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Old Apr 1st, 2013, 01:16 AM   #106
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Re: 1983

CONNORS, EVERT BREEZE
The Miami Herald
Saturday, May 28, 1983
From Herald Wire Services

Jimmy Connors, seeking the only Grand Slam title to elude him, and Chris Evert Lloyd, aiming for her third straight Grand Slam tournament victory, followed each other on center court Friday and then into the fourth round of the $1.1-million French Open championships.

Connors roared past clay-court specialist Hans Gildemeister, 6-3, 6-1, 5-7, 6-1, and Evert swept past Evonne Goolagong Cawley, 6-2, 6-2, in just 77 minutes.

While the two Americans were making their way into the round of 16, French police were providing extra security for Swedish players, including defending champion Mats Wilander, after a kidnap threat from an Armenian terrorist group. Tournament Director Christian Duxin said the French interior ministry had been contacted about the threat.

A spokesman at the Swedish embassy confirmed a player had received a telephone call saying one of the Swedes at Roland Garros would be kidnapped because an Armenian terrorist had been tried on drug charges in Stockholm.

On court, Gildemeister looked as if he was in need of protection as Connors raced through the first two sets in devastating style.

Connors, who played in his first French Open 10 years ago, seemed to lose his concentration in the third set, but he finished off Gildemeister with a flourish in the next set. In one stretch Connors reeled off 15 straight points to take a 4-1 lead.

"I am playing much better on clay now," he said. "I am not trying to go so close to the lines. I am happy to keep the ball in play, and I don't mind hitting 15 to 20 balls before winning a point."

Connors is trying to become the first American man to win this event since Tony Trabert in 1955.

In other top men's matches, third-seeded Ivan Lendl beat Mario Martinez, 6-0, 6-2, 3-6, 6-0; sixth-seeded Yannick Noah beat Pat Dupre, 7-5, 7-6, 6-2, and 12th-seeded Brian Gottfried beat Magnus Tideman, 3-6, 6-3, 6-0, 6-0.

In the top women's match, Evert was never pressured by Goolagong, who is making a comeback after the birth of her second child.

"Evonne hasn't played much tennis over the last few years and needs a lot more matches," Evert said. "I am amazed she can run around on court as much as she does, especially after having had two children."

The two friendly adversaries, who first met in the 1972 Wimbledon semifinals, last faced other in the 1980 Wimbledon final, which Goolagong won. This time, Goolagong, 31, could not match Evert's accuracy on the slow clay.

Others reaching the round of 16 were third-seeded Andrea Jaeger, 6-0, 3-6, 6-2 over Beverly Mould; eighth-seeded Hana Mandlikova, 6-0, 6-1 over Anne White, and Kathy Horvath, 6-4, 7-5 over 15th-seeded Claudia Kohde.

Meanwhile, Marshall Happer, administrator of the Men's International Professional Tennis Council, set up an inquiry into press reports that second-seeded John McEnroe shouted obscenities at linesmen and kicked a press camera during his first-round match against Ben Testerman.

Happer, who arrived in Paris Thursday night, said: "I have received reports of these things, but the chair umpire and the supervisor did not see them. They cannot take action on things they did not see."

Happer said officials also were reviewing incidents in McEnroe's second-round match against Alberto Tous of Spain.

"If we establish that press reports are true, then action will be taken," Happer said. "We will not put up with obscenities on the court."

Men

Third round--Jimmy Connors (1) d. Hans Gildemeister, 6-3, 6-1, 5-7, 6-1; Ivan Lendl (3) d. Mario Martinez, 6-0, 6-2, 3-6, 6-0; Yannick Noah (6) d. Pat Dupre, 7-5, 7-6, 6-2; Brian Gottfried (12) d. Magnus Tideman, 3-6, 6-3, 6-0, 6-0.

Eric Fromm d. Pablo Arraya, 2-6, 6-4, 6-4, 6-1; Christophe Roger-Vasselin d. Heinz Gunthardt, 3-6, 4-6, 7-6, 6-3, 6-1; Fernando Luna d. Mike DePalmer, 6-1, 4-6, 7-5, 6-0; John Alexander d. Mel Purcell, 4-6, 6-1, 6-3, 6-7, 6-3.

Women

Third round--Chris Evert Lloyd (2) d. Evonne Goolagong, 6-2, 6-2; Andrea Jaeger (3) d. Beverly Mould, 6-0, 3-6, 6-2; Hana Mandlikova (8) d. Anne White, 6-0, 6-1; Andrea Temesvari (10) d. Yvona Brzakova, 6-2, 6-3; Kathy Horvath d. Claudia Kohde (15), 6-4, 7-5.

Gretchen Rush d. Manuela Maleeva, 2-6, 6-2, 6-2; Ivanna Madruga Osses d. Lisa Bonder, 6-3, 6-4; Helena Sukova d. Natalie Herreman, 6-4, 6-2; Anne Hobbs d. Amy Holton, 6-2, 6-2.
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Old Apr 25th, 2013, 01:15 AM   #107
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Re: 1983

HORVATH HALTS MARTINA'S STREAK
The Miami Herald
Sunday, May 29, 1983
From Herald Wire Services

Martina Navratilova's winning streak ended at 39 matches in stunning fashion Saturday as she fell victim to a 17-year-old who considered leaving the women's pro tennis tour last year because of a bad back.

Unseeded Kathy Horvath pulled the biggest upset of the French Open -- and the biggest of the season -- with a 6-4, 0-6, 6-3 victory over top-seeded Navratilova, the defending champion and dominant player on the women's tour for the past year and a half.

"I feel great," said Horvath, who advanced to the quarterfinals against Yugoslavian Mima Jausovec, the French Open winner in 1977. "This was the first time she lost this year, and she only lost three times last year. I'm glad to be one of the ones to beat her."

