TennisForum.com - Reply to Topic
Thread: Rosebud - Rosie Casals Reply to Thread
Title:
Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the TennisForum.com forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



  Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

  Topic Review (Newest First)
Sep 17th, 2017 04:11 AM
PLP
Re: Rosebud - Rosie Casals

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rollo View Post
Article from 1982. Rosie talks about the lack of variety in the game-a topic perhaps still relevant today.

NEW RICHES FOR ROSIE CASALS

By NEIL AMDUR, Special to the New York Times
Published: December 17, 1982


EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J., Dec. 16— As the winner of the first women's professional tennis tournament, Rosie Casals is assured of a permanent place in the record books.

But just as the sport has changed since that first eight-player event was held in Houston in 1970, Miss Casals is finding herself drawn into new and different roles - from coach to critic to promoter. As always, she is candid.
''The game has changed,'' she said the other evening at Byrne Meadowlands Arena, site of the season-ending $300,000 Toyota championships, where Miss Casals is paired with Wendy Turnbull in the doubles. ''There's not enough contrast from No. 1 down to No. 100. Too many people play the same now.''

An exciting serve-and-volleyer, Miss Casals thinks the success of the two-handed backhand has made the women's game routine. It started with Chris Evert, and now a number of the top professionals, including Tracy Austin, Andrea Jaeger and Kathy Rinaldi, among others, consider it part of the framework of their games.

''During our period, there wasn't any one person who had terrific ground strokes who dominated,'' Miss Casals said. ''Nancy Richey probably had great ground strokes, but not in the sense of a Chris Evert.

''Virginia Wade had her style, Billie Jean King had a style. I had a style. Frankie Durr definitely had a style. Everybody had individual styles of play, individual ways of hitting a backhand and forehand. The game was faster because we had more serve-and volleyers. Some of the young players do have their own certain styles today, but people don't come and watch them because what they see is sameness. I don't feel it's good for the game because people want to see a variety of things.''

Pressure Is a Problem

Of greater concern to the 34-year-old Miss Casals is the pressure that confronts today's teen-age pros. ''You have such an influx of young players,'' she said, ''that all of a sudden, they're all old by the age of 20. If I were 14 and 15 and that good, I'd want to play. But in the long run, I don't think that it's good because it's going to shorten their professional careers. It's very difficult for them, especially now that tennis is big; they get a lot of publicity. Some of them are spoiled. Some can't handle it. There's a lot of pressure put on them. They have so much more exposure and visibility than we did. We didn't have to cope with that anxiety, exposure, media attention and rivalries that are created because there's so many young ones competing against one another.

''A lot of parents push and a lot of agents are selling. There's so many different aspects of tennis now that we never had. It's commercial now. It's business. You're involving a young kid who's not necessarily emotionally capable of handling and channeling and directing and being aware of all these feelings. When you're young, it's tougher, and people expect more. They see you grow up, you're good, you're winning, they treat you with respect and perhaps spoil you. And then you expect it. And everybody expects it. And you forget - hey, this kid's only a kid.''

Among peers, ''the Rosebud,'' as she is called, has always been thought of as more soft, sensitive and knowledgeable than crusty. Leslie Allen, who is currently 22d on the Women's Tennis Association computer list, saw this side last summer when she and Miss Casals played team tennis on the West Coast.

''Her tennis know-how and ability, you have to respect that,'' said Miss Allen, who also qualified for the Toyota doubles, with Mima Jausovec. ''Having been on the circuit, she sees trends and certain types of game plans to beat certain players. Any situation that comes up, she knows that.''

''With a little bit of direction and a little bit of coaching, she probably could become a better player as far as being solid,'' said Miss Casals, who encouraged Miss Allen to drop her two-handed backhand for a one-handed stroke and is stressing more aggressive play. ''My feeling about coaching is that a player has to be able to do it by herself when she's on the court. I wouldn't want Leslie to think that I've got to sit and watch her play and give her signals. I want Leslie to be responsible and be able to play.'' New Circuit on Her Mind

Miss Casals finished second to Martina Navratilova in the Toyota doubles standing but is only 98th on the singles computer. Long practices with Miss Allen have trimmed some pounds and sharpened her singles game, although Miss Casals has a new priority - an over-30 women's circuit.

