Serve and Volley-40's tennis - Page 8 - TennisForum.com
TennisForum.com   Wagerline.com MensTennisForums.com TennisUniverse.com
TennisForum.com is the premier Women's Tennis forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.Please Register - It's Free!
Reply

Old Jul 18th, 2009, 06:16 PM   #106
Rollo
Moderator - BFTP
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 17,400
Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Serve and Volley-40's tennis

Info on Joe Hunt (a good friend of Bobby Riggs apparently) from Sports Illustrated.

http://vault.sportsillustrated.cnn.c...90/2/index.htm

Quote:
"He was good and knew it," says Pat Henry Yeomans, a onetime neighbor of the Hunts'. " Joe knew what he wanted, and he got it."
This would mean Pat knew your mom Well Praise Him. I suspect Pauline Betz did too-she was great friend of Riggs.

Quote:
One of the objects of his desire was another neighbor, noted for her knockout looks and punch on the tennis court. In 1935 Jacque Virgil was the No. 1 junior girl in Southern California. When Virgil became Mrs. Joe Hunt in 1943, she was still playing well enough to be accepted into the singles at Forest Hills and to play the mixed doubles with her new husband.
The world of tennis is small. The widowed Jacque Virgil Hunt married Winsor Rowley, a former Navy pilot, in 1949. She died in 1975, he in 1991, but her tennis bloodline continues. Two of her grandchildren, Brett and Carrie Rowley, 17 and 12, respectively, are ranked in Florida. Their father, Pike, played for Clemson. Their mother, the former Laurie Fleming, was Chris Evert's biggest girlhood rival in Fort Lauderdale and nationally.

"One of mother's best friends," says Pike, "was Elizabeth Froehling. You may remember her son [Frank Froehling III, who reached the final at Forest Hills in 1963]. But she went away, and nobody seemed to want to talk about it."

Elizabeth's death in 1963 in Los Angeles was ruled a suicide—an overdose of barbiturates. "We were divorced by then," says Frank Froehling Jr., her former husband, "but I was notified, just before young Frank played the national final. I didn't believe it was suicide, because Elizabeth was a Christian Scientist who never took a pill of any kind. The police didn't think so either. Some people suspected her husband, but the police said they didn't have a case. It looked kind of suspicious because her husband later shot himself dead. His family was prominent but had a lot of bad luck."
That it did. The husband who pulled the trigger on himself was Charlie Hunt, who had never flown as high as his kid brother, Joe.


Last edited by Rollo : Jul 18th, 2009 at 06:23 PM.
Rollo is online now View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 

Old Jul 18th, 2009, 06:31 PM   #107
Rollo
Moderator - BFTP
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 17,400
Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Serve and Volley-40's tennis

Not sure I've got my facts straight so here goes:


Jacque Virgil Hunt Fischer Rowley

Born c 1917
Died 1975 (aged 58)

nee Jacque (short for Jacqueline?) Virgil

by 1935 the #1 junior in Southern California

What happened between 1935-43??


Played US Nationals a few times:

1943-lost first round
1946-lost 2R to Pauline Betz as Mrs Fischer
1947-lost 2R to Doris Hart as Mrs Fischer.


Often in Southern Cal tennis draws.

Won La Jolla in 1937 and 1943 (as Hunt)

Listed as from Beverly Hills (Louise Brough went to Bev Hills High School)

1943-Md airman Joseph "Joe" Hunt(1919-1945) He died in Feb 1945 in plane crash in Daytona Florida.. Jacque and Joe were doubles partners in southern Cal events as early as 1936-losing one mixed match to Helen Wills. Note that the Hall of fame lists death as 1944-this is an error. His death was anounced in the New york Times in 1945.

-Joe Hunt-member of the Tennis Hall of Fame



c 1946 Md Andrew Fischer of New Jersey/New York.

1949 Md Winsor Rowley, Former Navy pilot.

Son Pike Rowley md to Laurie Fleming, prominent playe from the late 60s earlu 70s and an early rival to Chris Evert.

Grandkids Brett and Carrie.

