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View Full Version : Do you thinks aliens exist?


Cassius
Oct 15th, 2003, 10:29 PM
Yes? Or no?
Simple really.

alexusjonesfan
Oct 15th, 2003, 10:54 PM
There can be only one answer http://www.planet-smilies.de/alien/alien_005.gif

CondiLicious
Oct 15th, 2003, 11:10 PM
Yes there are aliens. And the only person who can save us is Sigourney Weaver :hearts:

ys
Oct 15th, 2003, 11:12 PM
Of course. Ballbuster.

Kart
Oct 15th, 2003, 11:38 PM
I've met several people whom I think are likely from another planet.

Most of them in General Messages actually ...

Sam L
Oct 16th, 2003, 12:04 AM
I believe there is life elsewhere in the universe but I don't believe they have visited Earth yet, at least not in the last couple of millions of years.

BTW, if the "life originated from Mars" theories are correct, technically we're all aliens.

Scotso
Oct 16th, 2003, 12:23 AM
They think that the Egyptian Gods might have been aliens :worship:

I think with infinite worlds and infinite possibilities, there are at least a few other advanced races out there.

Colin B
Oct 16th, 2003, 12:30 AM
Of course there is life elsewhere in the universe. It would be illogical to think otherwise.

alexusjonesfan
Oct 16th, 2003, 12:55 AM
Of course there is life elsewhere in the universe. It would be illogical to think otherwise.

...not to mention a teeny bit arrogant...:)

CanadianBoy21
Oct 16th, 2003, 01:25 AM
I said NO, and don't u guys think it's illogical and a tenny bit arrogant to think there are aliens. Unless I see one in real life, I won't believe it.
And I thought there would be more Nos than just me... okay kids, time for x-files.

Sam L
Oct 16th, 2003, 01:32 AM
I said NO, and don't u guys think it's illogical and a tenny bit arrogant to think there are aliens. Unless I see one in real life, I won't believe it.
And I thought there would be more Nos than just me... okay kids, time for x-files.
There are two arguments to this.

1. Let's ask ourselves this question: "If you've never been to Antarctica, how do you know it really exists?" Well the problem is we don't. I've never been there and I can say yes, logically speaking since I've never been there I cannot for 100% sure say that it exists. So likewise, we can't be 100% sure life exists elsewhere until we see it, feel it, smell it, touch it.

2. However, how about atoms? electrons? neutrons? How do we they exist? But we know they exist because they're what we're made off. It's like saying sure we can't see them yet but we know it is out there. There's no direct evidence yet but there are arguments as to why there is life elsewhere in the universe. For one, the likelyhood that there are many sun-like stars in the universe. For two, the likelyhood of many earth-like planets in the universe. And considering how old and how vast the universe is, you can be sure that somewhere there is life. But yes, until we see it, there'll be that 1% or so chance that we're a special group of living organisms.

bionic71
Oct 16th, 2003, 01:45 AM
Not "little green men"..........but definately other lifeforms.

adss
Oct 16th, 2003, 02:18 AM
sorta...
http://news.bbc.co.uk/media/images/38289000/jpg/_38289931_jackson150.jpg

CanadianBoy21
Oct 16th, 2003, 02:21 AM
You guys are too imaginitive! Why would u think aliens exist in the first place? Their are many thinks out there, but who the hell created these green creature freaks?
I cannot say 'no' they don't exist', but I'll rather say no because I do not know that they do exist.

GoDominique
Oct 16th, 2003, 02:29 AM
Probably. Maybe not in our galaxy though.

Sam L
Oct 16th, 2003, 02:36 AM
Probably. Maybe not in our galaxy though.
Why not?

vs1
Oct 16th, 2003, 05:27 AM
it would be too self-centric for us to think that in this huge universe, we're unique and alone. i think that other living beings exist but they are probably so far away, we'll never find each other. which may not be such a bad thing. we can't even get along with one another, let alone introduce aliens!!! it could be a mess.