Miss Casals has formed a company, with three full-time employees. An eight-player prize-money event has been scheduled for Jan. 13 through 16 in Santa Rosa, Calif., with some of the early stars (Mrs. King, the Misses Wade, Casals and Durr, and Betty Stove) of the women's tour. Miss Casals hopes to package five tournaments and a series championship event.

''You really appreciate your life style a lot more once you become a promoter,'' she said. ''As a player, all you worry about is getting paid and complaining about not having tennis balls or cars. As a promoter, all of a sudden, the roles are reversed. You're going out and asking for the money. It feels like you're begging. Every time somebody turns you down you say, 'Why? I can't believe this.' It's a totally different angle. You have to apppreciate that though, even though it's only $35,000. It's tough money to get, especially the way things are now.''
That's really frightening! Totally Relevant today.
Sep 17th, 2017 03:50 AM
Rollo
Re: Rosebud - Rosie Casals

Article from 1982. Rosie talks about the lack of variety in the game-a topic perhaps still relevant today.

NEW RICHES FOR ROSIE CASALS

By NEIL AMDUR, Special to the New York Times
Published: December 17, 1982


EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J., Dec. 16— As the winner of the first women's professional tennis tournament, Rosie Casals is assured of a permanent place in the record books.

But just as the sport has changed since that first eight-player event was held in Houston in 1970, Miss Casals is finding herself drawn into new and different roles - from coach to critic to promoter. As always, she is candid.
''The game has changed,'' she said the other evening at Byrne Meadowlands Arena, site of the season-ending $300,000 Toyota championships, where Miss Casals is paired with Wendy Turnbull in the doubles. ''There's not enough contrast from No. 1 down to No. 100. Too many people play the same now.''

An exciting serve-and-volleyer, Miss Casals thinks the success of the two-handed backhand has made the women's game routine. It started with Chris Evert, and now a number of the top professionals, including Tracy Austin, Andrea Jaeger and Kathy Rinaldi, among others, consider it part of the framework of their games.

''During our period, there wasn't any one person who had terrific ground strokes who dominated,'' Miss Casals said. ''Nancy Richey probably had great ground strokes, but not in the sense of a Chris Evert.

''Virginia Wade had her style, Billie Jean King had a style. I had a style. Frankie Durr definitely had a style. Everybody had individual styles of play, individual ways of hitting a backhand and forehand. The game was faster because we had more serve-and volleyers. Some of the young players do have their own certain styles today, but people don't come and watch them because what they see is sameness. I don't feel it's good for the game because people want to see a variety of things.''

Pressure Is a Problem

Of greater concern to the 34-year-old Miss Casals is the pressure that confronts today's teen-age pros. ''You have such an influx of young players,'' she said, ''that all of a sudden, they're all old by the age of 20. If I were 14 and 15 and that good, I'd want to play. But in the long run, I don't think that it's good because it's going to shorten their professional careers. It's very difficult for them, especially now that tennis is big; they get a lot of publicity. Some of them are spoiled. Some can't handle it. There's a lot of pressure put on them. They have so much more exposure and visibility than we did. We didn't have to cope with that anxiety, exposure, media attention and rivalries that are created because there's so many young ones competing against one another.

''A lot of parents push and a lot of agents are selling. There's so many different aspects of tennis now that we never had. It's commercial now. It's business. You're involving a young kid who's not necessarily emotionally capable of handling and channeling and directing and being aware of all these feelings. When you're young, it's tougher, and people expect more. They see you grow up, you're good, you're winning, they treat you with respect and perhaps spoil you. And then you expect it. And everybody expects it. And you forget - hey, this kid's only a kid.''

Among peers, ''the Rosebud,'' as she is called, has always been thought of as more soft, sensitive and knowledgeable than crusty. Leslie Allen, who is currently 22d on the Women's Tennis Association computer list, saw this side last summer when she and Miss Casals played team tennis on the West Coast.

''Her tennis know-how and ability, you have to respect that,'' said Miss Allen, who also qualified for the Toyota doubles, with Mima Jausovec. ''Having been on the circuit, she sees trends and certain types of game plans to beat certain players. Any situation that comes up, she knows that.''

