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View Full Version : 2003 WTA YEC Attendance Down From 2002 YEC


lizchris
Nov 11th, 2003, 05:44 AM
From the Associated Press:

The final attracted an announced crowd of 8,925 - 1,307 less than last year's final, also on a Monday night. The six-day tournament drew 44,889 - 11,973 less than 2002, when both Williams sisters and Lindsay Davenport were in the field.

Is anyone surprised?

And then you wonder why the WTA and IMG are in secret talks to get the sisters to play Indian Wells next March.

disposablehero
Nov 11th, 2003, 05:47 AM
I wasn't aware it was possible to have lower attendance than last year.

TennisHack
Nov 11th, 2003, 05:48 AM
They only attracted 5,000 people to the final? :o

Damn, that's sad, no matter who is in the field!

lizchris
Nov 11th, 2003, 05:50 AM
I wasn't aware it was possible to have lower attendance than last year.

I didn't think so either, but when the top three American players out with injuries, some ticket holders probbly said why bother?

~ The Leopard ~
Nov 11th, 2003, 05:59 AM
It should have been played in Paris or Brussels then.

AjdeNate!
Nov 11th, 2003, 06:11 AM
Hmmmmm, the "guy" (I don't recall his name) said at the trophy present that attendance doubled from last year. :shrug: Oh well, I could care about attendance and tv ratings myself... I know I watched as much as I could on tv and my faves were about 60 places away from qualifying. ;)

LeonHart
Nov 11th, 2003, 06:15 AM
And where did you get this from? How do we know you're not making this up.

from wtatour.com


LOS ANGELES, CA - On the heels of the 30th anniversary of the WTA Tour, Chairman & CEO Larry Scott delivered a “State of the Game’’ address Monday, outlining the major highlights of his first six months with the Tour and unveiling his top priorities for the future growth of the sport.

One of Scott’s most important successes in 2003 is the rejuvenation of the Bank of America WTA Tour Championships presented by Porsche, which recorded increased attendance and attention this year.

monster
Nov 11th, 2003, 06:20 AM
Man this is bad.
Although 3 marquee players were missing, maybe LA has had enough chances.
Were attances better in NYC? Maybe it should move back there.
If not, what other US cities could be potential hosts? Maybe Chicago, Atlanta, Houston or even Philly? (All have had successful women's events in the past)
Maybe the YEC should move each year like the men's? If you could move Philly to a week earlier in year(maybe make INdioan Wells 1 week or play from a Sat to Sunday) you could place Philly in their.
IN Europe, where could it be? Belguim seems like a great choice with Kim and Justine doing so well- maybe in Brussels. If the Fed Cup is a success in Moscow- maybe their. Although they have no one in the top 10 anymore- the Spaniards have always supported women's tennis well- so maybe there.
Maybe Paris? Maybe a Swiss city? I don't think an Italian, Greek, German Austrian or Scandivian city would be right at the moment- or any of central or eastern European nation.
Although I would love to have it ni Australia I think it is a little unrealistic. Africa- no. S America- no Asia- I think only Japan or China would be contenders. I defintely think it is worth while moving it from LA though

Iroda_Fan
Nov 11th, 2003, 06:25 AM
With a score like that who would of wanted to go????? The tickets are so expensive. This was suppost to be the BEST players in THE WORLD.

jenglisbe
Nov 11th, 2003, 06:40 AM
Jon Wertheim said in the new Mailbag that attendance was better this year, as did the guy during the trophy presentation.

~ The Leopard ~
Nov 11th, 2003, 07:00 AM
Well, Momo let us all down in the final, but she and the others put on incredible tennis day after day. It seems that LA doesn't appreciate it. Move it almost anywhere else.

Tratree
Nov 11th, 2003, 07:18 AM
The AP must have corrected their story:

The final attracted an announced crowd of 8,925 -- 1,307 less than last year's final, also on a Monday night. The six-day tournament drew 44,889 -- 3,629 more than 2002, when both Williams sisters and Lindsay Davenport were in the field. A Staples Center official said last year's attendance was corrected to 41,260 instead of the originally announced 56,862, which was padded to include complimentary tickets.

treufreund
Nov 11th, 2003, 07:28 AM
attendance is up without lindsay and williams. :haha: thread starter must be pissed to no end.

disposablehero
Nov 11th, 2003, 07:32 AM
attendance is up without lindsay and williams. :haha: thread starter must be pissed to no end.

What, you mean the 3 best California-born players of the past 40 years?

~ The Leopard ~
Nov 11th, 2003, 07:45 AM
Okay, so it's up slightly on last year when you compare real figures with real figures? Yes? That might be a reason to stick with the round-robin format, since it hasn't made anything worse.

I still wonder whether it justifies LA as a venue for the tournament.

I realise that all this can be used as a point-scoring exercise about the relative drawing power of various players. Fuck that. The question is: what city is best for this tournament?

treufreund
Nov 11th, 2003, 07:48 AM
combine it with the men's event over a ten day period!!!

disposablehero
Nov 11th, 2003, 07:49 AM
I realise that all this can be used as a point-scoring exercise about the relative drawing power of various players. Fuck that. The question is: what city is best for this tournament?

Not LA. They have 2 events, and don't show up for either. I think it needs to be somewhere in the US, though. I'm going to suggest Chicago, since nobody else has.

~ The Leopard ~
Nov 11th, 2003, 07:52 AM
Actually, it seems crazy that one of the great cities of the world such as Chicago does not have its own WTA event. It's a reasonable suggestion. I visited Chicago for the first time this year and realised what a great place it is.

ChrisGermany
Nov 11th, 2003, 08:59 AM
As a European, I agree though, that the event should stay in the US or move around the world. Having re-installed Advanta and Quebec (at this point of time in the schedule), I believe it would be better leaving it in the US.

