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  Topic Review (Newest First)
Dec 14th, 2014 10:39 PM
Rollo
Re: Dorothy Round Little - One of Britain's greatest champions





Miss Dorothy Round (right), English tennis star, leaving the court with the well-known American player, Miss Helen Jacobs, whom she defeated yesterday in the All England women's singles at Wimbledon, thus avenging her defeat of last year by the same opponent. (Evening Post, 30 June 1937
Dec 14th, 2014 09:22 PM
Rollo
Re: Dorothy Round Little - One of Britain's greatest champions





OLD-TIME TENNIS.—Miss Dorothy Round making up as. Suzanne Lenglen in a costume worn several years ago,, while Mile. Lenglen supervises the process. They were being dressed to attend Lady Wavertree's old costume parade at Grosvenor House, London, on July 9. (Evening Post, 14 August 1934)
Dec 14th, 2014 09:11 PM
Rollo
Re: Dorothy Round Little - One of Britain's greatest champions




Mrs. Douglas L. Little and her baby son Dudley, who was three weeks old when this photograph was taken on August 9. Mrs. Little is better known as Dorothy Round, England's famous woman tennis champion. (Evening Post, 10 September 1938).
Jun 25th, 2014 03:25 AM
Rollo
Re: Dorothy Round Little - One of Britain's greatest champions

Mark originally posted this marriage notice of Dorothy's here at: http://www.tennisforum.com/showpost....postcount=1587

Dorothy Edith Round
United Kingdom
Born 13 July 1908
Died 12 November 1982

Married Douglas Leigh Little, 2 September 1937

From "Lawn Tennis and Badminton", September 4, 1937:

"The marriage took place on Thursday at the Wesley Methodist Church, Dudley, Worcestershire, between Dr Douglas Leigh Little, M.B., only son of the late Mr W.L. Little and of Mrs Barnes, of Darnley Place, Glasgow, and Miss Dorothy Round, only daughter of Mr and Mrs J.B. Round of Dudley, Worcestershire. Miss Mary Heeley was the bridesmaid.

"The wedding presents included gifts from Dudley Rotary Club, the Worcestershire County Lawn Tennis Association, Manor Park Club (Malvern), Edgbaston Club (Birmingham), the Pwllheli Lawn Tennis Club and Messrs Slazenger Ltd.

"Miss Round's hometown of Dudley honoured her last week when the Mayor (Alderman Joseph L. Hillman) on behalf of the council and burgesses of the ancient borough, presented her with a silver tray suitably inscribed, as part of their recognition of her winning the Championships at Wimbledon in July.

"The remainder of the town's gift consisted of a bedroom suite in antique walnut for her new home, Kenwood, Saint James's Road, Dudley, to which she and Dr Leigh Little will return after their honeymoon in Scotland.

"This is the third presentation made by Dudley to the Lady Champion. The first presentation, of a diamond and gold watch, was made in 1933 upon her success in reaching the ladies' singles final at Wimbledon.

"Mrs Little stated last week that a friend remarked at the time: 'Whatever are they going to do if you ever win it?' 'And I did win it the next year,' remarked the Champion. 'The Council asked me what I would like to have for the gift they wished to make. It was suggested I should have a car, but I felt I would like the money to go to the endowment of a cot in the Guest Hospital, so that it would last for all time.'

"With her characteristic generosity the Lady Champion again asked that the money might go to the hospital or other charity when the council approached her about a gift after her second Wimbledon triumph. But the Mayor impressed on her that in view of her approaching marriage her suggestion would be very much against the townspeople's wishes. The choice of a gift was left to her, and in addition to the tray, she chose the bedroom suite, thus indulging her taste for antiques and furniture in antique period."
-----
May 27th, 2010 07:34 AM
iainmac
Re: Dorothy Round Little - One of Britain's greatest champions

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rollo View Post
Here is film of Round beating Scriven at the 1934 British Hard Courts at Bournemouth. It's a real shame Round didn't contest the French, as peggy Scriven won it twice-the last time in 1934-weeks after this very match!

The capacity crowd illustrates how popualr these women were in their day.

http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=4943
RolloThanks so much for that link and yes isnt it impressive the crowds that they generated, I would imagine particularly in the case of Round who was a national heroine by this stage. I think it is a shame she didnt win the French as it would have cemented her even more as one of the GOAT British players. As for Scriven, for someone who never received a lesson in her life and didnt start to play till she was mid or late teens it is an astonishing achievement that she won the French twice. Only her relative lack of success at Wimbledon denied her a bigger profile here in Britain.
May 24th, 2010 09:20 PM
Rollo
Re: Dorothy Round Little - One of Britain's greatest champions

Here is film of Round beating Scriven at the 1934 British Hard Courts at Bournemouth. It's a real shame Round didn't contest the French, as peggy Scriven won it twice-the last time in 1934-weeks after this very match!

The capacity crowd illustrates how popular these women were in their day.

http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=4943
May 23rd, 2010 12:15 AM
iainmac
Dorothy Round

Would love to start some discussion on this legendary British player
Nov 11th, 2009 12:30 PM
iainmac
Re: Dorothy Round Little - One of Britain's greatest champions

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rollo View Post
Here is a cigarette card of Dorothy. These tennis cards were popular in the 1930s and are collector's items

To think that people would have bought their smokes and thrown these away most of the time- and now worth a fortune!!!!!
Nov 11th, 2009 06:01 AM
Rollo
Re: Dorothy Round Little - One of Britain's greatest champions

Here is a cigarette card of Dorothy. These tennis cards were popular in the 1930s and are collector's items

Sep 25th, 2009 02:52 PM
iainmac
Re: Dorothy Round Little - One of Britain's greatest champions

That is a fantastic action photograph. Isnt it amazing that all great players of whatever era always have a level of concentration that is so much more intense than the average tour player? Looks like Beckenham was attracting great crowds back then. Cheers for the photo Rollo.
Sep 25th, 2009 02:06 AM
Rollo
Re: Dorothy Round Little - One of Britain's greatest champions

This pic on Beckenham's site does not identify her-but it is Round, presumably at the Kent Chmpionships sometime in the 1930s. Dorothy won the Beckenham event in 1933 and 1935.

Sep 20th, 2009 02:22 PM
iainmac
Re: Dorothy Round Little - One of Britain's greatest champions

Quote:
Originally Posted by GeeTee View Post
Round was probably lucky that Joan Hartigan (who had already beaten defending champion Round at Wimbledon and reached the semis there for the second consecutive year) had to withdraw with illness from the Australian.

LONDON, Tuesday.
Prolonged applause greeted Joan Hartigan, the Australian, when she defeated the British holder of the title, Miss Dorothy Round, in the quarter final of the ladies' singles on the central court at Wimbledon today.

The result of the match was a great surprise in the present Wimbledon series. The crowd was particularly impressed by the Australian's stoicism in recovering her best form and going after difficult shots, after an unfortunate line decision was given against her, and delayed her winning the second set.

Although captured by the English woman, the first set gave an indication of the strength of the Australian's opposition, and her determination to make a match of it. When a point was incorrectly given in her favour , Miss Hartigan was leading 4-2, and 30-0, and was loudly applauded when she served a double fault which may or, may not have been deliberate. After levelling at 4-all, Miss Round went on to take the next two games, and the set at 6-4.

In the second set Miss Hartigan led 2-0, Miss Round contributing to her success by two successive double faults. Miss Hartigan failed to hold the service, but led 3-1, slamming cross court drives to unplayable acute angles. Good serving and volleying gave the Australian a 4-1 lead. Miss Round again double faulted, helping Miss Hartigan to obtain a lead of 2-1, after admirable deep driving. Miss Hartigan, holding a set point, outed a backhand toss, and the English woman took the game.

Driving, tossing and volleying beautifully Miss Hartigan held two set points on Miss Round's service, but lost the game after a deplorable line decision. She was disheartened, and played badly, while Miss Round crept up to 4-5. At this stage, Miss Hartigan dropped another set point, but made no mistake when a further set point was offered.

As the match continued, the Australian showed further control of her drive, and finished with great coolness and determination, taking the match with a service which flew off the edge of Miss Round's racket.

Interviewed after the match, Miss Round said 'I just did my best. Miss Hartigan played too well for me.",

"The Daily Express" said "Nobody thought the modest, almost apologetic lassie from downunder could win."


In 1934, Hartigan (despite complaining of 'rheumatism' in her left leg and arm) won four tournaments in the UK (and was runner-up in three more) and made the Wimbledon semis.

In 1935, she won another three UK tournies (and another final) and made the Wimbledon semis.

Even forgetting her Australian successes in these years, her overseas success showed she was of much more than 'moderate ability' herself.