Also Saturday, John McEnroe was fined $3,000 for misbehaving during a first-round match with Ben Testerman last week. McEnroe was in a quiet, subdued mood later as he beat Drew Gitlin, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3, 6-1, to advance to the final 16.

The packed crowd of 16,000 at Roland Garros Stadium watched in astonishment as Horvath, ranked No. 33 in the world, fell behind, 2-4, in the first set and swept the next four games to win it.

Navratilova hammered Horvath in the second set, and the crowd then seemed to sit back in anticipation that Horvath would quietly submit in the final set.

But Horvath found her winning combination again and mixed her shots perfectly, charging the net and foiling Navratilova's volleys with topspin lobs.

Horvath broke to a 2-0 lead before Navratilova rallied to tie the score, 3-3. After holding serve, Horvath scored a crucial break in the eighth game. Navratilova, down 15-40, double-faulted to fall behind, 3-5. Horvath rallied from break point in the next game and clinched the victory when Navratilova hit the net with a backhand after a long rally, ending the one- hour 45-minute match.

Navratilova, who lost only four sets during her winning streak, had not lost a match since December in the finals of the Australian Open against Chris Evert Lloyd. But Navratilova took her loss to Horvath well and was even joking with reporters afterward.

"I can see the headlines now," Navratilova said. "I knew she had been playing better lately. People told me her forehand was better than her backhand, but I found out today her backhand is nothing to sneeze at."

Horvath, who lives in Largo, Fla., turned pro at age 14 but had to give up tennis for part of last year after she developed a lower-back disc problem. She didn't touch a racquet for four months, but after consulting doctors and exercising to stretch her muscles, Horvath began playing again last October.

Horvath won $49,828 on the tour last year; Navratilova won $1.4 million.

McEnroe's fines were announced by Marshall Happer, administrator of the Men's International Professional Tennis Council.

McEnroe was fined $1,500 for physical abuse -- kicking a press photographer's camera -- and $1,500 for verbal abuse of linesmen.

The fines brought the total penalties against McEnroe in the last year to $5,750. If McEnroe gets slapped with more fines in the event and the total exceeds $7,500, he would automatically be suspended from Grand Prix tournaments for six weeks, meaning he would miss Wimbledon.

Men

Third round--Jimmy Arias d. Marcos Hocevar, 6-4, 5-7, 7-6, 6-2; Eliot Teltscher d. Patrice Kuchna, 6-3, 7-6, 6-3; John McEnroe d. Drew Gitlin, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3, 6-1; Mats Wilander d. Dominique Bedel, 6-1, 4-6, 6-4, 6-1; Jose Higueras d. Jaime Fillol, 6-4, 6-2, 6-4; Andres Gomez d. Shlomo Glickstein, 4-6, 7-5, 6-3, 3-6, 6-4; Guillermo Vilas d. Ilie Nastase, 6-1, 6-2, 6-1; Henrik Sunstroem d. Joachim Nystroem, 7-5, 6-3, 2-6, 6-1.

Women

Fourth round--Mima Jausovec d. Cathy Tanvier, 6-3, 6-3; Kathy Horvath d. Martina Navratilova (1), 6-4, 0-6, 6-3; Jo Durie d. Kathy Rinaldi, 6-3, 5-7, 6-1; Tracy Austin d. Kathy Jordan, 6-3, 6-1.
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Old Apr 25th, 2013, 01:15 AM   #108
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Re: 1983

NAVRATILOVA'S STREAK SNAPPED
The Philadelphia Inquirer
Sunday, May 29, 1983
Associated Press

Martina Navratilova, unbeaten since December, was conquered at the French Open tennis championships yesterday by unseeded 17-year-old Kathy Horvath, who dumped the defending champion, 6-4, 0-6, 6-3, in the fourth round.

Meanwhile, John McEnroe was slapped with a $3,000 fine for his behavior during a first-round match with Ben Testerman last week. The New Yorker seemed subdued later yesterday when he beat Drew Gitlin, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3, 6-1, in a third-round match and advanced to the final 16.

Horvath, of Largo, Fla., overcame a stiff wind on center court at Roland Garros Stadium to stop the top-seeded Navratilova and her winning streak of 39 straight matches.

Also advancing were defending champion Mats Wilander, No. 4 Guillermo Vilas and Americans Tracy Austin, Eliot Teltscher and Jimmy Arias, the Italian Open winner.

Navratilova, last beaten by Chris Evert Lloyd in the final of the Australian Open, blamed her defeat on poor tactics in the windy conditions.

"I should have driven my backhand," she said. "I played too many sliced backhands, and they didn't carry in the wind. She played well, but it was as well as I allowed her."

Horvath repeatedly raced to the net and met Navratilova's shots with volleys. Her double-grip backhand volley never failed in the match. "I beat Martina, I beat Martina," she shouted in a telephone call to her parents in Florida after the victory.

Horvath won four games in a row after trailing 2-4 in the first set. She was hopelessly outplayed in the second, but in the third she matched everything Navratilova could offer.

In other matches, Austin advanced by beating Kathy Jordan of King of Prussia, Pa., 6-3, 6-1; Britain's Jo Durie beat No. 12 Kathy Rinaldi, 6-3, 5-7, 6-1; and Mima Jausovec of Yugoslavia defeated Catherine Tanvier of France, 6-3, 6-3.

Meanwhile, McEnroe, the No. 2 seed, was brilliant in the last two sets of his match against Gitlin. He behaved faultlessly and gave only a puzzled look when he got a questionable line call.

After an inquiry that involved videotapes and testimony from witnesses, McEnroe was fined $1,500 for physical abuse - kicking a photographer's camera - and $1,500 for verbal abuse of linesmen.

The fines brought the total penalties against McEnroe in the last year to $5,750. If he exceeds the limit of $7,500, he would be automatically suspended from Grand Prix tournaments for six weeks - a ban that would mean missing Wimbledon.

