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pov
Oct 20th, 2012, 02:18 PM
Alex Cross is the only one I can think of.

Julian.
Oct 20th, 2012, 02:37 PM
Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden?

NoppaNoppa
Oct 20th, 2012, 02:40 PM
Bible

pov
Oct 20th, 2012, 02:46 PM
I guess that means there really aren't many?

Sammo
Oct 20th, 2012, 03:50 PM
Franz Kafka - The Metamorphosis :oh:

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_NdhJ_3S2aAs/TUFmv3SIRKI/AAAAAAAAAA0/73i47J0TQWM/s1600/metamor.jpg

miffedmax
Oct 20th, 2012, 03:54 PM
Lord of the Rings.

Mattographer
Oct 20th, 2012, 04:00 PM
I love Alex Cross books series :hearts: Well, at least the earlier ones.

spiceboy
Oct 20th, 2012, 04:30 PM
Life of Pi by Yann Martel

miffedmax
Oct 20th, 2012, 05:52 PM
The Good Earth, by Pearl Buck.

Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe.

Both of them are among the most important books ever written.

lee station
Oct 20th, 2012, 06:08 PM
now i'm thinking about bélver yin by jesús ferrero or the jim and lucas books by michael ende

lee station
Oct 20th, 2012, 06:46 PM
another example would be tuareg by alberto vázquez-figueroa. there is a good bunch of authors writing about protagonists of different ethnicity.

Lord of the Rings.
fantasy would be too vague a term when speaking of different ethnicities, i'm afraid.

Bayo
Oct 20th, 2012, 08:41 PM
Giovanni's Room by James Baldwin.

moby
Oct 20th, 2012, 08:54 PM
Kazuo Ishiguro (Remains of the Day, Never Let Me Go, etc.)

David Mitchell (number9dream).

This is not uncommon at all. Not sure what the point of this thread is. Most writers write about things they know, as they should; those who write from the perspective of another ethnicity/culture tend to have immersed themselves in that culture.

Sam L
Oct 20th, 2012, 09:24 PM
It's not a "book" but Aeneid would be one of the earliest examples of this.

miffedmax
Oct 20th, 2012, 10:38 PM
As a not particularly successful writer, I'd say sometimes it's harder to accurately get the opposite gender right. Men and women really do have different ways of processing certain types of information (not better or worse, just different) and in my writers' groups the guys catch the gals and the gals catch the guys all the time.

Sam L
Oct 20th, 2012, 10:47 PM
As a not particularly successful writer, I'd say sometimes it's harder to accurately get the opposite gender right. Men and women really do have different ways of processing certain types of information (not better or worse, just different) and in my writers' groups the guys catch the gals and the gals catch the guys all the time.

This is very true.

Wigglytuff
Oct 20th, 2012, 11:24 PM
Othello?

darrinbaker00
Oct 20th, 2012, 11:58 PM
If you go by how the film adaptations are cast, you would have to add "The Three Musketeers" to the list:

http://chefabioalmeida.files.wordpress.com/2010/09/alexandre_dumas_nadar.jpg

I have yet to see a black Musketeer on film, on television, or on a candy-bar wrapper.

Dani12
Oct 21st, 2012, 12:16 AM
Life of Pi by Yann Martel

I was going to say that one ;)

dybbuk
Oct 21st, 2012, 12:18 AM
Alejo Carpentier was a Cuban of European descent and wrote books about African slaves taken to the Caribbean and also the indigenous peoples of the islands.

Sam L
Oct 21st, 2012, 12:41 AM
As a not particularly successful writer, I'd say sometimes it's harder to accurately get the opposite gender right. Men and women really do have different ways of processing certain types of information (not better or worse, just different) and in my writers' groups the guys catch the gals and the gals catch the guys all the time.

One of the best examples of this would be Dracula where the author writes in 1st person as Mina Harker.

I think I would find it easier to write as or about a woman than a man.

JN
Oct 21st, 2012, 01:19 AM
The Forbidden (Books of Blood Volume 5) – Clive Barker

Moveyourfeet
Oct 21st, 2012, 02:08 AM
Bible

:rolls:

Rocketta
Oct 21st, 2012, 02:10 AM
There are a lot. I know I've read several books that I never finished that were written by caucasions and the lead were black males... I never finished them they were horrific... the dialog just makes you want to hurl. Even when authors just try to add minor charactors that are black the dialog usually is just bad.

Alex Cross is one of the few commercially successful ones but the dialog in the books still gives me a hard time to finish the books. :help:

brickhousesupporter
Oct 21st, 2012, 02:29 AM
There are a lot. I know I've read several books that I never finished that were written by caucasions and the lead were black males... I never finished them they were horrific... the dialog just makes you want to hurl. Even when authors just try to add minor charactors that are black the dialog usually is just bad.

