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View Full Version : Jet Lag: The Silent Killer


ASV
Jan 31st, 2002, 02:34 AM
I've always thought that Jet Lag in itself was always a problem. Like when the players leave London after Wimbledon and arrive in California for the hardcourt season. Thats gotta be the hardest thing to deal with then say a year long injury.

Like, for instance, if you're playing a day match in Cali, its like midnight in England and its so hard to play when you're so tired.

Does anyone else think that jet lag is one of the silent killers on the tennis circuit, or is it just me?

-Sonic-
Jan 31st, 2002, 08:39 PM
Well the cali season doesn't start for 2 weeks after wimbledon, and if u lose early there its best part of 4 weeks.

I'm guessing sensible players only play (or should only play) consecutive weeks where the time zones are the same or similar. If they have the money, arriving early to get used to a big difference should also be done.

But things like Japan to France is huge, and people playing Pan Pacific and France next week really must have recovering from it down to a tee, or they'll lose v early.

veryborednow
Jan 31st, 2002, 11:09 PM
Jen seems to ALWAYS lose at Adidas International straight after playing in Japan. I assumed that could be to do with Jet lag... ?

Steveg
Jan 31st, 2002, 11:17 PM
I wonder if the players travel in first, business or economy? I mean for players in the top 50.

For the others, it would most likely be either business or economy.

babsi
Jan 31st, 2002, 11:44 PM
I know of 2 instances a player has lost a match for this reason:

1.Anke Huber beats Testud in Paris in 2000. Testud had lost in the final in Tokyo on the Sunday and she played in Paris only a few days later exhausted. She lost very easily to Anke, who was in terrible form at this point and would have not won the match otherwise.

2.Alexandra Stevenson beats Anke Huber in Philadelphia 1999. Anke had got to the semis in Leipzig on the Saturday and she had to play on the Monday evening there. The organizers would not give her a later start, obviously to favour the American.:mad:

veryborednow
Jan 31st, 2002, 11:44 PM
it would be very expensive to travel first class, even for the top top players, if you're flying lots of places all the time

According to Venus Envy, Seles travels on really cheap flights "the flying equivalent to the Greyhound" I don't know what that is though.

JCFan
Feb 1st, 2002, 12:06 AM
Oh yeah that's right, Seles flew Southwest, LOL. With all her money... They don't even have first class I don't think. Has anyone seen a player on a flight or in the airport?

Steveg
Feb 1st, 2002, 12:11 AM
it would be very expensive to travel first class

Yes, but some players must be sponsored by travel agencies or airlines I would guess (Woodbridge for instance is sponsored by Qantas...).

And there must be some good bargains available. For instance, if you take Hochiminh City / Paris (return ticket)

Air France / Economy : USD 1,150
SIA / Economy : USD 1,100
SIA / Business : USD 3,500
SIA / First : USD 5,000
Thai Airways / Economy : USD 1,100
Thai Airways / Business : USD 1,800
Thai Airways / First : USD 2,600
Malaysian Airlines / Economy : USD 950...

And it is cheaper if you buy your ticket in Thailand...

Rollo
Feb 1st, 2002, 12:40 AM
Before the early 1950's those who wanted to play Wimbledon or the US had to cross the oceans on ships. Imagine days(or weeks in some cases) of tossing on the sea without practice. Some luxury liners had space for courts(or something like a court), but I'm not sure how much they helped. Bet they carried extra balls for all the ones they hit into the sea!

As you can guess, defeats due to people getting used to different conditions were common-it was said that person was 'finding his/her land legs". On top of that, standard balls are common today on the tours, but in those times EVERY event used whatever ball they felt like. For years European balls were like hitting bricks compared to American ones.

So while I sympathize with today's athletes, they have it easy compared to the "old timers".

ps. It's a little known fact that one survivor of the TItanic ship sinking in 1912 was a US title tennis champ. I think his name was Richard Williams:)

Barrie_Dude
Feb 1st, 2002, 01:22 AM
Jet Lag? I'm more worried about Computer Lag!:rolleyes: :rolleyes:

Imelda
Feb 1st, 2002, 07:41 AM
I'm sure the players are used to it so they expect it to happen from tournament to tournament. I on the other hand never deal with it well so I take loads of melatonin with me when I travel. Once I get there I'm off to the bar for a smoke, a martini and glance across the place to see who's putting me up for the night.

Williams Rulez
Feb 1st, 2002, 03:49 PM
I suppose if you are seeded, you get a few days rest before you play your next match.