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Old Sep 22nd, 2011, 07:25 PM   #81
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Re: Shahar's coach watch! Bye Pablo :sobbing: Who Will Be Shahar's New Coach???

Quote:
Originally Posted by shirgan View Post
And now the new coach is Harold Solomon (will translate highlights when I have the time)

http://www.globes.co.il/news/article...did=1000684648
The link is for an interview with Harold Solomon.
First it talks about how Solomon had remarkable success considering the fact that he is only 1.65 meters high, and weighed less than 60 kg. Complementing him about his sharp tennis mind, saying he's thorough without making much fuss.

Then there's some talk about the players he coached, and his expensive "boutique" academy that only works with 15-20 players at a time.

Solomon talks about the change in tennis from grass to hard courts that allowed him as a player to catch up to the faster players. And the change he made in 1978-1980 to be a top 5 player (getting more to net).

About the difference between coaching women and men:
"Women criticize themselves more. Men can more easily live with imperfection. Men have more confidence things will work out while playing, women are much more neurotic before matches. A female tennis player who had 30 perfect strikes and 1 strike was missed will not be content, and that lowers her confidence. Generally women are more emotional and have more ups and downs. When I speak to a female player after a match I think twice what to say, how to say it, or whether to say anything at all, because they're sensitive to criticism. To a man I say everything directly."

About Shahar Peer:
"Indeed a strange year for Peer. But I'm certain the bad period is temporary. She's a legitimate top-20 player for years, and she had some weeks where she did play well and won this year. When we started working together I went to see her for the first time in Miami and she played awful. I couldn't believe my eyes. But Shahar, like most players is built on confidence, and that was my main mission, to have her faith in herself return. First we got her back into shape. Her physical shape was not good enough and there was a decline in stability. I'm trying to get her back to her base, which is a fault-free stability, and trying to encourage her to hit the forehand with confidence and with all her heart, without hesitation. To get her to be more aggressive and believe in the stroke. for the moment, it's working well in practice, but not working good enough in tournaments."

Are you encouraging her to get to the net more?
Not particularly. I do encourage her to attack short balls, and of course if it's necessary, then she has to get to the net to close a point. But basically I'm trying to get her confidence back playing her basic game. When things don't work out, her old weaknesses start showing which are her forehand and her serve"

What about her serve? I noticed she changed it somewhat.
"Yes, we are trying to get her used to a more flowing and faster movement, with a twist of her shoulders and waist to create more momentum and power. And there is some improvement. In the week in Washington where everything clicked, she had 4-5 aces per match. The problem with her serve is that some days it doesn't work, and that affects her entire play.
I try to explain to Shahar that it's ok to play bad games, but she's a perfectionist, and if she doesn't play perfect she's not satisfied."

Last edited by shirgan : Sep 22nd, 2011 at 07:51 PM.
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