Australian Open 2009: Andrew's reports (quarter-final TV-report added) - TennisForum.com
TennisForum.com   Wagerline.com MensTennisForums.com TennisUniverse.com
TennisForum.com is the premier Women's Tennis forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.Please Register - It's Free!
Reply

Old Feb 22nd, 2009, 09:05 PM   #1
country flag andrewbroad
Team WTAworld
Senior Member
 
andrewbroad's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: England
Posts: 6,963
andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute
Australian Open 2009: Andrew's reports (quarter-final TV-report added)

===============
AUSTRALIAN OPEN (Melbourne, Australia; outdoor hard (Plexicushion); Major)
=============== http://www.australianopen.com/
Contents
--------

1. Photos
2. First-round result
3. Second-round result
4. Third-round review: Bartoli v Šafářová

---------
1. Photos
---------

Various players including Marion:
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/2/photogallery/
http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/7846259.stm

---------------------
2. First-round result (Monday 19th January 2009)
---------------------

+ MARION BARTOLI [16,DF,S] d. Melanie South, 6-2 6-4

----------------------
3. Second-round result (Wednesday 21st January 2009)
----------------------

+ MARION BARTOLI [16,DF,S] d. Tsvetana Pironkova [DF], 7-5 6-2

-----------------------------------------
4. Third-round review: Bartoli v Šafářová (Friday 23rd January 2009)
-----------------------------------------

+ MARION BARTOLI [16,DF,S] d. Lucie Šafářová [EF], 3-6 6-2 6-1

The match was third on Margaret Court arena, so it would have taken place in the Australian Open late afternoon, while I was sleeping in England.

Lucie led 6-3 *2-0, then lost 12 of the last 13 games.


4.1 Statistics
--------------

Lucie dominated the match with winners and unforced errors, compiling a mildly negative W:UE ratio of 32:36 (16:8 for the first set, and 16:28 for the second and third combined). Marion's W:UE ratio was 16:17 (5:9 + 9:6 + 2:2).

Lucie got 63% of her first serves in, winning 57% of the points when she did so, and 28% on second serve - those are disappointing winning-percentages, and her second-serve winning-percentage in particular dipped alarmingly from set to set: from 45% to 20% to 13%.

The corresponding percentages for Marion were 59%, 67% and 44%. After winning a disastrous 10% of points on second serve in the first set, it was in the 60s in the next two, while her percentages of first serves in and points won troughed at (44%, 55%) for the second set, and peaked at (80%, 83%) for the third.

While Lucie pipped Marion to the fastest serve (107-106 mph), Marion's serves were considerably faster than Lucie's on average: first serve 101-95 mph, second serve 83-80 mph.

Lucie served 10 double faults and just one ace, while Marion served two of each.

Lucie broke 4 times from 5 BPs, but gave Marion too many BPs on her own serve: Marion converted 7 of 13. Lucie won the first set by three breaks to one, but lost the second by three breaks to one, and the third by three breaks to none. Lucie only had one BP after the first set: the one she converted in the second.

Lucie won 9 of 17 points at the net (53%), Marion 6 of 9 (67%). After winning 6 of 8 points at the net in the first set, Lucie won just 2 of 7 in the second set, and just 1 of 2 in the third.

In points, Marion won 80-64 (first set 24-34, second set 32-21, third set 24-9).


4.2 Articles
------------

Bartoli advances to meet Janković
By Bronwen Largier (www.australianopen.com)
>>>
Marion Bartoli is set to make her first fourth-round appearance at the Australian Open after overpowering Lucie Šafářová in three sets on Friday.

The Frenchwoman won the match 3-6 6-2 6-1 in an hour and 42 minutes.

Šafářová started the match well, breaking Bartoli's serve in the first game, and displaying a powerful crosscourt backhand and good ball-placement.

Bartoli got a break at 3-2, but Šafářová returned the favour in the next game to lead 4-3. Šafářová broke a third time as Bartoli served to stay in the set.

Šafářová's good form looked to continue when she broke Bartoli a fourth time early in the second set, but her game began to fall apart as her number of unforced errors sky-rocketed and her winners dried up.

Šafářová's unfortunate habit of double-faulting at crucial points in the match, combined with the Frenchwoman's consistency, gave Bartoli the opportunity to take control. After dropping her first service-game in the second set, Bartoli won the next eight games straight to take the second set and shoot a 2-0 lead in the third.

The Czech rediscovered the form that won her the first set, winning her serve at 2-0 in the third without dropping a point, but her resurgence was brief.

Bartoli ran away with the rest of the set, taking her sixth and seventh breaks off Šafářová to close out the final set in just 27 minutes.

Bartoli will play Jelena Janković in the round of 16, after the Serbian top seed defeated Ai Sugiyama of Japan 6-4 6-4 on Friday afternoon.

Quick facts:

* Šafářová served 10 costly double faults to Bartoli's two.

* The Czech had 36 unforced errors, while Bartoli recorded just 17.

* Šafářová had double the number of winners: 32-16.

* Bartoli converted seven of her 13 break-point chances (54%), while Šafářová was 4 for 5 (80%).
<<<

Lucie out in singles (Janine, www.lucie-safarova.com)
>>>
Lucie lost her singles-match today against Marion Bartoli: 6-3 2-6 1-6. Lucka started really good until 6-3 2-0, but then she started to do a few more unforced errors, and Marion got stronger.

Comments:
* Sean: "I saw the match. Lucie played incredible to go up 6-3 *2-0, and then Lucie couldn't get a ball in the court."
<<<

--
Dr. Andrew Broad
__________________
My Eternal Fanship: 1. Monica Seles; 2. Мария Шарапова (‘Maria Sharapova’); 3. Daniela Hantuchová; 4. Jelena Dokić; 5. Iva Majoli; 6. Karina Habšudová; 7. Вера Звонарёва (‘Vera Zvonarëva’); 8. Nicole Vaidišová; 9. Анна Чакветадзе (‘Anna Chakvetadze’); 10. Lucie Šafářová; 11. Ирода Туляганова (‘Iroda Tulyaganova’); 12. Magdaléna Rybáriková; 13. Sabine Lisicki

Last edited by andrewbroad : Feb 8th, 2010 at 12:51 AM. Reason: edit Title
andrewbroad is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 

Old Feb 23rd, 2009, 05:45 AM   #2
country flag Charlieflip
-LIFETIME MEMBER-
 
Charlieflip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 317
Charlieflip is a name known to all Charlieflip is a name known to all Charlieflip is a name known to all Charlieflip is a name known to all Charlieflip is a name known to all Charlieflip is a name known to all Charlieflip is a name known to all Charlieflip is a name known to all Charlieflip is a name known to all Charlieflip is a name known to all Charlieflip is a name known to all
Re: Australian Open 2009: Andrew's reports (3r added; 4r + qf coming soon)

thanks for this!!!
__________________
I host a site where I post valueful insight and bets on WTA where I aim to help you pick winners for matches. http://predictorflip.wordpress.com/


Ivanovic|Cornet|Bartoli|Radwanska|Hantuchova
Charlieflip is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 28th, 2009, 11:14 PM   #3
country flag andrewbroad
Team WTAworld
Senior Member
 
andrewbroad's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: England
Posts: 6,963
andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute
Andrew's fourth-round report

===============
AUSTRALIAN OPEN (Melbourne, Australia; outdoor hard (Plexicushion); Major)
=============== http://www.australianopen.com/
Contents
--------

1. Photos
2. Fourth-round review: Bartoli v Janković

---------
1. Photos
---------

Various players from Sunday, including Marion Bartoli:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/7849577.stm
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/ten...Day-seven.html

------------------------------------------
2. Fourth-round review: Bartoli v Janković (Sunday 25th January 2009)
------------------------------------------

+ MARION BARTOLI [16,DF,S] d. JELENA JANKOVIĆ [1], 6-1 6-4

I saw Marion's match-point on a BBC Sports News round-up (on Freeview-channel 302): she forced a short ball from Janković, and hit a beautiful, early, two-handed off-forehand winner.


2.1 Articles
------------

Marion's Melbourne Blog
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/1...ContentID=2896
>>>
[Friday 23rd January 2009]

It was difficult, but my match with Lucie Šafářová ended up being really great. She was playing really, really well at the beginning, and was even up 6-3 2-0, but I was able to come back and win. I'm so happy about it.

It was also really exciting to have so much support in the crowd - not just the French fans, but also Australians. When Lucie was hitting lines, they were cheering for me, and it helped me to keep fighting. I started playing better after the first few games of the second set, and when I got that set in my pocket, it got even better.

It's my first time in the fourth round in Australia, which is so exciting for me - I've never played so well here! Next match I have Jelena Janković: the No.1 player in the world, so that'll be a real challenge, obviously!

Right now, I'm so tired. I feel like I need to rest a lot before my next match. I'm going to take tomorrow completely off. <snip>

Marion

[Sunday 25th January 2009]

As you may have heard, I beat Jelena Janković today. I just came from an hour and a half of press, and I still have another interview to go: with a French newspaper. So by the end of it all, it'll be two hours of press, which is a record for me! It's about 3pm now, and I haven't had anything to eat since I had breakfast at 6am! But I'm hanging tough >

I've already said I never played this well in Australia, but it just gets better and better. The other day, when I was down 6-3 2-0, I didn't know if I would still be here today. Lucie was hitting the lines and giving me no chance at all - she was too good. But I began to focus even harder and fought as hard as I could, and I was able to raise my game and win. I think I continued that today. It felt like everything I did was going in and I hit lots of winners too. I'm even prouder because it was the first time I ever played on Rod Laver Arena - I'm so happy to have put on this kind of performance for the Australian fans. I'm so, so happy.

After the match, Jelena's coach came and congratulated me, saying I played really well and made it hard for Jelena to do anything. It was a really nice gesture! I haven't spoken to Jelena since the match, mainly because both of us have been doing so many interviews! But we'll talk soon I'm sure.

<snip>

Tonight and tomorrow I'll rest again, because the matches are only going to get tougher and tougher. I'm playing Zvonarëva or Petrova, who are both so tough. Vera is more consistent - it feels like she only makes one unforced error per match. Nadia's shots are probably harder, but she can make more errors. But it doesn't matter who I play; I'll have to put in a really good performance.

<snip>

Marion
<<<

World No.1 Janković Falls To Bartoli; Safina Survives
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/1...ContentID=2921
>>>
For just the third time in the Open Era, the top seed at the Australian Open fell before the quarter-finals, as Jelena Janković was bundled out in the fourth round by No.16 seed Marion Bartoli.

It wasn't so much Janković's playing that caused the 6-1 6-4 defeat - after all, she had more winners than unforced errors in the match, even in the lopsided first set. Bartoli was in the zone, firing 34 winners to just 20 errors, and completely dictating play from beginning to end. Things got a bit tighter in the second set as Janković pulled even at 4-4, holding several points to go ahead 5-4; but the Frenchwoman muscled herself back into the lead with her two-fisted returns, breaking for 5-4, then gloriously serving it out with a series of huge serves, and a forehand down the line winner to finish it off.

"I think I just played just a great match," Bartoli said. "I hung in there when it was time to hang in there. I went for my shots when I needed to go for my shots. I returned well. I was not overwhelmed by the situation, and it felt like everything went in today. It was a great match. I'm so happy with how everything went."

Bartoli's run at the 2009 Australian Open is reminiscent of her run to the final of 2007 Wimbledon, not only because it is an unlikely run on paper - she was the No.18 seed at the All-England Club that year - but because she took out the world No.1 there too, stunning Justine Henin in the semi-finals. Coincidentally, she beat a No.3-ranked Janković in the fourth round there, albeit it was a far closer match.

In her third round here, Bartoli was down and out against Lucie Šafárová, rallying from 3-6 0-2 down to win 3-6 6-2 6-1. The player that showed up against Janković was definitely the player who won 12 of the last 13 games against Šafárová.

"I was confident today because I played really well in my last match," Bartoli said. "I knew I could beat Jelena on a good day - it was just a matter of executing it, playing the right shots at the right times and not making too many mistakes."

Janković, who was trying to claim her first Major singles-title, is the third Australian Open top seed in the Open Era to fall before the quarters, after Virginia Ruzici (who fell in the first round in 1979) and Steffi Graf (who fell in the fourth round in 1997). It was the Serb's fourth loss in seven meetings against Bartoli.

"All the credit to her - it was her day," a gracious Janković said. "It's obviously disappointing. Nobody likes to lose. I had a lot of opportunities in the second set to come back, but just didn't do what I was supposed to. I had some chances in the first set even, but let my opponent get on top of me and play her game. She played really well and went for her shots. She even played first and second serves the same. She hit whatever she could. She knew what she had to do."

Bartoli will next face No.7 seed Vera Zvonarëva, who edged No.10 seed Nadia Petrova, 7-5 6-4. Zvonarëva had been 1:5 against Petrova going in, including losing their last four meetings in straight sets. Zvonarëva will have a different outlook going in this time, having a 6:1 head-to-head edge against Bartoli.

"The last time I played her, I lost 6-0 6-1, so I hope to do better this time!" Bartoli told the Rod Laver Arena crowd during an on-court interview after her win.
<<<

Top-seeded Janković beaten in 4th round (AP)
>>>
Top-seeded Jelena Janković is out of the Australian Open, beaten in straight sets by 2007 Wimbledon runner-up Marion Bartoli of France.

Bartoli beat the Serbian star 6-1 6-4 in the opening match on Sunday at Rod Laver Arena. Janković lost last year's US Open final to Serena Williams, and has never won a Major title.

In the second set, Bartoli went ahead 5-4 on a service-break, then held to win the match with a forehand winner.

The 24-year-old Bartoli lost to Venus Williams at Wimbledon two years ago, and has never advanced past the second round in seven previous trips to Melbourne Park.

"I tried to not think about it for the whole match," Bartoli said of a possible upset of the No.1-ranked player.

"This is my first time playing in Rod Laver Arena. I think I just played amazingly today, and I'm so glad to put on a good performance."
<<<

Janković bundled out of Open by Bartoli (Reuters)
By Greg Stutchbury (editing by Alastair Himmer)
>>>
Top seed Jelena Janković was knocked out of the Australian Open by an inspired Marion Bartoli in the fourth round on Sunday.

The Frenchwoman capitalised on the Serbian's shaky serve, blasting winners at every opportunity before ending the world number-one's misery 6-1 6-4 in just 82 minutes.

The unconventional Bartoli, who, despite being right-handed, plays two-handed off both sides, had not advanced beyond the Australian Open second round in seven previous attempts.

The 16th seed set up a quarter-final against Russian Vera Zvonarëva.

"I was really confident, because I played really well my last match against [Lucie] Šafářová," the 24-year-old Bartoli told reporters.

"I knew I could beat Jelena on a good day, it was just a matter of executing, you know: play the right shot at the right time, and don't make too many mistakes.

"But I was not overwhelmed by the situation, and I just went for my shots, and everything went in today. It was just a great match."

DELICATE DROP

Bartoli, hitting winners from both sides off the baseline, won the first five games of the match, clinching the first set with a delicate drop-push that left Janković wafting at thin air.

The Serb won just 13 points on her own serve in the first set, but losing the set seemed to wake Janković up, although both players struggled with their serve in the second: each breaking the other twice in the first eight games.

Bartoli hung tough, however, securing her fifth break of the match, and booking her place in the quarter-finals after rifling a crosscourt backhand winner past a deflated Janković.

"It's obviously disappointing. Nobody likes to lose," said Janković. "Today was a tough day for me. I let my opponent completely come on top of me and play her game.

"I had a slow start. I gave her a lot of confidence throughout the match, and then in the second set, I also had a lot of opportunities to come back and try to get in the game somehow.

"She was the better one, and all the credit. She went for all her shots and hit whatever she could. She knew that she had to do that in order to win, and it was her day."
<<<

Janković blames loss on lack of preparation (Reuters)
By Greg Stutchbury (Editing by Alastair Himmer)
>>>
World number-one Jelena Janković lamented her lack of preparation as a factor in her Australian Open fourth-round loss to Marion Bartoli on Sunday.

The 6-1 6-4 defeat cemented the worst performance by a women's top seed at the year's first Major since Germany's Steffi Graf lost at the same stage to South Africa's Amanda Coetzer in 1997.

"I haven't played for a while. For two months, I didn't compete. I was supposed to play an exhibition in Hong Kong," the 23-year-old Janković told reporters.

"Unfortunately, me and my mother, we got sick, so it was very hard when I couldn't play some matches over there, which I wanted: just to feel the atmosphere, get the rhythm on the court.

"I'm this kind of a player who needs a little bit of time to get used to it, to get the routine playing matches and get the confidence.

"Then I feel that I can do whatever I want on the court. At the moment, I'm still not there."

Janković added: "I'm still finding my range, to get that confidence when I'm playing. Today, I just couldn't find it."

An aggressive Bartoli capitalised on the Serbian's inconsistent serve, blasting winners at every opportunity.

"My opponent was really on fire today, and she was hitting everything and really went for her shots," said Janković. "Most of those were going in. It was tough.

"I couldn't do my own thing. I just couldn't do what I needed to do. My shots were not where I wanted to be."

Janković, who has yet to win a Major, will lose the world's top ranking at the end of the tournament if Serena Williams or Elena Dementieva make the final.

"I really enjoy being the number-one, and I proved that at the end of last year when I won three tournaments in a row," she said.

"You know, it doesn't matter, because it's just the beginning of the year, and there are many more tournaments to play.

"So maybe it will change - the number-one ranking - but it's not important what you do now; it's the whole year ahead of us.

"[There are] a lot of tournaments, a lot of battles out there. You know, the best one will finish it. I think, at least for me, the most important thing is how you finish - not how you begin."
<<<

Revitalised Bartoli delighted with victory over Janković (Reuters)
By Greg Stutchbury (editing by John O'Brien)
>>>
Marion Bartoli vanquished the memories of last year's debilitating illness with a comprehensive demolition of world number-one Jelena Janković in the Australian Open on Sunday.

The 24-year-old Frenchwoman blasted winners from the baseline, and chased down everything the Serbian top seed threw at her to advance to the quarter-finals with the 6-1 6-4 victory.

"I was struggling with my health for the first six months of the year. I was just not able to practise as I should to be ready to play some tennis at the pro level," Bartoli told reporters.

"Some days, I was staying three days in a row inside my room at home, or even in the hotel-room when I was on the Tour.

"There is no way - even if I'm tough mentally - to win some matches like that.

"I think I had a great run to finish inside the top 20, which [in] half of the season was quite an achievement."

The victory for Bartoli - who had not advanced beyond the Australian Open second round in seven previous attempts - came two weeks after she made the final at the Brisbane International, and she said an off-season training-programme was paying dividends.

"At the end of last year, I was playing well, but having this little problem to win some tough matches in a row, and be able to go day in and day out and be strong physically," the 16th seed said.

