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Old Jul 20th, 2009, 04:26 PM   #151
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Re: Little Mo. Big Al and 50s tennis

A few years ago on the Blast there was a woman doing research for a book on Alice Marble who did a ton of research on Teach.

Teach was good enough to reach the semis of the US Nationals in 1920, taking a set off Molla Mallory and being ranked 3rd in the US that year. Her basic problem was money though. She wasn't independently wealthy enough to travel to big events in the east. Also her marriage went sour about this time. She took up with someone Hollywood, one source mysteriosuly calls her "Helene" I tihnk. Teach found she could make a living teaching tennis to the stars-Charlie Chaplin was a student of hers. Later friends included Carole Lombard and Clarke Gable. This meant giving up her amateur status though.
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Old Jul 21st, 2009, 11:52 AM   #152
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Re: Little Mo. Big Al and 50s tennis

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rollo View Post
A few years ago on the Blast there was a woman doing research for a book on Alice Marble who did a ton of research on Teach.

Teach was good enough to reach the semis of the US Nationals in 1920, taking a set off Molla Mallory and being ranked 3rd in the US that year. Her basic problem was money though. She wasn't independently wealthy enough to travel to big events in the east. Also her marriage went sour about this time. She took up with someone Hollywood, one source mysteriosuly calls her "Helene" I tihnk. Teach found she could make a living teaching tennis to the stars-Charlie Chaplin was a student of hers. Later friends included Carole Lombard and Clarke Gable. This meant giving up her amateur status though.
Thanks Rollo. She must have been pretty excellent to take a set off Mallory, impressive. Just a shame that she did not have the finances to further her own career. It would explain a lot of her determination re Marble and Connolly. She must have been absolutely determined that they would succeed on a world stage in a way that she had not been allowed to do.
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Old Jun 16th, 2010, 04:03 PM   #153
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Re: Little Mo. Big Al and 50s tennis

While looking for info on Gem Hoahing (the smallest tennis player ever at only 1.46 m or 4 feet 9 1/2 inches) I came across this story of the strange death of Gem Gilbert, a tennis player who was also active in the early 1950s. The story does not relate when Gilbert died.


The link to this is at
http://www.tribuneindia.com/2003/20030616/ncr2.htm

*note that the original story appeared in the London Daily Mail)


Quote:

I read a story describing the curious death of Gem Gilbert, a British tennis star. She had died on the dentist’s chair, just as the dentist was about to extract her tooth. Years before when she was a small girl, she had accompanied her mother to the dentist. And a most unusual and tragic thing happened. The little girl, terrified, watched her mother die in the dentist’s chair. Gem carried the trauma in her mind for thirty years. The fear was so real that she did not go to a dentist, no matter how badly she needed the treatment. However, there came a time when she had to get her tooth extracted as the pain was excruciating. She was compelled to visit the dentist. Her fears were so great that when she saw the dentist’s tools- she died. The writer of the news report remarked that Gem Gilbert had been killed by thirty years of thought.
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Old Jun 17th, 2010, 03:00 PM   #154
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Re: Little Mo. Big Al and 50s tennis

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rollo View Post
While looking for info on Gem Hoahing (the smallest tennis player ever at only 1.46 m or 4 feet 9 1/2 inches) I came across this story of the strange death of Gem Gilbert, a tennis player who was also active in the early 1950s. The story does not relate when Gilbert died.


The link to this is at
http://www.tribuneindia.com/2003/20030616/ncr2.htm

*note that the original story appeared in the London Daily Mail)
RolloAs someone who is a practicioner in mental health that is such a sad story about this lady. I mean nowadays she would surely have had adequate support via counselling and cognitive therapy, bereavment etc to help her come to terms with what happened to her mother. I think that is awful I really do. Was she actually an established player of Wimbledon stature? Much as I tend to think I know a lot I cant say that she is someone whom I would know anything about. And what a great idea for a thread this was back when it started. Gibson and Connolly were such legends it would be great to discuss them again.
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Old Nov 9th, 2010, 05:55 AM   #155
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Re: Little Mo. Big Al and 50s tennis

Pictures of Dorothy Bundy Cheney on court with Helen Wills Moody in Santa Monica in 1950:

http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assetserver/controller/view/search/EXM-N-9278-010~7
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assetserver/controller/view/search/EXM-N-9278-010~8
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assetserver/controller/view/search/EXM-N-9278-010~41