Hartigan was clearly the best Australian player, ahead of Emily Westacott. But another four women (Hopman, Bickerton, Molesworth and Le Messurier) had all played overseas - including Wimbledon - with some success. Entries in the 1935 Australian also came from South African and New Zealand players.

Young improvers Nancye Wynne and Thelma Coyne (who within a year would challenge Hartigan'#1 Aussie status - and presumably be considered of top 10 or 15 world standard) and Dot Stevenson added to the depth. And then we had the British team of Round, Dearman and Lyle.

This AUS v GBR match played in Sydney shows how even the AUS and GBR teams were, although Westacott had never played overseas and Bickerton had been out of top-level tennis for a few years.

DAY ONE
Emily Westacott AUS d Evelyn Dearman GBR 63 108
Joan Hartigan AUS d Nancy GBR Lyle 26 63 61
Dorothy Round GBR d Louie Bickerton 64 62
Doubles - AUS d GBR scores??

DAY TWO
Evelyn Dearman GBR d Louie Bickerton 64 57 61
Dorothy Round GBR d Joan Hartigan 62 26 63
Emily Westacott AUS d Nancy Lyle 46 63 62
Round/Dearman GBR d Hartigan/Bickerton AUS 16 64 97

FINAL SCORE: AUS 4/11/108 GBR 4/11/107

Tennis guru Wallis Myers travelled to Australia during this season. Some of his quotes on returning to London:

“Australia had more young players of championship mettle than any country in the world, with the possible exception of the United States.

Referring to the Junior Championships:."the play was of remarkably high standard. No decisions were ever questioned and their was no gestures following a winning or losing stroke.

Girl players did not get the same opportunities to travel as they did in Europe but, like the men, their courage and calmness was noticeable.
That was a great post. Hartigan by my quick research won the Australian three times and that is great. I think it is important to remember that distance stopped players going to Australia and vice versa. It was a very different world. But IMO nobody who won a GS title should be denied it becasue of what ifs!!!
Sep 20th, 2009 01:01 AM
GeeTee
Re: Dorothy Round Little - One of Britain's greatest champions

Quote:
Originally Posted by chris whiteside View Post
Treading carefully around Australian toes any moderate world class player could have won the Aussie Championships in 1935.
Round was probably lucky that Joan Hartigan (who had already beaten defending champion Round at Wimbledon and reached the semis there for the second consecutive year) had to withdraw with illness from the Australian.

LONDON, Tuesday.
Prolonged applause greeted Joan Hartigan, the Australian, when she defeated the British holder of the title, Miss Dorothy Round, in the quarter final of the ladies' singles on the central court at Wimbledon today.

The result of the match was a great surprise in the present Wimbledon series. The crowd was particularly impressed by the Australian's stoicism in recovering her best form and going after difficult shots, after an unfortunate line decision was given against her, and delayed her winning the second set.

Although captured by the English woman, the first set gave an indication of the strength of the Australian's opposition, and her determination to make a match of it. When a point was incorrectly given in her favour , Miss Hartigan was leading 4-2, and 30-0, and was loudly applauded when she served a double fault which may or, may not have been deliberate. After levelling at 4-all, Miss Round went on to take the next two games, and the set at 6-4.

In the second set Miss Hartigan led 2-0, Miss Round contributing to her success by two successive double faults. Miss Hartigan failed to hold the service, but led 3-1, slamming cross court drives to unplayable acute angles. Good serving and volleying gave the Australian a 4-1 lead. Miss Round again double faulted, helping Miss Hartigan to obtain a lead of 2-1, after admirable deep driving. Miss Hartigan, holding a set point, outed a backhand toss, and the English woman took the game.

Driving, tossing and volleying beautifully Miss Hartigan held two set points on Miss Round's service, but lost the game after a deplorable line decision. She was disheartened, and played badly, while Miss Round crept up to 4-5. At this stage, Miss Hartigan dropped another set point, but made no mistake when a further set point was offered.

As the match continued, the Australian showed further control of her drive, and finished with great coolness and determination, taking the match with a service which flew off the edge of Miss Round's racket.

Interviewed after the match, Miss Round said 'I just did my best. Miss Hartigan played too well for me.",

"The Daily Express" said "Nobody thought the modest, almost apologetic lassie from downunder could win."


In 1934, Hartigan (despite complaining of 'rheumatism' in her left leg and arm) won four tournaments in the UK (and was runner-up in three more) and made the Wimbledon semis.

In 1935, she won another three UK tournies (and another final) and made the Wimbledon semis.

Even forgetting her Australian successes in these years, her overseas success showed she was of much more than 'moderate ability' herself.

Hartigan was clearly the best Australian player, ahead of Emily Westacott. But another four women (Hopman, Bickerton, Molesworth and Le Messurier) had all played overseas - including Wimbledon - with some success. Entries in the 1935 Australian also came from South African and New Zealand players.

Young improvers Nancye Wynne and Thelma Coyne (who within a year would challenge Hartigan'#1 Aussie status - and presumably be considered of top 10 or 15 world standard) and Dot Stevenson added to the depth. And then we had the British team of Round, Dearman and Lyle.

This AUS v GBR match played in Sydney shows how even the AUS and GBR teams were, although Westacott had never played overseas and Bickerton had been out of top-level tennis for a few years.

DAY ONE
Emily Westacott AUS d Evelyn Dearman GBR 63 108
Joan Hartigan AUS d Nancy GBR Lyle 26 63 61
Dorothy Round GBR d Louie Bickerton 64 62
Doubles - AUS d GBR scores??

DAY TWO
Evelyn Dearman GBR d Louie Bickerton 64 57 61
Dorothy Round GBR d Joan Hartigan 62 26 63
Emily Westacott AUS d Nancy Lyle 46 63 62
Round/Dearman GBR d Hartigan/Bickerton AUS 16 64 97

FINAL SCORE: AUS 4/11/108 GBR 4/11/107

Tennis guru Wallis Myers travelled to Australia during this season. Some of his quotes on returning to London:

“Australia had more young players of championship mettle than any country in the world, with the possible exception of the United States.

Referring to the Junior Championships:."the play was of remarkably high standard. No decisions were ever questioned and their was no gestures following a winning or losing stroke.

Girl players did not get the same opportunities to travel as they did in Europe but, like the men, their courage and calmness was noticeable.
Sep 18th, 2009 06:28 PM
newmark401
Re: Dorothy Round Little - One of Britain's greatest champions

I feel that Dorothy Round had the beating of Helen Wills Moody that day. Unfortunately the controversial line call at the end of the second set completely threw her off her game. In "100 Years of Wimbledon", Lance Tingay wrote the following piece on that 1933 ladies' single final:

“The strength of the British women’s game was displayed in 1933 when Dorothy Round, who had to learn to live with her popular description as ‘the Worcestershire Sunday School teacher’, reached the singles final. It was against Mrs Moody and the Californian had been less rigorously dominating than the year before, being almost hard pressed, by her standards, to win her semi-final against Fraulein Krahwinkel [6-4, 6-3]. Miss Round beat Miss Jacobs at the same stage to justify her status as the second seed. The final proved a patriotic occasion for although Miss Round did not win, she averted defeat in a manner which for long had seemed impossible against the all-conquering Mrs Moody.

“The American victory was measured 6-4, 6-8, 6-3. It was the first set lost by the Californian for six years and that was enough to make it a memorable occasion. It was not, though, an unalloyed British triumph for if Miss Round merited her success by the stalwart nature of her resistance, the actual manner of it owed something to luck. Even so it was an exacting fight, the like of which Mrs Moody had not endured for years. The sentiments of the crowd were inflamed when Miss Round had a 40-15 chance to lead 5-4 in the first set. In the second her mixture of short and long drives continued to harass the champion and the British girl got in front 7-6. In the next game, Miss Round, serving, was 30-40, having been 15-40. On the next rally she overdrove the baseline. Or, at least, so she thought, together with Mrs Moody and the umpire, who called the score seven games all. The linesman, though, stuck to his decision of a line ball which everyone though to be an error. The umpire acquiesced, as strictly he had to do, but the incident, coming at so vital a point, proved a terrible distraction. Miss Round got the next two points to win the set. The crowd applauded practically every shot she played in the last set but by then her concentration had been marred."
Sep 14th, 2009 05:56 PM
iainmac
Re: Dorothy Round Little - One of Britain's greatest champions

Quote:
Originally Posted by chris whiteside View Post
Yes, unfortunately the AndyM result was so predictable although I was syrprised it was Cilic - I expected it to be Del Potro.

But wouldn't it be great to have a world class rivalry between Robson and Watson?
Hi friend. Hey do you not think that there is a chance there could be a Jones/Wade. Wade/Barker thing brewing with these two? I think her win at the Open juniors is one of the greatest in the annals of post 80s womens tennis here.
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