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  Topic Review (Newest First)
Jan 15th, 2014 11:24 PM
hablo
Re: Rape and how societies react

Quote:
Police say 51-year-old was attacked after asking for directions
Wow

Quote:
Originally Posted by wild.river View Post
^i'm shocked white women keep travelling there for fun. i wouldn't go unless i had 3 strong men with me for protection at all times.
As a female, I wouldn't go there even with men...

For example, that female Idian student (?) got raped while she was with her fiancé, remember? It doesn't matter how many males you are with; they can get beaten up too.
Jan 15th, 2014 07:15 PM
wild.river
Re: Rape and how societies react

Quote:
Originally Posted by nemurenai View Post
That makes no difference. White or whatever, you should just be schocked that women want to go there for fun (and even then, I myself wouldn't really be surprised). Unless there's some statistic or specific point you're making that I'm missing.
i wrote women at first, but of course indian women living abroad would want to go to their homeland regardless of the issues there. white was a lazier way of writing non-indian.
Jan 15th, 2014 07:07 PM
Mahogany Pluto
Re: Rape and how societies react

Quote:
Originally Posted by wild.river View Post
^i'm shocked white women keep travelling there for fun. i wouldn't go unless i had 3 strong men with me for protection at all times.
That makes no difference. White or whatever, you should just be schocked that women want to go there for fun (and even then, I myself wouldn't really be surprised). Unless there's some statistic or specific point you're making that I'm missing.
Jan 15th, 2014 05:59 PM
Kim's_fan_4ever
Re: Rape and how societies react

Quote:
Originally Posted by wild.river View Post
^i'm shocked white women keep travelling there for fun. i wouldn't go unless i had 3 strong men with me for protection at all times.
Exactly. Never going to set foot in this country
Jan 15th, 2014 05:35 PM
Punky
Re: Rape and how societies react

rapists are the scum of the earth, i dont know another harsh word in english, my friend was raped when she was very little, still deal with is every day, its a new battle a new flashback a new trigger, it's like taking a person soul but keep his body alive.

how they will rot in hell and in jail they will know how the feeling, every day every hour, i have no compassion for those ppl, its worst them murder
Jan 15th, 2014 03:01 PM
tennislover22
Re: Rape and how societies react

Quote:
Originally Posted by wild.river View Post
^i'm shocked white women keep travelling there for fun. i wouldn't go unless i had 3 strong men with me for protection at all times.
According to the article, the rate of women tourists has decreased, unfortunately, it appears it needs to decrease some more.
OTH, there are women who love to travel to India because they love the country.
Quote:
A study by India's Associated Chambers of Commerce and Industry said that foreign tourist visits to India dropped 25% in the three months after the rape and murder of the Delhi woman. Tourist visits by women fell by 35%.
Jan 15th, 2014 02:43 PM
wild.river
Re: Rape and how societies react

^i'm shocked white women keep travelling there for fun. i wouldn't go unless i had 3 strong men with me for protection at all times.
Jan 15th, 2014 02:40 PM
tennislover22
Re: Rape and how societies react

It has happened again, to another female tourist.


The woman has already left the country, this will complicate the job of the Indian police investigators




Quote:


Danish tourist gang-raped in Delhi

Police say 51-year-old was attacked after asking for directions






Jason Burke in Delhi and Richard Orange in Malmö
theguardian.com, Wednesday 15 January 2014 08.56 EST








The attack happened near Connaught Place in the centre of New Delhi. Photograph: Money Sharma/EPA




Ten men have been detained in Delhi after a Danish tourist told police she was gang-raped when she lost her way in the Indian capital and asked for directions back to her hotel.
The attack, which occurred on Tuesday, is the latest of a series of cases that have focused international attention on a wave of sexual violence towards women in India.
Police officials said the 51-year-old woman was also robbed and beaten in the attack, which happened in the afternoon in narrow streets near Connaught Place, a popular central shopping centre and one of Delhi's tourist attractions.


The tourist, who was returning from India's National Museum on foot, managed to reach her hotel later in the evening and the owner called the police.
"It was miserable," said Amit Bahl, owner of the Amax hotel. "I am really ashamed that this happened."