Sweden's Wilander, the No. 5 seed, was his usual cool self despite kidnapping threats and beat France's Dominique Bedel, 6-1, 4-6, 6-4, 6-1. Threats were made to a Swedish newspaper that a Swedish player in Paris would be kidnapped as hostage for an Armenian being held in Sweden on narcotics charges.

In other matches, Vilas beat Ilie Nastase, 6-1, 6-2, 6-1; Teltscher, seeded 10th, beat Patrice Kuchna, 6-3, 7-6, 6-3; Arias, seeded No. 11, defeated Marcos Hocevar, 6-4, 5-7, 7-6, 6-2; Jose Higueras, No. 8, beat Jaime Fillol, 6-4, 6-2, 6-4; Henrik Sundstrom, No. 14, beat Joachim Nystrom, 7-5, 6-3, 2-6, 6-1; and Andres Gomez, seeded 16th, beat Shlomo Glickstein, 4-6, 7-5, 6-3, 3-6, 6-4.
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Old Apr 25th, 2013, 12:35 PM   #109
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Re: 1983

Wonderful reading Mrs A.

Had reporters only known the Horvath shocker would be Martina's ONLY defeat of the year perhaps the reporting on the match would have been bigger.

Martina sounds like she was gracious in defeat. My memory wants to say there was a big debate in the Navratilova camp tactically over this result. Renee Richards favoring one tactic and Nancy Lieberman the other.

Anyone have more details on that?

The morsels I've read here make me want to watch it more.
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Old Apr 25th, 2013, 03:48 PM   #110
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Re: 1983

I've read Martina's autobiography, and she talks about that match. She said that Renee had advised her to stay back and wait for Horvath to make mistakes instead of coming in and forcing the issue. She said that ended up being the wrong choice.

Martina also said that she looked up and saw that Renee and Nancy weren't sitting together at some point in the match, and that distracted her as well.
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Old Apr 25th, 2013, 07:24 PM   #111
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Re: 1983

Quote:
Originally Posted by tommyk75 View Post
I've read Martina's autobiography, and she talks about that match. She said that Renee had advised her to stay back and wait for Horvath to make mistakes instead of coming in and forcing the issue. She said that ended up being the wrong choice.

Martina also said that she looked up and saw that Renee and Nancy weren't sitting together at some point in the match, and that distracted her as well.
Richards would end up getting booted from Team Navratilova shortly after this. I'll probably run across an article about it soon. If I recall correctly, Lieberman would leave Team Navratilova in 1984 or so. (Both eventually were recalled to duty.)

Rummaging through the Google news archives doesn't yield much, just a few extra quotes.

Navratilova: "I'm certainly not happy about it, but I knew I had to lose sooner or later. Losing today certainly has not set a tone for the rest of the year, though. It isn't a disaster for me. The pressure is off now."

And: "It's much more interesting when I get beat by someone like Kathy rather than someone like Chris (Evert Lloyd)."

Horvath: "I recovered my confidence in the third set and felt I should go for it."
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Old Apr 25th, 2013, 07:28 PM   #112
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Re: 1983

CONNORS, EVERT, LENDL, JAEGER GAIN QUARTERFINALS
The Miami Herald
Monday, May 30, 1983
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Top-seeded Jimmy Connors, playing an aggressive sort of game not normally seen on clay, raced past Eric Fromm, 6-2, 6-1, 6-1, Sunday to gain the quarterfinals of the French Open Tennis Championships.

Chris Evert Lloyd, now the favorite for the women's title, had a bit more difficulty, dropping her first set of the tournament before overcoming 18-year-old Helena Sukova of Czechoslovakia, 6-2, 3-6, 6-3.

Third-seeded Ivan Lendl, meanwhile, wore down Brian Gottfried, 7-6, 6-4, 6-3, in a baseline battle lasting 2 1/2 hours. Yannick Noah, bidding to be the first French winner of the title in 37 years, downed John Alexander of Australia, 6-2, 7-6, 6-1, as the crowd at Roland Garros Stadium shouted encouragement.

In woman's matches, No. 3 Andrea Jaeger defeated Britain's Anne Hobbs, 6-2, 6-4; Gretchen Rush of Pittsburgh defeated Ivanna Madruga-Osses of Argentina, 6-3, 6-2, and No. 8 Hana Mandlikova defeated Andrea Temesvari of Hungary, 6-2, 6-1.

Connors, whose reputation has been made on faster surfaces, said he is enjoying playing on clay. Unlike veteran claycourt players who stick to the baseline, Connors raced about center court, hitting numerous winning volleys against Fromm.

"I have never felt as comfortable as this on clay before," Connors said. "I don't know why I am feeling so good and why I am playing so well. Last year, I decided to improve my serve, to attack more and go to the net more. That's what's helping me here."

Connors is seeded to meet No. 2 John McEnroe in the final. No American has won the French Open title since Tony Trabert in 1955.

Evert is now favored to win the women's title since Martina Navratilova, the defending champion, was upset by 17-year-old Kathy Horvath Saturday. But Chris' victory wasn't an easy one as Sukova excited the fans in the second set by keeping her off balance with drop shots.

"I guess drop shots are the way to beat me," Evert said." Helena played a lot of good shots, but she also played some bad ones. I don't think she moves very well. But she serves and volleys well, and she could be tough on grass."

Against Lendl, Gottfried had a set point at 6-5 in the first set. At the end, he saved four match points before going under.

The next-to-last play was held up for several minutes when Gottfried, after losing a long rally, wanted it played again because he thought his own service had been long.

Lendl and Noah will face each other in the quarterfinals, while Connors meets another Frenchman, Christophe Roger-Vasselin, the only unseeded player left in the lineup. He beat Fernando Luna of Spain, 6-2, 6-3, 1-6, 6-1.

Eight men -- including McEnroe and defending champion Mats Wilander of Sweden -- still must play their fourth-round matches.

The Jaeger-Hobbs match was played in a cold wind at the start of the day. Jaeger, who has been suffering from laryngitis, told newsmen in a croaking voice, "There seems to be a virus going around. It is hard to get rid of. You should really sweat it out, but you can't because it's so cold.

