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View Full Version : Cybelle Knows Good Music...Introducing...


Cybelle Darkholme
Oct 9th, 2003, 09:27 PM
RHiann (http://www.bet.com/articles/0,,p400gb7283-8102,00.html)

Listen To Choice Tracks From Rhian's "Gold Coast," Right Here!
By The BET.com Staff

Rhian (pronounced Ree-Ann) Benson is enigmatic -- enigmatic because she defies categorization; enigmatic because her life and her music are framed by paradox. Complex and cerebral, Rhian's music is simultaneously warm and soulful, empathetic and ethereal. She's been compared to a diverse range of artists, from Jill Scott to Seal to Sade; from Lauryn Hill to Enya; Dinah Washington to Dido. Rhian's music has been described as R&B, soul, jazz, reggae, hip-hop and world beat - and, to illustrate the paradox of Rhian in only one of a hundred ways -- each of those genres apply.
Rhian - born into the renowned Ashanti tribe in Ghana, West Africa - grew up surrounded by music and musicians. Her mother, from Wales in Britain - is a singer, and her father, an Ashanti dignitary from Ghana, is also a guitarist. Rhian's grandfather led an acclaimed big band in the '50s and '60s, her eldest uncle was a popular highlife singer - and her youngest uncle a record producer.
She wrote her first song at 9 while family lived in New Delhi, India and was later educated at the London School of Economics and Harvard University. Rhian had to leave school to assume day-to-day care of her mother who had fallen in with a life-threatening illness. Her mother recovered, but the experience taught Rhian the real importance and healing power of music in her life. Soon after Rhian began singing in small venues throughout London, where she was discovered and signed by DKG Music executives.
Rhian has been working on her debut album, Gold Coast, for nearly two years. She wrote all the songs and composed all her music on guitar and keyboards. Gold Coast is co-produced by Rhian with Grammy-award winning producers James Poyser (Lauryn Hill, The Roots, Jill Scott) and Bob Power (D'Angelo, Tribe Called Quest, Erykah Badu). Gold Coast proves to be a unique, lush blend of R&B/soul, jazz and reggae. Listen to some choice tracks from Gold Coast right here and let us know what you think when you are done. Music that soothes and strengthens the soul, heart and mind. Right here!

Track Listing For Gold Coast Sampler:

1.) "Stealing My Peace of Mind"

2.) "Invincible"

3.) "Words Hurt Too"

4.) "Soul Boy"

5.) "Spirit"Her Site (http://www.rhianbenson.com/main_hi.html)

Miss Thang
Oct 9th, 2003, 10:40 PM
RHiann (http://www.bet.com/articles/0,,p400gb7283-8102,00.html)

Listen To Choice Tracks From Rhian's "Gold Coast," Right Here!
By The BET.com Staff

Rhian (pronounced Ree-Ann) Benson is enigmatic -- enigmatic because she defies categorization; enigmatic because her life and her music are framed by paradox. Complex and cerebral, Rhian's music is simultaneously warm and soulful, empathetic and ethereal. She's been compared to a diverse range of artists, from Jill Scott to Seal to Sade; from Lauryn Hill to Enya; Dinah Washington to Dido. Rhian's music has been described as R&B, soul, jazz, reggae, hip-hop and world beat - and, to illustrate the paradox of Rhian in only one of a hundred ways -- each of those genres apply.
Rhian - born into the renowned Ashanti tribe in Ghana, West Africa - grew up surrounded by music and musicians. Her mother, from Wales in Britain - is a singer, and her father, an Ashanti dignitary from Ghana, is also a guitarist. Rhian's grandfather led an acclaimed big band in the '50s and '60s, her eldest uncle was a popular highlife singer - and her youngest uncle a record producer.
She wrote her first song at 9 while family lived in New Delhi, India and was later educated at the London School of Economics and Harvard University. Rhian had to leave school to assume day-to-day care of her mother who had fallen in with a life-threatening illness. Her mother recovered, but the experience taught Rhian the real importance and healing power of music in her life. Soon after Rhian began singing in small venues throughout London, where she was discovered and signed by DKG Music executives.
Rhian has been working on her debut album, Gold Coast, for nearly two years. She wrote all the songs and composed all her music on guitar and keyboards. Gold Coast is co-produced by Rhian with Grammy-award winning producers James Poyser (Lauryn Hill, The Roots, Jill Scott) and Bob Power (D'Angelo, Tribe Called Quest, Erykah Badu). Gold Coast proves to be a unique, lush blend of R&B/soul, jazz and reggae. Listen to some choice tracks from Gold Coast right here and let us know what you think when you are done. Music that soothes and strengthens the soul, heart and mind. Right here!