"I was fit, but not strong enough. I really put in hard work during the off-season, and today it showed."

Bartoli had won her last three matches against Janković to amass a 3:3 career record against the Serb, and the surprise Wimbledon 2007 finalist said she had nothing to fear.

"When I step on the court, no matter who is my opponent on the other side of the net, I really feel I have some chances to win.

"I was not overwhelmed by the situation, and I just went for my shots and everything went in."

Bartoli who modelled her two-handed shotmaking off both sides after Monica Seles, said the victory against Janković meant little other than advancing to the quarter-final against Russia's Vera Zvonarëva.

"[It] doesn't mean I'm going to win the tournament.

"It's not working like that. There are some really tough players left into the draw, and I just hope to be able to achieve the same kind of matches in the quarter-final, and maybe I will go all the way."
<<<

Relieved Federer through, Janković falls at Open (Reuters)
By Ossian Shine (editing by Alan Baldwin)
>>>
A roar of relief marked Roger Federer's comeback from two sets down at the Australian Open on Sunday, while women's world number-one Jelena Janković was mute and ineffectual in a fourth-round defeat.

There were no good signs for Janković, who was blown off court by French typhoon Marion Bartoli: 6-1 6-4.

"When I'm on the top of my game, it's very hard to beat me, because you really have to kind of spill blood if you want to win the match," Janković mused afterwards.

"But at the moment, I'm not there yet. I still need to get better, to improve, be much, much tougher out there. Nobody likes to lose. Today was a tough day for me."

Janković's tough day was a jubilant one for Bartoli.

"I knew I could beat Jelena on a good day - it was just a matter of executing," she told reporters.

Bartoli next plays Vera Zvonarëva, after the seventh seed beat her 10th-seeded fellow Russian Nadia Petrova 7-5 6-4.
<<<

Bartoli bounces top-seeded Janković in straight sets (PA SportsTicker)
>>>
Top seed and world No.1 Jelena Janković was knocked out of the Australian Open after Marion Bartoli won their fourth-round encounter in straight sets: 6-1 6-4 on Sunday.

Janković's exit paves the way for the three players ranked immediately below her to take the coveted top spot.

If one of Serena Williams, Dinara Safina or Elena Dementieva wins the tournament, she will take the top spot. But with Safina having fewer ranking-points to defend, she has a chance to claim the top ranking even if she only reaches the semi-finals. Williams and Dementieva must reach the final in order to stand a chance of becoming world number-one.

But Janković is unconcerned.

"It doesn't matter, because it's just the beginning of the year and there are many more tournaments to play," the Serb said.

"Maybe it will change, but it's not important what you do now; there's the whole year ahead of us - a lot of tournaments, a lot of battles, so the best one will finish top. For me, the most important thing is how you finish - not how you begin."

Janković certainly didn't begin her match in the Rod Laver Arena well, going 0-5 down before she survived two set-points to finally get on the board.

It was a temporary reprieve, however, as Bartoli, the 16th seed, closed out the set in just 31 minutes.

The world No.1 improved in the second set, holding her serve in the first game, but she was broken again when she double-faulted in the third.

Bartoli broke her again in the seventh game to take a 4-3 lead, and although Janković broke back, she could not hold her own serve.

Bartoli then had the chance to serve for the match, which she did.

"Nobody likes to lose; today was a tough day for me," admitted Janković. "I had a slow start, and I let my opponent completely get on top of me and play her game.

"But she was the better one, and all credit to her. She played really well, went for all her shots."

Bartoli has now beaten Janković in their last three encounters for a 4-3 lead in head-to-head meetings.

"I was really confident, because I played really well in my last match against [Lucie] Šafářová," Bartoli said. "I knew I could beat Jelena on a good day - it was just a matter of executing it: play the right shot at the right time, and not make too many mistakes.

"But I was not overwhelmed by the situation, and I just went for my shots, and everything went in today. It was just a great match."

Seventh seed Vera Zvonarëva will play Bartoli in the quarter-finals after defeating fellow Russian Nadia Petrova 7-5 6-4.
<<<

Top seed Janković crashes out of Australian Open (AFP)
>>>
World number-one Jelena Janković has crashed out of the Australian Open with a humiliating 6-1 6-4 loss to French 16th seed Marion Bartoli for the biggest upset of the tournament so far. [I consider Carla Suárez Navarro's victory over Venus Williams to be a much bigger upset.]

The top seed made a dismal start in her fourth-round match against the fired-up Frenchwoman, finally calling on her renowned fighting qualities too late into the match.

The loss extends Janković's Major drought, and marked Bartoli's best performance at a Major since she reached the Wimbledon-final in 2007.

"I knew Jelena would fight. The last set was really hard for me, but I tried to hang tough and play my game," Bartoli said.

"I played my shots and served so well. I'm just so happy."

Bartoli broke Janković in the second game, then prevented the Serb breaking back twice in the next to race to a 3-0 lead.

The statistics in the first 10 minutes demonstrated Bartoli's dominance: she hit seven winners while Janković could not manage one, and committed a single unforced error to the Serb's four.

Janković looked lethargic as she tried to play her way into the match, constantly casting frustrated glances towards coach Ricardo Sánchez in the player's box.

In contrast, Bartoli was bouncing on her toes between points, and chased down everything Janković sent her way, returning the world number-one's groundstrokes with interest.

The Frenchwomen treated Janković's serve with distain, going up another break in the fourth.

Only some desperate scrambling prevented Bartoli from completing a humiliating clean sweep of the first set, with Janković finally getting on the board after 27 minutes.

It was a temporary reprieve, and Bartoli outfoxed her opponent with a delicately-hit dropshot four minutes later to take the first set.

The Serb's fightback did not begin until the fourth game of the second set, when she broke Bartoli's serve for the first time in the match.

Her opponent cancelled out the advantage in the next, with the pair again exchanging breaks in the seven and eighth games.

Bartoli maintained the pressure, and the ninth game went to deuce six times as she pressed for a decisive break to complete the rout.

She achieved it when Janković netted a backhand return, earning the chance to serve out the match.

The Frenchwoman double-faulted on her first match-point, but sealed the win with a crosscourt volley, raising her arms in victory.
<<<

Janković crashes out as tournament blown wide open (AFP)
>>>
The Australian Open was blown wide open when top seed Jelena Janković crashed out, joining Ana Ivanović and Venus Williams as high-profile early-round casualties.

They were nearly joined by Russian third seed Dinara Safina, who survived two match-points to claw back and beat France's Alizé Cornet 6-2 2-6 7-5.

Janković was crushed by French 16th seed Marion Bartoli 6-1 6-4, giving more ammunition to critics who believe she doesn't deserve the world number-one ranking having never won a Major.

With Ivanović and Williams already gone, the first Major of the season has become one of the most open ever, with Bartoli into a quarter-final against either Russia's Nadia Petrova or Vera Zvonarëva.

"It's obviously disappointing. Nobody likes to lose," said Janković, who looked lethargic as she tried to play her way into the match.

"It was a tough day for me. You know, I had a slow start. I let my opponent completely come on top of me and play her game."

She is now likely to lose her top ranking, but insisted it was not important.

"It doesn't matter, because it's just the beginning of the year, and there is [sic] many more tournaments to play," she said.

"So, you know, maybe it will change - the number-one ranking - but it's not important what you do now - it's the whole year ahead of us."

Bartoli was ecstatic at the upset, but said she always felt she could win.

"I was really confident, because I played really well in my last match against Lucie Šafářová," said the Frenchwoman, who made the Wimbledon-final in 2007, where she was beaten by Venus Williams.

"I knew I could beat Jelena on a good day. It was just a matter of executing it, you know: playing the right shot at the right time, and not making too many mistakes.

"I'm just pleased about everything."
<<<

Superb Bartoli dumps out Janković (BBC Sport)
http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/7849574.stm
>>>
Top seed Jelena Janković crashed out of the Australian Open after a stunning performance from French 16th seed Marion Bartoli, who won 6-1 6-4.

Bartoli took the first five games of the match to leave the Serbian reeling.

Janković looked dismally out of sorts despite a brief resurgence in the second set, and Bartoli reached the quarter-finals with surprising ease.

Bartoli showed incredible movement and determination to destroy Janković's chances of a second appearance in the Australian Open's last eight.

The French 24-year-old has never previously made it past the second round of the tournament, but she feasted on Janković's uncertain second serve in a one-sided encounter on the Rod Laver Arena.

Bartoli broke five times as the Serbian, 23, battled both her own inconsistency and the glare of the Melbourne-sun.

Janković's second set was a vast improvement on the first, but her game continued to exhibit unforgivable unforced errors.

When Bartoli eventually broke again in a testing ninth game of the second set, the last vestiges of Janković's resistance crumbled.

"I tried not to think about Jelena being the world number-one for the whole match," said Bartoli.

"I think I just played amazingly today, and I'm so happy to put on a good performance.

"I knew Jelena would fight, and the last set was really tough for me, but I tried to play my game, and I served so well in the last game."

Janković, meanwhile, said she had become "lost in the match" and allowed Bartoli to dominate.

"I let her hit all the shots that she wanted to. I let her play her game," said Janković.

"I didn't do what I was supposed to do, and I couldn't get my rhythm out there.

"She hit whatever she could. Her goal was just to get the first strike and go for it, because she knew [that] if I got in the point, she'd be in trouble."
<<<

Top seed Jelena Janković knocked out of Australian Open by Marion Bartoli
By Mark Hodgkinson in Melbourne (The Daily Telegraph - UK)
>>>
Top seed and world No 1 Jelena Janković has been knocked out of the Australian Open after Marion Bartoli won their fourth-round encounter in straight sets: 6-1 6-4.

There are few players on the women's circuit who are as quirky or as kooky as Bartoli: the Frenchwoman whose groundstrokes and service-action are never going to earn her any style-points at Melbourne Park. But Bartoli's unconventional tennis can be wonderfully effective, and her defeat of Janković was a result that demonstrated that players don't have to be slaves to the coaching-manual orthodoxy.

Many of the competitors in the women's game seem to have come off an Eastern-Bloc-and-Nick-Bollettieri production-line: all with the same, honed groundstrokes. Bartoli is refreshingly different, playing with a style that you are unlikely to find in a coaching-textbook near you: her serve is jerky and just plain weird, and her arms look cramped when she hits her double-handed forehands and backhands.

This wasn't even the first time that Mademoiselle Bizarre had embarrassed a world No.1 at a Major tournament, as she beat Justine Henin of Belgium in the semi-finals of the 2007 Wimbledon Championships, going on to finish as the runner-up that summer to Venus Williams. Here she was again, taking centre-stage at Melbourne Park.

"I'm just happy to be on the Rod Laver Arena, because I usually play so badly at the Australian Open that I'm on Court 21," Bartoli said after a 6-1 6-4 victory that took her into the quarter-finals of the Australian Open for the first time.

Janković had wanted to show at Melbourne Park that she deserved to have the top ranking by winning her first Major title, and she had prepared during the close-season by scrambling over rocks on endurance-runs in the Mexican mountains. She believed that, after the altitude-training and a new sense of purpose off the court, she was in the best shape of her tennis-life.

However, she had to withdraw from a semi-serious exhibition-tournament in Hong Kong because of illness, and so came into Melbourne Park without any form to go on. Janković has always tended to take a while to find her range and her rhythm at the start of the year, so she was vulnerable to defeat against Bartoli, especially when the Frenchwoman decided to go for her shots.

It was the earliest defeat for a women's top seed at Melbourne Park since Steffi Graf lost in the fourth round of the 1997 tournament to South Africa's Amanda Coetzer.
<<<

Bartoli Blasts Janković Out Of Oz (Tennis Week)
>>>
Jelena Janković buried her face in her hands as if seeking shelter from the break-point barrage she faced, but her palms proved to be only a temporary reprieve.

The top-seeded Serbian arrived in Melbourne seeking her first Major title, but an ambitious two-handed terror named Marion Bartoli blasted Janković right out of Rod Laver Arena with today's 6-1 6-4 Australian Open fourth-round victory.

"It was my first time in Rod Laver Arena, and I just played amazingly," Bartoli said. "I'm so happy to put on a good performance."

The 24-year-old Bartoli had not surpassed the second round in seven previous appearances at the Melbourne Major; now she is one win removed from the final four. Bartoli will play either seventh-seeded Vera Zvonarëva or 10th-seeded Nadia Petrova in the quarter-finals.

Cracking crosscourt shots off her compact swings, Bartoli's sharp timing and ability to take the ball early were evident in the first set as she whipped 15 winners compared to five for Janković to roll to a 5-0 lead and eventually seize the opening set in 31 minutes.

The 16th-seeded Frenchwoman kept creeping inside the baseline to rip returns on the rise with such depth and accuracy, Janković was sometimes just completing her service-motion only to see the reply speed by.

Janković, who had trouble reading the shots off Bartoli's racquet, faced a series of break-points in the ninth game of the second set.

Stepping into the court to attack Janković's second serve, Bartoli broke for a 5-4 lead when a Janković backhand caught the top of the tape.

The former Wimbledon-finalist smacked a service-winner down the middle to earn triple match-point. She double-faulted going for an ace on a second serve on her first break-point before firing a forehand winner down the line to seal the victory.

It was Bartoli's third straight win over Janković, and it marked the second time Bartoli has beaten Janković in the fourth round of a Major: she scored a 3-6 7-5 6-3 victory en route to the 2007 Wimbledon-final.
<<<

Jelena Janković bundled out of Australian Open by Marion Bartoli (Fox Sports / AAP)
>>>
Top seed Jelena Janković has been knocked out in the fourth round of the Australian Open in straight sets by Frenchwoman Marion Bartoli.

World No.1 Janković - a losing semi-finalist at Melbourne Park last year, who is still chasing her first Major title - was beaten 6-1 6-4 in one hour and 22 minutes by the No.16 seed.

Bartoli's career-highlight to date was reaching the final of Wimbledon in 2007, before eventually going down to Venus Williams.

She dominated the first set of the encounter on Rod Laver Arena, and held her nerve in the second.

The crucial moment came in the ninth game of the second set, which Bartoli eventually won on her fourth break-point.

She then served out the match for one of the biggest wins of her career.

Bartoli hit an an impressive tally of 34 winners in the two-set match, compared to just 17 from Janković.

"It's obviously disappointing. Nobody likes to lose," said Janković, who looked lethargic as she tried to play her way into the match.

"It was a tough day for me. You know, I had a slow start. I let my opponent completely come on top of me and play her game."

She is now likely to lose her top ranking, but insisted it was not important.

"It doesn't matter, because it's just the beginning of the year, and there is many more tournaments to play," she said.

"So, you know, maybe it will change - the No.1 ranking - but it's not important what you do now - it's the whole year ahead of us."

With Ana Ivanović and Venus Williams already gone, the first Major of the season has become one of the most open ever, with Bartoli into a quarter-final against Russia's Vera Zvonarëva.

Seventh seed Zvonarëva advanced to quarter-finals after winning an all-Russian clash with 10th seed Nadia Petrova: 7-5 6-4.
<<<

Janković's lofty ranking fails to compute (Leo Schlink, Fox Sports)
>>>
The WTA Tour's computer never lies.

Jelena Janković is No.1 in the world for a reason - but it's patently clear that it's not because the haughty Serb is the best player on the planet.

Her deflating 6-1 6-4 Australian Open defeat was the 22nd Major that Janković has contested and failed to win. The closest she has come to sealing acclaim as a genuine topliner was during a tight US Open final in September.

Janković won a swag of matches - 65 - last season, but none were in a Major final.

By the end of this tournament, Janković's grip on the No.1 ranking will be seriously weakened - or completely loosened - depending on other results.

For all her theatrics, Janković is a fine player.

But she does not deserve to be at No.1, even though the computer-machinations make perfectly good arithmetic sense. Everybody - possibly even Janković - knows that if Serena and Venus Williams or Maria Sharapova had been able to dodge injury last season, Janković would not have risen to No.1.

As it was, the right-hander closed the year in superb fashion, winning three late-season tournaments. Voilà: Janković fulfils a career dream.

"I think - at least for me - the most important thing is how you finish - not how you begin," Janković said.

Fair enough. Amélie Mauresmo took 32 Major tournaments before she broke through.

She was 26 when she triumphed at Melbourne Park in 2006.

Janković is 24 next month.

There is still plenty of time, but questions are mounting over her mental toughness - or lack thereof.

Janković has a 31:32 record against fellow top-ten players. That's not nearly good enough.

World No.2 Serena Williams has a 39:20 record against the same group.

Janković described the Bartoli-surrender as "a bad day of tennis, bad day at the tennis."

"I want to be the No.1," she said.

"I don't want to be No.2 so that I don't have any pressure."

Even in defeat, Janković talked herself up.

"When I'm on the top of my game, it's very hard to beat me, because you really have to kind of spill blood if you want to win the match," she said.

Time to reboot the computer; time for a reality-check.
<<<

Thumped (Tom Perrotta, TENNIS.com)
>>>
I remember this Jelena Janković. The one who whines on court when the ball doesn't bounce her way. The one who uses instant-replay challenges as if they were as abundant as oxygen. The one who stubbornly refuses to think.

It's been a while since /this/ Janković showed up at a Major tournament, however. Through all of last year, there was a sense that Janković was on the upswing - an upswing confirmed by her fine performance at the US Open, where she pushed Serena Williams to her limit in the final. When Janković later took over the No.1 ranking, she showed no satisfaction with her accomplishment. Instead, she trained harder than ever over the off-season with the intention of arriving in Melbourne as the favourite to win her first Major title.

The wait continues. Janković's plans were derailed on Sunday by one of the WTA Tour's most dangerous and unpredictable players: Marion Bartoli of France. This wasn't quite like Bartoli's performance at Wimbledon 2007, when she ran roughshod over Justine Henin on her way to the final. It's safe to say, though, that Bartoli is on her game in Melbourne this year. She has lost weight (and suppressed her obsession for chocolate), and recovered from a virus that left her tired and unable to train for about three months in the early part of 2008. One of the worst moments came at the Indian Wells tournament, where she felt she could not move from her bed. She didn't win three matches in a row until late July.

"Some days, I was staying three days in a row inside my room at home, or even in the hotel-room when I was on the Tour," Bartoli said. "I couldn't practise at all for three days in a row."

Before most fans had filed into Rod Laver Arena on Sunday, Bartoli held a 5-0 lead. She polished off the match 6-1 6-4 in an hour and 22 minutes. Match-ups matter in tennis: Just ask Tommy Robredo, who dropped his 10th straight match to Andy Roddick yesterday. Robredo doesn't return serve well; Roddick serves harder than anyone. Bartoli and Janković are equally at odds. I wouldn't expect Bartoli to outrank Janković anytime soon, but I wouldn't be surprised if she wins the next time they meet, too. The Frenchwoman, who hits with two hands on her forehand and backhand, doesn't think much of topspin, and clobbers her service-returns (like the Williams-sisters, she takes three or four steps inside the baseline). Janković, on the other hand, can't serve. In this match, she won a mere 47% of the points on her serve - including only 29% on her second serve.

