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View Full Version : The let's learn how to write "a lot" thread


Blu€
Sep 7th, 2012, 02:19 AM
I've always been baffled by how many people write "a lot" together... probably a lot of people know that this is mistake but for those who don't...

Please read: (grammar-monster)

Lesson 1:

Alot vs A lot

There is often confusion over the words 'alot', 'a lot' and 'allot'.

The word alot does not exist.
'A lot' means a large extent or to a large extent

Alot
This word does not exist. It is often mistakenly written instead of "a lot".

The term 'a lot' is the opposite of 'a little'. As an noun, 'lot' means a large extent, a large amount or a large number. As an adverb, 'lot' means 'to a great extent' or 'to a great degree'. It nearly always appears in the form 'a lot'.

Mark has a lot of toys.
(Lot is a noun in this example.)

He cheats a lot.
(Lot is an adverb in this example.)

Allot
The verb 'to allot' means 'to give out', 'to apportion', 'to divide' or 'to distribute'. (Other forms of the verb are allots, allotted and allotting.)

The peasant, aka Sharapova, was allotted just 25m2 to grow her monster pumpkins.


Lesson 2:

Your vs You're

Mistaking "you're" for "your" - or vice versa - is a common writing error most people have made at least once. Here's how to know which one to use.

You're is short for you are.
Your shows that something belongs to you or is related to you (e.g., your car, your father).

You're
You're is a contraction of you are. It has no other uses. This is a 100% rule. If you cannot expand it to you are in your sentence, then it is wrong.

Examples:

The trouble with the rat race is that even if you win, you're still a rat.

Your
The word your sits before another word (usually a noun or a pronoun) to show that it belongs to "you" (e.g., your car, your arm), is of "you" (e.g., your picture, your photograph) or is related to "you" (e.g., your uncle). Your is a possessive adjective. (Other possessive adjectives are: my, your, his, her, its, our and their.)

Examples:

Our expert will answer your questions about pensions and savings.
(questions belonging to you)

Sarah doesn't look like your sister.
(related to you)

Lesson 3:

D-E-F-I-N-I-T-E-L-Y vs Get a grip!

The correct spelling is definitely.

Not definately.

Not definatly.

Not definantly.

Not definetly.

Not definently.

And certainly not defiantly.

The correct spelling is definitely.

edificio
Sep 7th, 2012, 02:44 AM
I love dis thread alot. Did I due that write? ;)

égalité
Sep 7th, 2012, 02:52 AM
I think their are allot of people who could definately benefit from this thread. I wish it would of been created sooner.

The Witch-king
Sep 7th, 2012, 06:59 AM
I'm curoius - if a word, phrase or punctuation is used "incorrectly" ALOT can it really be said that it "doesn't exist" a la the OP? Esp where everyone knows what you mean when you use it...:unsure:

On a side note, another word I confuse ALOT is 'ofcourse'. Help?:lol:

Julian.
Sep 7th, 2012, 07:04 AM
The peasant, aka Sharapova, was allotted just 25m2 to grow her monster pumpkins.

:spit: how random :spit:

Mynarco
Sep 7th, 2012, 07:44 AM
Some TF posters definitely need to learn how to spell DEFINITELY correctly, not definately.
Same goes to SHOULD HAVE, not should of

The Witch-king
Sep 7th, 2012, 11:06 AM
Some TF posters definitely need to learn how to spell DEFINITELY correctly, not definately.
Same goes to SHOULD HAVE, not should of

Not to mention
Gorl
Heaux
Neaux
Eaux
Leaux
Reaux
Peaux
Chile
Loosing
Talanted
Xepher
etc etc

Olórin
Sep 7th, 2012, 11:27 AM
I think their are allot of people who could definately benefit from this thread. I wish it would of been created sooner.

:hysteric:

Seriously though "would of" and "definately" are far more prevalent and irritating than "a lot"; among so-called educated people too.

Wigglytuff
Sep 7th, 2012, 11:35 AM
ALOT of deez threds about gramm3r dont really help because people willz ignor deez lessons. :shrug:

besides, english is a living language and continues to evolve. personally i think that alot will soon become acceptable much the same way other conventions that were once seen as incorrect have been accepted. so in other words

suck it up ALOT is here to STAY!!

