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View Full Version : Putin Sign Anti-US Adoption Bill, As Retaliation; Hurt Russian Children


tennisbum79
Dec 28th, 2012, 03:59 PM
Putin signs anti-US adoption bill, likely to let Russian abandoned children spend their lives in state institutions.

You can be sure this does not affect the political and business class. Those likely to suffer are these Russian children or the familiy who want to put their children up for adoption.
Mind you, the orphanage in Russia have not progressed that much since the days of the Soviet Union.
These are places that cause permanent psychological damage for these children.

Although this action makes Russia proud for standing up to the USA, its long term effect hurts Russia itself.
Besides Americans, I don't see many Europeans adoting Russian children.

The embarrasement from UNICEF constantly reminding Russian goverment to improve the plight of Russian insttitutionalized children, will only grow.

Adoption cases already in process are in limbo now.
Let's see what ys, our resident Russialogist and Putin apologist, has to say.

Russia's Putin signs anti-U.S. adoption bill

(CNN) -- Aaron and Jenny Moyer already consider a Russian orphan named Vitali as their own. But a controversial Russian law that bans the adoption of Russian children by U.S. families may keep the boy from his new home in the United States.

The Moyers have photos of their visits with Vitali in Russia, and the adoption process was under way.
"He's our son," Aaron Moyer said. "In our hearts, he is our son."
Russian President Vladimir Putin may have put an end to that when he signed the controversial measure Friday.
The action could affect hundreds of American families seeking to adopt. Americans adopted close to 1,000 Russian children last year, according to U.S. State Department figures.

Though the number has been dropping in recent years, Russia remains the third most popular country for U.S. citizens to adopt, after China and Ethiopia.
The U.S. State Department said it "deeply regrets" the new Russian law.
"The Russian government's politically motivated decision will reduce adoption possibilities for children who are now under institutional care," it said in a statement. "We are further concerned about statements that adoptions already underway may be stopped and hope that the Russian government would allow those children who have already met and bonded with their future parent to finish the necessary legal procedures so that they can join their families."

Jenny Moyer says she knows there is an orphan crisis in Russia, especially for children with special needs, an undertaking she is willing to accept. The boy she wants to adopt, Vitali, has Down syndrome.
The couple, who have two biological children and one adopted American child, said they are relying on their faith to see them through this tough time.

"We want not just our son, but all the kids over there to have families and to grow up and know the love of a mom and dad," Aaron Moyer said.

The Russian measure also bars any political activities by nongovernmental organizations receiving funding from the United States, if such activities could affect Russian interests, Russia's semiofficial RIA-Novosti news agency said.
It also imposes sanctions against U.S. officials thought to have violated human rights.

The law, which goes into effect on January 1, envisages the drafting of a list of U.S. citizens who will be prohibited from entering Russia, and will suspend the activity of any legal entities controlled by these individuals in the country.

A vote this week in the Federation Council, Russia's upper house, was unanimous, but Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov criticized the bill ahead of its signing.

Lawmakers in the State Duma, Russia's lower house of parliament, adopted it last week (http://www.cnn.com/2012/12/21/world/europe/russia-us-adoption-ban/index.html).
The move by Russian politicians is widely seen as retaliation for a law that U.S. President Barack Obama signed on December 14. That bill, called the Magnitsky Act, imposes U.S. travel and financial restrictions on human rights abusers in Russia.
The Magnitsky Act is named in honor of Russian lawyer Sergei Magnitsky, who uncovered the largest tax fraud in the country's history in the form of rebates claimed by government officials who stole money from the state. Magnitsky died in 2009 after a year in a Moscow detention center, apparently beaten to death.

The Russian bill's implementation nullifies a recent agreement between the United States and Russia in which the countries agreed to additional safeguards to protect children and parties involved in inter-country adoptions.
Backers of the Russian bill said American adoptive parents have been abusive, citing 19 deaths of Russian children since the 1990s.
In 2010, an American woman caused outrage after she sent her adopted son back to Russia alone on a one-way flight, saying the boy, then 7, had violent episodes that made her family fear for its safety.