''With a little bit of direction and a little bit of coaching, she probably could become a better player as far as being solid,'' said Miss Casals, who encouraged Miss Allen to drop her two-handed backhand for a one-handed stroke and is stressing more aggressive play. ''My feeling about coaching is that a player has to be able to do it by herself when she's on the court. I wouldn't want Leslie to think that I've got to sit and watch her play and give her signals. I want Leslie to be responsible and be able to play.'' New Circuit on Her Mind

Miss Casals finished second to Martina Navratilova in the Toyota doubles standing but is only 98th on the singles computer. Long practices with Miss Allen have trimmed some pounds and sharpened her singles game, although Miss Casals has a new priority - an over-30 women's circuit.

Miss Casals has formed a company, with three full-time employees. An eight-player prize-money event has been scheduled for Jan. 13 through 16 in Santa Rosa, Calif., with some of the early stars (Mrs. King, the Misses Wade, Casals and Durr, and Betty Stove) of the women's tour. Miss Casals hopes to package five tournaments and a series championship event.

''You really appreciate your life style a lot more once you become a promoter,'' she said. ''As a player, all you worry about is getting paid and complaining about not having tennis balls or cars. As a promoter, all of a sudden, the roles are reversed. You're going out and asking for the money. It feels like you're begging. Every time somebody turns you down you say, 'Why? I can't believe this.' It's a totally different angle. You have to apppreciate that though, even though it's only $35,000. It's tough money to get, especially the way things are now.''
Oct 11th, 2012 01:00 AM
thrust
Re: Rosebud - Rosie Casals

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rollo View Post
Lucky you Thrust! What was it like to watch tennis at Forest Hills? I love some of the all court tennis seen in the old days on grass.

I wonder if she had a singles slam in her.

I've seen various reasons. Some cite her height. At 5' 2 and half inches (and Rosie liked to emphsize that half!) she was a good 2 inches shorter than King, for instance. Others cited her friendship with Billie Jean. King herself saluted Rosie's shotmaking but wrote she never worked hard enough for it.

Why, in your view, was Rosie never destined to win a slam?
Forest Hills was great in those days, because it was easy to get tickets. One could roam around from stadium to other courts easily as the place was rarely packed, especially in the early rounds. I think Rosie's main reason for not winning a slam was mental. She had such, perhaps too much, a variety of shots which caused her to choose the wrong ones in a tight situation. I suppose BJK knows best but I think Rosie did work hard enough, but just didn't have the physical and mental stamina to beat several top players consecutively, which is what is needed in order to win a slam.
Oct 8th, 2012 10:40 PM
SelesGOAT
Re: Rosebud - Rosie Casals

Casals played in an era of Court, King, Evert, Navratilova, Goolagong and behind them Jones, Wade, Richey, and then behind them other similarily dangerous players to herself like Stove, Barker, Turnbull, Morozova, Melville. She was good but in that era it would be pretty much impossible to see her winning a slam. Her best opportunity was probably the 70 or 71 U.S Open since there was less depth briefly then, and she only needed one really big win, the finals each time. She folded in the 3rd set in 1970 with a bunch of stupid errors even though Court was clearly nervous about the prospect of the Grand Slam and not at her domineering best, and in 1971 she should have won the 2nd set anyway.
Oct 6th, 2012 02:40 PM
Rollo
Re: Rosebud - Rosie Casals

Quote:
Rosie was, indeed, a great shotmaker. I was at that Forest Hills match in which she lost to Bueno in 3 sets. It was one of the finest women's matches I ever saw. Both players had great all-court games and could hit with power and finesse.
Lucky you Thrust! What was it like to watch tennis at Forest Hills? I love some of the all court tennis seen in the old days on grass.

I wonder if she had a singles slam in her.

I've seen various reasons. Some cite her height. At 5' 2 and half inches (and Rosie liked to emphsize that half!) she was a good 2 inches shorter than King, for instance. Others cited her friendship with Billie Jean. King herself saluted Rosie's shotmaking but wrote she never worked hard enough for it.

