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View Full Version : "Paris Syndrome" , YES, It is A Real Disordder Affecting Mostly Japanese


tennisbum79
Jul 1st, 2012, 08:50 PM
Sorry if this had been posted befor, but I just heard about it.
I thought it was joke., but apparently, it is a serious situation.

Is there anythother city in the world that comes close to provoking the same reaction that the Paris Syndrome is triggering to these Japanese tourists?


Paris Syndrome: Could Any Other City Produce This Bizarre Affliction?


There's a fascinating piece by Chelsea Fagan's over at TheAtlantic.com about the Paris Syndrome (http://www.theatlantic.com/life/archive/2011/10/paris-syndrome-a-first-class-problem-for-a-first-class-vacation/246743/), an apparently real disorder, somewhat similar to a panic attack, that has afflicted at least 20 tourists this year while visiting the City of Lights. Most Paris Syndrome sufferers have been Japanese tourists, and the cause of their symptoms, which include "acute delusions, hallucinations, dizziness, sweating, and feelings of persecution," is thought to be linked to extreme disappointment that Paris is not always the magical, romantic wonderland it's so often made out to be in the movies:

The shock of coming to grips with a city that is indifferent to their presence and looks nothing like their imagination launches tourists into a psychological tailspin which, in at least six cases this year, necessitated the patient being flown back to his or her country under medical supervision. Usually, though, bed rest and hydration seem to take care of the problem within a few days. The Japanese Embassy, though, has had no shortage of people who, in the throes of the Syndrome, call or visit to be reassured that the city is not going to collapse in upon them.


This illness seems to have taken its place as the 21st century gout -- just slightly too privileged a problem to sympathize with. One imagines women with large, ornate folding fans fainting on street corners and mustachioed men's monocles dropping, with a little tinkle, into champagne glasses. Yet, for those who succumb to it, Paris Syndrome and its after-effects are very, very real. Sufferers have reported being traumatized by the experience, of fearing ever traveling again.

Every city has its stereotypes, and Paris's "problem" here does indeed seem somewhat laughable: the picture of it in the minds of much of the world is incredibly idealized, or as Fagan puts it, we "imagine the whole city just smells like Chanel No. 5 and has a government-mandated mime on every corner." Upon realizing this is not really the case, tourists with more delicate constitutions can apparently have a surprisingly difficult time coping.

Are there any other cities that have such strong stereotypes that tourists could fall prey to a similar psychological shock? It's hard to think of any that have quite the same level of overwhelmingly positive media portrayals, but perhaps a Barcelona Syndrome or a Venice Syndrome are not far behind. On the flip side, cities with significantly outdated negative stereotypes seem ripe for further study: the New York Syndrome, for example, could be brought on when a New Yorker smiles and says "hello" to a stranger on the street, or the Philadelphia Syndrome upon meeting perfectly pleasant local sports fans.



source: http://www.theatlanticcities.com/arts-and-lifestyle/2011/10/paris-syndrome-could-any-other-city-produce-bizarre-affliction/318/

Petkovic
Jul 1st, 2012, 09:04 PM
:help:

I'd love to see the pictures of Paris these people draw in their heads. Paris is lovely. I can slightly relate to the disappointment that the Moulin Rouge (and Montmartre) might give tourists after they've seen the movies but hey, this is real life.

goat
Jul 1st, 2012, 09:09 PM
As a European I can say Paris is one of the shittest capital cities Europe has to offer....

Nicolás89
Jul 1st, 2012, 09:10 PM
Well I heard some people experience religious related delusions when they visit Jerusalem. Things like this don't surprise me anymore.

goat
Jul 1st, 2012, 09:11 PM
Gh

tennisbum79
Jul 1st, 2012, 09:13 PM
Well I heard some people experience religious related delusions when they visit Jerusalem. Things like this don't surprise me anymore.
Yes, some people have cited Jerusalem as well, alhtought not as acute as Paris.

For Jerusalem, depending on the symptomes, they can be easily attributed to religious experience of being in a holy city

*JR*
Jul 1st, 2012, 09:28 PM
Maybe Amelie had a form of it too, which was why she always choked @ RG. :help: (The arena for the Paris Indoor must have had some kind of "special shielding" from it, hence her 3 singles titles there). :scratch: Of course Max could blame Lena losing the '04 RG final (and thus being first female Russian singles Slam winner) to her childhood friend (the Contessa) to the Blond Bomber having this syndrome too. :tape:

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antonella
Jul 1st, 2012, 10:21 PM
I thought this was going to be about Paris Hilton.:lol:

tennisbum79
Jul 1st, 2012, 10:24 PM
I thought this was going to be about Paris Hilton.:lol:
Had I not created the thread, I would have thought the same too.