Konstantin Dolgov, the Russian Foreign Ministry's special representative for human rights, said Wednesday on Twitter that Russians are "well aware of, and have pointed out more than once, the inadequate protection of adopted Russian children in the US." He also said the United States is one of three nations that have not signed the 1989 U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Anthony Lake, executive director of the U.N. Children's Fund, touted the importance of "inter-country adoption."
"While welcoming Prime Minister Dmitri Medvedev's call for the improvement of the child welfare system, UNICEF urges that the current plight of the many Russian children in institutions receives priority attention," he said.

UNICEF asked that Russia let children's "best interests" guide the "design and development of all efforts to protect children."
"We encourage the government to establish a robust national social protection plan to help strengthen Russian families. Alternatives to the institutionalization of children are essential, including permanent foster care, domestic adoption and inter-country adoption," he said.
The United States has signed but not ratified the convention, which has sparked concerns from conservatives about its effect on U.S. sovereignty and parental rights.

Groups such as Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch had urged lawmakers to reject the bill.
"This bill hits back at Russia's most vulnerable children and could deprive them of the loving families they desperately need," Hugh Williamson, Europe and Central Asia director at Human Rights Watch, said last week.
John Dalhuisen, Amnesty International's Europe and Central Asia program director, has said that "this bill is frankly a childish response to the Magnitsky Act."


source: http://www.cnn.com/2012/12/28/world/europe/russia-us-adoptions/index.html

Beat
Dec 28th, 2012, 04:31 PM
this is a new low, even for putin's immoral standards.

all i can say is: virgin mary, rid us of this man.

Sammo
Dec 28th, 2012, 04:31 PM
Pathetic

KournikovaFan91
Dec 28th, 2012, 05:39 PM
Although this action makes Russia proud for standing up to the USA, its long term effect hurts Russia itself.
Besides Americans, I don't see many Europeans adoting Russian children

I know and have heard of several Irish people who've adopted Russian, Chinese, Vietnamese and Kazakh children. A lot of Europeans adopt and with countries like China and Vietnam closing up to foreign adoptions demand will probably move to Russia.

shap_half
Dec 28th, 2012, 06:31 PM
I hate to say this, but Russia has done absolutely nothing good for humanity in the last few years.

Super Dave
Dec 28th, 2012, 06:35 PM
Aaron and Jenny Moyer already consider a Russian orphan named Vitali as their own. But a controversial Russian law that bans the adoption of Russian children by U.S. families may keep the boy from his new home in the United States.

The Moyers have photos of their visits with Vitali in Russia, and the adoption process was under way.
"He's our son," Aaron Moyer said. "In our hearts, he is our son."
Russian President Vladimir Putin may have put an end to that when he signed the controversial measure Friday.

My God, at the very least let the ones that are already in progress go through. How cruel. What a dick.

Gagsquet
Dec 28th, 2012, 06:43 PM
Butthurt

MaBaker
Dec 28th, 2012, 07:04 PM
I hate to say this, but Russia has done absolutely nothing good for humanity in the last few years.
Same goes for USA.



This is stupid. Anyone who would adopt a child and give them home, love and security, should be allowed to do it.

shap_half
Dec 28th, 2012, 07:56 PM
Same goes for USA.



This is stupid. Anyone who would adopt a child and give them home, love and security, should be allowed to do it.


America has a lot of problems, sure, but the things that are happening in Russia are truly terrifying. The way Putin has manipulated the entire government is downright mind-boggling - and the fact that the country would pass this legislation because they're being called out for their bullshit dealings should be unthinkable. This is not high school, Vladimir.

Sammo
Dec 28th, 2012, 07:58 PM
Putin is a psychopath really

saint2
Dec 28th, 2012, 08:00 PM
Hes a dictator. He has poor economy, people are starving at Russia, but somehow majority of them feel OK with him BC he gives them illusion of Russia being powerful country, wich is not...Russia is in fact on verge of economical failure. One day ilusion will be gone, so will be Putin.

delicatecutter
Dec 28th, 2012, 08:06 PM
I hate to say this, but Russia has done absolutely nothing good for humanity in the last few years.