"It has cut down my practice, and I think it affects my game a little. But I play with my racquet, not my throat."

In the quarterfinals, Evert will meet Mandlikova, and Jaeger will meet Rush, who has not yet turned professional. Horvath will face Mima Jausovec of Yugoslavia, and Tracy Austin will meet Britain's Jo Durie.
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Old Apr 27th, 2013, 01:38 AM   #113
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Re: 1983

MCENROE ADVANCES, BUT AUSTIN IS UPSET
The Philadelphia Inquirer
Tuesday, May 31, 1983
Associated Press

John McEnroe, below his best form but on his best behavior, beat fellow American Eliot Teltscher 6-3, 3-6, 6-4, 6-1 yesterday and moved into the quarterfinals of the French Open tennis championships.

But McEnroe was upstaged by Jo Durie, a tall Briton with a powerful forehand, who beat fourth-seeded Tracy Austin 6-1, 4-6, 6-0 in the women's quarterfinals.

U.S. teenagers Jimmy Arias and Kathy Horvath also were losers at Roland Garros Stadium.

Arias, 18, who won the Italian Open before coming to Paris, was stopped, 7-5, 6-3, 6-2, by fourth-seeded Guillermo Vilas, whose greater experience and all-around stroke play prevailed.

Horvath, 17, who dumped defending champion Martina Navratilova in the previous round, failed to get past Yugoslavia's Mima Jausovec, who outclassed her, 6-1, 6-1.

In another match, Jose Higueras of Spain topped Andres Gomez of Ecuador, 7-6, 6-4, 7-6.

McEnroe, fined $3,000 earlier in the tournament for verbally abusing a linesman and kicking a photographer's camera, did not dispute a decision in his match against Teltscher. But he did not play his best tennis, either.

"I think I am capable of playing better on clay than I did the last time I competed here two years ago," he said afterward, "but it has taken me a little longer than I expected to find my rhythm."

McEnroe now moves into the quarterfinals against Sweden's Mats Wilander, the defending champion, who gunned away patiently on the slow clay to defeat his compatriot Hendrik Sundstrom, 6-4, 6-1, 6-3.

By beating Austin, Durie moved into the semifinals - a stage she has not reached in a major tournament.

Austin had more than her share of unforced errors against Durie and called the third set "one of the worst of my career."

Durie, 22, almost won in two sets, coming within a point of a 5-3 lead in the second set when the umpire overruled a linesman's call and gave the vital point to Austin. Austin then won three straight games to take the set and even the match.

But Durie raced through the final set, dropping only seven points. She lost only one point in three service games.

Arias never had a chance against Vilas, winner of the title in 1977, but Vilas was generous in his praise of the young American.

"He has been around for two or three years, but he is still only 18," Vilas said. "We can expect much more from him. He has a very good forehand. I think he needs to improve his service a little."

Second-seeded Chris Evert Lloyd, a four-time winner and a clear favorite since Navratilova's defeat, will meet Hana Mandlikova of Czechoslovakia in one quarterfinal contest. Gretchen Rush, the 19-year-old amateur from Pittsburgh, meets third-seeded Andrea Jaeger in the other.
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Old May 2nd, 2013, 05:49 PM   #114
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Re: 1983

CONNORS IS OUSTED
The Philadelphia Inquirer
Wednesday, June 1, 1983
Associated Press

Christophe Roger-Vasselin, ranked 130th in the world, knocked out top-seeded Jimmy Connors from the French Open tennis championships yesterday and sent the partisan Parisian fans wild. The crowd exploded again later in the day when Yannick Noah, another Frenchman, joined Roger-Vasselin in the semifinals.

Moving into the women's semifinals were four-time champion Chris Evert Lloyd and Andrea Jaeger.

Roger-Vasselin, 25, played from the baseline of the slow, clay surface in trimming Connors, 6-4, 6-4, 7-6. Noah, who is seeded sixth, stopped third- seeded Ivan Lendl of Czechoslovakia, 7-6, 6-2, 5-7, 7-5.

John McEnroe is the sole American remaining in men's singles. He plays his quarterfinal match today against Mats Wilander. Wilander, 18, is the defending champion and perhaps the most formidable European clay baseliner.

It has been 28 years since an American has won the men's title in the world's premier clay court event. Tony Trabert won in 1954 and 1955.

Noah and Roger-Vasselin will face each other in the semifinals. It is the first time since 1946 that two Frenchmen have reached the semifinals.

The fans stood and cheered as Noah almost closed out his match against Lendl in straight sets. But he lost two match points at 5-4 in the third and dropped the set.

Evert defeated Hana Mandlikova of Czechoslovakia, 4-6, 6-3, 6-2. Jaeger stopped 19-year-old Gretchen Rush of Pittsburgh, the remaining amateur, 6-2, 6-2.

Lloyd, who is seeded No. 2, and Jaeger, No. 3, will meet in one semifinal. Mima Jausovec of Yugoslavia and Jo Durie of Britain, both unseeded, vie in the other.

Connors' defeat by a player ranked far below him was the kind of fate suffered by many top Americans in Roland Garros stadium through the years.

Roger-Vasselin, a Frenchman with an English mother, was born in London but long has been a resident in Paris. He played the classic European clay court game from the back of the court, stroking the ball patiently while Connors tried to step up the pace by going to the net and attacking.

In the attempt, Connors made a flood of forehand errors. His forehands spattered the net and the dusty area behind the far baseline.

In the third set, Connors led 4-0 and Roger-Vasselin appeared to be losing steam. But he came back to force a tiebreaker, and then Connors' error-prone forehand let him down again.

Roger-Vasselin won the tiebreaker, 7-5, as Connors made six backhand errors. Down 3-6, Connors saved two match points, then rushed the net, only to put a forehand volley into the net.