Bundy Cheney teaching girls:
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assetserver/controller/view/search/EXM-N-9278-010~22

Bundy Cheney with a toddler:
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assetserver/controller/view/search/EXM-N-9278-010~40

Wills Moody posing:
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assetserver/controller/view/search/EXM-N-9278-010~27

Wills Moody the center of attention:
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assetserver/controller/view/search/EXM-N-9278-010~42

Louise Brough in 1958:
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assetserver/controller/view/search/EXM-N-12295-007~1

Maureen Connolly, apparently on clay, on September 16, 1951. Was the Pacific Southwest Championships held on that surface then?
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assetserver/controller/view/search/EXM-N-9355-015~5

Beverly Baker Fleitz, in the midst of losing to Connolly 9-7, 6-4 in the final of the 1951 Pacific Southwest Championships:
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assetserver/controller/view/search/EXM-N-9355-015~7

Collection of posed "action pics" of Connolly in April 1951:
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/search...=1289286386555

Karol Fageros, 1958:
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assets...N-12370-040~10

Last edited by austinrunner : Nov 9th, 2010 at 06:43 AM.
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Old Nov 9th, 2010, 03:02 PM   #156
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Re: Little Mo. Big Al and 50s tennis

Beautiful pictures AR-I particularly love the one of Baker from the 1951 PSW final. What a lady and unique player.

Speaking of the PSW-I can state with utter certainty that it was, has been and is held on a cement surface from start to finish. The "clay" look to the pictures comes from a couple of factors. First of all cement courts come in many types, and they often have scuff marks on them. This can really be the case if the cement courts are a gray or grayish color, as courts in the past often were. Today the tours like to use more brilliant colors that usually hide the scuff marks. I don't know what color the PSW courts were in 1951, but the black white photography must be picking up all the marks on the court.

How lucky we are today with color photography.
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Old Nov 9th, 2010, 07:49 PM   #157
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Re: Little Mo. Big Al and 50s tennis

Did you notice in the picture of Beverly Baker Fleitz that the lines had been swept, just like on a clay court? From the pictures I've seen, it looks like a clay court was used until the late 50s, when clearly a hard court was used.
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assets...-N-12289-060~3

Also, an aerial photo of the Los Angeles Tennis Club from the late 40s or early 50s shows three types of courts. One is definitely clay and I'm assuming the other two are grass and hard.
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assets...W-C5-55-1-ISLA

To me, this looks like a dried-up clay or dirt court:
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assetserver/controller/view/search/EXM-N-9355-015~3

Notice again the swept lines:
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assetserver/controller/view/search/EXM-N-9355-015~9
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assetserver/controller/view/search/EXM-N-9355-015~14
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assetserver/controller/view/search/EXM-N-9355-015~5

In my home town, all the public courts in the 50s were clay. They were paved over in the early 60s. There have not been any public clay courts here since then.

Last edited by austinrunner : Nov 9th, 2010 at 07:58 PM.
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Old Nov 10th, 2010, 01:17 PM   #158
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Re: Little Mo. Big Al and 50s tennis

The PSW was held on cement from the start. I have a program from the PSW. There are numerous references to the PSW being on cement. The PSW was famously difficult for players competing on hard (cement) courts for the first time.

The lines look the way they do probably because they used tape. The "swept" look around the lines may simply be one tape over an older and previous tape.

I have numerous magazines from the 30s and 40s, and one thing that becomes apparent after seeing hundreds of pictures in black and white is that it is often hard to tell the court surface. A lot depends on the angle of the pic, how close it is to the court, etc.

Here's a printed source that specifically goes into detail about the courts:


From American Lawn Tennis, October 1949, pages 22-23

Pacific Southwest Flourishes, Thanks to Impresario Perry Jones

by Edward C Potter

......All of the courts are of cement and are colored a deep brown, almost black. They are impervious to weather and provide a true and fast surface which encourages the type of attacking game for which Californaia players are famous." .....