Alex Cross is one of the few commercially successful ones but the dialog in the books still gives me a hard time to finish the books. :help:
Everyones all into the Alex cross series, but I much prefer Patterson's other books like when the wind blows and the Lake house. Do these books qualifiey because one of the protagonists were half bird half humans.

The only thing book series that I like are the Elvis Cole series by Robert Crais

Rocketta
Oct 21st, 2012, 02:37 AM
The only thing book series that I like are the Elvis Cole series by Robert Crais


GTFO! That is my favorite too! I love him. The lead and the author! :hearts:

So this is why we always get along! Great taste! :p :hug:

btw, a very nice TF poster got an Elvis Cole book signed for me and made out to Rocketta! :bounce:

miffedmax
Oct 21st, 2012, 02:05 PM
There are a lot. I know I've read several books that I never finished that were written by caucasions and the lead were black males... I never finished them they were horrific... the dialog just makes you want to hurl. Even when authors just try to add minor charactors that are black the dialog usually is just bad.

Alex Cross is one of the few commercially successful ones but the dialog in the books still gives me a hard time to finish the books. :help:

I've seen a lot like this, and not just black characters. The rule of thumb I've had drilled into me is that you should just establish a characters ethnicity and socio-economic background, then write pretty straight dialog and let the reader's imagination do the work. Most modern writers seem to do this for, say most white Americans and even some Europeans, but will still try to write dialog for Eastern Europeans, blacks (American, African or Caribbean) Hispanics and Southern whites, almost always with embarrassing results.

brickhousesupporter
Oct 21st, 2012, 02:17 PM
GTFO! That is my favorite too! I love him. The lead and the author! :hearts:

So this is why we always get along! Great taste! :p :hug:

btw, a very nice TF poster got an Elvis Cole book signed for me and made out to Rocketta! :bounce:
I had no idea Rocketta.....I even like the book that was from Joe Pikes perspective.

BTW, I think Alexander McCall Smith's number 1 ladies detective series is an example of a author writing a protagonist that is not of the same race and sex as the author.

JN
Oct 21st, 2012, 02:57 PM
I had no idea Rocketta.....I even like the book that was from Joe Pikes perspective.

BTW, I think Alexander McCall Smith's number 1 ladies detective series is an example of a author writing a protagonist that is not of the same race and sex as the author.

The Number 1 Ladies Detective Agency was great... the TV series, haven't read the books, yet. IMDb has a good forum comparing it to the books. Wish they'd film more eps.

Rocketta
Oct 21st, 2012, 02:57 PM
I had no idea Rocketta.....I even like the book that was from Joe Pikes perspective.


Me Too! I love Joe Pike! :hearts: I love Elvis' cat and the relationship with Joe. :lol:

and in the words of our average non-black writer's trying to write black dialog, 'Right On, Right On!' :yeah: :lol:

Rocketta
Oct 21st, 2012, 03:03 PM
I've seen a lot like this, and not just black characters. The rule of thumb I've had drilled into me is that you should just establish a characters ethnicity and socio-economic background, then write pretty straight dialog and let the reader's imagination do the work. Most modern writers seem to do this for, say most white Americans and even some Europeans, but will still try to write dialog for Eastern Europeans, blacks (American, African or Caribbean) Hispanics and Southern whites, almost always with embarrassing results.

yeah it usually doesn't end well when they do that... I can't take it, I can never get through the bad dialog and just concentrate on the story. I get too annoyed. :facepalm:


I'm trying to remember the last author that I didn't read because of this .... but I can't recall the name and most of my books are at my mom's house not with me now. He's relatively famous for writing dectective/suspense fiction. :banghead:

miffedmax
Oct 21st, 2012, 03:25 PM
I've read books by writers who shoot themselves in the foot by being pretty accurate, but use so much slang that the book is dated by the time it comes out in paperback.

Rocketta
Oct 21st, 2012, 03:43 PM
I've read books by writers who shoot themselves in the foot by being pretty accurate, but use so much slang that the book is dated by the time it comes out in paperback.

That's just it, they either use too much and you feel like no adult speaks like that all the time OR it sounds like it's from another era by time it's published. :lol:

Anyway here's another very successful series, I think the author is a white female but she writes among other things a series called , "Free man of color" by Barbara Hambly. I don't do historical fiction even if it's mystery so I don't know how they are written just know they are/were very successful books.

Oh and I finally remembered the author who I tried to read with a black antagonist but was a white author.... the author is George Pelecanos. I have a couple of the books.