Mattographer
Oct 16th, 2003, 06:39 AM
I'm with ICare4U. These people influenced by films or storytellers :rolleyes:

azza
Oct 16th, 2003, 06:42 AM
yes :D

King Satan
Oct 16th, 2003, 06:45 AM
Yes, who do you think put us here?

Hurley
Oct 16th, 2003, 06:56 AM
Good Lord. Do you know how big this universe is? Of course there are.

Just because they haven't gotten here yet means nothing. Have we got to them yet?

~ The Leopard ~
Oct 16th, 2003, 07:34 AM
Why not?

Fermi's paradox.

propi
Oct 16th, 2003, 08:29 AM
Sure, and almost all of them post in wtaworld :devil:

Manu79
Oct 16th, 2003, 09:09 AM
Sure, and almost all of them post in wtaworld :devil:

Of Course; and There are a lot in wtaworld

Perdona, pero pense esto en leer el thread; tú eres el que me lee el pensamiento :devil: :p

thalle
Oct 16th, 2003, 01:37 PM
Ellen is an alian. That's no secret

gentenaire
Oct 16th, 2003, 01:43 PM
I'd be very surprised if the earth is the only planet in the universe where the conditions are such that life is possible. The universe is so immense, there's bound to be 'life' in some form or other out there, lightyears and lightyears away. We'll never know what kind of life, and where exactly, as it's too far away.

Giuliano
Oct 16th, 2003, 02:15 PM
Yes, I think there's bound to be something living somewhere else in the Universe. Maybe it'd help us to comprehend the apparition of life better if we could "meet" them.

Calvin
Oct 16th, 2003, 02:46 PM
life elsewhere: yes
intelligent life: no

Experimentee
Oct 16th, 2003, 04:05 PM
I dont know. Its more probable than not that there are other life forms, considering the size of the universe, but in order for there to be life there has to be the right conditions for it. Earth happens to be the perfect distance from the sun in order to sustain life, maybe that happened by a big coincidence. Its probbaly hard for a planet to have exactly the right conditions for life. But then considering the number of stars out there its probable that theres somewhere else with life.

Cassius
Oct 16th, 2003, 10:57 PM
When I said "aliens", I didn't necessarily mean little green men.
I meant life that isn't from this world.
Bacteria is life, and therefore counts.

vaiva
Oct 16th, 2003, 11:11 PM
Yes.

And the only possible form of aliens is green men.

Sam L
Oct 17th, 2003, 12:15 AM
Fermi's paradox.
Hey Joui! :wavey:

Fermi's paradox never said that life didn't exist elsewhere in our galaxy. It said that if life did exist elsewhere, we would never be able to come in contact with it, because advanced civilizations cannot survive long enough or at least not long enough to travel the vastness of space to meet another civilization.

Wait, let me revise on this. I could be wrong. ;) However, I'm pretty sure there's not theory that suggests that life is exclusive to our solar system in THIS galaxy.

~ The Leopard ~
Oct 17th, 2003, 04:10 AM
Hey Joui! :wavey:

<snip>

Wait, let me revise on this. I could be wrong. ;) However, I'm pretty sure there's not theory that suggests that life is exclusive to our solar system in THIS galaxy.

Hey, Sam.

No, there's theory that says it that specifically. However, Fermi's paradox suggests that if there's intelligent life in the universe it is probably a loooooooong way away, like in another galaxy. (Well, maybe there are intelligent but non-technological species like dolphins around; I am really thinking of technological species like humans. However, I'll use the word "intelligent" as shorthand.)

The argument is that if intelligent life is fairly densely-packed into the universe you'd expect a mix of civilizations that are younger than ours and older than ours to be around the "local" volume of a few thousand light years, say. But if there are some species that are older (and we are talking here about variations in the age of species and civilizations of millions of years) you'd expect that they'd be more technologically advanced and that they'd have been here by now. All the supposed sightings of extraterrestrials on Earth are, let's face it, pretty bogus, so it looks like aliens have not yet been here.

Of course, the answer might be something to do with all old civilizations preferring to stay home and watch televisiom, or preferring to colonise microworlds of some kind rather than venturing into space. But wouldn't at least some of them decide to travel in space? It looks as if intelligent - in the sense of technology-using - life in the universe might be very rare. It probably exists elsewhere, but it may be so rare that we are the only such species, or one of very few, in our own galaxy.

Biological considerations back this up. Without going into all the detail, it's a helluva fluke that technology-using life even appeared on Earth. If not for that meteor impact 65 million years ago.......

All this is extrapolating beyond the original Fermi paradox, but I think it's legitimate extrapolation.

Sam L
Oct 17th, 2003, 05:06 AM
The argument is that if intelligent life is fairly densely-packed into the universe you'd expect a mix of civilizations that are younger than ours and older than ours to be around the "local" volume of a few thousand light years, say. But if there are some species that are older (and we are talking here about variations in the age of species and civilizations of millions of years) you'd expect that they'd be more technologically advanced and that they'd have been here by now. All the supposed sightings of extraterrestrials on Earth are, let's face it, pretty bogus, so it looks like aliens have not yet been here.

Of course, the answer might be something to do with all old civilizations preferring to stay home and watch televisiom, or preferring to colonise microworlds of some kind rather than venturing into space. But wouldn't at least some of them decide to travel in space? It looks as if intelligent - in the sense of technology-using - life in the universe might be very rare. It probably exists elsewhere, but it may be so rare that we are the only such species, or one of very few, in our own galaxy.

Yep, that's roughly what I thought too. Except you've answered your own question there, it's "one of very few, in our own galaxy". NOT the ONLY in our galaxy. Of course, we may well be the only ones in our galaxies but that's not what the fermi's paradox is purporting. So it's rather an argument of semantics really.

Biological considerations back this up. Without going into all the detail, it's a helluva fluke that technology-using life even appeared on Earth. If not for that meteor impact 65 million years ago.......

All this is extrapolating beyond the original Fermi paradox, but I think it's legitimate extrapolation.

I agree with this. However, asteroid/comet collisions are relatively common and will happen again. Jupiter like planets are necessary for Earth-like planets to evolve. That is, that they shield our planet from been bombarded with asteroids/comets all the time. So it gives a sufficient amount of time (millions and millions of years to evolve), however, it's only a matter of time before those big planets give in and one of them hits the smaller ones like ours. We will be hit again in the future, so it's a matter of whether humans can prevent it (if we're still around that is).

casanovalover
Oct 17th, 2003, 06:00 AM
the truth is out there, somewhere over the rainbow, let's get giggy with these alien sluts.

nerds

~ The Leopard ~
Oct 17th, 2003, 06:40 AM
Hey Sam, I see I left out the word "no" at one point (I meant to write "No, there's no theory" etc, etc). Glad you got the gist of it anyway. :)

Halardfan
Oct 17th, 2003, 08:46 AM
Its still possible that there i life elsewhere in our solar system. never mind in the vastness of space...if we were to find even traces of life on Mars, or Europa (where many sceintists beleive there could be vast ocean underneath the ice...) then the chances would be that life is as common as can be in the universe...

Its typically human to think of ourselves as the only 'intelligent' life in the universe (a glance at the news each day, might put this in doubt...)

If super-intelligent aliens do turn up here, lets hope they are vegetarian...otherwise we could be on the menu... ;)

Anyway, I think all humans should go veggie. Like on Star Trek. ;) It really is a lot more civilised. :)

Colin B
Oct 17th, 2003, 10:52 AM
No, there's theory that says it that specifically. However, Fermi's paradox suggests that if there's intelligent life in the universe it is probably a loooooooong way away, like in another galaxy. (Well, maybe there are intelligent but non-technological species like dolphins around; I am really thinking of technological species like humans. However, I'll use the word "intelligent" as shorthand.)


