PDA

View Full Version : The Greatest Novels of all-time


Halardfan
Oct 18th, 2003, 10:00 PM
The BBC's Big Read poll to find the greatest novel of all-time revealed the top 21 today, as voted by the great British public (ahem)

A limit was set of one book per author...thus saving us from FOUR Harry Potter books making it... :eek:

The list..

1984, George Orwell

Birdsong, Sebastian Faulks

Captain Corelli's Mandolin, Louis de Bernieres

Catch 22, Joseph Heller

The Catcher in the Rye, JD Salinger

Great Expectations, Charles Dickens

Gone with the Wind, Margaret Mitchell

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, JK Rowling

His Dark Materials, Philip Pullman

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, Douglas Adams

Jane Eyre, Charlotte Brontė

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, CS Lewis

Little Women, Louisa May Alcott

Lord of the Rings, JRR Tolkien

To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee

Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen

Rebecca, Daphne du Maurier

War and Peace, Leo Tolstoy

The Wind in the Willows, Kenneth Grahame

Winnie the Pooh, AA Milne

Wuthering Heights, Emily Brontė

From that list, Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights and Rebecca leap out to me...plus an affection for the likes"The Hitchikers guide to the Galaxy" and loads of respect too for "1984".

There are a few I haven't read, including the Potter one...

Your choice from that list? Or thoughts on the list in general?

Maybe three or four would have made my own top 21...

GBFH
Oct 18th, 2003, 10:03 PM
Gone With The Wind and Pride and Prejudice would make my list...but not the fourth harry potter book...the third and fifth were better, in my opinion. i liked 1984, but i don't think it's one of the best books ever.

Pureracket
Oct 18th, 2003, 10:04 PM
Toni Morrison's Beloved nor Richard Wright's Invisible Man are on this list.

This list is INVALID!!!!!
(Bronte is a nice choice, though).

Halardfan
Oct 18th, 2003, 10:06 PM
Im still fed up that NOTHING by the likes of HG Wells, Jules Verne or Victor Hugo made the top 100!

Martian Willow
Oct 18th, 2003, 10:20 PM
...I wish people would get over the idea that you can discover the greatest anything by having a poll on it... :rolleyes:

Cilla
Oct 18th, 2003, 10:28 PM
I watched the programme. Pride and Prejudice & To Kill a Mockingbird are my faves on that list.

I agree with you Willow. Polls don't really prove anything, as it's not eveyone's opinion.

GBFH
Oct 18th, 2003, 10:34 PM
Im still fed up that NOTHING by the likes of HG Wells, Jules Verne or Victor Hugo made the top 100!

HUGO! i loved The Hunchback of Notre Dame!

decemberlove
Oct 18th, 2003, 10:39 PM
1984 is definitely one of the greatest reads ever. so damn on point.

X-Lurker
Oct 18th, 2003, 11:07 PM
Any poll is going to have too many kid's books but that's fine because the "expert" lists always snub them. But...

:rolleyes: at Harry Potter.

Great Expectations is very good but it always makes lists simply because it's shorter than most other Dickens...

Catch 22 hasn't aged well.

War and Peace really is as phenomenal as its rep.

decemberlove
Oct 18th, 2003, 11:18 PM
yes, im really sick of seeing harry potter on the list. its just a trend. people 50 years from now will be laughing their asses off

raquel
Oct 18th, 2003, 11:27 PM
I saw a bit of this programme and saw them count down the top 10 books. I did not see it all though, does anyone know if 'Perfume' made the top 100? It should be in the top 21 :mad:. It is my favourite book :)

Rtael
Oct 18th, 2003, 11:30 PM
War And Peace is shit....anyone care to explain to me what the purpose of that book was?

Wuthering Heights wasn't bad, but it wasn't epic either.

Colin B
Oct 18th, 2003, 11:46 PM
I hate 1984 beacause I studied it for O-level (what became GCSE shortly after the Jurassic era) and being forced to analyse a book like that will put you right off it.

It's a bit of a stuffy list really, with the obvious exception of The Hitchiker's Guide ~ and a couple of the children's books but not C.S. Lewis; he's terribly dour, all that pseudo-religious nonsense.
And authors like Thomas Hardy, James Joyce and D.H. Lawrence all wrote better than J.K. Rowling.

