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Old Dec 9th, 2012, 11:34 PM   #3
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Re: Limit the number of foreign tennis players on womens teams

Quote:
Originally Posted by tie_breaker View Post
I think the US provides more opportunities than any other country for foreign players to receive a tennis scholarship. At the end of the day, they may become citizens and their children may become Americans. Consider that many foreign professional tennis players reside or have homes here in the US. Consider that many of the top international junior players come here to the US for training. If foreign players are coming here at the junior and professional levels, I don't think the NCAA is going to stop them from coming here at the collegiate level.

The NCAA may like the benefit that it brings as it raises the competition level at Division 1 schools. Coaches are pressured to recruit and develop a competitive and winning team.

At the end of the day, if an American does have scholarship potential, because of the competition level they may have less options at a Division 1 school and may have to resort to a Division 2 or Division 3, or if they're smart they can get into one of the Ivy League schools.

For instance, Suzy Tan (sister of Stacy Tan-playing for Stanford, blue chip recruit, NCAA singles final runner-up) graduated in 2012 and was a 4-star recruit. It was unlikely that she could follow in her sister's footsteps and play at Stanford. Fortunately, she got her free ride at Dartmouth. I am sure there are many others that eventually get scholarships.
Also, throw in Vania King's twin sisters who went on to play for Ivy League schools. Ironically, the Kings and Tans all played in the same league in high school in Long Beach/Lakewood.
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