McPie
Sep 7th, 2012, 11:53 AM
Chile
Loosing


these 2 are normal, ain't it? :scratch:

Sean.
Sep 7th, 2012, 12:24 PM
I never new I was doing it wrong, thank goodness you told me before its to late! :speakles:

The Witch-king
Sep 7th, 2012, 01:33 PM
these 2 are normal, ain't it? :scratch:

not if you're trying to say child and losing lol. Oh and i dont think loosing exists but i may be wrong

Mary Cherry.
Sep 7th, 2012, 01:40 PM
Apostrophe's.

ElusiveChanteuse
Sep 7th, 2012, 01:50 PM
never had any problem with spelling.:oh:

Super Dave
Sep 7th, 2012, 01:52 PM
Some TF posters definitely need to learn how to spell DEFINITELY correctly, not definately.


This kills me more than anything. I even knew someone on another board who spelled it "defiantly", which is something different altogether. :smash:

silverwhite
Sep 7th, 2012, 02:09 PM
ALOT of deez threds about gramm3r dont really help because people willz ignor deez lessons. :shrug:

besides, english is a living language and continues to evolve. personally i think that alot will soon become acceptable much the same way other conventions that were once seen as incorrect have been accepted. so in other words

suck it up ALOT is here to STAY!!

This * ;)



* There's a thread on that subject too :oh:

Julian.
Sep 7th, 2012, 02:26 PM
I never new I was doing it wrong, thank goodness you told me before its to late! :speakles:

You do it on purpose, don't you? :sobbing:

LUVMIRZA
Sep 7th, 2012, 02:37 PM
Thanks a lot for this thread:worship:

Dav.
Sep 7th, 2012, 02:37 PM
You do it on purpose, don't you? :sobbing:

:sobbing: Oh, Juju...

Javi.
Sep 7th, 2012, 03:53 PM
Next thread suggestion: The difference between you're and your. So fucking annoying when I read in TF "your" refering to you are.

delicatecutter
Sep 7th, 2012, 04:20 PM
My biggest pet peeve is "I seen". It's like nails on a chalkboard. :o

égalité
Sep 7th, 2012, 04:41 PM
"should have went" is bad too :o

Dave.
Sep 7th, 2012, 05:47 PM
ALOT of deez threds about gramm3r dont really help because people willz ignor deez lessons. :shrug:

besides, english is a living language and continues to evolve. personally i think that alot will soon become acceptable much the same way other conventions that were once seen as incorrect have been accepted. so in other words

suck it up ALOT is here to STAY!!

This. It looks much better as one word and I get annoyed when my macbook 'corrects' me.

Lin Lin
Sep 7th, 2012, 05:48 PM
:lol:

Natural Joe
Sep 7th, 2012, 05:51 PM
"should have went" is bad too :o

Agree. I don't get it either why people keep writing this instead of "should of went". :(

its vs it's
their vs there vs they're
your vs you're
too vs to
.
.
.

Alot of work still to do for Blu€ :worship:

Pump-it-UP
Sep 7th, 2012, 05:55 PM
"I could care less" vs "I couldn't care less" is the ULTIMATE pet peeve. :o

Super Dave
Sep 7th, 2012, 06:09 PM
its vs it's

That's one I've struggled with :[ <--- Also, putting prepositions at the end of sentences.

"I could care less" vs "I couldn't care less" is the ULTIMATE pet peeve. :o

:bowdown:

Mary Cherry.
Sep 7th, 2012, 07:01 PM
Agree. I don't get it either why people keep writing this instead of "should of went". :(

its vs it's
their vs there vs they're
your vs you're
too vs to
.
.
.

Alot of work still to do for Blu€ :worship:

It should never be "should of".

Natural Joe
Sep 7th, 2012, 07:38 PM
It should never be "should of".

no way :p

Blu€
Sep 7th, 2012, 09:53 PM
A lot of work still to do for Blu€ :worship:

Indeed, though "A lot" it's easy to not mistake, two words hello!

I've added two other common mistakes, you guys mentioned, while I was writing it last night I wondered whether you write "Good bye" or "Goodbye"... enlighten me people!

kwilliams
Sep 8th, 2012, 01:10 AM
:worship: I agree with all points that have been raised! Another one is saying "lay," instead of "lie."

This might not be something you see on TF very often and I think it's particular to Americans (or perhaps even North Americans) but it really bothers me!

Novichok
Sep 8th, 2012, 02:32 AM
Indeed, though "A lot" it's easy to not mistake, two words hello!

I've added two other common mistakes, you guys mentioned, while I was writing it last night I wondered whether you write "Good bye" or "Goodbye"... enlighten me people!

Goodbye.