Well, you asked for people's thoughts.... ;)

Colin B
Oct 19th, 2003, 12:01 AM
War And Peace is shit....anyone care to explain to me what the purpose of that book was?
Yeah. Seeing that reminded me of a list published a couple of years ago of the 'best novels of the C20th'.
Top of that poll was Joyce's epic, Ulysses and one critic, commenting on the list, asked "I wonder how many of the people who voted for it had actually read it all the way through?"

~ The Leopard ~
Oct 19th, 2003, 12:19 AM
I'm surprised that The Lord of the Rings didn't win. It usually wins such polls.

This is a pretty dumb outcome. There's not much doubt in my mind that the greatest novel of all time is The Brothers Karamazov by Feodor Dostoyevsky, but it's not a book most general readers would tackle. What I see here are a lot of popular novels and a lot of pretty good short novels that are widely read because they are popular choices as high-school texts (e.g 1984).

If you confined it to people who have read widely beyond recent best-sellers and school texts, you'd get a very different result.

OTOH, some literary snobs whine every time The Lord of the Rings does well in one of these polls. :rolleyes: In fact, LOTR really is a great book. Literary snobs have no understanding of what makes an adventure book like that great.

My own list would include works by Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy, Cervantes, Rabelais, Joyce, Dickens, Henry James, George Eliot, Flaubert, Melville, D.H. Lawrence, Marquez, etc, but would also include some fantasy and science fiction writers such as Tolkien, Frank Herbert (Dune), Heinlein (Stranger in a Strange Land), E.R. Eddison (The Worm Ouroboros), William Gibson (Neuromancer), Ursula Le Guin (The Dispossessed), Wells, Verne, etc, etc.

Chris_Martin's_woman
Oct 19th, 2003, 12:53 AM
Is there anyone besides me that wasn't that into To Kill a Mockingbird?:scratch: Anyways, I absolutely LOVE The Bell Jar!:clap2:

decemberlove
Oct 19th, 2003, 01:03 AM
never read 1984 in school.
we read animal farm for 6th grade honors and i loved it so much i decided to read 1984 on my own time.
instead, they shoved shakespeare down on throats EVERY year.
my favorite read during school was albert camus' the stranger. i was one of the few who actually liked the book... everyone else seemed to hate it.

i cant say what THE greatest novel of all time is, as i have not read every novel there is out there. im not much of a fiction reader to begin with... prefer to bury my nose in history books :)
but i can say that the book i enjoyed the most was tom robbins still life with woodpecker.

~ The Leopard ~
Oct 19th, 2003, 01:12 AM
Camus! Yes! :hearts:

Martian Willow
Oct 19th, 2003, 01:27 AM
...good to see Winnie the Pooh on the list...although imho Now We Are Six was a better book... :)

Rtael
Oct 19th, 2003, 01:43 AM
I still haven't heard any reason why these people seem to think these 2000 page stuffy, wordy, incomprehensible, gibberish, and just plain DULL books like War And Peace are the greatest novels of all time?

X-Lurker
Oct 19th, 2003, 01:51 AM
War And Peace is shit....anyone care to explain to me what the purpose of that book was?

:fiery: :fiery: :fiery: Arrgh!!! Huge, passionate War and Peace argument brewing. :lol:

I don't know anyone who's actually read it who didn't like it.

Any book that could be summed up in some kind of thesis statement "purpose" would be crap, because why bother reading it then?

It reads like a documentary. It doesn't follow any formulaic tragedy plot, making it completely unpredictable. Some people have trouble getting started because they're waiting for "the plot" to kick in - it never does. The book is episodic and just follows the lives of the characters.

Whether you like it or not depends on whether you're engaged in the various episodes. Some are touching (scenes of childhood), scary (a protagonist panics as death approaches on a battlefield), fascinating (minutiae of life circa 1812, but not boring) and epic (more battles).

The characters are realistic, not the cartoons of Dickens or Hugo. Tolstoy had an astounding talent for making you empathize with a character by taking you inside their mind as they struggle to make a decision, arguing with themselves over what to do. The effect is completely modern; these aren't stuffed costumes and it illustrates very effectively that people were basically the same two hundred years ago.