Last edited by Rollo : Jul 18th, 2009 at 06:52 PM.
Rollo is online now View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 18th, 2009, 06:55 PM   #108
Rollo
Moderator - BFTP
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 17,400
Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Serve and Volley-40's tennis

Hunt vs Riggs-1940


Last edited by Rollo : Aug 6th, 2012 at 12:43 PM.
Rollo is online now View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 19th, 2009, 09:28 PM   #109
country flag newmark401
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 8,358
newmark401 is a name known to all newmark401 is a name known to all newmark401 is a name known to all newmark401 is a name known to all newmark401 is a name known to all newmark401 is a name known to all newmark401 is a name known to all newmark401 is a name known to all newmark401 is a name known to all newmark401 is a name known to all newmark401 is a name known to all
Re: Serve and Volley-40's tennis

This "Time" magazine article from September 1946 on Pauline Betz, published just before that year's US Nationals at Forest Hills, gives a good overview of her life and career up until that point:

The Perils of Pauline. Last week they were all in Boston, at suburban Brookline's venerable Longwood Cricket Club, the next-to-last stop on the tournament line. There the National Doubles Championships were at stake. The goal they were all shooting for— the U.S. Singles —begins this week at Forest Hills. The big names: 1) skyscraping Yvon Petra of France, Wimbledon winner; 2) solemn Frank Parker, the U.S. champion; 3) brilliant but unpredictable ex-Coast Guardsman Jack Kramer; 4) jugeared Bill Talbert, best of the wartime tournament regulars. Among the women, there was one whose name led all the rest—California's Pauline Betz.

At 27, Pauline, a friendly, attractive and aggressive American girl, is three-time winner of the U.S. Women's Singles. This week she will be out to win a fourth time — a feat that has been accomplished six times before. Pauline is a trim 5 ft. 5; her hair is strawberry blonde, sun bleached and wiry. Principally because of her green eyes she seems to have a ready-to-pounce, feline quality. A straightening of her shoulders is a characteristic mannerism — a squaring away that seems to symbolize in an otherwise relaxed girl, a won't-be-beat spirit.

As a tennis player, Pauline (who prefers to be called Bobbie) is an obvious cut or two below the all-time greats, Lenglen and Helen Wills Moody. But she has certain natural gifts of champions: she is cool; she is confident of winning; she has a quick eye and a good court sense; her footwork is superb. No matter how impossible a shot looks, she makes a dive at it. Says she: "I am a retriever."

On a cement court, which she likes best, her acrobatics are rough on the hands and knees; on a grass court, she grass-stains her starchy white outfit and doesn't mind. After a bad spill at Wimbledon this summer, she bounced up to wisecrack: "And they say it takes three weeks to get laundry done in England." As a court strategist, she rates alongside another Californian, ex-Champ Helen Jacobs. Say tennis writers sadly: if Pauline only had the strokes.

No foot-stamping. Experts debate whether her brilliant backhand (rated more powerful than Lenglen's but not as consistent) makes her other strokes look weak. Whatever the fact, sheer virtuosity is only relatively important to Pauline Betz. The thing that makes her go is a terrifying determination not to lose at anything—tennis or checkers, or gin rummy at a cent a point. Competition is the spice of her life. Says Pauline: "If I were a second-rater, I'd quit."

The Betz competitive urge is the kind that once kept powerful Molla Bjurstedt Mallory, a sturdy Scandinavian with square-cut bangs, at the head of the class during and after World War I. Neither of them went in for irate foot-stamping like Lenglen, nor walked off the court as Helen Wills Moody did in 1933 when it looked as if she would take a licking. When Pauline's hit-or-miss game misfires, she usually controls herself.

To keep her temper down, she has worked out a talking-to-herself routine for tough matches. Examples: when a linesman's decision goes against her, she tells herself that the other girl was going to win the point anyhow. When the crowd follows the old U.S. custom of rooting for the underdog (Pauline hasn't been one for four years), she assures herself that there is still one person on her side: Betz. When her game goes hopelessly haywire, she mutters to herself: "Well, my friend, do you like this as well as tennis?" Before a match she is nervous, and unable to keep her meals down; she quit eating pre-game lunches. But when red-haired Pauline gets out on the court, narrows her green eyes and sets her jaw, she is cool as a cucumber.