ElusiveChanteuse
Sep 8th, 2012, 02:36 AM
Bye.:oh:

Mynarco
Sep 8th, 2012, 02:56 AM
besides, english is a living language and continues to evolve. personally i think that alot will soon become acceptable much the same way other conventions that were once seen as incorrect have been accepted. so in other words

That's a bit of a cop out isn't it?

wild.river
Sep 8th, 2012, 03:46 AM
who vs whom

me vs i

certain people always say the latter ones to sound more sophisticated. drives me crazy.


lesson:

who = subject

who is that sexy man?

whom = object

whom is he making out with?

(pls don't harp about ending with prepositions..that's not a real rule)

lesson:

i = subject or compared to the subject

that sexy man and i are going to eat strawberries

or

that fat woman is shorter than i (i know it sounds dumb...)

me = object

that fat woman gave the cookies to me

bonus lesson:

fewer = quantifiable

andy has fewer grand slams than roger

less = not quantifiable

andy has less hair than roger

Novichok
Sep 8th, 2012, 03:50 AM
That's a bit of a cop out isn't it?

Not really. It's an inevitable thing about languages. There is always lexical, semantic, and syntactic change. Prescriptive grammarians are fighting a losing battle. :lol:

McPie
Sep 8th, 2012, 08:04 AM
not if you're trying to say child and losing lol. Oh and i dont think loosing exists but i may be wrong

loose do exist, so loosing could be :scratch:


but, have to said, Jimi Hendrix does have influenced for using Chile instead of Child :shrug:

ElusiveChanteuse
Sep 8th, 2012, 08:18 AM
there's no such thing as loosing.:haha: Either you lose your match or your shirt is loose.

The Witch-king
Sep 8th, 2012, 09:41 AM
Not really. It's an inevitable thing about languages. There is always lexical, semantic, and syntactic change. Prescriptive grammarians are fighting a losing battle. :lol:

:speakles:

McPie
Sep 8th, 2012, 10:25 AM
there's no such thing as loosing.:haha: Either you lose your match or your shirt is loose.

how about loosing your cow from that rope?

Natural Joe
Sep 8th, 2012, 10:50 AM
Also this very basic example:

did+past tense instead of did+present tense ("she did played" vs "she did play")

I don't now why people's keep doing these mistake. :sad:

how about loosing your cow from that rope?

Wouldn't that be "loosen your cow from that rope"? :scratch:

nevetssllim
Sep 8th, 2012, 11:03 AM
'Would of' and 'should of' are my major grammatical bug-bears. I don't like to criticise spelling/grammar because I cringe when I re-read some of my posts (:o) but I've even seen teachers on FB make grammatical blunders like these.

ivanban
Sep 8th, 2012, 12:50 PM
Also this very basic example:

did+past tense instead of did+present tense ("she did played" vs "she did play")

I don't now why people's keep doing these mistake. :sad:

Because someone say it that way in mother language anf then just translate it in english :shrug:

I'm not sure why would anyone who speaks english as mother language be so much annoyed by spelling of someone else who doesn't speak english as first language :scratch: :rolleyes:

pov
Sep 8th, 2012, 12:55 PM
Hmmm . . 2 and 3 seem valid things to remind people about but I have yet to see anyone think "alot" is correct. I'd say that you can safely assume that it's almost always just a typo.

pov
Sep 8th, 2012, 12:56 PM
That's a bit of a cop out isn't it?
:yeah:

Wigglytuff
Sep 8th, 2012, 01:02 PM
That's a bit of a cop out isn't it?

Errr it's the truth. That's all it is no more, no less.

pov
Sep 8th, 2012, 01:07 PM
ALOT of deez threds about gramm3r dont really help because people willz ignor deez lessons. :shrug:

besides, english is a living language and continues to evolve. personally i think that alot will soon become acceptable much the same way other conventions that were once seen as incorrect have been accepted. so in other words

suck it up ALOT is here to STAY!!
Interestingly many of those who'll ignore such knowledge are often those who have a mindset that leads them to complain about the lack of opportunities available to them.

English and all languages do continue to evolve but simple ignorance of basic grammar and vocabulary is just that - ignorance.

You're correct that there will probably "always" be those who confuse their willful lack of knowledge of their own language with meaningful rebellion.

----
To be clear IMO "yo wassup?" "wha a gwan?" are fine. Adults not knowing that the correct English forms are "What's up?" and "What's going on?" is not fine.

pov
Sep 8th, 2012, 01:09 PM
Errr it's the truth. That's all it is no more, no less.
It's funny how you - and some others - have the idea that whatever conclusion you come to or opinion you have is somehow the truth. It's not! Having a strong opinion is one thing. Not knowing it's an opinion is a sad delusion. Especially when those opinions are driven more by ideology rather than any attempt at objective assessment.

Wigglytuff
Sep 8th, 2012, 01:11 PM
Besides, one thing about online grammar nazis is that rarely, if ever are their own posts without grammatical errors. Just read through this thread. I say as long as you can make out what the person means and it's not for a formal or professional reason, live and let live.

Just my take on it, and it's "cop-outness" :lol:

ivanban
Sep 8th, 2012, 01:21 PM
Besides, one thing about online grammar nazis is that rarely, if ever are their own posts without grammatical errors. Just read through this thread. I say as long as you can make out what the person means and it's not for a formal or professional reason, live and let live.

Just my take on it, and it's "cop-outness" :lol:

:yeah:

Wigglytuff
Sep 8th, 2012, 01:21 PM
Interestingly many of those who'll ignore such knowledge are often those who have a mindset that leads them to complain about the lack of opportunities available to them.

English and all languages do continue to evolve but simple ignorance of basic grammar and vocabulary is just that - ignorance.

You're correct that there will probably "always" be those who confuse their willful lack of knowledge of their own language with meaningful rebellion.

----
To be clear IMO "yo wassup?" "wha a gwan?" are fine. Adults not knowing that the correct English forms are "What's up?" and "What's going on?" is not fine.

Besides, one thing about online grammar nazis is that rarely, if ever, are their own posts without grammatical errors. Just read through this thread.

The above post is a perfect example. And what's worst about it, is that it is often not at all about being helpful and a lot about being an ignorant douche (again see the above) more interested in pretending they have a mastery of grammar than actually knowing what the hell they are talking about before going off at the mouth.

pov
Sep 8th, 2012, 01:30 PM
Besides, one thing about online grammar nazis is that rarely, if ever, are their own posts without grammatical errors. Just read through this thread.

The above post is a perfect example. And what's worst about it, is that it is often not at all about being helpful and a lot about being an ignorant douche (again see the above) more interested in pretending they have a mastery of grammar than actually knowing what the hell they are talking about before going off at the mouth.

:facepalm: We all make mistakes in posting to forums. That's not the point. The point is to learn from them, to know the correct form and to appreciate helpful info. It's twisted to rail against knowledge.

And okay . .you're on. If you point out the grammatical errors in my post above I'll own them. But throwing out stupid childish insults just shows more that you're driven by emotion and ideology rather than any attempt to be objective. I mean "grammar nazis" "ignorant douche" . . .really? It's like you're walking down the street hitting yourself in the head as you complain about how "those people" are giving you a headache.

Blu€
Sep 8th, 2012, 01:48 PM
Besides, one thing about online grammar nazis is that rarely, if ever are their own posts without grammatical errors. Just read through this thread. I say as long as you can make out what the person means and it's not for a formal or professional reason, live and let live.


This isn't a grammar nazi thread, mistakes happen, we all make them. There are a lot people on this board who don't speak English as a first language and they copy what they read from other users. So a lot of them are making mistakes they don't know about.
Yes, languages evolve and a lot of mistakes get eventually accepted but that doesn't mean it's right.
It only shows that ignorance spreads as fast as a disease :lol:

Novichok okay "Goodbye", I really meant to ask about "Good night or Goodnight" but I guess it's more or less the same :lol: I've looked up on the Internet but I'm not quite sure I understand it, from what I've gathered, you write it together when you mean to say "bye", as in the last word you say. You write it separately when there are more words around it, like "Have a good night".

ElusiveChanteuse
Sep 8th, 2012, 01:52 PM
This isn't a grammar nazi thread, mistakes happen, we all make them. There are a lot people on this board who don't speak English as a first language and they copy what they read from other users. So a lot of them are making mistakes they don't know about.
Yes, languages evolve and a lot of mistakes get eventually accepted but that doesn't mean it's right.
It only shows that ignorance spreads as fast as a disease :lol:

+1.
I do know "would have" is the correct one but when I saw people writing "would of", I thought it was something new which I have never gone through before, so I did try to use it a couple of times until some kind poster reminds me that it was wrong.:oh:

Wigglytuff
Sep 8th, 2012, 01:53 PM
:facepalm: We all make mistakes in posting to forums..

oh, but that is very much the point, when you, a dimwit, do it it's a mistake but when someone does it, it's "it's willful ignorance" and an automatic acceptance of every real world grammar folly. That is exactly the point

You, in particular, have your head so far up your own ass that you miss all your own flagrant grammar fouls while at the same thing attempting to lecture others. You have no desire to provide help or assistance, nor the ability to do so.