Why, in your view, was Rosie never destined to win a slam?
Oct 6th, 2012 01:20 AM
thrust
Re: Rosebud - Rosie Casals

Quote:
Originally Posted by samn View Post
I remember Bud Collins in the commentary booth once referring to Rosebud as the greatest shotmaker women's tennis had ever seen. Dick "Oh, my!" Enberg was really taken aback by Collins' claim and seemed to have no idea what being a shotmaker meant. He thought that Collins was claiming that Casals had better groundstrokes than any other woman player in history.
Rosie was, indeed, a great shotmaker. I was at that Forest Hills match in which she lost to Bueno in 3 sets. It was one of the finest women's matches I ever saw. Both players had great all-court games and could hit with power and finesse.
Sep 28th, 2012 03:41 PM
Rollo
Re: Rosebud - Rosie Casals

Ran across this video watching tV this morning in celebration of Hispanic Heritage month. The video is a good glimpse of how she hot started.

http://video.foxnews.com/v/186536599...e-rosie-casals


Loved how she pronounced Studebaker like Stu-di-baker
Sep 28th, 2012 03:39 PM
Rollo
Re: Rosebud - Rosie Casals

Recently I became aware of how close Rosie was to the singer Dusty Springfield. Casals is mentioned in some bios about the chanteuse.
Sep 13th, 2011 04:25 PM
Rollo
Re: Rosebud - Rosie Casals

Quote:
how i miss those virgina slims years! the virginia slims of chicago, san francisco, philadelphia, etcetera, etcetera. when CBS would air these tournaments in the 70's... incredible players, evert, martina, king, goolagong, wade, court, casals, morozova, richey gunter, etcetera... the greatest umpire ever lee jackson who made every match so exciting, the lighting of the court and crowd, the sound of the ball,everything was so awesome, fun and exciting to watch those matches back in the day!



The funny thing about the tour was the contrast. Sure-after 1974 every week was indoors. But no one will ever match the cast of characters and playing styles from that era.

Rosie has a special place in Virginia Slims history. She holds the record for playing the most events on the Virginia Slims tour (1971-1978). She was also the first female to win an event where the prize money was $100,000 or higher when she won the 1973 Family Circle Cup.
Sep 13th, 2011 12:26 PM
laschutz
Re: Rosebud - Rosie Casals

love watching rosie in action 1977 3rd place playoff match against a hurt shouldered martina in the virgina slims championship as well as her with billie jean against margaret and virginia in the 1975 u.s. open doubles final....

how i miss those virgina slims years! the virginia slims of chicago, san francisco, philadelphia, etcetera, etcetera. when CBS would air these tournaments in the 70's... incredible players, evert, martina, king, goolagong, wade, court, casals, morozova, richey gunter, etcetera... the greatest umpire ever lee jackson who made every match so exciting, the lighting of the court and crowd, the sound of the ball,everything was so awesome, fun and exciting to watch those matches back in the day!
Sep 13th, 2011 11:03 AM
austinrunner
Re: Rosebud - Rosie Casals

No, the professional contracts were signed in 1968. King was not payed a penny by Wilson to use its steel racquet.
Sep 13th, 2011 08:46 AM
alfajeffster
Re: Rosebud - Rosie Casals

Didn't both Rosie and Billie Jean sign on as touring pros (along with Roy Emerson, Ann Jones, and others) with George McCall (I think that's his name) that year, and wasn't one of the sponsors Wilson? God knows Jack Kramer wasn't interested in signing girls.
Sep 13th, 2011 08:28 AM
austinrunner
Re: Rosebud - Rosie Casals

Couldn't be 1967 because Casals played with wood at Wimbledon that year. I have posted a picture of her and King playing doubles that year in the King career results thread. King also played with wood there but switched to steel sometime after the 1967 U.S. Clay Court Championships but before the 1967 U.S. National Championships.
Sep 12th, 2011 05:23 PM
Rollo
Re: Rosebud - Rosie Casals

Casals at Wimbledon-note the steel racquet. (Exact year undetermined-see posts below)

Nov 16th, 2009 09:44 AM
iainmac
Re: Rosebud - Rosie Casals

Quote:
Originally Posted by preacherfan View Post
Unfortunately, by '72 Rosie's destiny as a bridesmaid was already determined. Maybe she could've done that earlier and it would've made a difference.

Watching Rosie's points on YouTube have given me even more appreciation for her shot-making ability.
I agree- it is easy to remember the greatness of stroke production of Hingis, Mandlikova, Goolagong. It is right to consider Casals as being right there for natural shot making ability!!!
This thread has more than 15 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome