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Joshua Lyner
Apr 18th, 2003, 12:43 AM
FIRST ROUND

EASTERN CONFERENCE
(1) DETROIT vs. (8) ORLANDO

(2) NEW JERSEY vs. (7) MILWAUKEE

(3) INDIANA vs. (6) BOSTON

(4) PHILADELPHIA vs. (5) NEW ORLEANS

WESTERN CONFERENCE
(1) SAN ANTONIO vs. (8) PHOENIX

(2) SACRAMENTO vs. (7) UTAH

(3) DALLAS vs. (6) PORTLAND

(4) MINNESOTA vs. (5) L.A. LAKERS

Well, I'm going to get this out of the way and state the obvious: the ultimate winner of the whole thing will either be San Antonio, Sacramento or L.A.

In the Western Conference First Round match-ups, it's pretty cut and dried. The Spurs over the Suns (sweep), the Kings over The Jazz(in 5), the Lakers over the T-Wolves (in 6). Scottie's back so I give Portland a chance against Dallas (Mavs in 7?).

Now to the grinders that is the Eastern Conference. In vain, I actually got my hopes up that the Wizards could get the 8th playoff berth but Milwaukee was not to be denied.

Based on how unpredictable the EC dudes have been since the All Star break, (don't laugh) I'm going out on a limb and choosing the Hornets to take the Eastern Conference title. In the past 3 months, Detroit, NJ, Philly and Indiana have played like none of them could care less about home court advantage or their respective division titles while Baron Davis has had a late season resurgence. Boston's got Walker and Pierce playing a game of "No, you lead the team". I'd love to see Tracy McGrady get to the final but that's not going to happen with this year's Magic, and the Bucks are just glad to be there.

In the East First Round, I'll go with Detroit over Orlando (in 5), Milwaukee over NJ (in 7), Indiana over Boston (in 6) and New Orleans over Philly (in 5).

What are your predictions?

Scotso
Apr 18th, 2003, 03:11 AM
:bounce: Philly :bounce:

adss
Apr 18th, 2003, 03:39 AM
FIRST ROUND

(3) INDIANA vs. (6) BOSTON



I hate this match up, these are two of my favourite teams :fiery: :mad:

King Satan
Apr 18th, 2003, 08:11 PM
Spurs sweep over Suns? :eek: nah, i think the suns are gonna give them a real good test. They won the season series 3-1 (suns). Marbury is EXTREMELY tough to stop, so i pick them to win a game or 2. ;)

I like Sac town over Utah in a sweep. I don't think Stockton and Malone can get one off Bibby and Webber.

I think Portland will win in 6. Who the hell is gonna stop sheed? Najera? lol.

and i also like the lakers in 6, i think they're in for a tough test in the first round. Most ppl are picking the lakers in a sweep or 5 games, but i think it's gonna be a lot tougher than that. No one on the lakers can match up against KG, and if walley gets hot, look out. Oh and plus, shaq might miss a game due to his wife giving birth to baby shaq :)

as for the east: WHO CARES! :)

Light-skinned Girl
Apr 21st, 2003, 08:04 PM
Spurs sweep over Suns? :eek: nah, i think the suns are gonna give them a real good test. They won the season series 3-1 (suns). Marbury is EXTREMELY tough to stop, so i pick them to win a game or 2. ;)

I like Sac town over Utah in a sweep. I don't think Stockton and Malone can get one off Bibby and Webber.

I think Portland will win in 6. Who the hell is gonna stop sheed? Najera? lol.

and i also like the lakers in 6, i think they're in for a tough test in the first round. Most ppl are picking the lakers in a sweep or 5 games, but i think it's gonna be a lot tougher than that. No one on the lakers can match up against KG, and if walley gets hot, look out. Oh and plus, shaq might miss a game due to his wife giving birth to baby shaq :)

as for the east: WHO CARES! :)

Cayate Joe! :p The Kings are going to *WIN* the whole enchilada. :wavey:

Peja :drool:

Pollard :drool:

doloresc
Apr 22nd, 2003, 12:56 PM
i realize that the attached article is about lew alcindor (kareem abdul- jabbar) but it ties basketball of the past (the days when lew alcindor was an idol to all of us) to the present.

dc

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The former Lew Alcindor models Bucks jersey in '69, thanks to Nets' low-ball offer.
http://www.nydailynews.com/ips_rich_content/287-alcindor_lew.jpg

Kareem, Nets could have hit new heights

by Filip Bondy

The former Lew Alcindor models Bucks jersey in '69, thanks to Nets' low-ball offer.

Off in a quiet corner yesterday after practice, confronted with an NBA history question, Byron Scott was at a loss for words - a historic moment in itself.

The query was hyperbolic in nature, but also quite true: "The Nets and Bucks clashed in the most important event in league history. Can you name it?"

Scott thought on it. "I guess this isn't multiple choice," he said. Then he gave up. Little do these Nets know, apparently, they ought to despise the Bucks, curse their uniforms, swear vengeance on the contents of two sealed envelopes. This is not just another random Eastern playoff pairing.

The landmark event, now 34 years old, involved one of Scott's former teammates, a center who was slightly more significant than the ornery, minutes-deprived Dikembe Mutombo. The Bucks once stole Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, then Lew Alcindor, from the New York Nets. In the process, they basically destroyed the American Basketball Association.

The Bucks, a fledgling NBA franchise back then, likely would not have survived the decade if they hadn't captured a championship with Abdul-Jabbar two years later. Everything would be different today. The Nets might still be on Long Island, a dynastic powerhouse mentioned in the same breath with the Yankees. The Kentucky Colonels might be playing the Virginia Squires, and David Stern might be commissioner of the Arena Football League.

For some time in 1969, this was all possible. The Bucks had won the NBA's last-place coin flip from Phoenix to draft Alcindor out of UCLA. The Nets were granted territorial ABA rights to the tall, lanky center from Inwood, on the northern tip of Manhattan.

The ABA was expanding, becoming a real threat to the older league. Spencer Haywood, Alcindor's collegiate rival, came out early to join Denver, a scandalous recruitment in those days.

Alcindor announced he would not abide a circus. Heeding the counsel of Sam Gilbert and Ralph Shapiro, two advisers, he would consider exactly one blind bid from the Bucks, one from the Nets. Highest bidder, wins. Simple as that.

Arthur Brown, the struggling Nets owner, was hemorrhaging money and about to move the team, yet again, from Commack to Hempstead's Island Garden. This bid on Alcindor was Brown's last shot to rescue his ownership.

The other ABA owners agreed to contribute money for this epic bid, even though Alcindor would be playing against them. The transcendent, 7-2 superstar would legitimize their league with fans, make it a marketable attraction to networks. Brown whispered confidently to friends that he would win the rights to Alcindor, bring him back home.

There were rumors, never proved, of spying by the NBA, regarding the bids. When the envelopes were opened, Milwaukee had offered far more. An appeal by Brown and the ABA for a second chance was spurned by Alcindor.

In his autobiography, "Giant Steps," Abdul-Jabbar wrote that he was disappointed by the bidding results.

"All things being equal, I would have been more than happy to play for (the Nets)," Abdul-Jabbar wrote. "The ABA was a new league, without the tradition and composure of the NBA, but I was no great fan of tradition and composure.

"I had wanted to sign with the Nets - 30-second clock, three-point shot, multi-colored basketball and all - but I was offended to be taken so lightly. If they hadn't taken me seriously when I was calling the shots, how would they treat me once I was under contract? The Nets had had the inside track and had blown it."

Brown, the late freight magnate, sold the team almost immediately to Roy Boe. Alcindor averaged 28.8 points his rookie season, led the Bucks from last place to the NBA Finals.

"Without him, no championship," former Bucks owner Wes Pavalon would say years later. "Without him, maybe no team. If he's not out there, I'm not interested and maybe some other city gets a team."

There would be more bad legal blood between these two rivals. The Bucks owned Julius Erving's NBA draft rights, and battled with both the Atlanta Hawks and the Nets for his contract in the early '70s. This protracted court battle went the Nets' way, but by then the ABA was clearly living on borrowed time.

Thanks to the Bucks.

"Whoa ... didn't know that," Scott said.

Now he does. And if the Nets required further inspiration, an ancient grudge to fuel resentment, then here it is.

You just know this Abdul-Jabbar thing is driving Jason Kidd crazy.
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Originally published on April 22, 2003