The characters range from young girls, to soldiers, to old men and Tolstoy convincingly puts you in the head of all of them.

Unlike many classics, it puts equal emphasis on psychology and environment in determining events; it's not just a psychological novel or just an historical epic - it's both.

It's great. I mean, c'mon, how many 135 yr old books can get people to write long-winded defenses of them on a women's tennis webboard?

Kart
Oct 19th, 2003, 01:56 AM
I've read:

1984, George Orwell
The Catcher in the Rye, JD Salinger
Jane Eyre, Charlotte Brontė
The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, CS Lewis
Lord of the Rings, JRR Tolkien
To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee
Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen
War and Peace, Leo Tolstoy
Wuthering Heights, Emily Brontė

Of those it's probably between To Kill a Mockingbird and Lord of the Rings which are both quite different. I would include Pride and Prejudice, but frankly I liked Sense and Sensibility more. I like long books because they give you pleasure over a longer time if they're well written so I lean toward Lord of the Rings which is cliched I know but still true. I could probably think of several books that I liked more than those though if I really thought about it.

Kart
Oct 19th, 2003, 01:58 AM
War and Peace is a long book too which I enjoyed but I'm still bitter that Sonia (I think that was her name) didn't get the ending I wanted for her :(.

X-Lurker
Oct 19th, 2003, 02:03 AM
I still haven't heard any reason why these people seem to think these 2000 page stuffy, wordy, incomprehensible, gibberish, and just plain DULL books like War And Peace are the greatest novels of all time?

If it's wordy and incomprehensible then you're not reading the right translation. Avoid translations of ANY book that were done in the Victorian era, they inserted a lot of flowery language. Generally speaking, the newer a translation the better.

X-Lurker
Oct 19th, 2003, 02:07 AM
Yeah. Seeing that reminded me of a list published a couple of years ago of the 'best novels of the C20th'.
Top of that poll was Joyce's epic, Ulysses and one critic, commenting on the list, asked "I wonder how many of the people who voted for it had actually read it all the way through?"

I don't know anyone who has read Ulysses who thinks it's anything other than a complete Emperor's-New-Clothes wank job (with some good parts).

*hingis_forever*
Oct 19th, 2003, 02:10 AM
For me it's easy. Lord of the Rings! It's literary work at it's finest and there isn't any book in my opinion that comes close! I mean, the movies were excellent but they were only half as good as the book!

Kart
Oct 19th, 2003, 02:22 AM
I don't know anyone who has read Ulysses who thinks it's anything other than a complete Emperor's-New-Clothes wank job (with some good parts).

I'm reading it at the moment and to be honest, so far I can't disagree with you (but I have only read about 40 pages).

decemberlove
Oct 19th, 2003, 02:22 AM
Camus! Yes! :hearts:

mi amor :kiss:

~ The Leopard ~
Oct 19th, 2003, 02:30 AM
Mmmmmmm, my soft-spoken sweetie with a wild side! :hearts: :kiss:

(Glad some other people here like War and Peace by the way.)

Tangerine~Juice
Oct 19th, 2003, 02:41 AM
Wicked : The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West

andylover_16
Oct 19th, 2003, 03:03 AM
Soldier Boys, BY: Dean Hughes
Bell Jar, By: Sylvia Plath

tia clara
Oct 19th, 2003, 03:50 AM
X-Lurker, you really did a good job talking about War and Peace. I think that the charactes become real people to the reader and one begins to really care about them and what happens to them. Even the characters one doesn't like are human, not just "bad guys". I've read War and Peace three times now and enjoyed it every time.
The film with Audrey Hepburn and Mel Ferrer and Henry Fonda was not too good, but Hepburn was definely a great Natasha.

Rtael
Oct 19th, 2003, 05:50 AM
:fiery: :fiery: :fiery: Arrgh!!! Huge, passionate War and Peace argument brewing. :lol:

I don't know anyone who's actually read it who didn't like it.

Any book that could be summed up in some kind of thesis statement "purpose" would be crap, because why bother reading it then?

It reads like a documentary. It doesn't follow any formulaic tragedy plot, making it completely unpredictable. Some people have trouble getting started because they're waiting for "the plot" to kick in - it never does. The book is episodic and just follows the lives of the characters.

Whether you like it or not depends on whether you're engaged in the various episodes. Some are touching (scenes of childhood), scary (a protagonist panics as death approaches on a battlefield), fascinating (minutiae of life circa 1812, but not boring) and epic (more battles).

The characters are realistic, not the cartoons of Dickens or Hugo. Tolstoy had an astounding talent for making you empathize with a character by taking you inside their mind as they struggle to make a decision, arguing with themselves over what to do. The effect is completely modern; these aren't stuffed costumes and it illustrates very effectively that people were basically the same two hundred years ago.

The characters range from young girls, to soldiers, to old men and Tolstoy convincingly puts you in the head of all of them.

Unlike many classics, it puts equal emphasis on psychology and environment in determining events; it's not just a psychological novel or just an historical epic - it's both.

It's great. I mean, c'mon, how many 135 yr old books can get people to write long-winded defenses of them on a women's tennis webboard?



bullshit, the characters are psychotic! It's basically a book about a guy who joins a cult, a soldier who appears to have more then platonic love for his emperor, and characters who are just all around frigging loopy.....those characters aren't any more realistic then mickey mouse! :rolleyes:

X-Lurker
Oct 19th, 2003, 08:21 AM
bullshit, the characters are psychotic! It's basically a book about a guy who joins a cult, a soldier who appears to have more then platonic love for his emperor, and characters who are just all around frigging loopy.....those characters aren't any more realistic then mickey mouse!

Gee, what a nice reply to a post that you actually requested, twice.

Your problem may have been that Tolstoy uses the word "than" a lot.

By consistently replacing it with "then" the story would have become "incomprehensible gibberish" for there would be numerous, unmotivated chronological jumps. A long book would've seemed even longer.

Also, the than/then confusion would hamper the dialogue and you might conclude the people were just "frigging loopy".

You would think the author was an idiot. :)

propi
Oct 19th, 2003, 11:45 AM
Where's the picture of Dorian Gray??? :eek:

moby
Oct 19th, 2003, 01:42 PM
if there must be a potter book, then it should be the third one

but i dont think the potter series are up there

i've read a few of those other books
LOTR, wind in the willows, kill a mockingbird and little women and they deserve to be there. i believe 1984 should be there because even though i havent read it, i have heard enuff

i just couldnt get started on either of the bronte novels

destry
Oct 19th, 2003, 04:40 PM
...I wish people would get over the idea that you can discover the greatest anything by having a poll on it... :rolleyes:

agreed...it is a rather silly notion. Somewhat interesting to see what titles come out in these things, though.

I rather like Little Women from this list - contains a good deal of optimism and hope for the future, despite the tragedies.

1984 is a nightmarish masterpiece - the idea of a Room 101 scares me to this day

"'You asked me once,' said O'Brien, 'what was in Room 101.
I told you that you knew the answer already. Everyone knows it.
The thing that is in Room 101 is the worst thing in the world.'"...." 'In your case, said O'Brien, 'the worst thing in the world
happens to be rats.'
A sort of premonitory tremor, a fear of he was not certain
what, had passed through Winston as soon as he caught his first
glimpse of the cage. But at this moment the meaning of the
mask-like attachment in front of it suddenly sank into him. His
bowels seemed to turn to water.
'You can't do that!' he cried out in a high cracked voice.
'You couldn't, you couldn't! It's impossible.'" (shudders)

Jane Eyre is very good and Rebecca is somewhat derivative of that, but good also - loved Hitchcock's movie version.

spokenword73
Oct 19th, 2003, 04:44 PM
Has anyone heard of the book "Crystal U"? It's about a hooker who becomes President of a university? Can't find it anywhere!!

Halardfan
Oct 19th, 2003, 09:45 PM
Perfume did feature, somewhere near the middle of the 100 I think...

Seeing as one or two other people have championed their fave with great enthusiasm...I want to sing the praises of HG Wells, who as I say, didn't get a single book in the top 100.

Look at some of Wells more famous tales...

The War of the Worlds...The Time Machine...The Invisible Man...all vastly influential, fantastic books...the man is the father of so much of Science-Fiction, not only that, but a great social thinker, ahead of his time, and frankly, OUR time...an absolute visonary, and an absolute genius...its a scandal not to see one of his books in that Top 100. Especially with those four Harry Potter things there.