Track Listing For Gold Coast Sampler:

1.) "Stealing My Peace of Mind"

2.) "Invincible"

3.) "Words Hurt Too"

4.) "Soul Boy"

5.) "Spirit"Her Site (http://www.rhianbenson.com/main_hi.html)

Go head and school us all Miss Cybelle! :worship: Girl u remind me of my sista cuz she like folk that u aint eva gon hear on the radio. If u go thru her albums and cds u be like WHO? :lol: Miss Cybelle u feelin Rashelle Farrell? That is my sista favorite and she also feelin Nine Freelen, Tashi Raygen, Rasan Patterson a buncha other peeps that u aint gon hear on the radio. Anyway this chick Rhian sound good. I'm a check out the site. :cool:

Cybelle Darkholme
Oct 9th, 2003, 10:43 PM
Go head and school us all Miss Cybelle! :worship: Girl u remind me of my sista cuz she like folk that u aint eva gon hear on the radio. If u go thru her albums and cds u be like WHO? :lol: Miss Cybelle u feelin Rashelle Farrell? That is my sista favorite and she also feelin Nine Freelen, Tashi Raygen, Rasan Patterson a buncha other peeps that u aint gon hear on the radio. Anyway this chick Rhian sound good. I'm a check out the site. :cool:

i love her song black bird her voice is so amazing I saw her live and she just blows you away rachelles brother also has an amazing voice.

nina is great also her acapella is flawless shes like an angel singing.

Martian Willow
Oct 9th, 2003, 10:55 PM
...I thought the music that's on the radio was the only music there is... :confused:

Miss Thang
Oct 10th, 2003, 12:36 AM
...I thought the music that's on the radio was the only music there is... :confused:

:p

Chile I can't help it. :o I grew up listenin to the radio and later watchin BET. My sista was the one goin to the record store and tryin out diffrent ish while I was buyin the hits from the radio. :cool:

ys
Oct 10th, 2003, 12:40 AM
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)


Introduction
(born Salzburg, 27 January 1756; died Vienna, 5 December 1791). Son of Leopold Mozart.
He showed musical gifts at a very early age, composing when he was five and when he was six playing before the Bavarian elector and the Austrian empress. Leopold felt that it was proper, and might also be profitable, to exhibit his children's God-given genius (Maria Anna, 'Nannerl', 1751-1829, was a gifted keyboard player): so in mid-1763 the family set out on a tour that took them to Paris and London, visiting numerous courts en route. Mozart astonished his audiences with his precocious skills; he played to the French and English royal families, had his first music published and wrote his earliest symphonies. The family arrived home late in 1766; nine months later they were off again, to Vienna, where hopes of having an opera by Mozart performed were frustrated by intrigues.

They spent 1769 in Salzburg; 1770-73 saw three visits to Italy, where Mozart wrote two operas (Mitridate, Lucio Silla) and a serenata for performance in Milan, and acquainted himself with Italian styles. Summer 1773 saw a further visit to Vienna, probably in the hope of securing a post; there Mozart wrote a set of string quartets and, on his return, wrote a group of symphonies including his two earliest, nos.25 in g Minor and 29 in A, in the regular repertory. Apart from a joumey to Munich for the premiere of his opera La finta giardiniera early in 1775, the period from 1774 to mid-1777 was spent in Salzburg, where Mozart worked as Konzertmeister at the Prince- Archbishop's court; his works of these years include masses, symphonies, all his violin concertos, six piano sonatas, several serenades and divertimentos and his first great piano concerto, K271.

In 1777 the Mozarts, seeing limited opportunity in Salzburg for a composer so hugely gifted, resolved to seek a post elsewhere for Wolfgang. He was sent, with his mother, to Munich and to Mannheim, but was offered no position (though he stayed over four months at Mannheim, composing for piano and flute and falling in love with Aloysia Weber). His father then dispatched him to Paris: there he had minor successes, notably with his Paris Symphony, no.31, deftly designed for the local taste. But prospects there were poor and Leopold ordered him home, where a superior post had been arranged at the court. He returned slowly and alone; his mother had died in Paris. The years 1779-80 were spent in Salzburg, playing in the cathedral and at court, composing sacred works, symphonies, concertos, serenades and dramatic music. But opera remained at the centre of his ambitions, and an opportunity came with a commission for a serious opera for Munich. He went there to compose it late in 1780; his correspondence with Leopold (through whom he communicated with the librettist, in Salzburg) is richly informative about his approach to musical drama. The work, Idomeneo, was a success. In it Mozart depicted serious, heroic emotion with a richness unparalleled elsewhere in his works, with vivid orchestral writing and an abundance of profoundly expressive orchestral recitative.

Mozart was then summoned from Munich to Vienna, where the Salzburg court was in residence on the accession of a new emperor. Fresh from his success, he found himself placed between the valets and the cooks; his resentment towards his employer, exacerbated by the Prince-Archbishop's refusal to let him perform at events the emperor was attending, soon led to conflict, and in May 1781 he resigned, or was kicked out of, his job. He wanted a post at the Imperial court in Vienna, but was content to do freelance work in a city that apparently offered golden opportunities. He made his living over the ensuing years by teaching, by publishing his music, by playing at patrons' houses or in public, by composing to commission (particularly operas); in 1787 he obtained a minor court post as Kammermusicus, which gave him a reasonable salary and required nothing beyond the writing of dance music for court balls. He always earned, by musicians' standards, a good income, and had a carriage and servants; through lavish spending and poor management he suffered times of financial difficulty and had to borrow. In 1782 he married Constanze Weber, Aloysia's younger sister.

In his early years in Vienna, Mozart built up his reputation by publishing (sonatas for piano, some with violin), by playing the piano and, in 1782, by having an opera performed: Die Entführung aus dem Serail, a German Singspiel which went far beyond the usual limits of the tradition with its long, elaborately written songs (hence Emperor Joseph II's famous observation, 'Too many notes, my dear Mozart'). The work was successful and was taken into the repertories of many provincial companies (for which Mozart was not however paid). In these years, too, he wrote six string quartets which he dedicated to the master of the form, Haydn: they are marked not only by their variety of expression but by their complex textures, conceived as four-part discourse, with the musical ideas linked to this freshly integrated treatment of the medium. Haydn told Mozart's father that Mozart was 'the greatest composer known to me in person or by name; he has taste and, what is more, the greatest knowledge of composition'.

In 1782 Mozart embarked on the composition of piano concertos, so that he could appear both as composer and soloist. He wrote 15 before the end of 1786, with early 1784 as the peak of activity. They represent one of his greatest achievements, with their formal mastery, their subtle relationships between piano and orchestra (the wind instruments especially) and their combination of brilliance, lyricism and symphonic growth. In 1786 he wrote the first of his three comic operas with Lorenzo da Ponte as librettist, Le nozze di Figaro: here and in Don Giovanni (given in Prague, 1787) Mozart treats the interplay of social and sexual tensions with keen insight into human character that - as again in the more artificial sexual comedy of Cosi fan tutte (1790) - transcends the comic framework, just as Die Zauberflöte (1791) transcends, with its elements of ritual and allegory about human harmony and enlightenment, the world of the Viennese popular theatre from which it springs.