I read the question - "Do you thinks(sic) aliens exist?" - as 'does extra-terrestrial life exist?' Intelligence wasn't mentioned.

Of course, the answer might be something to do with all old civilizations preferring to stay home and watch televisiom, or preferring to colonise microworlds of some kind rather than venturing into space. But wouldn't at least some of them decide to travel in space? It looks as if intelligent - in the sense of technology-using - life in the universe might be very rare. It probably exists elsewhere, but it may be so rare that we are the only such species, or one of very few, in our own galaxy.
The absence of visits from another part of the universe could have more to do with whether or not inter-steller travel is even possible, even for highly advanced technologies. Using the fastest propulsion methods we have now, it would take a rocket 100, 000 years just to reach our closest neighbour, Proxima Centauri. Even if you could improve that by 99%, that would still be one fuck of a mission. Would it be worth it?
Our best hope of finding evidence of technologically advanced life elsewhere lies through picking up radio transmissions (we blast them out into space constantly, so presumably they would too) but that presupposes that we are tuned in to their frequencies and in any case, it's a bit like you trying to get your local radio station on a radio on Pluto. Pretty futile really.
Biological considerations back this up. Without going into all the detail, it's a helluva fluke that technology-using life even appeared on Earth. If not for that meteor impact 65 million years ago.......

Who's to say that, had that meteor not struck, this planet wouldn't be run by technologically advanced lizards? ;)

dubro
Oct 17th, 2003, 01:08 PM
yup!

i'm an alien...did'nt u know it?? :p

~ The Leopard ~
Oct 17th, 2003, 01:09 PM
I read the question - "Do you thinks(sic) aliens exist?" - as 'does extra-terrestrial life exist?' Intelligence wasn't mentioned.;)


Sure, and I think that extra-terrestrial life must surely exist. But "aliens" conjures up images of those extra-terrestrial intelligent beings in science fiction, so I addressed that. :angel:


The absence of visits from another part of the universe could have more to do with whether or not inter-steller travel is even possible, even for highly advanced technologies. <snip> Would it be worth it?

Mmmmm, it might be if you had a civilization millions of years old. But, as I said, maybe they'd rather stay home and watch television or their equivalent.


Who's to say that, had that meteor not struck, this planet wouldn't be run by technologically advanced lizards?

Again, you're right, and various science fiction writers have postulated something like this. However, it's not at all clear that evolution will always lead to intelligence, or at least to technological societies. The dinosaurs were around for over a hundred million years, and there is not much sign that they would have evolved intelligence even if they'd had another hundred million years. I'm not sure I can do the argument justice, but Stephen Jay Gould argues pretty convincingly that the odds would be against intelligence as we know it evolving if we could play the whole tape of evolutionary history over again.

I was saying what the arguments are that might make someone think we are the only (or one of the few) technologically intelligent species in the galaxy. I think the arguments are pretty strong, but I admit they are far from conclusive for some of the reasons that you mentioned. In all, I can't believe there aren't alien civilizations somewhere in the incomprehensible vastness of the whole universe, but they may be so far away that we'll never encounter them, dammit.

Sam L
Oct 17th, 2003, 01:42 PM
Again, you're right, and various science fiction writers have postulated something like this. However, it's not at all clear that evolution will always lead to intelligence, or at least to technological societies. The dinosaurs were around for over a hundred million years, and there is not much sign that they would have evolved intelligence even if they'd had another hundred million years.

That'll be right. In fact, dinosaurs had been around for and evolving for up to 250 million years. If they were going to evolve into an intelligent species, they would've done so already. Humans had only been around for sometime over 5 million years and look where it's gotten us.

RE: Space travel.

