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View Full Version : Williams Sisters Caught in Drug Ring! (Not)


Volcana
Oct 16th, 2003, 10:53 PM
There has been a Major Sports Drug Bust (http://msnbc.com/news/981352.asp?0cv=CB10), but so far, no tennis-ers are caught up in it. But look at this, and at the ATP, and you get an idea of how competitors react when dealing with people they actually think have taking performance enhancers.

Which naturally gets me to thinking about all the accusations of doping leveled at the Williams sisters, mostly by detractor, but some few by competitors. At the time(s), I felt no one really believed that, it was just the only criticism they could come up with as Venus and Serena won more and more. The events of the past two weeks really confirm that feeling in my eyes. Now we see how sports organizations and competitors react when dealing with EVIDENCE, not just jealousy.

You folks claiming JH2's on 'roids, this means you too. And if you're a Williams fan, it's worse, because two years ago, YOU were screaming about how unfair it was. The players who play Fed Cup and the Olumpics get tested. And tennis' long season makes it virtually impossible for a player to do a long series of performance enhancing drugs, then get them out of her system before a Fed Cup tie.

In American football, players are away from the team for six months at a stretch. No surpise they have a major drug problem. The average baseball player has four months. Tennis players get six weeks. Then it's back to sharing locker room with people who destroy your career in a heartbeat if they had proof you were 'juicin'

Add the revealing dress favored by players today. The side-effects of steroids, like acne all over your back, pretty obvious.

For an athlete who prides him or herself on honor, an accusation of drug use is second only to throwing a match for gamblers as a personal affront. Honor. THERE'S an archaic concept. But what is a board like this, ultimately, except a chance to trash people behind their backs with impunity? I certainly would love to see some of the people who've insulted Lindsay over the years go up to her while she has a racket in her hand and say the same things. Hell, I'd even clean up the blood when Lindsay got done with them, just for the chance to watch.

X-Lurker
Oct 17th, 2003, 05:19 AM
I'm a little surprised you think this is going to make people LESS suspicious of steroid use in tennis...

It actually highlights how easy it is to get away with...all you need is a designer steroid where they've slightly altered the molecules and no test will pick it up. The USADA has now identified ONE designer steroid, THG, there are others...(AND it's still only detectable for a week after it's been injested, while the benefits carry on longer)

The lab owner has been busted and he knows it...but when he implies that nearly everyone else in track is doing it too, he's not totally bullshitting.

If so many Olympic athletes are using juice then of course some professional athletes, who make far more money, are using (Mr. Bonds).

I doubt tennis players are morally superior to other athletes. Acne on the back is not a universal symptom and track outfits are more revealing than tennis clothes.

For those of you hoping some current player you hate will be caught up in this...it's highly unlikely. The tennis players "affiliated" (meaning they're advertised on the company's webpage as clients, but might have done nothing more than buy a bottle of vitamins or accept some free products) with Balco Labs are Michael Chang, Ivan Lendl and Jim Courier, all of whom I seriously doubt are currently juicing up (and yes Juju works with Courier's former trainer Pat Etcheberry but Etcheberry owns Bricker Labs and isn't affiliated with Balco).

LMAO at the moron who let the syringe with a little THG left in it fall into the hands of a rival.

Volcana
Oct 17th, 2003, 04:32 PM
Link to USAToday article (http://www.usatoday.com/sports/olympics/summer/track/2003-10-16-drug-samples_x.htm)


Designer drug test flags U.S. track stars
By Dick Patrick, USA TODAY
The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency appears to have ambushed drug users in what could be a major steroid bust of several American track and field athletes.
"I know of no other drug bust (with steroids) that is larger than this involving the number of athletes we have involved," said Terry Madden, the CEO of USADA, which was formed three years ago to conduct drug testing in U.S. Olympic sports. "I'm unaware of anything overseas, either."

According to Madden, U.S. athletes have tested positive for a designer steroid on their "A," or preliminary urine samples in tests conducted at the USA Track & Field Championships in late June at Stanford and subsequent out-of-competition tests. After confirmation samples are analyzed and appeals held, names could be announced by mid-December, Madden said.

Promising careers of athletes could be derailed and the 2004 U.S. Olympic team could be severely weakened because of resulting two-year bans.

Foreign athletes also are involved, the USADA said. Though other sports have been tested recently, only track athletes have been announced positive so far. The cases appear tied to a Justice Department investigation of Victor Conte and his company, BALCO Laboratories Inc., located in Burlingame, Calif., south of San Francisco and raided last month by federal authorities, including the IRS.

BALCO has associations with many NFL and MLB players, including baseball star Barry Bonds. Track athletes with ties to the company include Marion Jones, who missed this season because of childbirth; Tim Montgomery, the world recordholder in the 100 meters; sprinter Kelli White, subject to losing two gold medals at the world championships for testing positive for a stimulant; sprinters Chryste Gaines of the USA and Dwain Chambers of Britain; Kevin Toth, a world-class shot putter; and Regina Jacobs, world indoor champ in the 1,500.

USADA said it received information from an anonymous informant claiming to be a high-profile track coach and naming Conte as the source of the steroid tetrahydrogestrinone (THG). Conte has denied steroid involvement.

The informant overnighted a syringe of the substance in early June to USADA, which had it analyzed in its UCLA lab by Don Catlin. He found the material similar to steroids on the banned list but sufficiently altered to avoid detection by normal tests.

USADA then retested 350 urine samples from the USA Track & Field Championships, resulting in the recent "A" positives.

"The athletes who did take part in this were very sure of being undetectable," Madden said. "This would be a very sophisticated designer steroid created by very sophisticated chemists."

The case marks the third time, beginning with the 2002 Winter Olympics, that Catlin has surprised drug users with unannounced advances in testing.

"We believe we're not only catching up, but we believe we have information where (drug users) are going in the future," Madden said.

USADA said in addition to the steroid positives, they have discovered more American athletes with "A" positives for using modafinil, the stimulant White tested positive for in August in Paris. After getting information on the drug, USADA reanalyzed data from tests from the USA Track & Field Championships.

"This has got to be another bloody nose for Craig Masback," said World Anti-Doping Agency head Dick Pound of the CEO for USA Track & Field. "He's got a sport in real trouble."

Masback himself had no comment but USATF responded in a statement that it applauds USADA's efforts to find cheaters.

USADA has informed the international track federation (IAAF) about THG.

The IAAF declined comment when asked if it tested for THG at the worlds or planned retests for the drug.