Mozart lived in Vienna for the rest of his life. He undertook a number of joumeys: to Salzburg in 1783, to introduce his wife to his family; to Prague three times, for concerts and operas; to Berlin in 1789, where he had hopes of a post; to Frankfurt in 1790, to play at coronation celebrations. The last Prague journey was for the premiere of La clemenza di Tito (1791), a traditional serious opera written for coronation celebrations, but composed with a finesse and economy characteristic of Mozart's late music. Instrumental works of these years include some piano sonatas, three string quartets written for the King of Prussia, some string quintets, which include one of his most deeply felt works (K516 in g Minor) and one of his most nobly spacious (K515 in C), and his last four symphonies - one (no.38 in D) composed for Prague in 1786, the others written in 1788 and forming, with the lyricism of no.39 in E-flat, the tragic suggestiveness of no.40 in g Minor and the grandeur of no.41 in C, a climax to his orchestral music. His final works include the Clarinet Concerto and some pieces for masonic lodges (he had been a freemason since 1784; masonic teachings no doubt affected his thinking, and his compositions, in his last years). At his death from a feverish illness whose precise nature has given rise to much speculation (he was not poisoned), he left unfinished the Requiem, his first large-scale work for the church since the c Minor Mass of 1783, also unfinished; a completion by his pupil Süssmayr was long accepted as the standard one but there have been recent attempts to improve on it. Mozart was buried in a Vienna suburb, with little ceremony and in an unmarked grave, in accordance with prevailing custom.

Rocketta
Oct 10th, 2003, 12:56 AM
:zzz:

King Satan
Oct 10th, 2003, 12:59 AM
Mozart! :worship:

I prefer vivaldi though. ;) and the original shredder, paganini :cool:

ys
Oct 10th, 2003, 01:01 AM
Mozart! :worship:

I prefer vivaldi though. ;) and the original shredder, paganini :cool:

I do not prefer Vivaldi. But I love Vivaldi too :worship:. And Paganini:worship:. And Albinoni:worship:.

King Satan
Oct 10th, 2003, 01:05 AM
hey, have you heard paganini's 5th caprice played on electric guitar? yes yes i know, so disrespectful lol, but who cares, it kicks ass.

if you haven't, i suggest you download it. search kazaa for Jason Becker, and dload it. it's mind blowing! :)

ys
Oct 10th, 2003, 01:18 AM
hey, have you heard paganini's 5th caprice played on electric guitar? yes yes i know, so disrespectful lol, but who cares, it kicks ass.

if you haven't, i suggest you download it. search kazaa for Jason Becker, and dload it. it's mind blowing! :)

I think 5th is not the only one. I tihnk 13th and 24th also played on electric guitar.. And , yes, it takes a virtuoso..

Cybelle Darkholme
Oct 10th, 2003, 04:22 AM
Hmmm since my thread has been hijacked by the classical afficiandoes I have to add that I prefer pachelbel, bach, and beethoven, oh and chopin above all others.

NOW ON TO SOME SOUL MUSIC!!! CHECK IT OUT!!!!

cybelle's dusty soul secret (http://www.dustygroove.com/)

Cybelle Darkholme
Oct 10th, 2003, 04:28 AM
Oh well since we are on a classical tip I have to throw out Filippa Giordano (http://www.atlantic-records.com/filippagiordano/index.html)

cause she puts sarah brightman to shame!

Rocketta
Oct 10th, 2003, 04:37 AM
Hmmm since my thread has been hijacked by the classical afficiandoes I have to add that I prefer pachelbel, bach, and beethoven, oh and chopin above all others.

NOW ON TO SOME SOUL MUSIC!!! CHECK IT OUT!!!!

cybelle's dusty soul secret (http://www.dustygroove.com/)

Ohh I wouldn't mind that Latin Soul album. I love that sound. :)