Last edited by Rollo : Nov 10th, 2010 at 11:17 PM.
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Old Nov 16th, 2010, 06:18 AM   #159
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Re: Little Mo. Big Al and 50s tennis

In a Long Beach Independent Press-Telegram interview published January 19, 1958, Beverly Baker Fleitz was asked who was the best player she ever faced. "Doris Hart. She had the most rounded game. Louise Brough and Mo Connolly would also be included." When asked to name the best current players, she said, "Gibson, Brough, Darlene Hard and Dorothy Knode." When asked to name the best prospects, she said, "Sally Moore. She hits a nice ball. Karen Hantze is another. I haven't seen Billie Jean Moffitt, but I hear she is good and works hard on her game." When asked whether she could beat Althea Gibson, she said, "I wouldn't say that, but I will say that Althea can be beaten. I have beaten her every time we've played, but of course that was before she became very good."
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Old Nov 17th, 2010, 02:01 AM   #160
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Re: Little Mo. Big Al and 50s tennis

Quote:
Originally Posted by austinrunner View Post
Did you notice in the picture of Beverly Baker Fleitz that the lines had been swept, just like on a clay court? From the pictures I've seen, it looks like a clay court was used until the late 50s, when clearly a hard court was used.
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assets...-N-12289-060~3

Also, an aerial photo of the Los Angeles Tennis Club from the late 40s or early 50s shows three types of courts. One is definitely clay and I'm assuming the other two are grass and hard.
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assets...W-C5-55-1-ISLA

To me, this looks like a dried-up clay or dirt court:
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assetserver/controller/view/search/EXM-N-9355-015~3

Notice again the swept lines:
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assetserver/controller/view/search/EXM-N-9355-015~9
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assetserver/controller/view/search/EXM-N-9355-015~14
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assetserver/controller/view/search/EXM-N-9355-015~5

In my home town, all the public courts in the 50s were clay. They were paved over in the early 60s. There have not been any public clay courts here since then.
Awesome photos!

I love how the linespeople look so casual

Also like how there are chairs right on court. Wouldn't happen nowadays!
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Old Mar 23rd, 2012, 04:42 PM   #161
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Re: Little Mo. Big Al and 50s tennis

Louise Brough



"Brough was tough" went one rhyme popular at the time-and she lived up to it by playing all 3 Wimbledon finals on 1 day for 3 years running (1948-50) she contested every final at Wimbledon.

1948
The first triple was relatively easy. Louise won her singles 6-3 8-6 over Doris Hart. Then she had a breather during the mens doubles final. Then came the dubs with her partner Margaret "Ozzie" Osbourne DuPont 6-3 3-6 6-4, and the mixed with John Bromwich 6-2 3-6 6-3. After 70 game she had her triple-with rival Doris Hart losing all 3 finals.

1949

"Broughie", the nickname given to her by her buddy Margaret DuPont, almost won the triple again. First she took an exciting singles final by 10-8 1-6 10-8 over Dupont. Thencame the doubles final after an hours rest. Broughie and Ozzie had a tougher than expected time-winning 8-6 7-5 over Gussy Moran (od lace panties fame) and Pat Todd.

The one match needed to repeat the triple was 1 too much. South African Sheila Summers and Eric Sturgess defeated John Bromwich and a tiring Louise 9-7 9-11 7-5.

The 8 sets had lasted 117 games.

When I talked with her a few years ago she still laughed about her bloody feet and losing her toenails after playing late into the evening.


1950

Louise won her 3rd consecutive singles by defeating Dupont 6-1 3-6 6-1. By this time the crowds, initially enamored of the serve and volley "Amazons", were tiring of the pair's dominance.

After a rest during the men's doubles Brough/Dupont d Shirely Fry and Doris Hart 6-4 5-7 6-1. When I asked Louise who the toughest doubles opponents were for her and Ozzie she quickly said, "Doris with anyone."

After last year's ordeal the Wimbledon committee gave Louise 30 minutes to rest before going on court for the mixed. Teamed with Eric Sturgess, they prevailed over Pat Todd and Tom Brown 1-9 1-6 6-4.
There was a controversial call when the umpire missed a let cord off a serve. At 4-4 30-40 Brown's serve hit the tape and was lightly returned by Sturgess. Todd mildly tapped it into the net, expecting a let cord call that never came. "Miss Todd angrily tossed her raquet into the air but the damge was done." Having secured the vital break, Sturgess served out the match.

It took Louise 9 sets to secure her second triple, but the added rest and fewer games (89-far fewer than 1948's 117) probably spelled the difference.

Brough was never the same after 1950. She developed an arm injury that kept her out for much of 1951 and then had to deal with the tornado force known as Maureen Connolly, who took the women's game by storm with baseline play.