One good thing...seeing as its a list restricted to novels we don't have to put up with any Shakespeare!

Hurrah! Rejoice at the abscence of the most over-rated writer in human history! :)

~ The Leopard ~
Oct 20th, 2003, 12:06 AM
Lol, I take it you have never seen a good production of, say, Twelfth Night or The Tempest or A Midsummernight's Dream?

starr
Oct 20th, 2003, 12:50 AM
bullshit, the characters are psychotic! It's basically a book about a guy who joins a cult, a soldier who appears to have more then platonic love for his emperor, and characters who are just all around frigging loopy.....those characters aren't any more realistic then mickey mouse! :rolleyes:

Psychotic? You must have been reading the cliff notes if you think what you wrote has anything to do with the book.

Anyway, I think that Tolstoy writes really good characters and his books are a great read in that they pull you in and carry you along on a great adventure.

Other Russian writers might be more philosophical and have greater depth, but Tolstoy is the best at telling an epic story and weaving seemingly different tales together.

starr
Oct 20th, 2003, 12:59 AM
A writer often overlooked but who I think is fabulous is Graham Green. I read Our Man in Havana when I was about 14 and howled with laughter. I've read it several times since. John LeCarre ripped it off in one of his books. Graham Green is wonderful with quiet desperation.

Jane Austen is my idol. If I had to choose one book to take to a desert Island, it would be her collected works. I've read every one of her books several times and each time I find something new.

Henry James -- A wonderful story teller and very deep psychologically.

Does no one read Thomas Wolfe anymore?

Carson McCullers. Sometimes I think that people don't read the book but only see the movie. What is that other southern woman's name... she wrote Ballad of the Sad Cafe.. Flannery... something. She is also absolutely wonderful

Shoeless Joe. I love that book.

Most Russian writers are wonderful.

Epigone
Oct 20th, 2003, 01:25 AM
I really enjoyed Anna Karenina. I've got a short attention span, so it took me two months to finish. However, it was worth the effort :yeah:.

starr
Oct 20th, 2003, 01:48 AM
Yeah. That was a good book. :)

Rocketta
Oct 20th, 2003, 02:31 AM
ewww, I read Great Expectations in High School and I thought it was the longest drivel I had ever read. :rolleyes:

My english teacher hated me after I gave it two thumbs down. :lol:

The feelings were mutual. ;)

I feel people are going to relate to things for different reasons. If nothing in a book captures you or makes you have a connection with you its going to be boring and seem like drivel.. Frankly, I'm tired of all these historic European novels shoved down "all" our throats as the be all. There are millions of people who can not relate to that stuff. So to them they're just not that great. :shrug:

starr
Oct 20th, 2003, 03:19 AM
I've always felt sorry for people who didn't like history. The same sort of traits that lead one to understand different cultures and different peoples are the ones that lead people to understand those from different historical eras who did not have the same values, customs or norms that we have today. Understanding those who lived in different times and different cultures assists with understanding those today who are differerent from ourselves.

It is easy to understand something that is just like us, but great adventures are born out of exploring different places, different times, and different people.

It's sort of only liking one kind of music or one kind of art. Where's the fun in that?

But, I've never been able to appreciate Dickens either. Tale of Two Cities. That was pretty good.

Rocketta
Oct 20th, 2003, 03:26 AM
I've always felt sorry for people who didn't like history. The same sort of traits that lead one to understand different cultures and different peoples are the ones that lead people to understand those from different historical eras who did not have the same values, customs or norms that we have today. Understanding those who lived in different times and different cultures assists with understanding those today who are differerent from ourselves.

It is easy to understand something that is just like us, but great adventures are born out of exploring different places, different times, and different people.

It's sort of only liking one kind of music or one kind of art. Where's the fun in that?

But, I've never been able to appreciate Dickens either. Tale of Two Cities. That was pretty good.

but who said I was talking about not feeling history? I said European history. I don't see a whole lot of Europeans listing Chinuah Achebe's Things Fall Apart as their favorite or Beloved for that matter. Why is that?