Janković had not looked terribly strong leading up to the match. She suffered a setback when she took ill in Hong Kong earlier this year, and didn't play enough matches before this tournament began. Still, she rightfully gave herself an "F" for her tactical performance on Sunday. It's not wise to trade hard groundstrokes with a hot Bartoli. When Janković used more spin (and less pace) and hit more severe angles, Bartoli was forced to move up and back (she doesn't excel at it) as well as side to side (her lateral movement is underrated). Janković neglected this strategy all too often.

"When I'm on the top of my game, you know, it's very hard to beat me, because you really have to kind of spill blood if you want to win the match," Janković said. "But at the moment, I'm not there yet. I still need to get better, to improve, be much, much tougher out there."

Though Janković said she wouldn't forget this loss for "months," she couldn't bottle up her bubbly side.

"Was it you there in the match, or was it somebody else talking to me during the match?" she asked a reporter. "When I was getting a towel, there was a man just like you. To be honest, it's for real. Maybe it's your clone or something."

At last, the real Jelena Janković arrives in Melbourne. Too bad she sent her clone onto court.
<<<

--
Dr. Andrew Broad
__________________
My Eternal Fanship: 1. Monica Seles; 2. Мария Шарапова (‘Maria Sharapova’); 3. Daniela Hantuchová; 4. Jelena Dokić; 5. Iva Majoli; 6. Karina Habšudová; 7. Вера Звонарёва (‘Vera Zvonarëva’); 8. Nicole Vaidišová; 9. Анна Чакветадзе (‘Anna Chakvetadze’); 10. Lucie Šafářová; 11. Ирода Туляганова (‘Iroda Tulyaganova’); 12. Magdaléna Rybáriková; 13. Sabine Lisicki
andrewbroad is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 7th, 2009, 10:34 PM   #4
country flag andrewbroad
Team WTAworld
Senior Member
 
andrewbroad's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: England
Posts: 6,963
andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute
Andrew's quarter-final report

===============
AUSTRALIAN OPEN (Melbourne, Australia; outdoor hard (Plexicushion); Major)
=============== http://www.australianopen.com/
Contents
--------

1. Photos
2. Quarter-final review: Zvonarëva v Bartoli

---------
1. Photos
---------

Quarter-finalists including Marion Bartoli:
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/2...t=melbourne_qf
http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/7852626.stm
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/ten...-Day-nine.html

Marion Bartoli and Elena Dementieva off court:
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/2...elbourne_week2

--------------------------------------------
2. Quarter-final review: Zvonarëva v Bartoli (Tuesday 27th January 2009)
--------------------------------------------

Nice winner, nice loser:
+ VERA ZVONARËVA [7,EF] d. MARION BARTOLI [16,DF,S], 6-3 6-0

Another stunning performance by Vera to extend her ownership of Marion to 7:1. Marion led 3-1*, but then lost every single game left in the match as she wilted in the extreme heat.

Marion described Vera as follows: "She's almost like a ball-machine: she just puts it back at you all the time with interest."

The match was second on Rod Laver Arena (following a doubles-match), so it would have been played in the Australian mid-afternoon, while I was sleeping in England.

Vera and Marion both agreed that Vera could go all the way here. Well, I think Vera would have been licking her lips if she saw how badly Dinara Safina played against an exhausted Jelena Dokić: Vera had a golden opportunity to reach the final, but she would certainly have had a tough opponent in the final.


3.1 Statistics
--------------

The match lasted 1h09m (first set 38m, second set 31m).

Vera had a W:UE ratio of 17:17, while Marion's was a disastrous 9:26. They were actually very similar in the first set (Vera 7:15, Marion 6:15), but in the second set, Vera's was 10:2 to Marion's 3:10.

Vera got only 52% of her first serves in (dipping from 59% in the first set to 40% in the second), winning 74% of the points when she did so, and a healthy 57% on second serve (her winning-percentages improved from (65%, 50%) for the first set to (100%, 67%) for the second).

Marion got 63% of her first serves in, but her winning-percentages were very poor: 50% on her first serve, 25% on second serve. All three percentages were very similar when comparing the two sets.

Vera had the bigger first serve: fastest 107-106 mph, average 100-95 mph. Marion's second serve was slightly faster than Vera's on average: 85-83 mph.

They each served one ace; Vera served 3 double faults to Marion's 4 (all 7 of their double faults came in the first set).

Vera broke 6 times from 13 BPs (3 from 7 in the first set, 3 from 6 in the second), while Marion had just 4 BPs (all in the first set): converting two of them.

Vera won 10 of 12 points at the net (83%) - including a perfect 7 of 7 in the second set - while Marion won just 3 of 10 (30%).

In points, Vera won 61-37 (first set 33-25, second set 28-12).


3.2 Articles
------------

Zvonarëva storms into semi-finals [CEEFAX 490->492]
>>>
Seventh seed Vera Zvonarëva made short work of France's Marion Bartoli to reach the Australian Open semi-finals.

The Russian took time to settle against the 16th seed, and was broken twice as she trailed 1-3 in the first set.

But Bartoli's game then completely fell apart, and Zvonarëva's agility around the court saw her reel off 11 games in a row to claim an amazing victory.

Third seed Dinara Safina takes on home-hope Jelena Dokić later on Tuesday, with the winner meeting Zvonarëva.
<<<

Russian Zvonarëva breezes into semi [Teletext 495->497]
>>>
Zvonarëva into first semi [Teletext 497]

Vera Zvonarëva produced a superb performance as she saw off Marion Bartoli at Melbourne Park to reach her first Major semi-final.

Bartoli started well and led the Russian 3-1 in the opening set, but the seventh seed then won the next 11 straight games for a 6-3 6-0 victory.

The 24-year-old will meet either third seed Dinara Safina or Australian Jelena Dokić for a place in the final.
<<<>>>
Russian: I had to improve [Teletext 497]

Vera Zvonarëva admitted she had needed to transform her display in the first set of her quarter-final triumph over Marion Bartoli at Melbourne Park.

The Russian seventh seed was down 1-3 in the opening set, but won 11 straight games as she recorded a 6-3 6-0 win.

She said: "I thought Marion was playing really well in the beginning. Then I was able to cut down on my unforced errors, and it made the difference."
<<<>>>
Bartoli hails Russian [Teletext 497]

Marion Bartoli has backed Vera Zvonarëva's title-credentials after losing to the Russian in Melbourne.

French 16th seed Bartoli, who had beaten world No.1 Jelena Janković in the last round, fell to a 6-3 6-0 defeat in their quarter-final clash.

She said: "If she keeps playing like this, she can definitely win this tournament. She's almost like a ball-machine. She played unbelievably well."
<<<

Zvonarëva first to final four
By Tom Kelly (www.australianopen.com)
>>>
World No.7 Vera Zvonarëva has powered through to the semi-finals of the Australian Open 2009, reeling off the last 11 games of the match to dispatch Marion Bartoli 6-3 6-0 in their quarter-final on Tuesday.

Seemingly unable to handle both the heat on court and the heat of Zvonarëva's groundstrokes, 16th seed Bartoli looked a different player to the one who beat world No.1 Jelena Janković in the fourth round.

Three breaks of serve started the match: the Frenchwoman playing safer from the back of the court, and initially making fewer errors.

However, at 3-1 up and looking to have set up a decisive lead, Bartoli's game began to crack as Zvonarëva tightened her own.

The 24-year-old Russian – a first-round loser here last year [she retired with an ankle-injury] – levelled scores at 3-3, powering through the next three to wrap up the set with a clean winner.

Bartoli's serve was broken again in the first game of the second, and her resolve seemingly followed soon after.

As the set progressed, the Frenchwoman wilted in the heat, errors flowing off her racquet with alarming regularity.

On the other side of the net, Zvonarëva could sense her impending maiden Major semi-final; she moved her opponent around the court, committing just two unforced errors for the set.

The Muscovite now awaits the winner of Jelena Dokić and Dinara Safina tonight, and should be confident that she can make her maiden Major final after winning her last three matches against the World No.3 and her only encounter with the Australian.

Quick facts:

* Zvonarëva served at just 49%, but won 74% of points when her first serve was successful.

* The Russian had 17 winners and 17 unforced errors; Bartoli had just nine winners and made 26 unforced errors.

* Zvonarëva converted six of her 13 break-point opportunities, while Bartoli capitalised on two of her four break-point chances.

* The second set, where Bartoli won just 12 points, lasted 30 minutes.
<<<

Business as usual for red-hot Russian
By Tom Kelly (www.australianopen.com)
>>>
Trying conditions, as Marion Bartoli learned today, are often as challenging to overcome as the player on the other side of the net.

After surrendering meekly in her quarter-final against Vera Zvonarëva on Tuesday, the No.16 seed was keen to make a point in her post-match press-conference.

"It was quite, quite hot. I have to say it was definitely some tough condition... I don't think it's really fair to have one quarter-final played at 1:00 - right in the middle of the heat - and one playing at 7:30. But I guess that's the way it is."

The conditions, with temperatures rising to 35°C in Melbourne on Tuesday, were less of a problem for Zvonarëva.

"I don't think there is something unfair," the Russian said. "It's a schedule. I think I played good my match, and hopefully they [Dinara Safina and Jelena Dokić] will have a good match tonight.

"I think it's going to be [a] very tough and a very interesting match. All players are very tough in the quarter-finals, so you never know what's gonna happen out there."

Business as usual – that's the line being toed by the world No.7.

Despite a 2008 in which she re-established herself in the top 10 – winning two titles and making the final of the season-ending WTA Tour Championships – Zvonarëva still slips under the radar.

And that's the way she likes it.

"I'm not really thinking about the scores or sets, or any statistics. I'm just trying to concentrate on every match, and trying my best in every match," she said.

"For me, it doesn't really matter what's happening around any other matches. I just try to concentrate on myself as much as possible; try to improve match to match, because I know I need it.

"That's why I'm just looking forward for the next one - not thinking about anything else.

"If I'm in the tournament, I'm here to try to win it."

Indeed, Zvonarëva has a golden opportunity to make her first Major final, even if she is unwilling to think that far ahead.

Importantly, the Muscovite's run to the Tour Championships final – where she lost but took a set off champion Venus Williams – included three wins over top-five opponents [four over top-seven opponents].

It's no surprise, then, that she has achieved her best Major showing in her very next tournament played for ranking-points.

After starting slowly against Bartoli, Zvonarëva's all-court game kicked into gear: the No.7 seed reeling off the last 11 games of the match.

"I was able to play [a] very clean match today. I think that's what made the difference... in the beginning, I made a few unforced errors and I was down, because Marion wasn't giving me any opportunities.

"It was very tough and very close. I think every point, we both were fighting as hard as we can.

"It's just [that] today, it happened [that] I was able to be a little bit better than her."
<<<

Zvonarëva Cruises, Makes First Major Semi-final
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/1...ContentID=2928
>>>
History definitely repeated itself on Tuesday, as Vera Zvonarëva continued to dominate her head-to-head with Marion Bartoli with a runaway 6-3 6-0 win in the quarter-finals of the Australian Open. Zvonarëva now advances to her first Major singles semi-final.

Their respective round-of-16 matches made it seem like No.16 seed Bartoli was perhaps in stronger form, as she hit nearly twice as many winners as unforced errors to upset top seed and world No.1 Jelena Jankovic in straight sets: 6-1 6-4. Meanwhile, the No.7-seeded Zvonarëva was struggling past No.10 seed Nadia Petrova, although she did edge her compatriot in two sets: 7-5 6-4.

Zvonarëva had won six of her seven career-encounters against Bartoli, however, and in Melbourne, she improved that to seven of eight with the aforementioned 69-minute rout, losing her serve twice early in the first set, but winning 11 straight games from 1-3 down to steamroll past her bewildered French opponent.

"I don't know what happened - I thought Marion was playing really well in the beginning, but I was able to cut down on my unforced errors and keep a good level of play throughout the rest of the match," Zvonarëva said. "I was able to play a very, very clean match today. That's what made the difference."

"She just played unbelievably well; she barely missed a ball after that," Bartoli said of the 11-game streak. "I was hitting as hard as I could, but she was always coming back with some better shots. Even when she was scrambling, she was putting the ball just 10 centimetres from the baseline. She was reading my game like a book. She was just too good - just better than me today."

For a player who has spent as much time ranked inside the world's top ten as Zvonarëva, it may come as somewhat of a shock that this was only her second Major singles quarter-final, having reached the final eight at the French Open once - nearly five years ago in 2003. But her form over the last year has hinted at a major breakthrough for the 24-year-old Muscovite, as she worked her way from outside the top twenty all the way to No.7 by year's end, winning two WTA Tour titles and reaching another six finals, including at the season-ending Sony Ericsson Championships. Nobody else reached eight finals in 2008.

Bartoli can only take positives away from Melbourne. She battled past tough opponents in her early rounds - including rallying from 3-6 0-2 down against former Australian Open quarter-finalist Lucie Šafářová in the third round - and notched her second win over a world No.1 against Jankovic - her first also coming at a Major, having beaten Justine Henin in the semi-finals of Wimbledon two years ago. She had never passed the second round previously here, either.

The second semi-final was scheduled for the evening-session, pitting No.3 seed Dinara Safina against wildcard Jelena Dokić.
<<<

Zvonarëva crushes Bartoli to reach semi-finals (Reuters)
By Julian Linden (editing by John O'Brien and Pritha Sarkar)
>>>
Vera Zvonarëva reached the semi-finals of a Major for the first time in her career after she won 11 games in a row to demolish Marion Bartoli 6-3 6-0 at the Australian Open on Tuesday.

Frenchwoman Bartoli made a bright enough start to open up a 3-1 lead in the first set, but she was unable to cope with the Russian's power when she suddenly raised her game.

Seventh seed Zvonarëva went on to register an easy victory in just 68 minutes with a performance that even she was unable to explain.

"I don't know what happened," Zvonarëva said.

"Marion was playing really well in the beginning and I made a few unforced errors, so that's why I think I was down 3-1.

"Then I was able to cut down on my unforced errors, and I was able to keep a good level of play throughout the whole match."

Zvonarëva is one of four Russians still in contention for the title, and will meet her compatriot Dinara Safina in the last four [this was a pretty arrogant assumption at the time this article was published!], ensuring there will be at least one Russian in the women's final for the third year running at Melbourne Park [Maria Sharapova was runner-up in 2007 and won in 2008].

Despite being a consistent top-ten player, Zvonarëva has a modest record at the Majors, and the only time previous time she had made it past the fourth round was at the French Open 2003, when she made the quarter-finals.

MAJOR CONTENDER

However, the 24-year-old has been in career-best form in Melbourne this year, winning all of her matches in straight sets, to emerge as a contender for the first Major of the year.

"I'm pretty confident in myself. If I'm in the tournament, I'm here to try to win it," she said.

"I think I played very good tennis. I think Marion's been playing very good as well, but I was able to play a very clean match today. That's what made the difference."

Bartoli - a Wimbledon-finalist two years ago - had also been in great touch this past week, beating world number-one Jelena Janković in the fourth round.

The 16th seed is recognised as one of the hardest hitters in women's tennis, but admitted she had no answer to Zvonarëva's power.

"I don't think I put in a bad performance," Bartoli said. "She was just coming [up] every time with a better shot to my shot.

"Sometimes you have to accept [that] someone is just better than you.

"She just played unbelievably well. It seemed like she was reading my game like a book.

"If she keeps playing like this, she can definitely win this tournament."

Like Novak Đoković in the men's tournament, Bartoli also mentioned struggling in the Melbourne-heat.

"I have to say it was definitely some tough conditions," she said.

"It was really hot. I don't think it's really fair to have one quarter-final played at 1:00 - right in the middle of the heat - and one playing at 7:30pm. But I guess that's the way it is."

Zvonarëva is one of four Russian women still in contention for the title, and will face either countrywoman Dinara Safina or Australia's Jelena Dokić in Thursday's semi-finals.
<<<

I can win it, says ice-cool Zvonarëva after Bartoli-blowout (AFP)
>>>
On Tuesday, Russian seventh seed Vera Zvonarëva coolly declared herself ready to win the Australian Open after crushing France's Marion Bartoli in searing conditions to reach the semi-finals.

The 23-year-old blew 16th seed Bartoli off court in a one-sided 6-3 6-0 drubbing, rattling off 11 straight games after going down 1-3 in the first set, as her opponent Bartoli wilted in the hot conditions.

The Russian maintained her ominous form at this year's tournament to reach her first Major semi-final in 25 attempts in emphatic fashion.

Far from being overawed at advancing so far, Zvonarëva immediately turned up the heat on her rivals by declaring herself ready to join the élite group of Major winners.

"If I'm coming for the tournament, I'm pretty confident in myself," she said. "If I'm in the tournament, I'm here to try to win it."

Bartoli agreed that Zvonarëva could go all the way here, where she is yet to drop a set, and has held her opponents to 6-0 in four of the ten sets she has contested.

"She's almost like a ball-machine: she just puts it back at you all the time with interest," the Frenchwoman said.

"There is not any weakness into her game [that] I can find. She's serving well, moving well, hitting the ball well. Of course she can win this tournament."

The ease with which Zvonarëva handled the heat - which left Bartoli bent double and sucking for breath - may also count in her favour as the tournament advances, with heatwave-conditions forecast at Melbourne Park this week.

"I like it when it's warm, so it's perfect for me," she said.

The heat meant Bartoli - a Wimbledon-finalist in 2007 - could not repeat the aggressive game-plan with which she thrashed world number-one Jelena Janković in the fourth round.

Her all-out attack worked early as she scored two breaks [to one] to go up 3-1 in the first set, but proved too draining over the course of the match.

Bartoli initially succeeded in keeping the points short, taking advantage of a Zvonarëva double fault and a rash of unforced errors from the Russian to go up a break in the first game.

Zvonarëva broke back in the next, but Bartoli left her stranded with a lob to regain the advantage.

By this time, Bartoli was covering her head with a towel between games to provide some relief from the heat, and Zvonarëva began moving her around the court.

The 23-year-old Frenchwoman surrendered the advantage three games later, committing two double faults and allowing Zvonarëva to level the set at 3-3.

The Russian, who took a 6:1 winning-record against Bartoli into the match, never looked back, and her penetrating groundstrokes finally began to find their mark.

She gained the upper hand with another break to go up 5-3, sending down her first ace of the match in the next as she went on to serve out the set after 38 minutes.

The conditions took their toll on Bartoli in the second set, and Zvonarëva moved her around the court, breaking her three times as she raced to a 6-0 win in just 30 minutes.
<<<

Safina, Zvonarëva advance to semis at Australian Open (PA SportsTicker)
>>>
The 22-year-old Safina next will face Vera Zvonarëva in the semi-finals after her seventh-seeded compatriot cruised to a 6-3 6-0 victory over France's Marion Bartoli - the 16th seed - earlier on Tuesday.

Zvonarëva trailed 1-3 in the first set of her match against Bartoli, but rallied to win 11 straight games, needing just over an hour to forge the victory in straight sets.

The result was all the more impressive after Bartoli had completely outplayed top-seeded Jelena Janković in the fourth round.

Bartoli started well and broke serve in the third game of the first set, but Zvonarëva battled back, evening the match at 3-3 after coming out on top of a fine rally.

The 24-year-old then won the next three games to claim the first set in 38 minutes before maintaining her momentum in the second set to breeze to victory.
<<<

Dokić-dream ends (Reuters)
By Ossian Shine (editing by Pritha Sarkar)
>>>
Safina next meets fellow Russian and seventh seed Vera Zvonarëva after she eased into the women's semi-finals with victory over Marion Bartoli.

The Frenchwoman also wilted during the 6-3 6-0 thrashing.

"I have to say it was definitely some tough conditions," she told reporters. It was really hot."
<<<

Exhausted Đoković out as Safina ends Dokić dream-run (AFP)
>>>
Safina will now meet seventh seeded compatriot Vera Zvonarëva for a place in the final, after the Russian coolly disposed of France's Marion Bartoli 6-3 6-0.

Bartoli felt the effects of the searing heat in her match against Zvonarëva, often bending double and sucking for breath.

She started strongly, but rapidly wilted in a one-sided drubbing to a player who is now in her first Major semi-final in 25 attempts.

Zvonarëva declared herself ready to win the tournament.

"If I'm coming for the tournament, I'm pretty confident in myself," she said. "If I'm in the tournament, I'm here to try to win it."

Bartoli agreed that Zvonarëva could go all the way here, where she is yet to drop a set.

"She's almost like a ball-machine: she just puts it back at you all the time with interest," the Frenchwoman said.
<<<

Zvonarëva cruises into tennis semis as Safina toughs it out (AFP)
>>>
Russian Vera Zvonarëva coolly took apart France's Marion Bartoli on Tuesday to reach the Australian Open semi-finals, while compatriot Dinara Safina almost imploded before overcoming wildcard Jelena Dokić.

Zvonarëva - seeded seventh - showed no sign of discomfort in searing conditions at Melbourne Park, blowing 16th seed Bartoli off court in a one-sided 6-3 6-0 drubbing.

The 24-year-old maintained her ominous form at this year's tournament, rattling off 11 straight games after going down 1-3 in the first set, to reach her first Major semi-final in 25 attempts in emphatic fashion.

Far from being overawed at advancing so far, Zvonarëva immediately turned up the heat on her rivals by declaring herself ready to join the élite group of Major winners.

"If I'm coming for the tournament, I'm pretty confident in myself," she said. "If I'm in the tournament, I'm here to try to win it."

Bartoli agreed that Zvonarëva could go all the way here, where she is yet to drop a set, and has held her opponents to 6-0 in four of the 10 sets she has contested.

"She's almost like a ball-machine: she just puts it back at you all the time with interest," the Frenchwoman said.

The ease with which Zvonarëva handled the heat - which left Bartoli bent double and sucking for breath - may also count in her favour as the tournament advances, with heatwave-conditions forecast at Melbourne Park this week.

"I like it when it's warm, so it's perfect for me," she said.
<<<

Safina beats Dokić to reach semis (BBC Sport)
http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/7852624.stm
>>>
Safina will now play her compatriot Vera Zvonarëva after the seventh seed eased past France's Marion Bartoli 6-3 6-0.

The 24-year-old Zvonarëva took time to settle against the 16th seed, and was broken twice as she trailed 1-3 in the first set.

But Bartoli's game then completely fell apart in the fierce heat, and Zvonarëva reeled off 11 games in a row to claim a one-sided victory and reach her first Major semi-final.

"I really thought Marion was playing really well in the beginning and I made a few unforced errors, so that's why I think I was down 3-1," said Zvonarëva.

"Then I was able to cut down on my unforced errors, and I was able to keep a good level of play throughout the whole match. I think it made the difference."

Zvonarëva has been in impressive form so far at Melbourne Park, reaching the last four without dropping a set.

And, although she started poorly against Bartoli in a scrappy opening that saw four breaks of serve in the opening six games, she quickly found her form.

In contrast, Bartoli - who knocked out top seed Jelena Janković in the fourth round - folded. The French star looked sluggish around the court, and her usually powerful groundstrokes lacked penetration and accuracy.

She offered little resistance as Zvonarëva broke three more times in the second set on her way to a comfortable victory that took a little over an hour.

"I think she played just unbelievably well," said Bartoli. "I was really feeling the heat after the end of the first set, so I really needed to cool down a little bit before to go on in the second.

"But I didn't find I was really putting a bad performance. She was just better - that's it."
<<<

Zvonarëva dominant in QF win against Bartoli (TENNIS.com)
>>>
The 24-year-old Russian's best performance in six previous trips to Melbourne was the fourth round — she'd gone out in the first round at the Australian Open three times, including last year. She also reached the quarter-finals at the 2003 French Open.

Seventh-seeded Zvonarëva rallied from an opening service-break to dominate Bartoli in the remainder of the match.

"I'm very excited about it," said Zvonarëva, who cut her unforced errors from 15 in the first set to two in the second. "I think it was a great day for me."

She's had four 6-0 sets out of the 10 in her five straight-sets wins.

"I'm not really thinking about the scores or sets or any statistics," she said. "I'm just trying to concentrate on every match and trying my best. And I think I've been doing pretty good so far."

Bartoli, seeded 16th, had ousted top-ranked Jelena Janković in the fourth round.

"I think she played just unbelievably well," Bartoli said of the last 11 games. "She barely missed one ball after that. I was hitting as hard as I could. She was always coming back with some better shots."
<<<

Vera Sweeps Into Semis (Tennis Week)
>>>
Marion Bartoli crashed the Australian Open quarter-final party with a bold and bruising baseline-attack to bounce World No.1 Jelena Janković out of the draw.

But the sound and fury Bartoli brought to the court in the fourth round was strangely absent today as Vera Zvonarëva served as a tennis mute-button in silencing the former Wimbledon-finalist with the ease of a woman pressing all the right buttons.

Down an early break, Zvonarëva won 11 straight games to blow Bartoli away 6-3 6-0 and storm into her first career Major semi-final in her 25th career Major-tournament appearance.

The seventh-ranked Russian is playing with the confidence of a woman who fully believes she can reach the final and take the title, and why not? Zvonarëva is the only player who has yet to drop a set in the women's draw, and delivered her fourth shutout-set in five matches.

"If I'm coming for the tournament, I'm pretty confident in myself. If I'm in the tournament, I'm here to try to win it," Zvonarëva said. "But I'm really concentrating on every match. For me, it doesn't really matter what's happening around any other matches. I just try to concentrate on myself as much as possible, try to improve match to match because I know I need it. That's why I'm just looking forward for the next one - not thinking about anything else."

She has made a believer of Bartoli, who pronounced the Moscow-native capable of taking home the title.

"I think if she keeps playing like this, she can definitely win this tournament," Bartoli said. "She's really consistent out of the baseline. As I said, she's almost like a ball-machine. She just puts it back at you all the time, you know, with interest. There is not any weakness into her game [that] I can find. She's serving well, moving well, hitting the ball well. Of course she can win this tournament."

The mere sight of Zvonarëva across the net seems to vaporise Bartoli's resistence. Zvonarëva had lost just three sets to the Frenchwoman in winning six of their seven career-clashes. Though Bartoli won three of the first four games, she found herself being pushed behind the baseline by the depth of Zvonarëva's drives.

Competing with more intensity, Zvonarëva consistently caught the corners with crisp crosscourt shots that began to elude the restricted reach of Bartoli, who plays with two hands off both forehand and backhand.

Zvonarëva cracked an ace to reach set-point, and collected the 38-minute first set on a Bartoli backhand error.

The match was essentially over at that point as Bartoli - who spent some time between points leaning on her racquet as if it was a crutch keeping her upright - increasingly withered as on-court temperatures soared higher and hotter.

"I think she's just the better player. That's it," a blunt Bartoli said. "At a point, you have to admit when someone just plays better than you. I think she plays better than me on today. I don't know about the whole year, but today she just played better. I don't think I put a bad performance, but I think she was serving better in second serve than Jelena [Janković] was doing two days ago. I didn't have the same look at the same ball. I couldn't attack it the same way. She was moving faster. She was just coming every time with a better shot to my shot. You have to accept sometimes [that] someone is just better than you."

Zvonarëva broke to open the second set, and held at 15 to consolidate. Bending her knees to get down to a flat drive from Bartoli, Zvonarëva turned her hips into an inside-out forehand winner to collect her fourth consecutive service-break.

Running to her right, Zvonarëva curled a running forehand crosscourt winner to break for 5-0. A backhand winner down the line concluded a clinical and brutally efficient effort from Zvonarëva, who closed with a clenched fist and quick wave to all four corners of the court.

It's a career-milestone for the sensitive Moscow-native, but it was mild celebration. That may be because Zvonarëva is well aware that she's got more work to do and, more importantly, she knows she's capable of finishing off the job.

Zvonarëva will play the winner of tonight's quarter-final between third-ranked Dinara Safina and the resurgent Jelena Dokić. Zvonarëva has swept Safina three times in a row — all three wins were on hard courts last season — and is 1:0 against the 187th-ranked Dokić in a match played more than five years ago.
<<<

Jelena Dokić bows out of Australian Open as Dinara Safina reaches semi-finals (The Daily Telegraph - UK)
>>>
Dinara Safina has ended local hope Jelena Dokić's surprising run in the Australian Open, claiming a 6-4 4-6 6-4 quarter-final victory.

The win sees Safina advance to a semi-final against fellow Russian Vera Zvonarëva, who beat Marion Bartoli.

Seventh seed Zvonarëva produced a superb performance as the Russian saw off Bartoli of France in straight sets to secure her place in the semis.

Zvonarëva had trailed 1-3 in the first set, but then won the next 11 straight games for a 6-3 6-0 victory that took just over one hour at Rod Laver Arena.

The result was all the more impressive after 16th seed Bartoli had completely outplayed top seed Jelena Janković in the fourth round.

Bartoli started well and broke serve in the third game of the first set, but Zvonarëva battled back to level at 3-3 after coming out on top of a fine rally.

The 24-year-old then won the next three games to claim the first set in 38 minutes, before maintaining her momentum in the second set to breeze to victory.

"I'm very excited about it," Zvonarëva said. "I think it was a great day for me.

"I'm not really thinking about the scores or sets, or any statistics. I'm just trying to concentrate on every match, and trying my best. And I think I've been doing pretty good so far."

Asked about Zvonarëva winning 11 straight games, Bartoli said: "I think she played just unbelievably well.

"She barely missed one ball. I was hitting as hard as I could. She was always coming back with some better shots."
<<<

Safina, Zvonarëva Reach Aussie Semis (The Sports Network)
>>>
Top-ten Russians Dinara Safina and Vera Zvonarëva were a pair of quarter-final winners on Tuesday at the Australian Open 2009: the first Major event of the year.

The third-seeded Safina held off resurgent Aussie wild card Jelena Dokić 6-4 4-6 6-4, while a seventh-seeded Zvonarëva zipped past 16th-seeded Frenchwoman Marion Bartoli 6-3 6-0. The Wimbledon 2007 runner-up Bartoli stunned world No.1 Jelena Janković in the fourth round this past weekend.

The 22-year-old Safina - last year's French Open and Olympic runner-up - will appear in her third career Major semi-final, while the 24-year-old Zvonarëva will play in her first.

In the Zvonarëva v Bartoli affair, Zvonarëva fell behind 1-3 in the first set, but promptly won the next 11 games to easily finish the match against her overwhelmed French counterpart.

"I really thought Marion was playing really well in the beginning, and I made a few unforced errors, so that's why I think I was down 3-1," said Zvonarëva. "Then I was able to cut down on my unforced errors, and I was able to keep a good level of play throughout the whole match. I think it made the difference."

Bartoli committed 26 unforced errors and won just 5 of 20 points on her second serve in the searing heat at Melbourne Park. Temperatures climbed above 125°F on the court.

The Olympic Bronze-medallist Zvonarëva displayed a solid forehand, and went up 5-3 in the first set when Bartoli was wide on a return. The Russian served out the set, and then cruised in the second, ending the match with a backhand winner.

The second set, where Bartoli won just 12 points, lasted 30 minutes.

"Even when she was scrambling, she was putting the ball just ten centimeters from the baseline," said Bartoli. "It seems like she's reading my game like in the book. It was just too good. She was just better than me - that's it."
<<<

--
Dr. Andrew Broad
__________________
My Eternal Fanship: 1. Monica Seles; 2. Мария Шарапова (‘Maria Sharapova’); 3. Daniela Hantuchová; 4. Jelena Dokić; 5. Iva Majoli; 6. Karina Habšudová; 7. Вера Звонарёва (‘Vera Zvonarëva’); 8. Nicole Vaidišová; 9. Анна Чакветадзе (‘Anna Chakvetadze’); 10. Lucie Šafářová; 11. Ирода Туляганова (‘Iroda Tulyaganova’); 12. Magdaléna Rybáriková; 13. Sabine Lisicki

Last edited by andrewbroad : Mar 7th, 2009 at 10:40 PM.
andrewbroad is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 3rd, 2010, 04:29 AM   #5
country flag andrewbroad
Team WTAworld
Senior Member
 
andrewbroad's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: England
Posts: 6,963
andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute
Andrew's third-round TV-report

===============
AUSTRALIAN OPEN (Melbourne, Australia; outdoor hard (Plexicushion); Major)
===============
Third round (Friday 23rd January 2009)
-----------

+ MARION BARTOLI [16,DF,S] d. Lucie Šafářová [EF], 3-6 6-2 6-1

I acquired Fox Sports' coverage of the match from Tennis Videos International in December 2009. This coverage starts at 5-3* (15/0*).

Lucie led 6-3 *2-0, but her brilliant game then disintegrated into unforced errors, and Marion won 12 of the last 13 games.

I had a lot of fun watching the match in spite of Lucie's disintegration. It was full of high-quality rallies from both players, as well as the "oh, Lucie!" moments!

Lucie was overpowering Marion from the baseline, forcing Marion into the role of counterpuncher. The turnaround came when Marion's counterpunching improved, frustrating Lucie into making errors when she couldn't win the points earlier, and going for the lines when it wasn't necessary. Marion also became wise to the fact that Lucie was serving out wide in the ad-court every time she faced a break-point.

After Marion broke for *3-2 in the second set, Lucie's groundstrokes started losing their penetration: where once they had skidded through low, they now sat up nicely for Marion to have her way with them. A lot of this had to do with Marion's deep groundstrokes forcing Lucie to take the ball early. As a result, Marion became the aggressor. Lucie also became increasingly erratic, making unforced errors even when she was firmly in charge of some points.

In the third set, it was Marion's groundstrokes that were skidding through low, forcing Lucie into numerous errors. It was easy to see why Marion went on to beat top seed Jelena Janković in the next round. At least the one game that Lucie won (at *0-2) was a brilliant hold to love with four winners!

My full TV-report – which includes a point-by-point description, and transcriptions of Marion's on-court interview and selected commentary – is now available on my new website:

http://abroad.sqweebs.com/tennis/saf..._open2009.html

--
Dr. Andrew Broad
__________________
My Eternal Fanship: 1. Monica Seles; 2. Мария Шарапова (‘Maria Sharapova’); 3. Daniela Hantuchová; 4. Jelena Dokić; 5. Iva Majoli; 6. Karina Habšudová; 7. Вера Звонарёва (‘Vera Zvonarëva’); 8. Nicole Vaidišová; 9. Анна Чакветадзе (‘Anna Chakvetadze’); 10. Lucie Šafářová; 11. Ирода Туляганова (‘Iroda Tulyaganova’); 12. Magdaléna Rybáriková; 13. Sabine Lisicki
andrewbroad is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 8th, 2010, 12:50 AM   #6
country flag andrewbroad
Team WTAworld
Senior Member
 
andrewbroad's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: England
Posts: 6,963
andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute andrewbroad has a reputation beyond repute
Andrew's quarter-final TV-report

===============
AUSTRALIAN OPEN (Melbourne, Australia; outdoor hard (Plexicushion); Major)
===============
Quarter-final (Tuesday 27th January 2009)
-------------

+ VERA ZVONARËVA [7,EF] d. MARION BARTOLI [16,DF,S], 6-3 6-0

Another stunning performance by Vera to extend her ownership of Marion to 7:1. Marion led 3-1*, but then lost every single game left in the match as she wilted in the extreme heat.

I acquired 7 Sport's coverage of the match from Tennis Videos International in December 2009.

Vera made a nervous start, dropping her first two service-games en route to that *1-3 deficit. She then held to love, and broke back to *3-3 after a game of two deuces. She broke for *5-3 with the help of two backhand winners, then an ace set up set-point at 40/30, which she converted when Marion missed a second-serve return: 6-3.

Vera jumped out to a 2-0* lead in the second set, then got the better of a game of four deuces in which Marion had two game-points and Vera three break-points: *3-0. By this time, Marion was looking really tired and slow. Vera won each of the last three games to 15; in fact she won five of the last six points with clean winners, including a stunning crosscourt forehand winner to break for *5-0, a delectable forehand drop-volley winner, and she sealed her victory with an off-backhand winner onto the baseline!

Vera was really calm at the end, and I love the spirit with which Marion accepted defeat. Vera was delightfully demure in her on-court interview, even getting a little bit embarrassed when Chris Dittmar complimented her on how fit she looked!

My full TV-report – which includes a point-by-point description, transcriptions of selected commentary and Vera's on-court interview – is now available on my new website:

http://abroad.sqweebs.com/tennis/zvo..._open2009.html

--
Dr. Andrew Broad
__________________
My Eternal Fanship: 1. Monica Seles; 2. Мария Шарапова (‘Maria Sharapova’); 3. Daniela Hantuchová; 4. Jelena Dokić; 5. Iva Majoli; 6. Karina Habšudová; 7. Вера Звонарёва (‘Vera Zvonarëva’); 8. Nicole Vaidišová; 9. Анна Чакветадзе (‘Anna Chakvetadze’); 10. Lucie Šafářová; 11. Ирода Туляганова (‘Iroda Tulyaganova’); 12. Magdaléna Rybáriková; 13. Sabine Lisicki
andrewbroad is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


Copyright (C) Verticalscope Inc
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
vBCredits v1.4 Copyright ©2007, PixelFX Studios