Thou hypocrite, first cast out the beam out of thine own eye;
and then shalt thou see clearly to cast out the mote out of thy brother's eye.

Wigglytuff
Sep 8th, 2012, 02:08 PM
This isn't a grammar nazi thread, mistakes happen, we all make them. There are a lot people on this board who don't speak English as a first language and they copy what they read from other users. So a lot of them are making mistakes they don't know about.
Yes, languages evolve and a lot of mistakes get eventually accepted but that doesn't mean it's right.
It only shows that ignorance spreads as fast as a disease :lol:

Again, why is it when one does it, it's "mistakes happen" and when others do it, it's "ignorance that spreads as fast as disease". If its a mistake when you do it, than surely it is only rational that it should be one when someone else does it.

Plus, people have lots of things to do, and don't go through every post to check that no mistake that is personally offensive to another poster spills through. Nor is it rational to extrapolate that because the posters don't give a shit in the forums about crisp grammatical perfection on the forums they do not care elsewhere or in "the real world". Or that any one mistake or even indifferece within the forums means anything but one mistake or difference in the forums. ALOT of people r!t3 won wei online and another when it matters. :lol:

pov
Sep 8th, 2012, 02:11 PM
[QUOTE=Wigglytuff;22171101]oh, but that is very much the point, when you, a dimwit, do it it's a mistake but when someone does it, it's "it's willful ignorance" and an automatic acceptance of every real world grammar folly. That is exactly the point
[/QUOTE}

The "willful ignorance" wasn't about anyone's mistake. It was directed to you equating poor grammar as being something positive - something to "suck up."

You keep prattling on about my "grammar fouls" yet somehow not pointing them out. I have no problem with you or anyone pointing out things like that. More to the point, I'm glad that others started a thread about the topic. You are the deluded lunatic that decided to post in a grammar thread about the virtues of grammatical errors. As for questioning my ability . . .:lol: as it turns out you may as well propose that I'm a purple elephant. As for being helpful . . .:lol: I am.

And . ."Thou hypocrite, first cast out the beam out of thine own eye;and then shalt thou see clearly to cast out the mote out of thy brother's eye."
:haha: See what I wrote earlier about you walking down the street hitting yourself in the head. Of course, it wouldn't dawn on you that using that biblical phrase when one is a party in the "argument" is inane.

Wigglytuff
Sep 8th, 2012, 02:14 PM
Anyway, I can haz ALOT of things do and ALOT of things BYE at Costco today, so I'll sheck back on you gaiz laterz :lol: :lol: :bounce:

Mary Cherry.
Sep 8th, 2012, 02:15 PM
Well that escalated quickly.

pov
Sep 8th, 2012, 02:19 PM
Nor is it rational to extrapolate that because the posters don't give a shit in the forums about crisp grammatical perfection on the forums they do not care elsewhere or in "the real world". Or that any one mistake or even indifferece within the forums means anything but one mistake or difference in the forums.
Hmmm . .those points I agree with. But that doesn't explain why you'd start posting all this in a thread about grammar. Those who aren't interested in their grammar can just not read the thread. Nor does it explain you're defense of poor grammar as being a positive thing. Yes there are those who know and don't care and there are those who know and make errors, but there are also those who don't know.

BTW it's indifference.:cool:
(yeah I know you know that and that it was an unimportant typo but hey . . :lol: )

Wigglytuff
Sep 8th, 2012, 02:23 PM
The "willful ignorance" wasn't about anyone's mistake. It was directed to you equating poor grammar as being something positive - something to "suck up."
.

Where EXACTLY did I say that poor grammar in the real world is something positive?

That's right, I didn't. And what did I tell tell you about talking shit you don't understand. "Alot" is improper SPELLING not GRAMMAR, you halfwit. :lol: :lol:

pov
Sep 8th, 2012, 02:37 PM
Where EXACTLY did I say that poor grammar in the real world is something positive?

That's right, I didn't. And what did I tell tell you about talking shit you don't understand. "Alot" is improper SPELLING not GRAMMAR, you halfwit. :lol: :lol:
A good example of what I mean . You've inserted the clause "real world" which has nothing to do with what we've been going at each other about.

What did you tell me? Nothing of consequence so far. But thanks for showing your own brilliance again . "alot" if what was meant is "a lot" is a grammatical error. "alot" if used to mean "allot" would be a spelling error.

Please continue with hitting yourself in the head while pointing at others as the reason for your headache.

"halfwit" "Dimwit" "ignorant douche" "grammar nazi" . . :yeah: :haha: What else ya got?

pov
Sep 8th, 2012, 02:41 PM
Wigglytuff will get the last word as I'm bored with the back-and-forth. I'm out.

The Witch-king
Sep 8th, 2012, 02:45 PM
It's because he's dark skinned isn't it?

wild.river
Sep 8th, 2012, 03:23 PM
A good example of what I mean . You've inserted the clause "real world" which has nothing to do with what we've been going at each other about.

What did you tell me? Nothing of consequence so far. But thanks for showing your own brilliance again . "alot" if what was meant is "a lot" is a grammatical error. "alot" if used to mean "allot" would be a spelling error.

Please continue with hitting yourself in the head while pointing at others as the reason for your headache.

"halfwit" "Dimwit" "ignorant douche" "grammar nazi" . . :yeah: :haha: What else ya got?

if the bad grammar apologists actually consistently do the shit mentioned here "in the real world", i'm pretty sure they get severely dinged at work or school every time they write something...or open their mouths :lol: probably without even realizing it :sobbing:

Novichok
Sep 8th, 2012, 04:54 PM
This isn't a grammar nazi thread, mistakes happen, we all make them. There are a lot people on this board who don't speak English as a first language and they copy what they read from other users. So a lot of them are making mistakes they don't know about.
Yes, languages evolve and a lot of mistakes get eventually accepted but that doesn't mean it's right.
It only shows that ignorance spreads as fast as a disease :lol:

Novichok okay "Goodbye", I really meant to ask about "Good night or Goodnight" but I guess it's more or less the same :lol: I've looked up on the Internet but I'm not quite sure I understand it, from what I've gathered, you write it together when you mean to say "bye", as in the last word you say. You write it separately when there are more words around it, like "Have a good night".

1. Well once those mistakes get accepted then it's no longer a mistake in that speech community. On TF, variants of "girl" are accepted (gerl, gorl). Using those words wouldn't be a mistake within TF but would be outside of it. We can't say that most of the languages of Europe/Near East today are riddled with mistakes because they're a lot different from proto-Indo-European (the ancestor language that they're descended from).

2. Yeah, you're right. You use "goodnight" when you want to use it to mean "bye." But you use "good night" in the other cases (where "good" in an adjective modifying the noun "night").

"Have a good night."
"I had a good night."
"She had a good night."

miffedmax
Sep 8th, 2012, 06:08 PM
That's one I've struggled with :[ <--- Also, putting prepositions at the end of sentences.



:bowdown:

That is precisely the sort of pedantry up with which I will not put.
--Winston Churchill.


My pet peeve is people who say "I am doing good" when they mean "I am doing well."

"Doing good" means you are engaged in charitable acts, not that you are in fine fettle.

"These ones" also drives me mad.

swissmr
Sep 9th, 2012, 04:09 PM
Hmmm . .those points I agree with. But that doesn't explain why you'd start posting all this in a thread about grammar. Those who aren't interested in their grammar can just not read the thread. Nor does it explain you're defense of poor grammar as being a positive thing. Yes there are those who know and don't care and there are those who know and make errors, but there are also those who don't know.

BTW it's indifference.:cool:
(yeah I know you know that and that it was an unimportant typo but hey . . :lol: )

Your. As no one else had pointed it out. :lol:

Wigglytuff
Sep 9th, 2012, 04:23 PM
Your. As no one else had pointed it out. :lol:

:lol: Game. Set. Match.

Wigglytuff
Sep 9th, 2012, 04:39 PM
But since some people who shall remain nameless (that dimwit pov) don't even know what GRAMMAR and SPELLING even mean. I figure I would help by providing their respective Wikipedia entries.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grammar

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spelling

Mary Cherry.
Sep 9th, 2012, 05:06 PM
That's a bit of a cop out isn't it?

Yes.

WowWow
Sep 9th, 2012, 05:18 PM
ALOT of deez threds about gramm3r dont really help because people willz ignor deez lessons. :shrug:

besides, english is a living language and continues to evolve. personally i think that alot will soon become acceptable much the same way other conventions that were once seen as incorrect have been accepted. so in other words

suck it up ALOT is here to STAY!!

