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Sammo
Oct 1st, 2012, 08:04 PM
http://sphotos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/536245_10151175393853360_1391501423_n.jpg

:oh:

PhilePhile
Oct 1st, 2012, 08:13 PM
???=3

JJ Expres
Oct 1st, 2012, 08:25 PM
2 -.-

Sammo
Oct 1st, 2012, 08:27 PM
???=3

http://i787.photobucket.com/albums/yy159/Sphenic/Glee/MMHMM.gif

2 -.-

http://lh5.ggpht.com/_DVoNvgQORbw/TAi8_i66KyI/AAAAAAAAAds/53EJtFCbUGA/yes.gif

Lucemferre
Oct 1st, 2012, 08:29 PM
2.



took me 20 sec :hearts:

*edit* too late :(

Direwolf
Oct 1st, 2012, 08:32 PM
0=1
1=0
2=0
3=0
4=-
5=-
6=1
7=0
8=2
9=1

??

Pump-it-UP
Oct 1st, 2012, 08:33 PM
2. :hearts:

Sammo
Oct 1st, 2012, 08:37 PM
0=1
1=0
2=0
3=0
4=-
5=-
6=1
7=0
8=2
9=1

??

Way simpler than that ;)

Direwolf
Oct 1st, 2012, 08:41 PM
Way simpler than that ;)

Answering with "2" sounds too simple...
so i answered with 0-9...

Nicolás89
Oct 1st, 2012, 08:41 PM
It's 2 right? It did take me a couple of minutes, nice mind excercise. ;)

Sammo
Oct 1st, 2012, 08:42 PM
Answering with "2" sounds too simple...
so i answered with 0-9...

Ah OK sorry, I thought you had done something weird and complicated :lol: Yep, correct answer.

PhilePhile
Oct 2nd, 2012, 12:03 AM
"2" is technically not correct. The "=" should be "≈" for the "2" answer to be correct.


For example,

8096 = 5

and

9881 = 5

is not possible. It's reasonable that "9" = "6" ... but "9" + "6" = "8" ? or "0" = "9" ?

égalité
Oct 2nd, 2012, 12:24 AM
"2" is technically not correct. The "=" should be "≈" for the "2" answer to be correct.


For example,

8096 = 5

and

9881 = 5

is not possible. It's reasonable that "9" = "6" ... but "9" + "6" = "8" ? or "0" = "9" ?

What? :unsure:

PhilePhile
Oct 2nd, 2012, 01:01 AM
What? :unsure:

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQxiGKLgs4j6DZ1H2IsgqvM66OqjEFG-zaAi2IOuk22XKpsJLDX2Q
"2" is technically not correct. The "=" should be "≈" for the "2" answer to be correct.


For example,

8096 = 5

and

9881 = 5

is not possible. It's reasonable that "9" = "6" ... but "9" + "6" = "8" ? or "0" = "9" ?

Morning Morgan
Oct 2nd, 2012, 01:27 AM
"2" is technically not correct. The "=" should be "≈" for the "2" answer to be correct.


For example,

8096 = 5

and

9881 = 5

is not possible. It's reasonable that "9" = "6" ... but "9" + "6" = "8" ? or "0" = "9" ?

If "=" is defined as a topological mapping function to the integers, it's totally valid. The function need not be one-one.

ce
Oct 2nd, 2012, 01:42 AM
2 :oh:

Moveyourfeet
Oct 2nd, 2012, 02:43 AM
haven't read the thread. My answer is 2. Done in 30 sec.
Am I a :weirdo:

Moveyourfeet
Oct 2nd, 2012, 02:44 AM
0=1
1=0
2=0
3=0
4=-
5=-
6=1
7=0
8=2
9=1

??

This is how I did it.