The woman has now returned to Denmark.
"She has already left India by air and is on her way home," Rajeev Sharma, assistant commissioner with the Delhi police, told Danish broadcaster TV2.
"But we need a medical examination of the Danish woman, so we are still in contact with the Danish embassy."


Delhi police confirmed that a robbery and rape case had been "registered". "We are questioning a group of men," said Rajan Bhagat, a police spokesman.
The problem of sexual violence in India was highlighted by the gang rape and murder of a 23-year-old physiotherapist on a bus in Delhi in December 2012.
The case prompted grief and outrage across India, with thousands taking to the streets in protests demanding tougher laws, better policing and a wholesale shift in cultural attitudes.
The United Nations asked India, the world's second most populous country, to ensure security for women.


But though prison terms for rape have been stiffened, stalking made a criminal offence and gender sensitivity programmes introduced for some police officers, there appears to have been little change on the ground.
Vrinda Grover, a campaigner and lawyer, said that the most recent attack showed that "every day was a dangerous day for the women of Delhi".
"That this happened where it did is stunning. Women are most vulnerable, but Delhi police are not ensuring basic security.
Anyone can be robbed or mugged. We need systematic measures, not soundbites," she told the Guardian.


Every week India's media describe attacks on women across the country, often involving several men and frequently resulting in the death of the victim.
On Wednesday, newspapers reported the gang rape of a teenager in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh.
Last week a 13-year-old girl was allegedly gang-raped and "tortured" before being killed in Uttarakhand's Haridwar district. In southern Andhra Pradesh, nine men arrested earlier this month reportedly told police they had raped 59 women in the past two years.
The eastern state of West Bengal has emerged as a particular blackspot.


Pranab Mukherjee, India's president, recently met the parents of a 16-year-old who was gang-raped twice in October and then set on fire. She died of her injuries.
The second rape occurred as she was returning from a police station where she reported the first attack.
Authorities have been criticised for failing to ensure her safety.


The exact causes of the current wave of sexual violence – and its extent – are hotly debated.
Among other factors, analysts blame rapid urbanisation, fast-changing gender roles, bad urban planning, poor policing and deep-rooted social attitudes.
Ranjana Kumari, director of pro-feminist thinktank the Centre for Social Research, said India's conservative and patriarchal traditions led men to use rape as a tool to instil fear in women.
"This mindset is not changing. It's a huge challenge," she said.


Between January and October last year, 1,330 rapes were reported in Delhi and its suburbs, compared with 706 for all of 2012, according to government figures.
Police officials say the rise may indicate that women are becoming more likely to lodge complaints about crimes.


News of the attack on the Dutch tourist comes weeks after a Polish woman said she was drugged and raped by a taxi driver while travelling with her two-year-old daughter to New Delhi.


Last year saw a series of incidents involving foreigners. In March a British woman jumped out of the window of her hotel room in Agra – home to the Taj Mahal – to avoid an assault by a staff member,
and a Swiss woman who was cycling with her husband in central India was gang-raped. In June, an American woman was gang-raped by three men while hitch-hiking back to her hotel in the Himalayan valley of Kullu.
The tourism ministry has launched a publicity campaign – I Respect Women – after industry surveys showed a steep drop in the number of tourists coming to India.


A study by India's Associated Chambers of Commerce and Industry said that foreign tourist visits to India dropped 25% in the three months after the rape and murder of the Delhi woman. Tourist visits by women fell by 35%.







source: http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...ed-delhi-india

Oct 3rd, 2013 12:25 AM
hablo
Re: Rape and how societies react

Good for her.
Oct 2nd, 2013 11:58 PM
mykarma
Re: Rape and how societies react

Quote:
Originally Posted by JN View Post
Banned poster who shall not be named won't like this:
____


Woman fends off would-be rapist with frying pan

By David Ferguson
Wednesday, October 2, 2013 11:48 EDT




A woman in the Boston suburbs served up some rough justice to a would-be rapist by striking him in the head with a frying pan. According to CBS News, the suspect allegedly threatened the woman with a knife after luring her to his room at an Extended Stay America hotel.

Police arrived at the hotel at around 5:30 a.m. on Sunday and found Frank Harrison, 46, covered in blood from multiple head injuries. The woman reported to police that she and Harrison had met the night before at a party and that he had used a lie to trick her into coming to his room, then attacked her.