Brough won a fourth and final Wimbledon win later (1955) in Connolly's absence. Her final and last Wimbledon win was her sweetest memory, but winning 8 of 9 Wimbledon finals from 1948 to 1950 may be her finest acheivement.

Last edited by Rollo : Mar 23rd, 2012 at 05:37 PM.
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Old Jun 19th, 2013, 12:31 PM   #162
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Re: Little Mo. Big Al and 50s tennis

I searched for this title to no avail. If it ever was published, it was probably a very limited run.

GOLDEN GIRL LEAVES LEGACY WITH BOOK
The Miami Herald
Sunday, February 19, 1989
JIM MARTZ

Karol Fageros Short raised more than $1 million for the American Cancer Society before she died of the disease last April at age 53. She left another legacy -- an autobiography, Heaven Will Have to Wait, reminiscing about growing up in Miami and becoming noted as the Golden Girl of tennis.

With the help of her longtime friend and former tennis student Julie Murphy, she completed the manuscript shortly before her death. It has yet to be published, but excerpts appear in the March issue of World Tennis magazine.

Fageros, who married Miami attorney Gene Short in 1962 and had three daughters, talks about shamateurism when amateurs were paid under the table. She writes of "Uncle" Eddie Herr of Miami Beach finding ways to promote her and his daughter Sue in tournaments.

She also recalls the publicity stunt in 1957 at Miami Beach's Roney Plaza Hotel when she played an exhibition match and for the first time wore gold lame panties.

"I hit about three balls and, all of a sudden, it felt like my pants had given way," she writes. "What we hadn't known about gold lame is that it must be stitched in a certain way or it expands."

Fageros soon found more durable material and shocked the tennis world with her gold panties at the French Championships a month later and became known as the Golden Goddess of tennis.

In 1957, she was ranked as high as sixth in the world. She turned pro in 1959 and toured with Althea Gibson as the opening act for the Harlem Globetrotters. A bus accident in 1961 ended her competitive career.

"Her husband and I want the book to be a success so she can leave something behind," Murphy said. "She felt she came along too soon, as many others have who played before tennis became big-time.

"There are five chapters on her cancer. It's the reason she did the book, to help others who have cancer. We're still shopping the manuscript. There's also talk of a TV movie with Lynda Carter. But everything out there is dangling."

MCENROE AT 30

John McEnroe, who turned 30 Thursday, says he has something left before ending his career --winning one of the Grand Slam tournaments. "Wimbledon, the U.S. and the Australian Open are my likely targets. Jimmy (Connors) won Wimbledon at 32. Thus, those things can happen." . . . If the all-time women's tennis greats met in a tournament,
who would win? Historian Ted Tinling says Steffi Graf, who beats Maureen Connolly in the final in his make-believe event in World Tennis. . . . Manuela Maleeva, Stephanie Rehe, Sylvia Hanika, Arantxa Sanchez and Helen Kelesi joined the field in the $300,000 Virginia Slims of Florida March 13-19 at the Polo Club of Boca Raton. The field already includes Graf, Chris Evert and Gabriela Sabatini. Tickets are available through Ticketmaster or
Liddun International, 491-7115 in Broward County and 407-395-8512 in Palm Beach County.

TV SHOW EXPANDS

What started in 1984 as Inside Florida Tennis and in 1987 became nationally syndicated as Inside World Tennis is now the Tennis Magazine Show. It's co-produced by Grand Slam Communications of Delray Beach and Tennis Magazine of Connecticut. Program founder Carl Foster, owner of the South Florida Breakers of Domino's Pizza TeamTennis, is co-executive producer. The show appears in South Florida on Thursdays on SportsChannel Florida at 6 p.m. and the Sunshine Network at 7 p.m., and it's on Channel 19 (WAQ) in
West Palm Beach at 4 p.m. Sundays. . . . Rod Mandelstam, University of Miami tennis All-American in the early 1960s, is in charge of construction at the new Association of Tennis Professionals headquarters at Ponte Vedra near Jacksonville. Mandelstam runs a tennis consulting firm in Miami, Dimensional Tennis Systems, and he recently became associated with the Miami law firm Adorno, Zeder, Allen and Yoss. . . . Leo Fullwood, 68, is retiring as a teaching pro, and he and his wife Barbara are selling their Coral Oaks Tennis Club in South Dade to 16 members headed by Robert Kimmell and Maurice Alpert. . . . The U.S. Professional Tennis Association will hold a certification training course March 17-18 at Kings Bay Resort in Miami and a teachers course March 16-18 at Saddlebrook Resort near Tampa. Call 813-973-3777. . . . The 2-year-old Eddie Herr International Junior Invitational at Eagle Trace in Coral Springs has earned International Tennis Federation sanction. This year's event will be Dec. 4-9.
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Old Jun 19th, 2013, 01:18 PM   #163
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Re: Little Mo. Big Al and 50s tennis

Thanks AR!

I look forward to any more of these you have. If Karol's book was never published perhaps the manuscript lies in a library or at least the Tennis Hall of Fame.
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Old Jun 21st, 2013, 12:40 PM   #164
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Re: Little Mo. Big Al and 50s tennis

Nancy Chaffee, 73; Ranked 4th in Women's Tennis in '51
August 13, 2002
LISA DILLMAN
LOS ANGELES TIMES

Nancy Chaffee, who was once ranked as high as No. 4 in the world in tennis, died in
Coronado on Sunday of complications from cancer. She was 73.

She was diagnosed with the disease on Valentine's Day, according to her husband of
11 years, veteran network sportscaster Jack Whitaker.

Chaffee, who was raised in Ventura, played tennis during the era of Maureen Connolly,
Doris Hart and Shirley Fry. She reached the semifinals of what is now called the U.S. Open in 1950 as an unseeded player. A year later, at that event, Chaffee and her partner,
Patricia Todd, lost in the doubles final to Fry and Hart.

From 1950 to 1952, Chaffee won the U.S. women's national indoors singles titles, which included a victory over legend Althea Gibson in the 1950 final.

Her highest world ranking came in 1951 just after Connolly, Hart and Fry.

Although Chaffee won the national girls' 18-and-under title in 1947, she didn't compete
at Wimbledon until 1950.

A Los Angeles sportswriter helped her raise the necessary funds by writing a column,
suggesting a "Chaffee to Wimbledon fund."

In 1951, Chaffee married baseball star Ralph Kiner. She is survived by their children, Michael, Scott and Kathryn, who is married to golf pro Robin Freeman; three granddaughters; and two grandsons.

In later years, Chaffee was active in fund-raising. In 1992, she helped start an amateur
mixed doubles tournament in East Hampton, N.Y., raising funds for the American Cancer Society.

A funeral service will be held Friday in Palm Desert, Whitaker said.
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Old Jul 1st, 2013, 01:02 PM   #165
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Re: Little Mo. Big Al and 50s tennis

SUZANNE HERR FELDMAN, TENNIS PLAYER
The Miami Herald
Sunday, March 4, 1990
JIM MARTZ

Suzanne Herr Feldman, a tennis pro who lived in Dade and Broward counties, died Saturday in Hollywood after a 4 1/2-year battle with cancer.

She was 55.

Her father, Eddie Herr, founded the Orange Bowl tennis match at Flamingo Park in Miami Beach in 1948 because his daughter Suzanne and her friends needed tournament competition.

Columnist and television commentator Bud Collins wrote in World Tennis magazine in 1978 that "Suzie Herr launched hundreds of tennis players toward better times" at the Orange Bowl match, which today is recognized as the world's premier junior tennis event.

In 1950, 15-year-olds Suzanne Herr of Miami Beach, Maureen Connolly of California and Karol Fageros of Miami played in the U.S. Lawn Tennis Association Intersectionals in Philadelphia.

All three went on to pro tennis careers. Suzanne Herr Feldman earned a No. 14 national junior ranking and played three years on the pro tour; Maureen Connolly Brinker won Wimbledon and the U.S. National championships; and Karol Fageros Short earned a top-10 ranking and played in the Wightman Cup.

They had something else in common: All three died of cancer. Mrs. Brinker died in 1969, Mrs. Short in 1988.

Mrs. Feldman first played at Forest Hills when she was 16 and won her first match. She later worked as a teaching pro at Aventura, Hillcrest in Hollywood and Pembroke Lakes in Pembroke Pines.

She is survived by her father, Eddie Herr, who also founded the Sunshine Cup and Continental Players Cup junior tournaments; her husband Dr. Marvin Feldman, a radiologist; a daughter, Karen, a lawyer in New York City; and a son, Glenn, a lawyer in Miami.

Funeral services will be at 11 a.m. Monday at Levitt-Weinstein Beth David Chapel and interment will be at Beth El Cemetery, both in Hollywood.
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