How can you say this as a gymnastics fan? :eek:

MaBaker
Dec 28th, 2012, 08:18 PM
America has a lot of problems, sure, but the things that are happening in Russia are truly terrifying. The way Putin has manipulated the entire government is downright mind-boggling - and the fact that the country would pass this legislation because they're being called out for their bullshit dealings should be unthinkable. This is not high school, Vladimir.
So are in USA.

fifty-fifty
Dec 28th, 2012, 09:21 PM
So what? Why can people adopt kids from another country? How about adopting from US?

saint2
Dec 28th, 2012, 09:24 PM
So are in USA.

You have to be mad to even compare situation in USA with situation in Russia.
Putin Era has been disgrace. If Western leaders would just boycott that bum instead of making business with him, he'd be long goner.

KournikovaFan91
Dec 28th, 2012, 09:36 PM
So what? Why can people adopt kids from another country? How about adopting from US?

There could be an availability issue in Ireland it's quite rare for people to give kids up for adoption nowadays. I dunno what the situation is like in the USA.

fifty-fifty
Dec 28th, 2012, 09:42 PM
So I guess US 'free press' again failed to mention a few important details, such as the real name of the law and the incident that lead to its support among Russian people.


http://www.bsr-russia.com/en/politics/item/2558-the-dima-yakovlev-bill.html
The Dima Yakovlev Bill

The bill has been poignantly named after the Russian two-year old Dima Yakovlev, who died after his American adoptive parents left him in a car for nine hours in hot weather.



Dima Yakovlev’s death is one of the many cases of torture, rape, manslaughter and murder that adopted Russian children are alleged to have suffered at the hands of their adoptive parents in the United States in recent years. Since the early 1990s, according to Russian officials, at least 19 Russian children have been killed by their foster parents in the US.About 60,000 Russian children have been adopted by American couples the largest number of all those sharing adoption arrangements with Russia. Relations were strained when an adoptive mother put her 7-year-old son back on a plane to Russia saying he was no longer wanted, forcing a moratorium on adoptions in the US, until a new agreement on cross-border adoptions was signed in November 2012.

shap_half
Dec 28th, 2012, 09:56 PM
Oh please. As if that's really the reason why.

Next, you'll tell me the whole issue with Pussy Riot is rooted in something other than extreme bigotry.

shap_half
Dec 28th, 2012, 09:57 PM
How can you say this as a gymnastics fan? :eek:

It pains me to say it, believe me. Aliya Mustafina's Olympics is the only shining light when it comes to Russia as far as I'm concerned.

delicatecutter
Dec 28th, 2012, 10:00 PM
Ksenia Afanasyeva's floor exercises SAVE LIVES!!!

fifty-fifty
Dec 28th, 2012, 10:02 PM
Oh please. As if that's really the reason why.

Next, you'll tell me the whole issue with Pussy Riot is rooted in something other than extreme bigotry.

When did I say it's the real reason? In the long run it'll be good for Russia, since it'll create more publicity for taking care of their own kids rather than hoping they'd be adopted into a foreign home. US parents have many other options.

KournikovaFan91
Dec 28th, 2012, 10:05 PM
It also passed both houses of the Duma.

saint2
Dec 28th, 2012, 10:07 PM
When did I say it's the real reason? In the long run it'll be good for Russia, since it'll create more publicity for taking care of their own kids rather than hoping they'd be adopted into a foreign home. US parents have many other options.

Another Russia Lover ?

All these Russia Lovers would scream for abuse of human rights if it would happen in USA . BONUS OPTION- if it would happen in USA under Bush, they'd scream that its fascism and nazism combined.

KournikovaFan91
Dec 28th, 2012, 10:10 PM
Another Russia Lover ?

All these Russia Lovers would scream for abuse of human rights if it would happen in USA . BONUS OPTION- if it would happen in USA under Bush, they'd scream that its fascism and nazism combined.

Not every country has an adoption agreement with every other country, that isn't unusual. And in some cases adoption doors do close for various reasons.

saint2
Dec 28th, 2012, 10:13 PM
Not every country has an adoption agreement with every other country, that isn't unusual. And in some cases adoption doors do close for various reasons.

Are you in love with Putin or what ?
Never saw you criticizing anything that scumbag is doing. Always justifying his evil actions.

KournikovaFan91
Dec 28th, 2012, 10:19 PM
But that is the case I know Ireland's agreements with certain countries have expired making it more difficult to adopt from certain countries.

shap_half
Dec 28th, 2012, 10:19 PM
When did I say it's the real reason? In the long run it'll be good for Russia, since it'll create more publicity for taking care of their own kids rather than hoping they'd be adopted into a foreign home. US parents have many other options.

Because that's Russia's real target here.

Gagsquet
Dec 28th, 2012, 10:33 PM
Are Russian people severely dumb ? or scared ? or just uninformed and manipulated ?

Cajka
Dec 28th, 2012, 10:36 PM
Are Russian people severely dumb ? or scared ? or just uninformed and manipulated ?

:facepalm:

Gagsquet
Dec 28th, 2012, 10:41 PM
:facepalm:

You feel like Putin is something good for Russia for real ?

fifty-fifty
Dec 28th, 2012, 10:42 PM
Another Russia Lover ?

All these Russia Lovers would scream for abuse of human rights if it would happen in USA . BONUS OPTION- if it would happen in USA under Bush, they'd scream that its fascism and nazism combined.

Law and regulations about adoption is not an important issue to me.

ToopsTame
Dec 28th, 2012, 10:44 PM
LOL you guys. This law is politically motivated as a response to the Magnitsky act passed by the US Congress but you people passing judgement on an entire country because of it look really stupid. There is much more to this story than "Russia hates orphans."

Cajka
Dec 28th, 2012, 11:02 PM
You feel like Putin is something good for Russia for real ?

:spit: :weirdo: Where did this come from?

I was reacting to your post about Russian people being stupid and uninformed. That kind of generalization is silly.

Gagsquet
Dec 28th, 2012, 11:06 PM
:spit: :weirdo: Where did this come from?

I was reacting to your post about Russian people being stupid and uninformed. That kind of generalization is silly.

How Putin won elections then? Or you assume he cheated.

fifty-fifty
Dec 28th, 2012, 11:19 PM
How Putin won elections then? Or you assume he cheated.

You wanted Communists to win instead?

Cajka
Dec 28th, 2012, 11:24 PM
How Putin won elections then? Or you assume he cheated.

I don't assume he cheated. Russia was a complete mess during nineties. In that sense, at one point, he was what Russia needed, a tough guy. But obviously he's been out of control for a while already. All the power and popularity messed up his head. That's why nobody should be elected so many times. 4-8 years is more than enough.

You wanted Communists to win instead?

This too.

Gagsquet
Dec 28th, 2012, 11:33 PM
I wanted democratic elections.
that's why I wonder how Russian people keeps voting for him. They must be brainwashed.

KournikovaFan91
Dec 28th, 2012, 11:35 PM
I wanted democratic elections.
that's why I wonder how Russian people keeps voting for him. They must be brainwashed.

People say the same thing about Chavez, Correa, Morales etc. it's so patronising to assume people for for non-western leaders just because they're brainwashed.

Cajka
Dec 28th, 2012, 11:41 PM
I wanted democratic elections.
that's why I wonder how Russian people keeps voting for him. They must be brainwashed.

If you live in Western Europe, it's only natural that you recognize many flaws when it comes to Putin's decisions and behavior. I'm sure that many Russian people see it as well, but it's not that simple in their case, when it comes to choosing between security and freedom, it's not such an easy and obvious choice. Unlike them, you don't have to choose between those two.

Gagsquet
Dec 28th, 2012, 11:49 PM
If you live in Western Europe, it's only natural that you recognize many flaws when it comes to Putin's decisions and behavior. I'm sure that many Russian people see it as well, but it's not that simple in their case, when it comes to choosing between security and freedom, it's not such an easy and obvious choice. Unlike them, you don't have to choose between those two.

It's worse if they are able to see these flaws and vote for him anyway just for 'security'. I can't believe that and if it's real it's just sad.


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fifty-fifty
Dec 28th, 2012, 11:54 PM
I wanted democratic elections.
that's why I wonder how Russian people keeps voting for him. They must be brainwashed.

Russians don't see another alternative. Liberals have very bad reputation after 1990's. They'll never win another election in Russia.

Gagsquet
Dec 28th, 2012, 11:57 PM
Russians don't see another alternative.

That's for sure when Putin keeps putting in jail dangerous opponents.


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Cajka
Dec 29th, 2012, 12:01 AM
It's worse if they are able to see these flaws and vote for him anyway just for 'security'. I can't believe that and if it's real it's just sad.


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It is sad, but it doesn't change the reality. Serbian people still worship famous Yugoslavian dictator Tito, because they had security with him. My parents, for example. They are not brain-washed, it's just that things got much worse after his death. The best option is to have everything, social protection, security, freedom, but when you don't have that option, you'll choose security.

Gagsquet
Dec 29th, 2012, 12:04 AM
It is sad, but it doesn't change the reality. Serbian people still worship famous Yugoslavian dictator Tito, because they had security with him. My parents, for example. They are not brain-washed, it's just that things got much worse after his death. The best option is to have everything, social protection, security, freedom, but when you don't have that option, you'll choose security.

Sometimes you have to fight to recover your liberties. Your words sounds like a resigned person.


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fifty-fifty
Dec 29th, 2012, 12:13 AM
That's for sure when Putin keeps putting in jail dangerous opponents.


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Again, those people don't have a chance in hell of getting elected.

Cajka
Dec 29th, 2012, 12:15 AM
Sometimes you have to fight to recover your liberties. Your words sounds like a resigned person.



I'm not resigned, I believe in democracy, I would never vote for any other option (although in my country democracy doesn't really exist). But I wasn't speaking about my own preferences, I'm just adding a perspective here. You can't call the whole nation manipulated and stupid, because from their POV, at some point, it was the best choice. And he did a lot of good things for Russia, nobody can deny it, but IMO now it's time to say "thank you" and move on. That's only my opinion, I don't get to decide what's best for them.

Gagsquet
Dec 29th, 2012, 12:25 AM
I don't care the good things Putin did. I don't care if opponents he put in jail were not all relevant (some were anyway). If Russian are able to see this shit going, I think they are terribly wrong to keep voting for him. Even if I understand they choose the safest option with him, that's still wrong. And I do keep thinking a relevant part of the population is somehow manipulated and uninformed. I accept you disagree about this of course ( but not about the fact Putin is fundamentally a wrong option )


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tennisbum79
Dec 29th, 2012, 01:36 AM
But that is the case I know Ireland's agreements with certain countries have expired making it more difficult to adopt from certain countries.
Well, this is a different case. There is no agreement expiration here.
You seem to want to somehow work Ireland in this equation. I don't think can fill the void.

tennisbum79
Dec 29th, 2012, 01:56 AM
So I guess US 'free press' again failed to mention a few important details, such as the real name of the law and the incident that lead to its support among Russian people.
I don't think that is the reason Russia passed this law.
You know it, people in Russia know it. You are just graspping for straw.

The fact is Russia's orphanages conditions have only marginally improved from their Soviet Union state.
At that time, only Romania had worse conditions.

I understand, Rusian, like any other country, has national pride bruised to see their children adopted by another country, especially if it is the USA. It does not refelct well on the society and culture.

But they have a choice to make.
1) Let the children suffer and grow into traumatised and psychologially damaged adults who will never be able to take care of themselves.
2) Or let these children be adopt by families who can give them hope and future. Note that Americans are also adopting children with physcial and menatl challenges.

It is clear that in Russian culture, there is a stigma attached to adopted children, that is why their orphanages are not transitional living instittuions, but permanent factories when they house thes kids.
Until the culture changes and allow Russian to adopt their own orphans, they have to let the kid go where they are wanted and loved.

KournikovaFan91
Dec 29th, 2012, 02:26 AM
Well, this is a different case. There is no agreement expiration here.
You seem to want to somehow work Ireland in this equation. I don't think can fill the void.

Ehh because I live here and it is one of the worlds Top 10 countries on inequality adjusted HDI has a low Gini coefficient and is considered the developed world. I'm giving a developed world example not that Eastern Europe isn't the developed world although many on her look down up it.

Various countries have various adoption agreements with others, you think an Iranian could adopt an American or a Turk and Armenian. They are two contentious examples however other more mundane ones exist. Adoption agreements are bilateral agreements and Russia has decided to stop this one which is within their rights as a sovereign state to make that internal policy change.

Is this situation ideal of course not however its not uncommon that adoption rights between countries are removed.

Frankly this is another non story. Also in terms if these institutions I know of one charity that works in Russia and people who've adopted from Kazakhstan who say the orphanages have acceptable living conditions and the children fed and nourished. Some people seem to think this is Romania circa 1992. Even in the USSR times the orphanages weren't like the Romanian ones discovered in the 90s, the charity that I mentioned earlier confirmed this since they began work in Russia in the early 90s.

Crazy Canuck
Dec 29th, 2012, 02:41 AM
... but somehow majority of them feel OK with him BC he gives them illusion of Russia being powerful country, wich is not...

From this sentence, I'm going to judge that either you don't speak to a lot of Russians, or you speak to an entirely different class of them than I do. Most Russians that I know are not big Putin fans (I've met few who don't think the election was rigged), and certainly don't have illusions of Russia being anymore powerful than it actually is.

tennisbum79
Dec 29th, 2012, 03:20 AM
Ehh because I live here and it is one of the worlds Top 10 countries on inequality adjusted HDI has a low Gini coefficient and is considered the developed world. I'm giving a developed world example not that Eastern Europe isn't the developed world although many on her look down up it.

Various countries have various adoption agreements with others, you think an Iranian could adopt an American or a Turk and Armenian. They are two contentious examples however other more mundane ones exist. Adoption agreements are bilateral agreements and Russia has decided to stop this one which is within their rights as a sovereign state to make that internal policy change. .
Is this situation ideal of course not however its not uncommon that adoption rights between countries are removed.

Again, the agreement between the USA and Russia has not expired.
In fact they just signed a new agreement that took effect on 11/01/2012.


Frankly this is another non story. Also in terms if these institutions I know of one charity that works in Russia and people who've adopted from Kazakhstan who say the orphanages have acceptable living conditions and the children fed and nourished. Some people seem to think this is Romania circa 1992. Even in the USSR times the orphanages weren't like the Romanian ones discovered in the 90s, the charity that I mentioned earlier confirmed this since they began work in Russia in the early 90s.
I disagree. A number of families who were in various stages of adoption have been affected.
Many have appeared on CNN and FOXNews with photos the kids, they have already bonded with them.

NJ couple worried by Russian adoption ban
http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/dam/assets/121228095142-russian-adoption-family-limbo-story-top.jpg




THis is a big story.


As for the conditions of Russian orphanage, an intertional expert on adoption said the condition in Russia are terrible.
I trust her more than your experts.

bulava
Dec 29th, 2012, 08:38 AM
Putin signs anti-US adoption bill, likely to let Russian abandoned children spend their lives in state institutions.

You can be sure this does not affect the political and business class. Those likely to suffer are these Russian children or the familiy who want to put their children up for adoption.
Mind you, the orphanage in Russia have not progressed that much since the days of the Soviet Union.

This is another PR stunt from biased and ignorant media just to show that Putin in bad shades. Here we go:

In the U.S. 423,000 children are living without permanent families in the foster care system. 115,000 of these children are eligible for adoption, but nearly 40% of these children will wait over three years in foster care before being adopted.

That comes straight from the horse's mouth! The Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute:
http://www.ccainstitute.org/why-we-do-it-/facts-and-statistics.html

First let them adopt their children instead pointing at others aka Hypocrisy :D

PS: only thing I don't know is whether those children requested by Russians living in the US or not.

bulava
Dec 29th, 2012, 08:42 AM
The way Putin has manipulated the entire government is downright mind-boggling - and the fact that the country would pass this legislation because they're being called out for their bullshit dealings should be unthinkable. This is not high school, Vladimir.
This is another reason why propaganda corrupts innocent citizens. I know how this ball is played in the US.

Please watch to Presidential debates from GOP camp who are obsessed with Russia and Putin :)

bulava
Dec 29th, 2012, 08:45 AM
So what? Why can people adopt kids from another country? How about adopting from US?
That's my point. We could even adopt villages like few of us who studied from IITs started doing it in India.

tenn_ace
Dec 29th, 2012, 11:53 AM
Putin is a moron, no doubt. This law will hurt kids who could have been adopted otherwise and have brighter future prospects, but also potentially save some children. There are multiple cases when Russian adopted kids were hurt by their new parents.

tennisbum79
Dec 29th, 2012, 02:11 PM
This is another PR stunt from biased and ignorant media just to show that Putin in bad shades. Here we go:

In the U.S. 423,000 children are living without permanent families in the foster care system. 115,000 of these children are eligible for adoption, but nearly 40% of these children will wait over three years in foster care before being adopted.

