olympic gold medal.

Both teenagers brushed aside the preface to their story with devastating ease. Graf defeated American Zina Garrison 6-2 6-0 in 45 minutes and Sabatini dismissed Bulgarian Manuela Maleeva 6-1 6-1.

"I played great tennis," Graf said with mild understatement. "I was terrible in practice, and then I just came out and played like this.

"In the past few days I could not think I would play like this."

It is impossible to express how devastating Graf's performance was. She lost a mere 23 points in the entire match, and reeled off the last 11 games after a slight hiccup to fall behind a service break in the third game.

There was no shot in the book that she could not hit as returns, which should have been outright winners from Garrison, were fired back like bazookas, and the American, ranked nine in the world, and a semi-finalist in the US Open where she beat Martina Navratilova, was made to look like a novice.

Graf has been having minor problems getting psyched-up for this event so soon after the US Open, where she captured the grand slam. As a result, she came close to losing in the previous round to Larissa Savchenko.

It has been suggested that Graf's lack of concentration is due to the fact that she really did not want to be at the Games and would rather have taken time off after the Open. She denies this.

"Everyone knows how important this is to me to get to the finals," she said. "It shows the way I came through with it."

The 19-year-old West German, however, could offer no explanation for the sudden turnaround in her form from the third round against the Soviet player when thoughts of losing entered her head.

She said: "Everyone was saying 'win this one'. I went out cold on court, but I was more relaxed and suddenly my backhand was working just incredibly. I never played my backhand like this before, so I don't know what it is."

Garrison did not play badly and was trying to mix up her returns.

She tried staying back and rallying, but Graf just hit her right off the court. Then she would try to come into the net, but Graf's ground strokes whipped excruciating winners past her that landed within centimetres of the line.

"I never saw the ball," a bewildered Garrison said. "I think she was nervous in the beginning, but once she found her rhythm she just kept rolling. It is a very distressing loss."

Garrison, who is regarded as one of the quickest players on the tour, was left standing time and again.

She would serve, and the ball was back before she could take another step.

Garrison is reluctant to "hand over" the gold medal to Graf, however, because she feels, on this hardcourt, that Sabatini can make amends for her US Open final performance.

Sabatini's exaggerated ground strokes with their heavy topspin made it difficult for Maleeva, who looks frail at the best of times, to get a play on the ball.

The Argentine's serves were heavy, and she volleyed with pinpoint accuracy. She played a very smart match by keeping the ball deep, and came in behind her shots and put pressure on the Bulgarian to producing passing shots.

Sabatini feels confident that she can upset Graf and become the first athlete from her country in 36 years to win an Olympic gold medal.
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Old Sep 29th, 2013, 11:17 AM   #2951
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Re: Steffi Graf Admiration Thread Vol 2

I can imagine the pep talk Shriver gave to Garrison before the match: "Zina, she's shaky right now. She's tired. She's having a letdown. You're in top form, you can take her out. Just keep attacking her backhand, and she'll crack. You got this one." Oops.

Garrison's other oops was thinking improving her upper body strength would solve the problem. Her problem was that she was not getting her racket on the ball, ergo she needed to improve her speed/maneuverability and/or anticipation/reactions. Improved technique on her serve would have helped, too, and there is a lot of "leg action" in the better serves.

Olympics '88 - Seoul Summer Games - Graf has little trouble putting away Garrison
Houston Chronicle
Thursday, SEPTEMBER 29, 1988
FRAN BLINEBURY

SEOUL, South Korea - It's one thing to get trampled by a steamroller, but quite another to not even know what hit you.

"I don't think I ever saw the ball,'' said Zina Garrison.

Indeed, Steffi Graf barely gave her a chance, rocketing her usual barrage of forehands and a surprising mix of deft backhands to every corner of center court to make short work of their semifinal match 6-2, 6-0 in women's single tennis at the XXIVth Summer Olympics.

Graf needed just 45 minutes to run up six service breaks and send Garrison off to shake her head and utter vows of working harder.

The victory sends Graf, already the winner of the pro tennis Grand Slam this year, into the gold-medal match against the winner of Gabriela Sabatini of Argentina and Manuela Maleeva of Bulgaria. Garrison will receive a bronze medal.

But more importantly, perhaps, the quick KO will send Garrison into a more intensive training program, she said, in anticipation of her next meeting with the No. 1 ranked woman in the world.

"This is my profession, not just a match at the Olympics,'' Garrison said. "So I'm ready to go back home and work my butt off so I can hopefully do better the next time that I meet her.''

Garrison is now 1-3 lifetime against Graf and didn't stand much of a chance this time after an early service break gave Zina a brief 2-1 advantage in the first set.

But Graf broke right back, getting the set even again when Garrison double faulted and proceeded to run off the next 10 games to run out the match and amaze the crowd on a sunny, warm day at center court.

Some thought Graf might finally be ripe for an upset. She had lost her only set of the tournament in the previous round to the Soviet Union Larissa Savchenko and was even down a break 1-3 in the third set. But that match must simply have snapped Graf back to attention.

Garrison's chance to get back in the match came on the first game of the second set when she had Graf down 0-30 on her serve. But Garrison then put a backhand into the net, then sent a backhand return long of the baseline.

She still battled and had Graf at deuce twice. But Graf nailed a service winner to the left baseline and then, Garrison ended a long rally by letting a forehand fall low into the net. After that, it was just a matter of playing out the string.

"She hit the ball very well,'' said Garrison. "I thought I was playing pretty well at the beginning. But she was nervous and once she settled down and got her momentum, she just rolled.

"I was in some of the points, but the way she returned the ball made it difficult to stay with her.''

What made Graf especially difficult was a backhand that she hit with pace and accuracy, making her - if it's possible to consider in this year of success - even tougher to beat.

"I heard that Steffi was working on that (backhand) shot,'' Garrison said. "But I didn't know that she had done that much work and was having that kind of success.

"The thing is, the people who have been beating me lately, have been overpowering me. So I think I'm going to have to work on improving my upper body strength.''

Garrison still has work ahead of her here at the Olympics, where she and partner Pam Shriver will meet the Czech team of Helena Sukova and Jana Novotna for the doubles gold medal.

"I'm a team person anyway and to be able to pull together with Pam and win a gold medal would be great,'' Garrison said. "I've had a great time here staying in the village and meeting all the people. Now to get a gold in the doubles would top it off. It would also help me get off this loss a little better, too.''

Earlier, top-seeded Americans Ken Flach and Robert Seguso destroyed Czechoslovakia's Milan Srejber and Miloslav Mecir, 6-2, 6-4, 6-1 to reach the men's doubles final.

In the championship match, they will play Spain's Emilio Sanchez and Sergio Casal, the No. 2 seeds, who beat Sweden's Stefan Edberg and Anders Jarryd 6-4, 1-6, 6-3, 6-2.

Jarryd and Edberg and Srejber and Mecir, as losing semifinalists, get a bronze medal.
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Old Sep 29th, 2013, 11:18 AM   #2952
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Re: Steffi Graf Admiration Thread Vol 2

Steffi tells 'em who is going to win this gold medal...

Graf Blasts Garrison for Shot at Gold
USA TODAY
Thursday, September 29, 1988
JIM TERHUNE, Gannett News Service

SEOUL - It would have made an uplifting story, an Olympic story, the little girl rising from the park system of Houston, Texas, to hurl the stone that dropped the giant.

Zina Garrison broke Steffi Graf's serve to go ahead, 2-1, in the first set.

Could it happen? No. Hardly.

That was the last anyone saw of Garrison.

Graf played the rest of the way at the top of her game. Because the middle of her game is better than anyone else's, she won the last 11 games and squashed Garrison, 6-2, 6-0, in 46 minutes.

"I never even saw the ball," she said. "I played well in the beginning and she was nervous when she got there. But then she found her rhythm and just kept rolling."

The loss knocked the last American out of the women's singles Friday, but the explosive U.S. men's doubles tandem of Robert Seguso and Ken Flach moved into the gold medal match with a 6-2, 6-4, 6-1 win against Miroslav Mecir and Milan Srejber of Czechoslovakia. The American team is now 12-0 in sets.

"A lot of people around here don't realize what the Olympics is," Flach said. "I realize now that a gold medal would be the crowning achievement of my career."

On Saturday, Seguso-Flach will meet Spain's Sergio Casal and Emilio Sanchez, who stopped Swedes Anders Jarryd and Stefan Edberg, 6-4, 1-6, 6-3, 6-2, Friday. Seguso-Flach rallied to beat Casal-Sanchez after being down, 2-0, in sets in the 1987 Wimbledon final.

In the Garrison-Graf match, Graf wasn't just hitting everything back. She was sending them into Garrison's court out of a gun barrel. Especially her backhand.

"Suddenly my backhand was working incredibly," she said. "I've never played my backhand like this before."

Said Garrison: "I knew she had worked on that shot, but this was something else. She killed me from the baseline. When I came to the net, everything zipped past me and fell in."

Garrison won just 23 of 76 points. Even most of the points she rallied long and hard for ended with Graf's screaming passing shots.

The winner of the four Grand Slam tournaments in '88 ended the assault with three fiery forehands down the line or crosscourt on Garrison's serve before the American volleyed wide on match point.

All that's left for Graf to achieve the "Golden Slam," something that may be not only a first but a last in history, is Gabriela Sabatini of Argentina. But it is Sabatini who holds the only victories (two) over Graf this year. Graf has won 61 other matches and 39 in a row.

The Argentine beat Manuela Maleeva of Bulgaria, 6-1, 6-1, in the other semifinal.

"I see no big, close match," said Graf, aggressively confident now that she has finally been able to relax. "The court suits my game more than hers."

Garrison, meanwhile, is still hunting for gold. She and Pam Shriver are in the doubles final Friday against Jana Novotna and Helena Sukova of Czechoslovakia.

"This (gold) would be better," Garrison said. "I'm a team person. We lost to these people, 7-6, 7-6, in Montreal. To get beat like I did today, then for Pam and I to pull together and win it would be great."

With Tim Mayotte going for the men's singles title against Czechoslovakia's Miroslav Mecir here Friday, America still has shots at three of the four tennis golds.
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Old Sep 29th, 2013, 11:19 AM   #2953
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Re: Steffi Graf Admiration Thread Vol 2

MAYOTTE, MECIR GAIN FINAL
St. Paul Pioneer Press
Thursday, September 29, 1988
Andrew Warshaw, Associated Press

American Tim Mayotte and Czech Miloslav Mecir will play today for the men's singles title.

No. 2 seed Mayotte won a battle of Americans, beating Brad Gilbert 6-4, 6-4, 6-3. Mecir upset top-seeded Stefan Edberg of Sweden, the Wimbledon champion, 3-6, 6-0, 1-6, 6-4, 6-2.

Gilbert and Edberg each receives a bronze medal. "It's pretty shocking that I won a medal before Chris Evert," Gilbert said. "That's probably the most amazing thing of all time."

Meanwhile, West German Steffi swept to the edge of tennis' first "Golden Slam," with a 6-2, 6-0 rout of American Zina Garrison.

Graf, 19, is only the fifth player in history to achieve the Grand Slam. She moved closer to capping her season with an Olympic gold medal as she crushed Garrison in a one-sided semifinal.

Graf, who only just kept alive her Golden Slam hopes in the previous round when she struggled to beat Larissa Savchenko, was back to her best against Garrison, displaying a style that had been missing in recent matches and a backhand she called her best ever. Graf was brilliant, losing only lost 23 points in entire match and just 15 in the last 11 games. The match lasted a mere 46 minutes.

"I was playing great tennis," Graf said. "I'm very pleased, especially after the last couple of days when I did not play that well."

Garrison tried hard to mix up her game with a combination of serve-and-volley and backcourt tactics. She actually led 2-1 when she broke Graf in the third game with a well-timed lob. But it was the American's last success as Graf broke straight back, and didn't lose another game as her usually powerful forehand was joined by an equally lethal backhand.

''Suddenly, my backhand was working incredibly,'' she said. ''I've never played it like this before.''

Garrison wound up with a bronze medal.

Sabatini, the only player to beat Graf this season, also advanced easily to tomorrow's final with a 6-1, 6-1 victory over Manuela Maleeva of Bulgaria.

The championship match in Seoul comes three weeks after Graf beat Sabatini for the women's championship of the U.S. Open to become the first person since Margaret Court in 1970 to complete the Grand Slam in the same calendar year.

Graf said it would be great to complete the Golden Slam.

''If I do it, it would be great,'' she said. ''Everyone around me knows how important it is for me to get to the final. For myself, it was very important that I came through.''

Sabatini, aiming to win Argentina's first gold medal of the Games, hardly made an error and blasted Maleeva off the court with her powerful groundstrokes.

Sabatini was asked if a gold medal or a victory over Graf in a Grand Slam final was more important.

''Beating Steffi Graf is always important,'' she replied.

The run for the gold is what drew Graf, Garrison and many other athletes to the Olympics - there are no prizes or computer points to be gained.

''The Olympics . . . have inspired me to go out and try to play with a positive attitude,'' Tim Mayotte said.

''On the tour, sometimes you just get involved in the money, computer points and rankings. This is something totally different, a breath of fresh air,'' said Mayotte, whose career highlights include the semifinals at Wimbledon in 1982 and the Australian Open a year later.

But he said a gold medal would rank as ''the biggest prize I have played for thus far.''

Mecir said he placed the Olympics on a different plain from any of the Grand Slam tournaments.

''I feel something different at this event,'' Mecir said. ''You see other sportsmen fighting for a special place. You don't see that at other tournaments.''

Top-seeded Americans Ken Flach and Robert Seguso destroyed Czechs Mecir and Milan Srejber 6-2, 6-4, 6-1 to reach the men's doubles final against Spain's Emilio Sanchez and Sergio Casal, the No. 2 seeds, who beat Swedes Edberg and Anders Jarryd 6-4, 1-6, 6-3, 6-2.

Garrison and Pam Shriver of the U.S. reached the women's doubles final, beating Australia's Wendy Turnbull and Elizabeth Smylie 7-6, 6-4. Czechs Jana Novotna and Helena Sukova won their semifinal over West Germany's Graf and Claudia Kohde-Kilsch 7-5, 6-3.
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Old Sep 29th, 2013, 11:20 AM   #2954
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Re: Steffi Graf Admiration Thread Vol 2

Everyone --athlete, reporter, spectator-- is getting kinda punchy from the whole Olympic experience as the Games enter their final days. The reactions to this match have a dazzled-yet-mellow vibe, especially from the journalists who don't usually cover tennis.

GRAF, SUSHI PROVIDE BREAK POINT
THE SEATTLE TIMES
Thursday, September 29, 1988
BLAINE NEWNHAM

SEOUL - Baseball at the Olympic Games seems out of place. They sell smoked squid in the stands instead of Crackerjacks.

You know, "Take me out to the ballgame, buy me some peanuts and smoked squid . . .'' just doesn't work.

This is not a knock on concessions at the Olympic Games. King County should have sent a delegation here before giving us 10 more years of overpriced King Dogs.

Although you can buy potato chips, popcorn and the Koreans' idea of a hot dog, which I'm not able to stomach or describe, the overwhelming favorite at most stadiums is steamed noodles.

No wonder we're piling up a trade deficit. For 400 Korean won, about 55 cents, you're handed a bowl of dried noodles with a package of stuff so hot you're surprised police let it into the stadium. Or don't use it to quell student riots.

You fill your bowl with boiling water, from a tap at the end of the concession booth, sprinkle on the kimchi-flavored sauce, pull back the lid, duck, and quietly let it steep for three minutes.

Then, chopsticks in hand, you slurp the noodles and ultimately drink the broth. The Koreans wonder if you'll survive, red-faced and sweaty, but you do.

I've eaten noodles at Seoul Equestrian Park, the $85 million facility built for the Games that will be used as the Churchill Downs of Korea. And I've eaten noodles at boxing, swimming, baseball, track and field, and cycling. The standard fare for this Olympic Games.

It shouldn't have been surprising, however, that food would be different at the end of Olympic Park, where the tennis stadium sits not only apart, but looking as if it had been lifted straight out of Flushing Meadows in New York.

Tennis, even in the Olympic Games, and even in a crowded, confused city, remains above it all.

It was hard work sitting in the bright autumn sun, poking chopsticks into a box lunch of sushi, and watching Steffi Graf play some of the very best tennis of her life.

The Koreans, even more than usual, were dressed impeccably.

They know the game. Their sun visors and manners tell you they do.

There were guards to lock the doors to center court until the players were changing sides. Parents with noisy children were asked to remove them.

And the sushi, 15 little rice cakes filled with ham and "other things,'' was strangely elegant and appropriate, especially at $3 with dessert, chopsticks and wash cloth included.

Nothing, however, was better than Graf, the Teutonic terror who is one match away from adding the Olympic gold to the more negotiable kind she's won in the grand slam.

Already this year, the 19-year-old West German has won the French, U.S. and Australian opens and Wimbledon. But she might not have played better than she did here Wednesday, beating Zina Garrison of the United States 6-2, 6-0.

"This is tennis for all of us to gape at,'' said a British television commentator. "For one stretch today, it was the finest she has ever played.''

After losing two of the first three games, Graf won 11 in a row over Garrison, who previously hadn't lost a set here and had some momentum after beating Martina Navratilova in the quarterfinals of the U.S. Open.

"I never saw the ball,'' said Garrison, 25. "She did everything well. When I took the net, she really killed me. Everything was zipping past me and falling in, even the ones I thought were going out.''

The match impressed even Graf, who doesn't often get excited.

"Until now,'' she said, "I didn't feel I could play this well. I've never really gotten used to anything here. But today I was more relaxed and I was playing great tennis. I've never played my backhand like this before. It was incredible.''

Put the backhand with the most lethal forehand the game has known, and this was as magnificent a performance as you'll see, hard to compare with Florence Griffith-Joyner's world-record in the 200 meters, but you get the idea.

The women's tennis tournament at the Olympics is first rate. Of the world's top-ranked players, only Navratilova and Hana Mandlikova, ranked Nos. 2 and 7, are missing.

In the final, Graf today will battle fourth-ranked Gabriela Sabatini of Argentina, who yesterday dismantled Manuela Maleeva of Bulgaria 6-1, 6-1. Tim Mayotte of the U.S. will play Miloslav Mecir in the men's final.

Are the tennis pros enjoying their first whirl at the Olympics?

"It's hard to measure the importance of tennis in the Olympics,'' Mayotte said. "But the motivation here is a breath of fresh air. The Olympics are very special to me, and have inspired me to play well.

"In terms of a prize, certainly the gold medal is the biggest prize I have ever played for.''

Graf said the intensity of her play said how she valued the gold medal.

"For myself,'' she said, "it was very important. I tried everything for it.''

Although Garrison was overwhelmed and discouraged after the thrashing, there is no one who seems to be enjoying the Olympic experience more.

She grew up in a predominantly black neighborhood in Houston, playing on public courts and turning pro instead of going to college.

"I had no idea the Olympics was this much fun,'' Garrison said. "I'm enjoying it much more than I thought I would. I've never had a chance to be around other athletes before.''

It is her hope that the focus on tennis in the Olympics will reach beyond the fans who revere Wimbledon.

"In my neighborhood,'' she said, "the Olympics are far more important than Wimbledon. People don't really know tennis, but they know the Olympics.''

For the U.S. to get back on top in tennis, there are going to have to be more Zina Garrisons.

For the Kingdome to get up to speed, they're going to have to add blow-torch noodles.
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Old Sep 29th, 2013, 11:20 AM   #2955
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Re: Steffi Graf Admiration Thread Vol 2

Steffi Graf on Brink of Golden Slam
The Atlanta Journal and The Atlanta Constitution
Thursday, September 29, 1988
ED HINTON

SEOUL, South Korea - With easy might, Steffi Graf flicked the last American from women's singles tennis competition Thursday, and swept to the brink of an unprecedented "Golden Slam."

In a whirlwind 46 minutes, the 19-year-old West German overwhelmed Zina Garrison 6-2, 6-0, and now stands a match away from an Olympic gold medal to go with her Grand Slam in professional tennis this year.

Her opponent in Saturday's final will be Gabriela Sabatini of Argentina, whom Graf defeated earlier this month in the U.S. Open to complete the Grand Slam which also includes the Australian Open, French Open and Wimbledon.

Graf, at age 15, won the gold medal at Los Angeles in 1984, when tennis was a demonstration sport.

But winning the gold here would mean "a lot more to me than that time," she said. "This is part of the Olympics now. Los Angeles was a great experience for me, and one of my first big successes. But at that time it was not as integrated --it was not open to all tennis players."

Thursday, Graf found the top form that had eluded her in two previous matches here, winning the last 11 games by serving lightning, returning bullets and employing a backhand she herself termed "just incredible. I have never played my backhand like this before."

Garrison was succinct: "I never saw the ball."

"I was playing great tennis," Graf said. "I'm so happy with the way I won so easily, after playing so badly the last couple of days."

Why the sudden surge in her game?

"I have no idea," she said. "When I got here I just couldn't get used to everything. But today, I was more relaxed."

Garrison, who scrambled into a 2-1 lead in the first set before the rout took full force, observed that "I played well early and she was nervous when she got out there, but when she got her rhythm, she got rolling.

"I'd serve well and she'd have the ball by me before I even stepped," said Garrison. "She really killed me from the baseline. Even balls I thought were going long fell into the corners."

After her breeze, and even as Sabatini was in mid-match with Manuela Maleeva of Bulgaria, Graf said that "I would prefer to play Sabatini" in the final because "this court is suiting my game better than hers. You have to run a lot."

Sabatini also advanced easily, beating Maleeva 6-1, 6-1.

Garrison mixed up her game with a combination of serve-and-volley and backcourt tactics, and it worked early as she broke Graf for the 2-1 lead.

Then her mixed bag began to shred at the hands of Graf, but "you can't get away from your strategy just because you're getting killed."

Graf is the first woman since Margaret Court in 1970 to complete the Grand Slam in the same calendar year. And because tennis was dropped as an Olympic medal sport from 1924 until now, no one, male or female, has ever won the both the Grand Slam and an Olympic gold medal in the same year.

"If I could do it," Graf said softly in English, "it would be great."

Garrison, who did take a bronze medal in singles, remains in the tournament in doubles, with a chance at gold. She and Pam Shriver will team in Friday's final.

"To get beat the way I got beat today, it would be great to win something," Garrison said.
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