égalité
Oct 2nd, 2012, 06:18 AM
https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQxiGKLgs4j6DZ1H2IsgqvM66OqjEFG-zaAi2IOuk22XKpsJLDX2Q

oh, thanks for clarifying :weirdo:

There are two functions. f:Z-->Z assigns, for example, the number 1 to 0, the number 0 to 1, the number 0 to 2, etc. (where Z=the integers). Then there is a quaternary map on Z, written as a word of length 4, that simply produces the sum of the "letters" in the word. The expression "8809=6" means g((f,f,f,f)(8,8,0,9))=6, where (f,f,f,f) is the cartesian product of f with itself 4 times (it is a map from Z^4 to Z^4). The composition g((f,f,f,f)) is certainly not injective, given the brief glimpse into the behavior of the function f that was provided in the statement of the problem, and especially given the fact that decomposing an integer into a sum of 4 other integers is a highly non-unique process. Hope that makes sense gurl. :cheer: :cheer: :cheer:

PhilePhile
Oct 2nd, 2012, 10:58 AM
oh, thanks for clarifying :weirdo:

There are two functions. f:Z-->Z assigns, for example, the number 1 to 0, the number 0 to 1, the number 0 to 2, etc. (where Z=the integers). Then there is a quaternary map on Z, written as a word of length 4, that simply produces the sum of the "letters" in the word. The expression "8809=6" means g((f,f,f,f)(8,8,0,9))=6, where (f,f,f,f) is the cartesian product of f with itself 4 times (it is a map from Z^4 to Z^4). The composition g((f,f,f,f)) is certainly not injective, given the brief glimpse into the behavior of the function f that was provided in the statement of the problem, and especially given the fact that decomposing an integer into a sum of 4 other integers is a highly non-unique process. Hope that makes sense gurl. :cheer: :cheer: :cheer:

Sorry, no :tape: . Most of us are pre-schooler here. Can you elaborate on your solution/concept :lol: .

http://banksgilberti.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/math-equation1.png

Sammo
Oct 2nd, 2012, 01:00 PM
oh, thanks for clarifying :weirdo:

There are two functions. f:Z-->Z assigns, for example, the number 1 to 0, the number 0 to 1, the number 0 to 2, etc. (where Z=the integers). Then there is a quaternary map on Z, written as a word of length 4, that simply produces the sum of the "letters" in the word. The expression "8809=6" means g((f,f,f,f)(8,8,0,9))=6, where (f,f,f,f) is the cartesian product of f with itself 4 times (it is a map from Z^4 to Z^4). The composition g((f,f,f,f)) is certainly not injective, given the brief glimpse into the behavior of the function f that was provided in the statement of the problem, and especially given the fact that decomposing an integer into a sum of 4 other integers is a highly non-unique process. Hope that makes sense gurl. :cheer: :cheer: :cheer:

I'm studying chemical engineering and I don't understand a fuck out of this :weirdo:


I've always hated calculus anyway... Algebra on the other hand :hearts:

Sean.
Oct 2nd, 2012, 01:12 PM
It's 2.

Spoiler: It's the number of enclosed spaces. ;)

moby
Oct 2nd, 2012, 04:20 PM
OK, I'll play.

Basically we are computing the rank of the first homology group of each of the given topological spaces.

égalité
Oct 2nd, 2012, 05:11 PM
OK, I'll play.

Basically we are computing the rank of the first homology group of each of the given topological spaces.

Oh my :hearts: I didn't notice that :hearts:

Direwolf
Oct 2nd, 2012, 08:52 PM
"2" is technically not correct. The "=" should be "≈" for the "2" answer to be correct.


For example,

8096 = 5

and

9881 = 5

is not possible. It's reasonable that "9" = "6" ... but "9" + "6" = "8" ? or "0" = "9" ?

8096
8=2
0=1
9=1
6=1

9881
9=1
8=2
8=2
1=0
???

9=6=1
9+6=2

0123456789=5
0123456789=8096=9881
:lol::lol::lol:

M=Mental
A=Abuse
T=to
H=Health
:o

Morning Morgan
Oct 2nd, 2012, 10:13 PM
OK, I'll play.

Basically we are computing the rank of the first homology group of each of the given topological spaces.

Win.

An extension to homotopy groups would ensure that the problem can be further generalized.

égalité
Oct 2nd, 2012, 10:26 PM
Sorry, no :tape: . Most of us are pre-schooler here. Can you elaborate on your solution/concept :lol: .

http://banksgilberti.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/math-equation1.png

Sorry I was just being unnecessarily pedantic :D My point is that it's perfectly legitimate for 8096 and 9881 to both "equal" 5. As moby pointed out, they are homotopy equivalent. :oh: