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View Full Version : More stupidity in modern "science" - Mars and Life


pov
Aug 5th, 2012, 02:35 PM
Are we alone? Or was there life on another planet?

That there are still people who work in the "sciences" that think that life elsewhere must somehow be similar to what we know as life(carbon based, air/water needing) on this planet is stunning in its wanton and abject stupidity.

Sammo
Aug 5th, 2012, 02:54 PM
Elaborate

The Witch-king
Aug 5th, 2012, 03:04 PM
Simple

Sammo
Aug 5th, 2012, 04:23 PM
Yeah I see what he means, life elsewhere doesnt have to be like here, I mean, years ago my father told me he read that they discovered a microbe that could live in sulfuric acid, but somehow the conditions on this planet just seem the appropiate ones for life, because here life doesn't have to adapt to extreme conditions. It just seems much easier. Independently of the life we know here, what seems more suitable for life? Inhospitable planets or planets with water, atmosphere, etc.?

pov
Aug 5th, 2012, 10:32 PM
Yeah I see what he means, life elsewhere doesnt have to be like here, I mean, years ago my father told me he read that they discovered a microbe that could live in sulfuric acid, but somehow the conditions on this planet just seem the appropiate ones for life, because here life doesn't have to adapt to extreme conditions. It just seems much easier. Independently of the life we know here, what seems more suitable for life? Inhospitable planets or planets with water, atmosphere, etc.?

Yes that's exactly what I mean. And the answer to your question is "we don't know." One cannot postulate what conditions would be suitable for other lifeforms unless one knows what those lifeforms are.

I'm all for those scientists who state "based on the life forms we currently know" and postulate that there's a good chance that other life within this solar system would have some similarities. However there are likely more than 200 billion plants in this galaxy alone. And there are more than 150 billion galaxies. To think that life throughout all would conform to Earth-based life isn't even arrogant - it's just stupid!

Sammo
Aug 5th, 2012, 10:47 PM
But the conditions on Earth are the only conditions we know in which life can exist for sure, so scientists looking for the same conditions in order to find life is the logical choice. I agree that it would be dumb to think those would be the only conditions in which life could exist though.

Sam L
Aug 6th, 2012, 10:35 AM
I think more research should also be done into origins of life here. Whether it came from somewhere else or it originated here. This would also involve studying comets, asteroids and other minor astronomical bodies and simple cells.

pov
Aug 6th, 2012, 03:44 PM
But the conditions on Earth are the only conditions we know in which life can exist for sure, so scientists looking for the same conditions in order to find life is the logical choice. I agree that it would be dumb to think those would be the only conditions in which life could exist though.

I agree that looking for other planets that have some Earth-like conditions is a sensible exploration. The issue is that, because of the thinking that life as we know is some sort of blueprint for all lifeforms, other exploration and research is curtailed.

pov
Aug 6th, 2012, 03:50 PM
I think more research should also be done into origins of life here. Whether it came from somewhere else or it originated here. This would also involve studying comets, asteroids and other minor astronomical bodies and simple cells.

I agree with that thought. One thing is that a lot of current "science" isn't scientific - in the way the term originally meant. Open exploration that isn't constrained by current assumptions is minimal. Genuine scientists are often ostracized by the "science" orthodoxy. On the "plus" side there are more and more of those genuine scientists who are willing to risk being ostracized.

JN
Aug 16th, 2012, 12:55 PM
https://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/s480x480/527043_3447753362789_289601618_n.jpg

miffedmax
Aug 16th, 2012, 06:18 PM
I agree that looking for other planets that have some Earth-like conditions is a sensible exploration. The issue is that, because of the thinking that life as we know is some sort of blueprint for all lifeforms, other exploration and research is curtailed.

It's more likely that when you know that 99.9% of the life we know of needs carbon and water, and you have limited funds, you hedge your bets by looking for life where experience and biology tells you it's more likely to exist. It's a matter of economics as well as science.

It's like looking for say, oil. Geologists know what kinds of rock formations are the most likely to have oil. That doesn't mean all those rock formations have oil, or that other rock formations don't sometimes have oil. But if you're looking for oil, it makes the most sense to drill in areas with rock formations that are more likely to have oil than it does to run around drilling holes at random.

le bon vivant
Aug 16th, 2012, 07:46 PM
https://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/s480x480/527043_3447753362789_289601618_n.jpg

lmao