Right.

HippityHop
Sep 9th, 2012, 07:13 PM
who vs whom

me vs i

certain people always say the latter ones to sound more sophisticated. drives me crazy.


lesson:

who = subject

who is that sexy man?

whom = object

whom is he making out with?

(pls don't harp about ending with prepositions..that's not a real rule)

lesson:

i = subject or compared to the subject

that sexy man and i are going to eat strawberries

or

that fat woman is shorter than i (i know it sounds dumb...)

me = object

that fat woman gave the cookies to me

bonus lesson:

fewer = quantifiable

andy has fewer grand slams than roger

less = not quantifiable

andy has less hair than roger

I hate it when a supermarket has a sign that says "10 items or less".

"Their" ;) seems to be not as much of that nowadays.

kwilliams
Sep 9th, 2012, 11:40 PM
Your. As no one else had pointed it out. :lol:

I did in a good rep :angel:

égalité
Sep 10th, 2012, 12:53 AM
there's no such thing as loosing.:haha: Either you lose your match or your shirt is loose.

Yes there is :weirdo: It means "to release" or "to set free" or--get this--"to let loose."

miffedmax
Sep 10th, 2012, 04:59 PM
Yes there is :weirdo: It means "to release" or "to set free" or--get this--"to let loose."

You beat me to it.

Another peeve of mine is "over" when you mean "more than." If there's a number after it, it's "more than."

WRONG: "Max has made over 25,000 posts about Lena's bangs."

RIGHT: "More than nine years have passed since the tragic day Elena Dementieva trimmed off her adorable bangs"

Mynarco
Sep 10th, 2012, 05:01 PM
^ :eek: WHAT? Never knew that was wrong

I always use loosen instead of loose (apart from let loose)

Wert.
Sep 10th, 2012, 06:13 PM
Your good. I definetly like this thread alot. :oh:



j/k. Thanks :p

miffedmax
Sep 10th, 2012, 06:31 PM
^ :eek: WHAT? Never knew that was wrong

I always use loosen instead of loose (apart from let loose)

Well, you loosen a bolt or a tie. But you loose a leash or shackles.

English is a needlessly complex language, because it's a German dialect that borrowed heavily from Norman-French (itself a bit bizarre) with Latin grammar force-fitted onto the whole shebang.

debby
Sep 10th, 2012, 07:47 PM
I definitely think it's important to respect the grammar and the spelling of words and phrases.

As for alot, it's weird but it is not too shocking. I am not disturbed by it.

Your, you're, their, they're, etc. is an annoying case because yes if there is a typo or lack of attention, it is not a big deal even if a bit irritating to read in a long post, a story or a serious cover letter. But to keep making that kind of mistakes ? :o

Same can be said with "should have" and "should of", I knew a teacher who kept making that mistake and that was really disturbing :lol:

I am not a grammar nazi in the sense that every grammatical or spelling mistake should be fixed asap and to hunt them, but to avoid these easy but so common mistakes.
I know that I am not that great in english, but I think there are some basic grammar rules that everyone should respect, it makes posts much more enjoyable to read !

That thread is amazing, I need to consolidate my english knowledge for an exam in march/april. I am still quite confused about who/whom but I will sort it out ! ;) I used to struggle with definetly and definitely , but now all is good, I know it's definitly .

To french speakers : "Sa va" is a pet peeve of mine :help: :help: :help: I cannot ever understand that aberration.

Blu€
Sep 10th, 2012, 08:46 PM
I used to struggle with definetly and definitly , but now all is good, I know it's definitly .

Madre! Read that first post again, s'il vous plaît! :lol::p

debby
Sep 10th, 2012, 08:47 PM
Madre! Read that first post again, s'il vous plaît! :lol::p

I am struggling with my keyboard to be fair. :lol: the e and the s :help:
definitely
definitely
definitely
definitely

yup it's all good :lol: i know it's de-fini-tely
or definite-ly :D

Wigglytuff
Sep 10th, 2012, 08:55 PM
Well, you loosen a bolt or a tie. But you loose a leash or shackles.