IMO, it would be better to re-schedule the FedCup stuff which turns into a real "circus" this year with the "final" Russia-France as the semis due to the lack of interest of the other semis´ players, USA and Belgium, not sending their best teams. I think it would be necessary to extend the US preparation tournament schedule to 2 weeks (maybe Chicago) and then have a season-end so that people realize, yes, the season does not end with the Open but with a mini-tour indoors. If you just have ONE preparation event (and people probably don´t follow European events that closely) you cannot guarantee that people continue to watch tennis with that much interest.

Maybe if they shift Luxemburg to an earlier point of time and install an event next to Linz that is located in the US, that might be a good choice, having a 3-week-tour in the US with the finals at the end ?!

Dymension
Nov 11th, 2003, 09:05 AM
attendance is up without lindsay and williams. :haha: thread starter must be pissed to no end.

:haha:

LeonHart
Nov 11th, 2003, 09:21 AM
Poor Lizchris, trying to find a way to make a tournament look bad without a willies hehe.

lizchris
Nov 11th, 2003, 01:57 PM
Poor Lizchris, trying to find a way to make a tournament look bad without a willies hehe.

My quote came form an Assoicated Press aritcle from AOl.com last night. If you go there, you will be able to see it. If I have time, I will post it.

starr
Nov 11th, 2003, 01:59 PM
ATTENDANCE WAS UP THIS YEAR!!!!!!!!!!!!

:woohoo:

That's great for women's tennis. I think the round robin format may be the ticket!

lizchris
Nov 11th, 2003, 02:01 PM
Updated: 02:24 AM EST

Clijsters wins second straight WTA Championships
By BETH HARRIS, AP SPORTS

LOS ANGELES (AP) - Dangle a $1 million-plus paycheck, play the tournament in California and then wait for Kim Clijsters to win the whole thing.

Clijsters successfully defended her title in the WTA Championships, defeating Amelie Mauresmo 6-2, 6-0 in 52 minutes Monday night.

She became the first player since Steffi Graf in 1996 to win successive titles at the season-ending tournament.

WTA Tour president and CEO Larry Scott said the event will leave Los Angeles in 2005, and relocate to another American city, Europe or China.

Clijsters earned $1,000,030, the largest prize in women's tennis. The extra $30 represented the WTA Tour's 30th anniversary. She finished the year with $4,091,594 in earnings, the first female player to top $4 million in a season. Virginia Ruano Pascual and Paola Suarez defeated Clijsters and Ai Sugiyama 6-4, 3-6, 6-3 for the doubles title.

"It's a dream come true," she said, singling out Billie Jean King and the nine women who formed the first pro circuit in 1971. "It's because of them that players at this moment can be making a good living."

Clijsters dropped her serve to start the match, then dominated Mauresmo, who had just two more break points against the Belgian the rest of the way. She had 16 winners to Mauresmo's eight.

"You want to focus on yourself and not let her back in the match," Clijsters said. "I saw the ball like a football, I was seeing it really well. It's nice to know you can do whatever you want with the ball."

Clijsters broke Mauresmo three times in the first set and served two love games. Her first match point came at 40-love on Mauresmo's serve, but Clijsters netted a backhand. She won on her second match point when Mauresmo's backhand went into the net.

Clijsters raised her arms in triumph and ran to hug Mauresmo at the net. Her victory delighted about 20 Belgians who shouted her name between points. Mauresmo had a small group of beret-topped supporters.

"I did my best but it wasn't good enough," Mauresmo said. "I wasn't finding my rhythm. She played a good game and wasn't making any mistakes. Of course, I helped her by making a lot."

Clijsters won all five of her matches in Los Angeles, including a 3-6, 6-4, 6-4 victory over Mauresmo in round-robin play Saturday.

"I wanted to play the same way I played yesterday and a few days before," Mauresmo said. "She was covering the court very well and she wasn't giving me any short balls to try to come in."

Clijsters finished the year with a 90-12 record and nine titles. She was particularly successful in California, winning in Los Angeles, Indian Wells and Carson, and she was a finalist in Carlsbad.

Clijsters will drop from No. 1 to No. 2, however, when the year-end WTA Tour rankings are released. She will finish 75 points behind top-ranked countrywoman Justine Henin-Hardenne, who lost to Mauresmo in a three-set semifinal.

Clijsters said she was disappointed not to play Henin-Hardenne in the final. Henin-Hardenne defeated Clijsters in both the French Open and U.S. Open finals.

"She deserves to be there as well," Clijsters said. "We've been the two strongest players from the moment Venus and Serena didn't play as much."

The Williams sisters missed the most of the last six months because of injuries. Venus will drop out of the Top 10 - to 11th - for the first time since March 1998.

A year ago, Clijsters defeated both sisters en route to the WTA tournament title.

Mauresmo is projected to equal her career-best ranking of fourth. She was 2-3 during the tournament, and only reached the semifinals when Elena Dementieva defeated Chanda Rubin.

The final attracted an announced crowd of 8,925 - 1,307 less than last year's final, also on a Monday night. The six-day tournament drew 44,889 - 3,629 more than 2002, when both Williams sisters and Lindsay Davenport were in the field. A Staples Center official said last year's attendance was corrected to 41,260 instead of the originally announced 56,862, which was padded to include complimentary tickets.


11/11/03 02:23 EST


This article was changed after I posted the original last paragraph last night. But the fact still remains; this year's tournament's attendance wasn't that great.

JennyS
Nov 11th, 2003, 02:38 PM
The attendance during the Serena/Jennifer match seemed pretty decent last year. I remember the crowd was very enthusiastic.