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  Topic Review (Newest First)
Jan 17th, 2016 05:15 PM
rodlaver
Re: Long skirts and bowler hats-Pioneers til 1914

Hi

sorry for my english, here a Piano piece dedicated to women tennis players of the early twentieth century with some old photos

A Ladies Sport (Tennis Piano Piece);

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cPolhHN0EWM

I like very much Madame Reytiens, very pretty woman
Jan 2nd, 2016 12:34 AM
Rollo
Re: Long skirts and bowler hats-Pioneers til 1914

From an old journalist named Harry Scrivener discussing how ladies of this era were titled "Mrs" or "Miss" and not by their first names.

"Girls were never called by their Christian names by people who were strangers to them, including journalists! If you had gone up to Mrs Hillyard and called her 'Blanche' she would had given you a thick ear which you would have spent several days trying to forget. There was perhaps some excuse for 'Lottie' Dod because she was such a child but her mother objected strongly to her daughter, Miss Charlotte Dod, being described as 'Lottie' and that is one of the reasons why lawn tennis saw less of her than it should have done."

from page 15 of the July 1956 issue of World Tennis.
May 26th, 2015 02:22 AM
Rollo
Re: Long skirts and bowler hats-Pioneers til 1914

3 of the 4 The Sutton sisters together in a photo. Only Ethel is missing.

Dec 14th, 2014 04:01 PM
Ms. Anthropic
Re: Long skirts and bowler hats-Pioneers til 1914

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rollo View Post
Woman's tennis dress from Auckland-1900

And they complain about a Barbie Doll's impossible anatomical proportions!
Dec 14th, 2014 11:43 AM
Rollo
Re: Long skirts and bowler hats-Pioneers til 1914

Woman's tennis dress from Auckland-1900

Dec 10th, 2014 01:08 PM
LKK
Re: Long skirts and bowler hats-Pioneers til 1914

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rollo View Post
Can we id all of these ladies?

The caption says: At tennis tournament, Morristown - Misses Hamilton, Crag, Stephens, Hamilton, [Gertrude] Della Torre, Hamilton and Smith

Date: circa 1910-1915


My guess is they are (not in any order) Misses: Buda Stephens; Anne, Mary and Alida Hamilton (probably sisters); Adele Cragin - all of them were active in New Jersey area in the early 1910s. "Smith" is just too common last name, so I shouldn't suggest anyone as I don't know all Misses Smith playing in those times, hehe.
Dec 10th, 2014 04:20 AM
Rollo
Re: Long skirts and bowler hats-Pioneers til 1914



Finals of the Victorian Lawn Tennis club event in August of 1907
Sep 14th, 2014 11:05 PM
Rollo
Re: Long skirts and bowler hats-Pioneers til 1914

Can we id all of these ladies?

The caption says: At tennis tournament, Morristown - Misses Hamilton, Crag, Stephens, Hamilton, [Gertrude] Della Torre, Hamilton and Smith

Date: circa 1910-1915


Sep 14th, 2014 10:49 PM
Rollo
Re: Long skirts and bowler hats-Pioneers til 1914

7th Regiment Armoury in New York city-long the site of the US Indoors.

This photo was from 1908 (Source:Library of Congress)

Sep 14th, 2014 10:45 PM
Rollo
Re: Long skirts and bowler hats-Pioneers til 1914

The tennis grounds at Bad Homburg in the 1890s. Photos like this became postcards.

Sep 2nd, 2014 03:14 AM
Rollo
Re: Long skirts and bowler hats-Pioneers til 1914

A view of the Irish Championships in 1903. The tennis courts dominated Fitzwilliam Sqaure.

Aug 4th, 2014 02:52 AM
Rollo
Re: Long skirts and bowler hats-Pioneers til 1914

Artist: John Lavery

A Tennis Party.

Mar 27th, 2014 09:17 PM
Rollo
Re: Long skirts and bowler hats-Pioneers til 1914

Shoes from the same era



At website: http://www.powerhousemuseum.com/coll...images=&c=&s=1

Description
Tennis shoes, pair, womens, leather / rubber, made by Joseph Box, exhibition work, London, England, 1886

Pair of womens Oxford style front lace tennis shoes with red covered rand construction, narrow oval toe and covered spring wedge heel. Shoes consist of tan Morocco uppers featuring winged vamp, closed tab, stitched over front lacing, 5 pairs of buttonholed lace eyelets with red laces in inverted V pattern over tongue with rounded top, red flared backstrap and red top edge bound. Throat features a row of scalloped stitches. Shoes lined in white kid and the sock is also in white kid. Heel covered in Morocco and rubber sole continues under the heel.[LEFT][COLOR=#000000]
Read more:
Mar 27th, 2014 09:08 PM
Rollo
Re: Long skirts and bowler hats-Pioneers til 1914

A well preserved tennis dress from the 1880s to 1890s at the Powerhouse Museum in Australia.



A zoomable photo and excellent description are at:

http://www.powerhousemuseum.com/coll...images=&c=&s=1

This two piece tennis ensemble, comprising a tunic jacket and ankle length skirt, is a well-preserved example of the type of tennis costume worn by women in the late 19th century. At this time, tennis dresses were more likened to walking dresses, worn with black stockings, gloves, laced shoes with heels and a hat. Although the dress may appear to have little consideration for function and practicality by modern standards, the skirt in this piece is actually fitted with eyelets and hooks for folding the bottom up when playing. Some dresses also featured sewn-in pockets and aprons for holding the racquet and balls. As opposed to fashionable dress, the bodice in this ensemble is also unboned and the skirt features large box pleats which allows for more vigorous movement.

Tennis only started to be played by women as late as the 1870s, after Major Wingfield patented the modern tennis court in 1873, and the sport became fashionable alongside other recreational pursuits like cycling and riding. This particular style of tennis dress with an ankle length skirt was popular until 1910 when garments became lighter and less restrictive. The short skirt, however, did not formally appear until 10 years later when French tennis player, Suzanne Lenglen, appeared on the courts at Wimbledon, not only with a short white skirt, but also a tight fitting top, fur coat and make-up! Her attire was described by American tennis player, Bill Tilden, as "a cross between a prima donna and a streetwalker"!

It is rare to find such beautifully preserved examples of late 19th century tennis costume as this. It complements other closely dated tennis items in the Museum's collection, such as a pair of tennis shoes from 1886 and photographs from 1850-1900, and provides a nice contrast with a 21st century women's tennis outfit in the collection designed and made by Puma in 2002.
Mar 6th, 2013 09:54 AM
Sam L
Re: Long skirts and bowler hats-Pioneers til 1914

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rollo View Post
Found this on wikicommons. To me this is a beautuful photo that reeks of atmosphere.

1912 Olympic Indoor event:
Edith Hannam (Serving) and Charles Dixon vs. Helen Aitchison (returning) and Herbert Roper Barrett
Thanks Rollo. I've never seen this before. This almost looks like a real tennis match the way the building is and having the spectators on the side.
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