Wormholes are meant to be real. Apparently, they do exist. Something to do with blackholes. So these wormholes, some scientists believe, should allow for space travel between vast distances by shortening the space. There is also, a multverse theory which states that universes exist in bubbles that one is created like how an air bubble is created and expands. And therefore, that space that initially makes the bubble grow is like a wormhole, but I'm not too familiar with this. In the end, space travel is yes, dare I say almost impossible. Which is pretty sad, because it would be wonderful to come in contact with other civilizations.

RE: Life in our solar system.

Not sure who mentioned it, Chris Ba? Anyway, possible. Although the likelihood for Mars is dying (even underground). But Europa, one of Saturn's moons, is believed to have water underneath the icy crust. However, Saturn gives off strong radiation so not sure if life (if any, will be microbial, can even survive there).

RE: Another form of life.

Think outside the square guys. There's been suggestions that life on Earth may have been started by travelling comets that carried tiny organisms (that are strong enough to survive in space). And when they came into contact with Earth they dispersed in the oceans. So if we can research comets and other celestial bodies further, who knows what we will find there. That will also be alien life forms.

Colin B
Oct 17th, 2003, 02:56 PM
Again, you're right, and various science fiction writers have postulated something like this. However, it's not at all clear that evolution will always lead to intelligence, or at least to technological societies. The dinosaurs were around for over a hundred million years, and there is not much sign that they would have evolved intelligence even if they'd had another hundred million years.

Good point. I think our technological advancement was probably sparked off by a chance discovery, probably that if you rub two sticks, or bash a couple of stones together, you can make a fire.
Maybe a dinosaur was just about to discover how to make fire when God said,
"Nah, I'm bored with you scaly bastards - I've got a better idea; now where did I put that asteroid?..........."

Hey! You creationists, what do you think...? ;)

Giuliano
Oct 17th, 2003, 03:02 PM
Were there dinosaurs with opposible thumbs?

Colin B
Oct 17th, 2003, 03:26 PM
RE: Space travel.

Wormholes are meant to be real. Apparently, they do exist. Something to do with blackholes. So these wormholes, some scientists believe, should allow for space travel between vast distances by shortening the space. There is also, a multverse theory which states that universes exist in bubbles that one is created like how an air bubble is created and expands. And therefore, that space that initially makes the bubble grow is like a wormhole, but I'm not too familiar with this. In the end, space travel is yes, dare I say almost impossible. Which is pretty sad, because it would be wonderful to come in contact with other civilizations.


The 'wormhole' theory is for inter-galactic travel, first you'd have to get to the black hole that lies at the entrance and fortunately there are none in our neck of the woods, or it would have gobbled us up.

As I said, the shortest inter-steller trip we could make (a mere stone's throw in cosmological terms) would take us about 100,000 years and we'd still be no closer to our local black hole.


Here's the thing guys:

The universe contains millions of galaxies, each of which contain billions of stars. Nature, whether you believe it was created by God or chemistry, always seems to find a way to do what it has to do. So if you aimed for one pocket of life per galaxy (a conservative estimate in my opinion), there are still millions of places where alien life exists in one form or another.
That thought seems to scare some people, I find it quite comforting.


:) :) :)

Barrie_Dude
Oct 17th, 2003, 08:14 PM
Yes, Of Course! Just Look At The Many Hingis Fans We Have Here!

Sam L
Oct 21st, 2003, 12:11 AM
Here's the thing guys:

The universe contains millions of galaxies, each of which contain billions of stars. Nature, whether you believe it was created by God or chemistry, always seems to find a way to do what it has to do. So if you aimed for one pocket of life per galaxy (a conservative estimate in my opinion), there are still millions of places where alien life exists in one form or another.
That thought seems to scare some people, I find it quite comforting.


It would only comfort me if we could come in contact with that life. Because without proof, there'll always be people who claim we're the only lifeforms (no matter how illogical that sounds). I know.