"That's tennis," Roger-Vasselin said. "Sometimes you lose to someone who is worse than you are, and sometimes you win against someone who is better."

Connors said: "There are guys who are specialists on slow surfaces and come out only to play on this stuff. Some of them don't come to Wimbledon or the U.S. Open.

"I play on everything, and so when I come over to European clay, I am at some disadvantage. But that's my own fault because I don't come to Europe two or three months in advance to prepare."

On paper, the likely winner of the women's title will be the winner of the Evert-Jaeger semifinal, but form has turned upside down from the start of the tournament. The upsets included defending champion Martina Navratilova's falling to 17-year-old Kathy Horvath.

Evert gained revenge for her defeat by Mandlikova in the 1981 final. The two traded shots from their baselines, but Evert was more ready to vary the pace with drop shots, and in the end she was the steadier.

The final set swayed back and forth with five of the first six games going against service. Evert came out of that leading 4-2; she then won two more long, fluctuating games to finish it. Mandlikova survived double break point in the seventh game to stay in contention, but Evert outlasted Mandlikova through the long rallies of the eighth and ninth games.

"I don't think I have yet reached my peak form in this tournament," Evert said, "But I'm still hoping to.

"Hana is a tough opponent on these courts. She made some terrible errors, but sometimes she hit brilliant winners."

Rush's winning streak ended with her going down fighting. She kept long rallies going against Jaeger and stretched their match to more than 1 1/2 hours before falling.

"I have played hard and I have enjoyed my time here," said Rush, a student at Trinity University in Texas. "It has all been a big thrill."

Rush said it never occurred to her to turn pro before the tournament so she could take a shot at the $70,000 first prize.

"I can play as much tennis as I want to at college and also do all the other things I want to," she said.
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Old May 2nd, 2013, 05:51 PM   #115
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Re: 1983

LLOYD SPOILS JAEGER'S PLANS
Philadelphia Daily News
Friday, June 3, 1983
United Press International

Four-time champion Chris Evert Lloyd, with one eye on a million-dollar bonus, scored a revenge victory over fellow-American Andrea Jaeger yesterday and Yugoslavia's Mima Jausovec outlasted Britain's Jo Durie to reach the final of the French Open championships.

Jaeger had hoped to celebrate her 18th birthday tomorrow by appearing in her second consecutive final here, but Evert Lloyd ran away with the 76-minute match, 6-3, 6-1, in an exact reversal of their 1982 semifinal clash.

Jausovec, who has lost all 13 previous meetings to Evert Lloyd, came from behind to edge Durie, 3-6, 7-5, 6-2, in her bid to recapture the crown she held four years ago.

Jaeger's dream shattered with the string of her favorite racket in the sixth game of the opening set, and she managed to win only one more game, failing to cope with the windy conditions.

While Jaeger dropped points with a stream of unforced forehand errors, Evert Lloyd played with the rhythm of a metronome, running away with the match after trailing, 3-2, in the opening set.

"It was the first match where I felt the ball," Evert Lloyd said. "We had some good rallies, getting 15 balls back. I made some good drop shots and I moved well."

Victory for Evert Lloyd, the U.S. and Australian open champion, tomorrow would mean a $1 million bonus if she manages to win at Wimbledon - the final leg of the Grand Slam.

"If it happens here, then I hope I can get really fired up for Wimbledon," Evert Lloyd said.

"I didn't take this match for granted and I could have. It'll be tough for me to get motivated for the final as I am not playing a big name. I don't want to jump the gun though. It is a huge thrill and it has been my goal all year."

While the women were settling their differences, eighth-seeded Spaniard Jose Higueras took just 17 minutes to win the last four games to complete a 6-2, 6-7 (1-7), 6-1, 4-6, 6-1 victory over Argentinian Guillermo Vilas in their men's quarterfinal.

The California-based Spaniard had been serving at 2-1 in the fifth set when the match was halted Wednesday night after the two players had been on court for 4 hours, 13 minutes.

Higueras's reward for his victory is a semifinal clash today against fifth- seeded Mats Wilander, Sweden's defending champion. No. 6 seed Yannick Noah, meets unranked fellow Frenchman Christophe Roger-Vasselin in the other.
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Old May 2nd, 2013, 05:52 PM   #116
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Re: 1983

EVERT, JAUSOVEC IN FRENCH FINAL
The Miami Herald
Friday, June 3, 1983
From Herald Wire Services

Chris Evert Lloyd rolled into the final of the French Open tennis championships Thursday, with only Mima Jausovec of Yugoslavia to beat for her fifth title in the event.

Evert defeated Andrea Jaeger, 6-3, 6-1, and said her game was peaking. Jausovec, the 1977 French Open champion who has lost all 13 of her matches with Evert, beat Jo Durie of Britain, 3-6, 7-5, 6-2.

In the men's quarterfinals, Jose Higueras of Spain, whose match was interrupted by rain and halted by darkness Wednesday night, won four straight games Thursday to complete a 6-2, 6-7, 6-1, 4-6, 6-1 upset of Guillermo Vilas of Argentina.

Higueras, who is seeded eighth, will face defending champion Mats Wilander of Sweden, the fifth seed, in the semifinals today. The other semifinal will match two Frenchmen -- No. 6 Yannick Noah and unseeded Christophe Roger-Vasselin.

Higueras, who has been suffering from tennis elbow, admitted later that he was worried about being able to complete his match.

"This morning, when I practiced before the match, I could not even serve," he said. "I was really scared. I think one day I will wake up and not be able to play tennis anymore. It goes worse and worse daily, slowly but surely."

Evert, who last won the French Open in 1980, clearly was in a confident mood. After taming Jaeger and the wind that swirled around the center court of Roland Garros stadium, she said, "Conditions were not easy, but this was the first match in which I felt on the ball. We had some good rallies getting 15 balls back."

Jaeger's hopes snapped with the string of her favorite racquet in the sixth game of the opening set, and she managed to win only one more game.