She fought back with the first thing that came to hand, a frying pan, which she used to strike several blows to Harrison’s head.

Police arrested Harrison and charged him with kidnapping, armed assault with attempt to rape and indecent assault and battery on a person over the age of 14, said CBS Boston.

Harrison claimed that the woman was trying to rob him and that he was only attempting to defend himself with the knife. He will remain in custody until at least Friday.

Watch video about this story, embedded @ the link below via CBS Boston:

[The Raw Story]
Lol She knotted up his damn head.
Oct 2nd, 2013 11:10 PM
JN
Re: Rape and how societies react

Banned poster who shall not be named won't like this:
____


Woman fends off would-be rapist with frying pan

By David Ferguson
Wednesday, October 2, 2013 11:48 EDT




A woman in the Boston suburbs served up some rough justice to a would-be rapist by striking him in the head with a frying pan. According to CBS News, the suspect allegedly threatened the woman with a knife after luring her to his room at an Extended Stay America hotel.

Police arrived at the hotel at around 5:30 a.m. on Sunday and found Frank Harrison, 46, covered in blood from multiple head injuries. The woman reported to police that she and Harrison had met the night before at a party and that he had used a lie to trick her into coming to his room, then attacked her.

She fought back with the first thing that came to hand, a frying pan, which she used to strike several blows to Harrison’s head.

Police arrested Harrison and charged him with kidnapping, armed assault with attempt to rape and indecent assault and battery on a person over the age of 14, said CBS Boston.

Harrison claimed that the woman was trying to rob him and that he was only attempting to defend himself with the knife. He will remain in custody until at least Friday.

Watch video about this story, embedded @ the link below via CBS Boston:

[The Raw Story]
Sep 11th, 2013 02:32 PM
Start da Game
Re: Rape and how societies react

do you all realize that the biggest culprit, who happens to be a muslim, escaped with just a 3 year term in jail? simply because that pig is a minor(less than 18 years)......italian mafia using even this horrific incident to improve their minority vote bank......they will rot in hell......
Sep 11th, 2013 10:30 AM
Punky
Re: Rape and how societies react

Quote:
Originally Posted by LUVMIRZA View Post
Hang them They are worse than renegade maneaters
Agree.


Hang them!!! Devilish monsters

enjoy hell for what u did
Sep 11th, 2013 10:03 AM
LUVMIRZA
Re: Rape and how societies react

Hang them They are worse than renegade maneaters
Sep 11th, 2013 09:16 AM
JN
Re: Rape and how societies react

Sentencing of New Delhi gang rape convicts to take place Friday

By Jethro Mullen and Sumnima Udas, CNN
updated 4:46 AM EDT, Wed September 11, 2013



Convicted Indian rapists plan to appeal

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Prosecutors ask for the death penalty; defense lawyers want leniency
  • The victim's father has called for the men to be hanged
  • A court found the men found guilty of gang-raping a woman on a bus; she later died
  • The attack caused widespread outrage in India and prompted changes to the law
New Delhi (CNN) -- [Breaking news update at 4:40 a.m. Wednesday]

The sentencing of four men convicted of the gang rape and murder of a woman in New Delhi will take place on Friday, the judge said Wednesday.

The court on Tuesday had convicted the men -- Vinay Sharma, Akshay Thakur, Pawan Gupta and Mukesh Singh -- of murder, rape and kidnapping.

Prosecutors and the victim's family have asked for the death penalty. Defense lawyers called for leniency for the men, who have denied the charges.

[Original story, posted at 2:55 a.m. Wednesday]


Indian court to sentence 4 men convicted of New Delhi gang rape
(CNN) -- Four men convicted of raping and murdering a woman on a bus in New Delhi are due to be sentenced by an Indian court Wednesday.

Many Indians, including members of the 23-year-old victim's family, have called for them to be hanged.

"There can be nothing more diabolic than a helpless girl put through torture," prosecutor Dayan Krishnan told the court, as he asked for the death penalty.

As the convicts stood before the judge, flanked by police officers on either side, the victim's father sat with his eyes half-closed.

Defense lawyers, meanwhile, argued for leniency.

"The court must bear in mind that life imprisonment is the rule and the death sentence is the exception," said V.K. Sharma, the lawyer for one of the convicted men.

Found guilty


After a trial that lasted about seven months, the Delhi court found the men guilty of murder, rape and kidnapping on Tuesday amid a heavy media and security presence.

The victim's parents had tears in their eyes as the judge read out the verdict, in which he said the men had been convicted of "committing the murder of a helpless victim." Her brother wiped a tear from his cheek.

The four men -- Vinay Sharma, Akshay Thakur, Pawan Gupta and Mukesh Singh -- will appeal the verdict, their lawyers said.

Outrage over the brutal, deadly assault had far reaching consequences in India. It fueled protests in various cities, started a discussion about women's treatment in Indian society and prompted the introduction of tougher punishments for sexual abuse.

Calls for execution
s

On Wednesday, the focus is on the consequences for the perpetrators of the attack.

The father of the victim, whose name has been withheld under Indian law, has repeatedly called for the four men, aged between 19 and 28, to face the death penalty.

"We have faith in the judiciary. The accused should be hanged," he told CNN sister network IBN in an interview that aired Monday.

Family members are not alone in their desire for capital punishment. Calls for the execution of those responsible for the attack have been widespread in India.

Kiran Bedi, a human rights activist and former Indian police officer, said that a death sentence would send a "very powerful message" to a country bedeviled by sexual violence.

"A brutal crime gets absolutely severe punishment, so it's in proportion to the brutality of the crime," she said.

Death sentences issued by Indian courts have rarely been carried out in the past decade. No state executions took place in the country between 2004 and late 2012, when the last surviving gunman from the 2008 terrorist attacks in Mumbai was hanged.

But human rights advocates have said they fear that India's stance on executions has changed.

"In the past year, India has made a full-scale retreat from its previous principled rejection of the death penalty," Meenakshi Ganguly, South Asia director at Human Rights Watch, said last month.

Two others accused


The fate of two others accused in the case had already been determined before this week.

One man, Ram Singh, 35, was found dead in his jail cell in March. Authorities said he had hanged himself, but his family claimed he had been murdered.

Saturday, a juvenile court convicted a teenage boy for his part in the gang rape, sentencing him to three years in a special juvenile correctional facility.

His trial was in juvenile court because he was 17 at the time of the crime, and the sentence is the maximum allowed under the court's rules.

The victim's mother said she was unhappy with the verdict and wants the teenager to be hanged.

A brutal attack


The brutality of the New Delhi attack, as described by police and prosecutors, helped stir the strong emotions surrounding the case.

On the evening of December 16, the victim, a physiotherapy student, had gone to see the movie "The Life of Pi" with a male friend at a New Delhi mall.

During their journey home to the suburbs, they boarded a bus at a major intersection in upmarket South Delhi.

The driver and at least five other men on the bus were drunk and looking for a "joyride," police said.

The men, from a poverty-ridden slum on the outskirts of Delhi, dragged the woman to the back of the bus and beat up her male friend.

Police say the men took turns raping the woman, using an iron rod to violate her as the bus drove around the city for almost an hour. When they had finished, they dumped the two victims by the side of the road.

The woman's injuries were so severe that some internal organs had to be removed. She died two weeks later at a hospital in Singapore.

"This is an extreme case of depravity" Krishnan, the prosecutor, said.

A rape every 22 minutes


As in many countries, rape is a grimly frequent occurrence in India.

According to Indian government statistics, a woman is raped every 22 minutes on average.

But the New Delhi attack seized the country's attention.

Advocates criticized the world's largest democracy for failing to protect half of its population. Protesters demanded better treatment of women and decried the apathy of police and the judicial system.

The government passed tougher anti-rape laws, introducing the death penalty for repeat offenders, and imprisonment for acid attacks, human trafficking and stalking.

But some Indians say that while the laws on crimes against women have changed, mindsets and enforcement have been slower to adjust.

'Take it to the source'


Government figures show that the number of women reporting rapes has risen significantly since the New Delhi attack and the heavy scrutiny that followed it.

Observers say it indicates that women who are victims of sexual attacks feel more emboldened to come forward than they did before.

Prosecution of such crimes has improved, Bedi believes, but it will take a heavy emphasis on the family and school environments to resolve the problem in the long run.

"You can't just begin and end with the police and the prosecution and the courts," she said. "You have to go backward and take it to the source."

[CNN]


So Neanderthal.
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