That comes straight from the horse's mouth! The Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute:
http://www.ccainstitute.org/why-we-do-it-/facts-and-statistics.html

First let them adopt their children instead pointing at others aka Hypocrisy :D

PS: only thing I don't know is whether those children requested by Russians living in the US or not.
You have admitted in the past your bias against the USA, and this post is typical of that.
You reaction is informed by that bias.
You see propaganda everwhere.

If you would just step back, you would see there are descenting voices, in government and civil society, against the passing of this bill

fifty-fifty
Dec 29th, 2012, 02:16 PM
NJ couple worried by Russian adoption ban
http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/dam/assets/121228095142-russian-adoption-family-limbo-story-top.jpg




.

Why is this couple worried? Because they want a white kid? They wouldn't adopt from China/Africa/India?

tennisbum79
Dec 29th, 2012, 02:20 PM
Why is this couple worried? Because they want a white kid? They wouldn't adopt from China/Africa/India?
What does the race have to do with it?
I also saw couple who have adopted a child from Ethiopia(Africa) and who are in the process of adopting a Russian child.

So what is your point?

useme
Dec 30th, 2012, 12:05 AM
This is another PR stunt from biased and ignorant media just to show that Putin in bad shades. Here we go:

In the U.S. 423,000 children are living without permanent families in the foster care system. 115,000 of these children are eligible for adoption, but nearly 40% of these children will wait over three years in foster care before being adopted.

That comes straight from the horse's mouth! The Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute:
http://www.ccainstitute.org/why-we-do-it-/facts-and-statistics.html

First let them adopt their children instead pointing at others aka Hypocrisy :D

PS: only thing I don't know is whether those children requested by Russians living in the US or not.

Interesting poing about the U.S. foster care system. Is it possible that many families choose to adopt foreign children as a way to make it more permanent and maybe even less of a hassle once the child is adopted? I simply can't imagine it is just a race issue.

ys
Dec 30th, 2012, 06:17 AM
Russians don't see another alternative. Liberals have very bad reputation after 1990's. They'll never win another election in Russia.

Absolutely. Russian liberals do have a reputation. Very much in line with old good Dostoevski definition ( that liberals are always looking to clean someone's shoes, so to speak ).

I am on vacation in Russia right now, visited several cities. The country looks terrific and definitely changing to the best. People look better, to start with. Young people look more confident and educated. Streets look great. Just used the Sapsan train system. The best train system I've ever used in my life.

Talked with people about this law. Most of people support it, saying that we can fix the situation on our own. Given that the demographic policy is becoming central to the state, I can imagine that things may indeed get better. That, apart from everyone's opinion that Magnitsky Act was a truly idiotic piece of American legislation. Which I tend to agree with.

Regardless, I see no reason for hysterical reaction ( on top of that that the "'adoption" part is is a very small part of this law, it is essentially, about something else ). So, we'll see.

Sam L
Dec 30th, 2012, 06:28 AM
Just used the Sapsan train system. The best train system I've ever used in my life.

Sapsan is awesome. But they didn't even ask me for the ticket when I boarded. I kept wanting to show it to the lady on the train but she wouldn't have it. I think she knew I was a tourist who spoke no Russian. :lol:

bulava
Jan 2nd, 2013, 11:57 AM
You have admitted in the past your bias against the USA, and this post is typical of that.
You reaction is informed by that bias.
You see propaganda everwhere.

I hate to do this on New Year. You are lying because I never admitted any bias against any nation. I only show what's reality in many countries including MINE. I observed this trend with you many times where you target members with some hidden agenda, and write with full of assumptions and assertions. FYI, I run my office/lab/facility at Santa Clara where I employ many Americans. So don't try that on me!

If you would just step back, you would see there are descenting voices, in government and civil society, against the passing of this bill
Perhaps you should do that, go back to your state and find out the reality instead of picking on other countries. Or follow people like Michael Moore et al. Or watch US Senate/Congress hearings to know what's happening in the United States and how people there are really upset/pissed. You want more? Try with Fiscal Cliff, Debt Ceiling etc.