English is a needlessly complex language, because it's a German dialect that borrowed heavily from Norman-French (itself a bit bizarre) with Latin grammar force-fitted onto the whole shebang.

thats for starters, dont forget the newish words from japan (tycoon, karaoke), parts of africa (yarn, bozo, chimpanzee, cola, banana and more) and mesoamerica(chipmunk, hickory, chia, coca, condor, kayak, hurricane, potato, jaguar, alpaca* and so much more). and because we have no sense we added internet era words like spyware, ringtone, googling and many more)

*i sell alpaca hair scarves and they are amazing. i like them better than the cashmere scarves.

miffedmax
Sep 10th, 2012, 09:47 PM
thats for starters, dont forget the newish words from japan (tycoon, karaoke), parts of africa (yarn, bozo, chimpanzee, cola, banana and more) and mesoamerica(chipmunk, hickory, chia, coca, condor, kayak, hurricane, potato, jaguar, alpaca* and so much more). and because we have no sense we added internet era words like spyware, ringtone, googling and many more)

*i sell alpaca hair scarves and they are amazing. i like them better than the cashmere scarves.

Of course I didn't mean to disparage the many words we've borrowed from other non-European cultures, or even other European cultures (e.g. Spanish, Italian, Swedish, Hebrew/Yiddish).

But many of those borrowings are specific to American English, or in other cases are replaced by borrowings from other languages in other English dialects (like Australian, New Zealand, South African, etc.).

I was limiting myself to the core elements of the language, which was largely a mish-mash of German and Anglo-French (itself something of a mash-up of Danish-tinged French).

Wigglytuff
Sep 10th, 2012, 09:57 PM
Of course I didn't mean to disparage the many words we've borrowed from other non-European cultures, or even other European cultures (e.g. Spanish, Italian, Swedish, Hebrew/Yiddish).

But many of those borrowings are specific to American English, or in other cases are replaced by borrowings from other languages in other English dialects (like Australian, New Zealand, South African, etc.).

I was limiting myself to the core elements of the language, which was largely a mish-mash of German and Anglo-French (itself something of a mash-up of Danish-tinged French).

you are right, i was just thinking about american english, which is my own fault as its not the only "english"

i do feel like american english, borrows more and as such is less predictable and easy to master, i could be, its just a feeling that i have. i dont know if thats true, but just my feeling.

WowWow
Sep 10th, 2012, 09:59 PM
You beat me to it.

Another peeve of mine is "over" when you mean "more than." If there's a number after it, it's "more than."

WRONG: "Max has made over 25,000 posts about Lena's bangs."

RIGHT: "More than nine years have passed since the tragic day Elena Dementieva trimmed off her adorable bangs"

Yes, but over sounds better.

ivanban
Sep 11th, 2012, 12:05 AM
Well, you loosen a bolt or a tie. But you loose a leash or shackles.

English is a needlessly complex language, because it's a German dialect that borrowed heavily from Norman-French (itself a bit bizarre) with Latin grammar force-fitted onto the whole shebang.

For me any language that doesn't have cases is not hard to learn :shrug: That's why I would like to learn spanish :tears:

wild.river
Sep 11th, 2012, 03:31 AM
Well, you loosen a bolt or a tie. But you loose a leash or shackles.

English is a needlessly complex language, because it's a German dialect that borrowed heavily from Norman-French (itself a bit bizarre) with Latin grammar force-fitted onto the whole shebang.

i've been dying to whip out this chart since i read the op.

http://labs.bio.unc.edu/Hurlbert/images/indoeuro_fan.jpg

ivanban
Sep 13th, 2012, 09:13 PM
I Fucking New It He Was Much To Fine!!!!!!!!!

:sobbing:

Blu€
Oct 12th, 2012, 10:19 PM
Just a couple of updates, I've read these in the GM area:

"Ivanovic has to fired Sears" -> She either "has to fire" as in she must do something or she "has fired", past tense.

"Azarenka and Dementieva: Why does Serena and Sharapova struggle with the opposite?" -> Why DO Serena and Sharapova... they 3rd person plural.

ivanban
Oct 15th, 2012, 10:17 PM
Just a couple of updates, I've read these in the GM area:

"Ivanovic has to fired Sears" -> She either "has to fire" as in she must do something or she "has fired", past tense.

"Azarenka and Dementieva: Why does Serena and Sharapova struggle with the opposite?" -> Why DO Serena and Sharapova... they 3rd person plural.

:scratch:

Blu€
Oct 16th, 2012, 12:33 AM
:confused: would you care to elaborate please? :)

third-person plural (plural third-person plurals)

1. (grammar): The form of a verb used (in English and other languages) with plural nouns and with the pronoun they (or its equivalents in other languages).

"Are" is the third-person plural of the verb "to be".

2. The pronoun they (or its equivalents in other languages). In the aforementioned example, Serena & Sharapova = They

Wiktionary for more info ;)