"I should not have let it bother me, but it did," said Jaeger, who began by breaking Evert's serve for a 2-0 lead. "You can never be sure with your racquets. I should have had that game for 4-2, but I lost it. One day you play with a racquet that is perfect, and the next day it is dead."

Yet it was not all one-sided. There were long rallies on the slow clay surface, and five long deuce games. Jaeger had three
break points in the sixth game of the first set, one in the first game of the second and two more in the final game, but Evert stroked the ball from her baseline with unfailing accuracy to win each key point.

A victory Saturday would give Evert her third straight Grand Slam title and a chance at a $1-million bonus, should she win Wimbledon next month. The International Tennis Federation awards a $1-million bonus to any player who wins four consecutive Grand Slam tournaments. Last year Evert won the U.S. Open and the Australian Open.

If she wins the French Open and Wimbledon, the ITF would recognize Evert as winner of the Grand Slam because she would hold all four titles at the same time. Most tennis observers, however, believe a Grand Slam can only be achieved by winning all four tournaments in the same calendar year.

The wind blew more strongly before Jausovec and Durie played, and the first rally brought a sign of things to come. A sliced backhand by Jausovec appeared to be good, but the ball was caught by the wind and taken far out of the court.

Jausovec managed only six points in five service games -- all losses -- in the first set. But later the wind subsided, Jausovec improved and Durie lost her way.

In the last two sets, Durie got her first service in only four times, but she was not dismayed.

"It has been a successful tournament for me," she said. "It is my first Grand Slam semifinal, and it will do my confidence a lot of good in the future."

Men's singles

QUARTERFINALS

Jose Higueras d. Guillermo Vilas, 6-2, 6-7, 6-1, 4-6, 6-1.

Men's doubles

Sherwood Stewart-Mark Edmondson d. Broderick Dyke-Belus Prajoux, 6-4, 7-5, 6-3.

Anders Jarryd-Henrik Simonssen d. Pavel Slozil-Tomas Smid, 6-2, 6-4, 6-4.

Women's singles

SEMIFINALS

Chris Evert Lloyd d. Andrea Jaeger, 6-3, 6-1.

Mima Jausovec d. Jo Durie, 3-6, 7-5, 6-2.
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Old May 2nd, 2013, 05:55 PM   #117
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Re: 1983

LLOYD CRUSHES JAEGER IN FRANCE, REACHES FINAL IN QUEST FOR FIFTH TITLE
The Philadelphia Inquirer
Friday, June 3, 1983
Associated Press

Chris Evert Lloyd sailed into the final of the French Open tennis championships yesterday, and only Mima Jausovec of Yugoslavia stands in the way of Lloyd's fifth title.

Lloyd, 28, defeated Andrea Jaeger, 6-3, 6-1, and said she believed that her game was peaking. Jausovec, 26, the 1977 French Open champion, overcame a bad start to oust Jo Durie of Britain, 3-6, 7-5, 6-2, in a battle between two unseeded long shots.

In the men's quarterfinals, Jose Higueras of Spain, whose match Wednesday night was interrupted by rain and halted by darkness, won four straight games when the match was resumed yesterday. He completed a 6-2, 6-7, 6-1, 4-6, 6-1 upset of Guillermo Vilas of Argentina.

Higueras, who is seeded eighth, faces defending champion Mats Wilander of Sweden, the fifth seed, in the semifinals today. The other semifinal is between two Frenchmen - No. 6 Yannick Noah and unseeded Christophe Roger- Vasselin.

Lloyd, who last won this prestigious clay-court crown in 1980, clearly was in a confident title-hunting mood.

After taming Jaeger and the wind that swirled around the center court of Roland Garros Stadium, she said: "Conditions were not easy, but this was the first match in which I felt on the ball. . . . I won the big points."

Jaeger began by winning the first two games. After that, she won only two of the remaining 14.

Yet it was not all one-sided. There were long rallies on the slow surface, as well as five long deuce games. Jaeger had three break points in the sixth game of the first set, one in the first game of the second and two more in the final game.

Each time, Lloyd's cool control, as she stroked the ball from her baseline with unfailing accuracy, kept the younger player at bay.

Jaeger, who turns 18 tomorrow - the day of the women's final - was runner- up to Martina Navratilova here last year, but she has not yet won a Grand Slam event.

Lloyd has won 14 - three Wimbledons, four French, six U.S. Opens and one Australian Open. This is her 34th Grand Slam tournament, and she has reached the semifinals in each.

A victory tomorrow against Jausovec, whom she has beaten all 13 times they have met, would give Lloyd her third straight Grand Slam title and a shot at a $1 million bonus if she should win Wimbledon next month.

The International Tennis Federation (ITF) awards any player who wins four consecutive Grand Slam tournaments a $1 million bonus. Lloyd last year won the U.S. Open and the Australian Open.

Also, if she wins both the French Open and Wimbledon, the ITF would recognize Lloyd as winning the Grand Slam, since she would hold all four titles at the same time. However, many tennis observers believe that a Grand Slam can be achieved only by victories in all four tournaments in the same calendar year.

In yesterday's match, Jaeger became upset by a line call when she trailed, 1-3, in the second set. She walked to the far end of the court and circled a ball mark on the clay inside the line.

Lloyd said later: "I never query bad calls when they go against me, so I don't query calls when they go in my favor. At that stage of the match, I don't think the point made much difference."

The wind got worse before Jausovec and Durie went on the court, and the first rally brought a sign of things to come. Jausovec's sliced backhand appeared to be good, but the ball was caught up by the wind and taken way out of the court.

Neither player overcame the conditions, and as many shots were lost on errors as were won by superior shot-making.
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Old May 2nd, 2013, 06:00 PM   #118
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Re: 1983

There is a bit of confusion about the Grand Slam bonus. Evert would have qualified for it at Wimbledon.