The Betz Club. Women's tennis, in the days of the fighting Helens—Moody and Jacobs, was a catty rivalry that was high in headline value and low in court manners. Betz is on wisecracking terms with her two principal rivals (also from California): San Francisco's chubby, red-haired Margaret ("Ozzie") Osborne and blonde Louise Brough (rhymes with rough) of Beverly Hills. All of Ozzie's strokes except the backhand (which is only good) are better than Betz's.

Because she is the current First Lady of Tennis, Pauline usually chooses what tournaments she will play, demands and gets top expense money. Since the rest of the girls have little choice but to tag along, women's tennis today is known as the Betz Club. Its eastern home is with Delaware's wealthy tennis fan William du Pont, who subsidizes Ozzie, Bruffie and a dozen or so lesser lady tennists as much as the watchdog of amateur tennis, the U.S.L.T.A., allows. Betz owns to having been helped financially at one time (it is permissible to accept "gifts"), but now she gets along on her own and the legitimate take.

Tennis for the King. The Betz Club got its first foreign seasoning in June. For the first time since 1938, the top five U.S. women players — Betz, Osborne, Brough, Pat Todd and Florida's Doris Hart — headed for England to play Britain's top women in Wightman Cup competition. The U.S. team blasted Britain's out-of-practice best off the courts in seven straight matches without dropping a set. Betz won the Wimbledon singles crown, a glory at least equal to the U.S. championship. In Paris three weeks later, Osborne handed Betz one of her few beatings. The Betz Club romped up to Sweden, and played barelegged before 88-year-old tennis bug King Gustav. Then the other club members returned to the U.S., but Pauline headed for a Swiss resort (Gunten) to celebrate her 27th birthday with Millionheiress Barbara Hutton. They swam, jitterbugged and went mountain-climbing for ten days — Pauline's longest vacation from tennis in ten years.

Something ladylike. Pauline Betz has had a tennis racket in her hands almost every day ever since she was nine. Her mother, a gym teacher at Los Angeles' Jefferson High School, put it there. Pauline is convinced that her mother set her playing tennis "to get me off the streets and doing something more ladylike." She was a tree-climbing tomboy. Every night when her father came home, Pauline and her younger brother greeted him by walking down the street on their hands. Papa complained once: "I wish I could see those children right side up once in a while."

From the time she was 16, and got her first real tennis instruction (from Bruce Ainley, pro at swank Town House), Pauline set the alarm clock for 5 a.m., took a basketful of balls to the practice court and worked on her strokes until it was time for school. At 21, she won a scholarship to Florida's tennis-conscious Rollins College, played No. 4 on the men's team and got enough As in the classroom to earn a scholarship in economics at Columbia. She didn't like Manhattan's weather, and quit Columbia after six months. At 23 she was national champion.

Hobnobbing with Headliners. She liked the life—checking in & out of hotels, hopping planes, eating in restaurants, hobnobbing with headline names. Winters, when the tournament season is over, she rarely spends an evening in the Betzes' small Los Angeles apartment, where the family serves vegetables in her sterling silver trophies. Usually she is to be found with movie folk, especially the Bill Powells. At the elegant Beverly Hills Tennis Club, she has little trouble beating Cinemactors Paul Lukas and Robert Taylor.

Men Are Better. But against topflight men tennists, Pauline, like all women players, is far behind. The 700-year-old French game of tennis, traditionally as much a lady's as a man's game, was introduced to the U.S. in 1874 by a woman, Mary E. Outerbridge. For 62 years women have played championship tennis at Wimbledon, at first in ankle-length gowns and long sleeves, yet no woman has ever done better than to beat the best men juniors. On the subject of male v. female in tennis, Pauline says: "It's ridiculous to compare them." Her reasons: a man anticipates the play better, runs faster, hits harder, lasts longer.

Pauline has had a succession of boyfriends, but says with a grin: "I can't find anyone who wants to be married one month out of the year." But she admits a fear of turning 30 without getting married. This spring she passed California's exam for real-estate saleswomen, and this winter will sell for a Beverly Hills firm which specializes in expensive homes with tennis courts and swimming pools. The firm, Lawrence Block, Inc., likes to dazzle prospective buyers with celebrity salesmen like onetime film star Rod La Rocque and Charles Christie, of early-day Christie Comedies' fame. Betz expects to be good at it.

Egg on Her Face. Last fall, after three years as national champion, Pauline Betz had her first major setback, from 33-year-old Sarah Palfrey Cooke, who came out of retirement to tournament play. Sarah took the crown away from Pauline at Forest Hills.

Pauline marched home to California, beaten and burned up — at herself. She sought out Eleanor Tennant, an old tennis teacher, who coached Champions Bobby Riggs and Alice Marble, once charged the movies' Marion Davies $1,000 a month for lessons. Teacher Tennant decided to buck Pauline up first. Says Eleanor: "When a gal has egg on her face, the first thing to do is let her know she is the world's greatest player."

Then came the details. Tennant, a believer in "easy does it" tennis, decided that Pauline's strength was in her killer instinct ("She has the quality of a stevedore"). So she strengthened Pauline's weak forehand by cutting two-thirds off the backswing and adding it to the follow-through. Her service was none too robust, so Eleanor Tennant concentrated on placement. When Pauline took her revamped tennis game on tour this summer, the egg was off her face. Teacher Tennant, who has taught them both, glowingly rated Betz above Alice Marble. Most tennis experts are content to call Pauline the best in a year which has no greats, and wait for the rest of the returns to come in before saying more.

1980's Verdict. Halfway through last week's doubles championships at Brookline, Pauline ran into trouble. Her big toe became infected, swelled up to twice its normal size. In the semifinals, teamed with Doris Hart, Pauline discarded sneakers, played in heavy woolen socks. They lost. (Osborne and Brough won their fifth doubles championship beating Mary Arnold Prentiss and Pat Todd.)

Just how the injury would affect Pauline's playing at Forest Hills this week, no one knew for sure. At Brookline, it interfered with her latest hobby: taking action pictures of her tennis-playing pals, with a new movie camera she bought in Switzerland. At Forest Hills, besides the newsreel cameramen focusing on her, she will have a friend filming her matches with a new camera. Says Pauline: "In 1980, I want to be able to say, 'See what grandma did!'"

---------------

[Pauline Betz will turn 90 on August 6, 2009. She won Forest Hills again in 1946, beating Doris Hart 11-9, 6-3 in the final.]

Last edited by newmark401 : Jul 20th, 2009 at 12:09 AM.
newmark401 is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 20th, 2009, 02:33 PM   #110
country flag iainmac
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 5,782
iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold
Re: Serve and Volley-40's tennis

Quote:
Originally Posted by newmark401 View Post
This "Time" magazine article from September 1946 on Pauline Betz, published just before that year's US Nationals at Forest Hills, gives a good overview of her life and career up until that point:

The Perils of Pauline. Last week they were all in Boston, at suburban Brookline's venerable Longwood Cricket Club, the next-to-last stop on the tournament line. There the National Doubles Championships were at stake. The goal they were all shooting for— the U.S. Singles —begins this week at Forest Hills. The big names: 1) skyscraping Yvon Petra of France, Wimbledon winner; 2) solemn Frank Parker, the U.S. champion; 3) brilliant but unpredictable ex-Coast Guardsman Jack Kramer; 4) jugeared Bill Talbert, best of the wartime tournament regulars. Among the women, there was one whose name led all the rest—California's Pauline Betz.

At 27, Pauline, a friendly, attractive and aggressive American girl, is three-time winner of the U.S. Women's Singles. This week she will be out to win a fourth time — a feat that has been accomplished six times before. Pauline is a trim 5 ft. 5; her hair is strawberry blonde, sun bleached and wiry. Principally because of her green eyes she seems to have a ready-to-pounce, feline quality. A straightening of her shoulders is a characteristic mannerism — a squaring away that seems to symbolize in an otherwise relaxed girl, a won't-be-beat spirit.

As a tennis player, Pauline (who prefers to be called Bobbie) is an obvious cut or two below the all-time greats, Lenglen and Helen Wills Moody. But she has certain natural gifts of champions: she is cool; she is confident of winning; she has a quick eye and a good court sense; her footwork is superb. No matter how impossible a shot looks, she makes a dive at it. Says she: "I am a retriever."

On a cement court, which she likes best, her acrobatics are rough on the hands and knees; on a grass court, she grass-stains her starchy white outfit and doesn't mind. After a bad spill at Wimbledon this summer, she bounced up to wisecrack: "And they say it takes three weeks to get laundry done in England." As a court strategist, she rates alongside another Californian, ex-Champ Helen Jacobs. Say tennis writers sadly: if Pauline only had the strokes.

No foot-stamping. Experts debate whether her brilliant backhand (rated more powerful than Lenglen's but not as consistent) makes her other strokes look weak. Whatever the fact, sheer virtuosity is only relatively important to Pauline Betz. The thing that makes her go is a terrifying determination not to lose at anything—tennis or checkers, or gin rummy at a cent a point. Competition is the spice of her life. Says Pauline: "If I were a second-rater, I'd quit."

The Betz competitive urge is the kind that once kept powerful Molla Bjurstedt Mallory, a sturdy Scandinavian with square-cut bangs, at the head of the class during and after World War I. Neither of them went in for irate foot-stamping like Lenglen, nor walked off the court as Helen Wills Moody did in 1933 when it looked as if she would take a licking. When Pauline's hit-or-miss game misfires, she usually controls herself.

To keep her temper down, she has worked out a talking-to-herself routine for tough matches. Examples: when a linesman's decision goes against her, she tells herself that the other girl was going to win the point anyhow. When the crowd follows the old U.S. custom of rooting for the underdog (Pauline hasn't been one for four years), she assures herself that there is still one person on her side: Betz. When her game goes hopelessly haywire, she mutters to herself: "Well, my friend, do you like this as well as tennis?" Before a match she is nervous, and unable to keep her meals down; she quit eating pre-game lunches. But when red-haired Pauline gets out on the court, narrows her green eyes and sets her jaw, she is cool as a cucumber.

The Betz Club. Women's tennis, in the days of the fighting Helens—Moody and Jacobs, was a catty rivalry that was high in headline value and low in court manners. Betz is on wisecracking terms with her two principal rivals (also from California): San Francisco's chubby, red-haired Margaret ("Ozzie") Osborne and blonde Louise Brough (rhymes with rough) of Beverly Hills. All of Ozzie's strokes except the backhand (which is only good) are better than Betz's.

Because she is the current First Lady of Tennis, Pauline usually chooses what tournaments she will play, demands and gets top expense money. Since the rest of the girls have little choice but to tag along, women's tennis today is known as the Betz Club. Its eastern home is with Delaware's wealthy tennis fan William du Pont, who subsidizes Ozzie, Bruffie and a dozen or so lesser lady tennists as much as the watchdog of amateur tennis, the U.S.L.T.A., allows. Betz owns to having been helped financially at one time (it is permissible to accept "gifts"), but now she gets along on her own and the legitimate take.

Tennis for the King. The Betz Club got its first foreign seasoning in June. For the first time since 1938, the top five U.S. women players — Betz, Osborne, Brough, Pat Todd and Florida's Doris Hart — headed for England to play Britain's top women in Wightman Cup competition. The U.S. team blasted Britain's out-of-practice best off the courts in seven straight matches without dropping a set. Betz won the Wimbledon singles crown, a glory at least equal to the U.S. championship. In Paris three weeks later, Osborne handed Betz one of her few beatings. The Betz Club romped up to Sweden, and played barelegged before 88-year-old tennis bug King Gustav. Then the other club members returned to the U.S., but Pauline headed for a Swiss resort (Gunten) to celebrate her 27th birthday with Millionheiress Barbara Hutton. They swam, jitterbugged and went mountain-climbing for ten days — Pauline's longest vacation from tennis in ten years.

Something ladylike. Pauline Betz has had a tennis racket in her hands almost every day ever since she was nine. Her mother, a gym teacher at Los Angeles' Jefferson High School, put it there. Pauline is convinced that her mother set her playing tennis "to get me off the streets and doing something more ladylike." She was a tree-climbing tomboy. Every night when her father came home, Pauline and her younger brother greeted him by walking down the street on their hands. Papa complained once: "I wish I could see those children right side up once in a while."

From the time she was 16, and got her first real tennis instruction (from Bruce Ainley, pro at swank Town House), Pauline set the alarm clock for 5 a.m., took a basketful of balls to the practice court and worked on her strokes until it was time for school. At 21, she won a scholarship to Florida's tennis-conscious Rollins College, played No. 4 on the men's team and got enough As in the classroom to earn a scholarship in economics at Columbia. She didn't like Manhattan's weather, and quit Columbia after six months. At 23 she was national champion.

Hobnobbing with Headliners. She liked the life—checking in & out of hotels, hopping planes, eating in restaurants, hobnobbing with headline names. Winters, when the tournament season is over, she rarely spends an evening in the Betzes' small Los Angeles apartment, where the family serves vegetables in her sterling silver trophies. Usually she is to be found with movie folk, especially the Bill Powells. At the elegant Beverly Hills Tennis Club, she has little trouble beating Cinemactors Paul Lukas and Robert Taylor.

Men Are Better. But against topflight men tennists, Pauline, like all women players, is far behind. The 700-year-old French game of tennis, traditionally as much a lady's as a man's game, was introduced to the U.S. in 1874 by a woman, Mary E. Outerbridge. For 62 years women have played championship tennis at Wimbledon, at first in ankle-length gowns and long sleeves, yet no woman has ever done better than to beat the best men juniors. On the subject of male v. female in tennis, Pauline says: "It's ridiculous to compare them." Her reasons: a man anticipates the play better, runs faster, hits harder, lasts longer.

Pauline has had a succession of boyfriends, but says with a grin: "I can't find anyone who wants to be married one month out of the year." But she admits a fear of turning 30 without getting married. This spring she passed California's exam for real-estate saleswomen, and this winter will sell for a Beverly Hills firm which specializes in expensive homes with tennis courts and swimming pools. The firm, Lawrence Block, Inc., likes to dazzle prospective buyers with celebrity salesmen like onetime film star Rod La Rocque and Charles Christie, of early-day Christie Comedies' fame. Betz expects to be good at it.

Egg on Her Face. Last fall, after three years as national champion, Pauline Betz had her first major setback, from 33-year-old Sarah Palfrey Cooke, who came out of retirement to tournament play. Sarah took the crown away from Pauline at Forest Hills.

Pauline marched home to California, beaten and burned up — at herself. She sought out Eleanor Tennant, an old tennis teacher, who coached Champions Bobby Riggs and Alice Marble, once charged the movies' Marion Davies $1,000 a month for lessons. Teacher Tennant decided to buck Pauline up first. Says Eleanor: "When a gal has egg on her face, the first thing to do is let her know she is the world's greatest player."

Then came the details. Tennant, a believer in "easy does it" tennis, decided that Pauline's strength was in her killer instinct ("She has the quality of a stevedore"). So she strengthened Pauline's weak forehand by cutting two-thirds off the backswing and adding it to the follow-through. Her service was none too robust, so Eleanor Tennant concentrated on placement. When Pauline took her revamped tennis game on tour this summer, the egg was off her face. Teacher Tennant, who has taught them both, glowingly rated Betz above Alice Marble. Most tennis experts are content to call Pauline the best in a year which has no greats, and wait for the rest of the returns to come in before saying more.

1980's Verdict. Halfway through last week's doubles championships at Brookline, Pauline ran into trouble. Her big toe became infected, swelled up to twice its normal size. In the semifinals, teamed with Doris Hart, Pauline discarded sneakers, played in heavy woolen socks. They lost. (Osborne and Brough won their fifth doubles championship beating Mary Arnold Prentiss and Pat Todd.)

Just how the injury would affect Pauline's playing at Forest Hills this week, no one knew for sure. At Brookline, it interfered with her latest hobby: taking action pictures of her tennis-playing pals, with a new movie camera she bought in Switzerland. At Forest Hills, besides the newsreel cameramen focusing on her, she will have a friend filming her matches with a new camera. Says Pauline: "In 1980, I want to be able to say, 'See what grandma did!'"

---------------

[Pauline Betz will turn 90 on August 6, 2009. She won Forest Hills again in 1946, beating Doris Hart 11-9, 6-3 in the final.]
Good post there Mark- a bit like Alice Marble it is easy to forget what a great champion Betz was held to be in the tennis world. Quite a character as well.
iainmac is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 20th, 2009, 02:34 PM   #111
country flag iainmac
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 5,782
iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold
Re: Serve and Volley-40's tennis

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rollo View Post
Hunt vs Riggs-1940

I know what he could be like but Riggs is funny I have to say.
iainmac is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 12th, 2009, 12:59 AM   #112
Rollo
Moderator - BFTP
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 17,400
Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Serve and Volley-40's tennis

Found this pic titled-Tennis Fashion-1947


Last edited by Rollo : Apr 27th, 2012 at 06:54 PM.
Rollo is online now View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 16th, 2009, 04:47 PM   #113
country flag iainmac
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 5,782
iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold iainmac is a splendid one to behold
Re: Serve and Volley-40's tennis

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rollo View Post
Found this pic titled-Tennis Fashion-1947

http://www.shorpy.com/node/967?size=_original

Cheers chief!!!
iainmac is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 9th, 2010, 09:05 AM   #114
country flag austinrunner
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 1,403
austinrunner has disabled reputation
Re: Serve and Volley-40's tennis

Footage of the 1946 Wimbledon finals:

http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=54710
http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=54720
austinrunner is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 9th, 2010, 03:55 PM   #115
Rollo
Moderator - BFTP
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 17,400
Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Serve and Volley-40's tennis

Fantastic images Louise really has a bounce to her step when hits a winner. Doubles footage like this is rare.

Thanks AR.
Rollo is online now View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 10th, 2010, 02:28 AM   #116
country flag austinrunner
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 1,403
austinrunner has disabled reputation
Re: Serve and Volley-40's tennis

If you look closely in the background of the second video, you can see sections of the stands that were closed off because of unrepaired World War II bomb damage.

That's Queen Mother Mary in the first video.
austinrunner is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 4th, 2012, 05:09 PM   #117
Rollo
Moderator - BFTP
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 17,400
Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Serve and Volley-40's tennis

Aussie player Dorn McGill (later Fogarty) in 1946 with a boatload of trophies

Rollo is online now View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 27th, 2012, 06:53 PM   #118
Rollo
Moderator - BFTP
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 17,400
Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute Rollo has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Serve and Volley-40's tennis

Gussy Moran in June 1949 photo shoot.
Rollo is online now View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 31st, 2012, 04:48 AM   #119
country flag Joseph Hunt
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 4
Joseph Hunt is an unknown quantity at this point
Re: Serve and Volley-40's tennis

Hello,

My name is Joe Hunt. I am the great nephew of the Joe Hunt who was friends with Bobby Riggs and married to Jacque Virgil. I have a great deal of information about my great uncle Joe. I would love to know where you got the photo of Joe and Bobby that you posted. thank you.
Joseph Hunt is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 31st, 2012, 04:57 AM   #120
country flag Joseph Hunt
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 4
Joseph Hunt is an unknown quantity at this point
Re: Serve and Volley-40's tennis

Rollo,

I have seen the posts you made in 2009 regarding Joe Hunt and Jacque Virgil. You have been able to gather correct information and i appreciate that. Joe was on a training mission for the Navy in February 1945. He was flying a Grumman Hellcat. the plane went down off the coast of Daytona Beach and was never recovered.

Joe Hunt
Joseph Hunt is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


Copyright (C) Verticalscope Inc
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
vBCredits v1.4 Copyright ©2007, PixelFX Studios