I don't see a whole bunch on diversity being listed on here? Do you?

decemberlove
Oct 20th, 2003, 03:46 AM
sorry, starr, but rockies got a point. you are really contradicting yourself here.

rockie, you ever read anything by erika lopez?

history and eng lit went together nicely in school. it was almost all european and american bullshit. we never even touched the subject of asia or their culture, africa we spoke on a lil bit, but only when the europeans were involved.

other than that, it was all about the europeans. thats why so many people had problems with history in school, esp if you had a shitty teacher. people can only tke so much of the world wars or columbus is a hero ramblings.

the same applies to books. european and american books arent really that diverse... esp the classics they have you read in school.

tommyk75
Oct 20th, 2003, 04:11 AM
Before my comments, a preface: the books you like, like almost anything, are going to be subjective and based on your personal preferences, so we could argue all day and all night, but there isn't going to be any consensus, and that's perfectly all right, because diversity rocks. Now that having been said...

--I'm sorry, the Harry Potter books are fun and entertaining, but none of them belong on this list. They amuse, but they do not take you by the heart. "The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe" is far superior.
--I read "Anna Karenina," expected great things, and ended up just getting pissed off at the actions of the stupid woman who was not even all that interesting. Very disappointing to say the least.
--Amen to "The Brother Karamazov." That book is just amazing. Alyosha is the literary character that I aspire to be.
--"Catch-22" was and IS a fantastic novel. It's the one book that I've read that uses humor and surrealism to depict the horror and tragedy of war, and it succeeds amazingly. (My favorite character is Milo the guy who sells all the stuff)
--Anybody read Anne Tyler books? They're subtle, but they stay with you. They remind me of Tori Amos' CD title: "Little Earthquakes." I recommend "Accidental Tourist" and "A Slipping-down Life."
--I've actually seen some posters list John Grisham and Michael Crichton books as their all-time favorites. That makes me utterly sad. Those books are what I call "McBooks." They're fun, enjoyable, but when you read them once, there's never any need to read them ever again.
--If you're into gay fiction, please check out "The Charioteer" by Mary Renault. It's easily the best gay love story I've ever read. It's funny to think it was actually written by a woman. Or if you want to read something that's just plain fun and bitchy, check out Robert Rodi's books.
--My own personal favorite novel, which will probably never see the light of day in this kind of list, is "Endless Love" by Scott Spencer. It changed my life. It's an amazing book. "Waking the Dead" is also pretty good.

gentenaire
Oct 20th, 2003, 06:28 AM
Pride and Prejudice is still my all time favourite.

I agree with everyone saying HP doesn't deserve to be in that list. I've enjoyed reading HP, but I don't consider it a masterpiece, it's just a fun read, nothing more, nothing less. Not everything I read must be a masterpiece.

ys
Oct 20th, 2003, 06:29 AM
From modern literature, I love "The Hopscotch" by Cortazar.

Halardfan
Oct 20th, 2003, 10:35 AM
Lol, I take it you have never seen a good production of, say, Twelfth Night or The Tempest or A Midsummernight's Dream?

No, but I have seen a BAD production of Twelfth Night!

Is there such a thing as a GOOD production of Twelfth Night??? It would be a tall order, considering the woeful source material! :) ;)

At the centre of what I think people should about books or films or art or anything, is that they should simply like what they like, simply give the opinions that are their own...if they think a Jeffrey Archer book is the greatest ever, then fine...I may think them stupid, but at least its their true opinion.

Too often in all these fields, people name something which they feel makes them come across as intelligent, or cultured...no one would do that in this thread though, Im sure! ;)

The books that would have been near the top for me...leaving aside the rule about more than one book per author...Im sure Ill forget some, so Ill alter it later...

Notre Dame of Paris - Victor Hugo
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory - Roald Dahl
Les Miserables - Victor Hugo
Dracula - Bram Stoker
Frankestein - Mary Shelley
Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde - RL Stevenson
Moby Dick - Herman Melivlle
A Tale of Two Cities - Charles Dickens
The Magic Finger - Roald Dahl
Twenty Thousand leagues under the sea - Jules Verne
The Turn of the Screw - Henry James
War of the Worlds - HG Wells
A Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens
Jounrey to the Centre of the Earth - Jules Verne
The Picture of Dorian Gray - Oscar Wilde
The Martian Chronicles - Ray Bradbury
What Dreams May come - Richard Matheson
The Haunting of Hill House - Shirley Jackson
Wuthering Hieghts - Emily Bronte
Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte
Rebecca - Daphne Du Maurier

gentenaire
Oct 20th, 2003, 11:31 AM
Wuthering Heights *shudder* I would have killed them off at the start ;)

propi
Oct 20th, 2003, 11:35 AM
I miss some Spanish nice books :p but I guess they're not read in there... :rolleyes:

tommyk75
Oct 20th, 2003, 12:16 PM
Oh, I forgot. Carson McCullers IS amazing. "The Heart is a Lonely Hunter" is so beautifully sad...