EVERT RULES FRENCH OPEN A 5TH TIME
The Miami Herald
Sunday, June 5, 1983
From Herald Wire Services

Chris Evert Lloyd moved neatly and methodically to a 6-1, 6-2 victory over Mima Jausovec Saturday, winning the French Open tennis title for a record-tying fifth time and reaching the halfway mark of a Grand Slam bonus of $1 million.

The men's title will be decided today (9 a.m., Chs. 5, 7) when Yannick Noah, seeking to become the first Frenchman since Marcel Bernard in 1946 to win the French Open , plays 18-year-old defending champion Mats Wilander of Sweden.

Evert, who won $70,000, equaled the record of Margaret Smith Court of Australia. It was Evert's 15th Grand Slam title, nine fewer than Court's record total.

"I guess this was my fastest and easiest Grand Slam final," Evert said of her 65-minute match on the slow, clay center court of Roland Garros Stadium. "I think Mima had such a great tournament, and mentally she had a bit of a letdown. But even if she had been really strong today, I think I would still have won."

The International Tennis Federation later issued a statement on the confused situation regarding the Grand Slam. The ITF said Evert is three-quarters of the way toward winning the Grand Slam after her victories in the U.S., Australian and French Opens.

If Evert wins Wimbledon next month, the ITF will recognize her as a Grand Slam winner, even though the four titles would not have been won in the same calendar year.

The term Grand Slam was first coined in 1938 when Don Budge became the first player to win all four major titles in the same year. The feat has been matched by Maureen Connolly, Margaret Court and twice by Rod Laver.

While the ITF will recognize four consecutive titles, a number of tennis observers, including the U.S. Tennis Writers Association, say they will continue to recognize a Grand Slam only if the four titles are won in the same calendar year.

Evert is only halfway toward the $1-million bonus offered by the ITF Sept. 15 after the U.S. Open. To win the bonus, Evert has to win the Wimbledon and U.S. Open titles this year.

"I will let other people work this out," Evert said. "I'm not going to worry about it. I'm just going on to try to win Wimbledon."

Once again, Evert was the master of Roland Garros, where the ball bounces slowly and most rallies are fought from the baseline.

Enjoying the sunshine before a crowd of 16,500, Evert was a model of efficiency as she raced through the opening set in 20 minutes, losing just 13 points. Six of the points came in the fourth game, which Jausovec won on her third break point.

Evert's pinpoint placements and sliced drop shot were too much for Jausovec, who won $40,000. Whenever Jausovec tried the drop in return, she merely left the court open for Evert's two- fisted backhand and cross-court forehand.

Jausovec improved in the second set, holding service for the only time in the match to tie the score, 1-1. She then threatened to break in the next game, but Evert escaped and took a 5-1 advantage, serving for match.

Uncharacteristically, Evert lost her service to love before clinching the victory on Jausovec's serve in the next game.

"I think Chris played her best today," said Jausovec, who has lost all 14 of her matches with Evert. "She only missed two or three shots in the whole match, and it is difficult to play against that kind of form.

"She has played better with each match of this tournament."

A Swedish pair, Anders Jarryd and Hans Simonsson, won the men's doubles title, beating Mark Edmondson of Australia and Sherwood Stewart of the United States, 7-6, 6-4, 6-2, in the final.

In the men's singles, the red clay courts again were the Americans' graveyard. Jimmy Connors and John McEnroe both were tumbled out of the singles in the quarterfinals. No American has won the men's singles title since Tony Trabert in 1955.

Lloyd was asked why she had won the French title so often, while American men cannot seem to win here at all.

"It's because I come from Florida, which is clay-court territory," she said. "Most of our leading men, including Connors and McEnroe, were brought up on cement."
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Old May 2nd, 2013, 06:05 PM   #119
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Re: 1983

One net-rusher, one baseliner cop French titles
The Christian Science Monitor
Tuesday, June 7, 1983
William Echikson, Special to The Christian Science Monitor

Until he held up the champion's silver cup, Yannick Noah didn't think he could win the French Open.

''My coach told me before the tournament started that I could win,'' the talented 23-year-old recounted after he overpowered Mats Wilander 6-2, 7-5, 7-6 in the finals. ''But I didn't believe him for a minute.''

Lack of confidence, not athletic ability, has always been Noah's shortcoming. He would often lose his concentration and fold in big matches.

Noah has now shed this reputation as a loser. By becoming the first Frenchman since 1946 to win at Roland Garros, he proved to himself that he had the spirit as well as the talent of a champion.

Mental toughness was also the story among the women. Chris Evert Lloyd has always epitomized the competitive, confident, and concentrating champion, and she regally displayed all of these qualities to take her fifth title here by dispatching Mima Jausovec 6-1, 6-2 in just 65 minutes. Coupled with victories in last year's US and Australian Opens, she now simultaneously holds three Grand Slam titles for the first time in her career.

Even so, her determination and machine-like ground strokes have often not been enough to stop Martina Navratilova in recent years. Navratilova won in Paris last year and over the winter she had used her aggressive, all-court game to overpower Chris twice, both times in straight sets. As a result, she came into the tournament heavily favored.

But Navratilova has always suffered from bouts of self-doubt and could not muster the needed concentration in a third-round loss to American teen-ager Kathy Horvath, who snapped Martina's 39-match winning streak.

In contrast, when Evert Lloyd struggled to find her rhythm during her first few matches, she survived on sheer courage. Down against Helena Sukova, also in the third round, she hit her few good ground strokes when it counted and pulled through in three sets.

Evert Lloyd's superior concentration continued to carry her past Hana Mandlikova, the tremendously talented Czech, and Andrea Jaeger to a berth in the finals.

The match against Jaeger was particularly revealing. Andrea is perhaps the best of a seemingly endless series of teen-age baseliners who have joined the tour. Yet even she sometimes lacks the maturity and concentration needed of a champion.

When she ran into difficulties against Evert Lloyd, Jaeger moaned about everything from a broken string to a heavy gust to a bad bounce on the rain-soaked clay.

