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Old Sep 18th, 2009, 05:28 PM   #6
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Re: Dorothy Round Little - One of Britain's greatest champions

I feel that Dorothy Round had the beating of Helen Wills Moody that day. Unfortunately the controversial line call at the end of the second set completely threw her off her game. In "100 Years of Wimbledon", Lance Tingay wrote the following piece on that 1933 ladies' single final:

“The strength of the British women’s game was displayed in 1933 when Dorothy Round, who had to learn to live with her popular description as ‘the Worcestershire Sunday School teacher’, reached the singles final. It was against Mrs Moody and the Californian had been less rigorously dominating than the year before, being almost hard pressed, by her standards, to win her semi-final against Fraulein Krahwinkel [6-4, 6-3]. Miss Round beat Miss Jacobs at the same stage to justify her status as the second seed. The final proved a patriotic occasion for although Miss Round did not win, she averted defeat in a manner which for long had seemed impossible against the all-conquering Mrs Moody.

“The American victory was measured 6-4, 6-8, 6-3. It was the first set lost by the Californian for six years and that was enough to make it a memorable occasion. It was not, though, an unalloyed British triumph for if Miss Round merited her success by the stalwart nature of her resistance, the actual manner of it owed something to luck. Even so it was an exacting fight, the like of which Mrs Moody had not endured for years. The sentiments of the crowd were inflamed when Miss Round had a 40-15 chance to lead 5-4 in the first set. In the second her mixture of short and long drives continued to harass the champion and the British girl got in front 7-6. In the next game, Miss Round, serving, was 30-40, having been 15-40. On the next rally she overdrove the baseline. Or, at least, so she thought, together with Mrs Moody and the umpire, who called the score seven games all. The linesman, though, stuck to his decision of a line ball which everyone though to be an error. The umpire acquiesced, as strictly he had to do, but the incident, coming at so vital a point, proved a terrible distraction. Miss Round got the next two points to win the set. The crowd applauded practically every shot she played in the last set but by then her concentration had been marred."
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