~ The Leopard ~
Oct 20th, 2003, 12:52 PM
Tastes do differ. :) I find Twelfth Night about the funniestthing in the English language. The scenes involving the practical joke on Malvolio always reduce me to helpless laughter. :devil:

starr
Oct 20th, 2003, 01:29 PM
but who said I was talking about not feeling history? I said European history. I don't see a whole lot of Europeans listing Chinuah Achebe's Things Fall Apart as their favorite or Beloved for that matter. Why is that?

I don't see a whole bunch on diversity being listed on here? Do you?

I like history of every sort. Asian, African, Australian, European, you name it. Why single out European history as something you don't like?

There also aren't very many Latin American authors listed. Jorge Amado is one of my favorites. He writes about Bahia -- an extremely diverse place. I also like Marquez.

The list was developed from a poll taken in Great Britian. If the poll were taken here in the U.S., it might be different. As for my own favorites, I stopped reading fiction a long time ago, and haven't read much of contemporary literature. It's a big gap in my knowledge. I just listed those books from the time that I was reading fiction.

But instead of railing against the favorites of others why don't you just post your own favorites and praise them?

starr
Oct 20th, 2003, 01:33 PM
For a good non fiction read that is as good as any novel I recommend "Wild Swans." It is about three generations of women in China. It takes begins in pre WWII China and continues through the Cultural Revolution up to the present. (and pssst!! It's not about Europeans. :))

Rocketta
Oct 20th, 2003, 03:32 PM
I like history of every sort. Asian, African, Australian, European, you name it. Why single out European history as something you don't like?

There also aren't very many Latin American authors listed. Jorge Amado is one of my favorites. He writes about Bahia -- an extremely diverse place. I also like Marquez.

The list was developed from a poll taken in Great Britian. If the poll were taken here in the U.S., it might be different. As for my own favorites, I stopped reading fiction a long time ago, and haven't read much of contemporary literature. It's a big gap in my knowledge. I just listed those books from the time that I was reading fiction.

But instead of railing against the favorites of others why don't you just post your own favorites and praise them?

I didn't rail against anyone's favorite. I said that some of us just can not relate to the classic's. They hold nothing for some of us to have a connection to. You then went on to say what about diversity? and I agree what about diversity?

The titles listed here are not diverse. That was my point. I am only referring to what the posters have said and not specifically the list.

I have nothing against people liking what they like. Just don't be shocked when someone else reads it and thinks its drivel that's all. We all come from different places and things will connect with us all differently. That is my point.

Yes maybe if the list was made in the US then it would be different. I doubt it would differ greatly though.

Rocketta
Oct 20th, 2003, 03:36 PM
Oh and I singled out European history as something that I hold no connection with. Its not a thing of like or dislike. As far as facts go, European history is fine. Its as interesting as the next but its a different story if we are talking about pleasure reading. I hold no interest on that level.

Rocketta
Oct 20th, 2003, 03:41 PM
sorry, starr, but rockies got a point. you are really contradicting yourself here.

rockie, you ever read anything by erika lopez?

history and eng lit went together nicely in school. it was almost all european and american bullshit. we never even touched the subject of asia or their culture, africa we spoke on a lil bit, but only when the europeans were involved.

other than that, it was all about the europeans. thats why so many people had problems with history in school, esp if you had a shitty teacher. people can only tke so much of the world wars or columbus is a hero ramblings.

the same applies to books. european and american books arent really that diverse... esp the classics they have you read in school.

No I haven't read Erika Lopez. What are her most famous novels?

I do however want to read Julia Alverez's books, "How the Garcia girls lost their accents" and "YO!".

Have you read those?