Playing in the same wind and on the same clay, Evert Lloyd never had a complaint. She always looked the mature champion, and she credits her positive attitude for her mastery over her younger rivals in big events.

''I think the reason I win is that I am more confident,'' she explained. ''I think there's a mental block for the other players. That's why Andrea or Hana don't make it through.''

Until this tournament, Noah had the same sort of difficulty surmounting mental barriers. His athletic brilliance, however, was recognized 12 years ago by Arthur Ashe during a goodwill tour of Cameroon in Africa. Ashe arranged for him to be sent to Paris for training. In France, he blossomed, displaying as much speed and power as any other player in the world.

An easy-going attitude, though, seemed to prevent him from developing the instincts needed to beat less-talented rivals. In two tournaments this year, he had match point, before proceeding to crumble and lose.

The French Open was his big test. Besides having the advantage of an enthusiastic hometown crowd, the red clay at Roland Garros is his favorite surface.

The clay slows shots down much more than grass or asphalt. It means that the slam-bang, serve-and-volley tactics favored by Americans are out, and partly explains why no American male has won here since Tony Trabert in 1955. This year, the top two seeds were Americans John McEnroe and Jimmy Connors, but neither showed enough patience for the clay to get past the quarterfinals.

The Europeans adore the surface. It favors their steady baseline games. Bjorn Borg won the French title six times, and last year, at 17, Borg's countryman Wilander used his steady strokes to become the tournament's youngest winner. Unlike Borg or Wilander, Noah uses an unorthodox attacking strategy on clay. The surface gives him time to hit his topspin strokes and to set up at net.

Still, many doubted whether an aggressive player without championship credentials could win the long, grueling matches customary in Paris.

He came through a confidence-building victory over Ivan Lendl in the quarterfinals, and followed with an easy victory over countryman Christophe Roger-Vasselin in the semis. His most severe test would come in the finals against Wilander, a master of baseline rallies who beat McEnroe in the quarterfinals and outlasted Jose Higueras in a five-hour semifinal match.

Attacking throughout the final, Noah never permitted the young Swede to lure him into long rallies. He hit his ground strokes deep enough to follow them to the net. There, he picked off most of Wilander's passing shots for winners.

For Noah, the moment was almost too good to be true. ''I came to France 11 years ago to become a tennis player,'' he said. ''Now its done. . .I know I am capable of winning again.''
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Old May 4th, 2013, 07:16 PM   #120
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Re: 1983

I guess Evert really wouldn't have qualified for the $1 million bonus. Kind of an odd stipulation and I'm sure it would have made for a lot of confusion.

Lloyd Chasing Grand Slam
The Sydney Morning Herald
June 6, 1983
Alan Trengrove

PARIS, Sunday. -- Chris Evert Lloyd will claim the grand slam if she follows up her French Open triumph yesterday by winning Wimbledon.

Evert Lloyd won the United States and Australian Open titles, and under a revised concept by the International Tennis Federation, she will be recognised as the third woman to achieve the grand slam if she succeeds at Wimbledon.

However, she will not be eligible to take the $1 million jackpot that the ITF is offering grand slam winners because the prize was not announced until after the US Open.

And she might not be acknowledged as a true grand slammer in her own country since the American press has decided that a grand slam must be achieved in one calendar year.

The relentless baseliner from Fort Lauderdale, Florida, won the 15th -- and easiest -- grand slam championship of her career when she outclassed Yugoslavia's Mima Jausovec 6-1, 6-2 in a 65-minute final.

Evert Lloyd said that the chance to equal Margaret Court's record of five French Open championships, as well as grab the third leg of the grand slam, gave her the determination to play her best.

"Now there is a lot of incentive for me to win Wimbledon," she said, "and I will be trying to get psyched up early in my matches."

A couple of years ago Evert Lloyd was hinting at an imminent retirement. Now she seems as hungry as ever to amass a collection of big titles.

She claims that her game is "mostly mental" and that mentally she has been at "a very high level" during the past three grand slam tournaments.

The rise of Martina Navratilova, who fell early in the French Open to 17-year-old Kathy Horvath but who has tended to overshadow Evert Lloyd for much of the past two years, is probably the main reason for this renewed dedication.

Evert Lloyd's pride as a great competitor has responded to the acclaim that has been showered on her rival, and she will not be really satisfied until she has stopped Navratilova's run of Wimbledon triumphs.

"Winning the Australian Open (in which she beat Navratilova in the final) really pumped me up," she said. "Last year I didn't play Martina at all until Wimbledon.

"It has helped me this year to play her twice. Even though I lost both times, I know her strengths and weaknesses. She is No. 1 and I'm No. 2, and that is helping, too.

"I made a commitment to play on all surfaces this year, and I am enjoying the practice, the competition, and even the pressure.

"Sometimes you think: 'Is it worth it?' But most of the time I am really happy to go through the pressure."

Evert Lloyd was in such command against Jausovec, who won the French title in 1977 and was runner-up in 1978, that the win gave little guide to her Wimbledon prospects.

Jausovec could not match the champion's baseline game, was afraid to go to the net, and played a string of inept dropshots that simply handed points to Evert Lloyd.

"I have lost a few times this year and what I need most is confidence," Evert Lloyd said. "If I had lost today it would have hurt me a lot."

The young Swedes Anders Jarryd and Hans Simmonsson, seeded No. 8, defeated unseeded Mark Edmondson, of Australia, and Sherwood Stewart, of the US, 7-6 6-4 6-2 in the men's doubles final.

The Swedes were faster, and better retrievers, and exploited some patchy play by Stewart. It was the seventh grand prix doubles title of their careers.

Australia scored a solitary success when Mark Kratzmann, of Queensland, and Simon Youl, of Tasmania, won the boys' doubles title by beating the Russians, Chesnokov and Olkhovski, 6-2 6-3.
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