WhatTheDeuce
Jul 1st, 2012, 10:31 PM
This is one of the most bizarre afflictions I've come across. I can't help but feel it's kinda stupid, despite the symptoms being real. :o
:help:

I'd love to see the pictures of Paris these people draw in their heads.
Right? :unsure: Very odd...

tennisbum79
Jul 1st, 2012, 10:36 PM
:help:

I'd love to see the pictures of Paris these people draw in their heads. Paris is lovely. I can slightly relate to the disappointment that the Moulin Rouge (and Montmartre) might give tourists after they've seen the movies but hey, this is real life.
Apparently, in Japan, according to some accounts I read, they show lot of romantic movies, where everyone is middle to upper middle class, is well dressed and elegant
All service workers , concierges, waitresses, taxi drivers, flight attendants are all all polite and always ready attend to all customer's needs.

Hotels, restaurants are outstanding with elegant settings.

Rarely do you see non-white(non blacks, no Arabs, no Asians) in any of the images they are exposed to.
In short,, Japanese have a very idyllic, romantic, idealistic idea of Paris

Halardfan
Jul 1st, 2012, 10:47 PM
Apparently, in Japan, according to some accounts I read, they show lot of romantic movies, where everyone is middle to upper middle class, is well dressed and elegant
All service workers , concierges, waitresses, taxi drivers, flight attendants are all all polite and always ready attend to all customer's needs.

Hotels, restaurants are outstanding with elegant settings.

Rarely do you see non-white(non blacks, no Arabs, no Asians) in any of the images they are exposed too.
In short,, Japanese have a very idyllic, romantic, idealistic idea of Paris

Here in Japan customer service in restaurants etc is spectacularly good. This is why France, with it's often surly waiters etc, is an extra shock.

Their perception of England, the image of the English gentleman, must likewise be shaken after 5 minutes at Heathrow or on the London Underground.

tennisbum79
Jul 1st, 2012, 10:54 PM
Here in Japan customer service in restaurants etc is spectacularly good. This is why France, with it's often surly waiters etc, is an extra shock.

Their perception of England, the image of the English gentleman, must likewise be shaken after 5 minutes at Heathrow or on the London Underground.
Yeah, I forgot you are in Japan.

Can you shed some light this so called syndrome that is afflicting the Japanese?
The expert I listened blamed it on the outdated, idyllic, unrealistic images of Paris Japanese are exposed too?
What is your experience?

Halardfan
Jul 1st, 2012, 11:08 PM
Yeah, I forgot you are in Japan.

Can you shed some light this so called syndrome that is afflicting the Japanese?
The expert I listened blamed it on the outdated, idyllic, unrealistic images of Paris Japanese are exposed too?
What is your experience?

Haven't come across it in a major way. Though Japanese women do dream of going to Paris, and their vision of Paris probably doesn't square with reality. There is an innocence about the Japanese that is rather wonderful at its best. People have been so kind to me here.

My tutor has been to Paris, she liked it but made the mistake of speaking English there...which is a big no-no in my experience of France.

Tennis Fool
Jul 1st, 2012, 11:14 PM
Yes, I heard about this syndrome, maybe first about 10-12 years ago.

I think it's just a major clash of cultures :shrug:

Tennis Fool
Jul 1st, 2012, 11:22 PM
Here's another article that goes more in detail:

http://newsvote.bbc.co.uk/nol/shared/img/printer_friendly/news_logo.gif
'Paris Syndrome' strikes Japanese
By Caroline Wyatt
BBC News, Paris


A dozen or so Japanese tourists a year have to be repatriated from the French capital, after falling prey to what's become known as "Paris syndrome". That is what some polite Japanese tourists suffer when they discover that Parisians can be rude or the city does not meet their expectations.

The experience can apparently be too stressful for some and they suffer a psychiatric breakdown.
Around a million Japanese travel to France every year.

Shocking reality
Many of the visitors come with a deeply romantic vision of Paris - the cobbled streets, as seen in the film Amelie, the beauty of French women or the high culture and art at the Louvre.

The reality can come as a shock.

An encounter with a rude taxi driver, or a Parisian waiter who shouts at customers who cannot speak fluent French, might be laughed off by those from other Western cultures.

But for the Japanese - used to a more polite and helpful society in which voices are rarely raised in anger - the experience of their dream city turning into a nightmare can simply be too much.

This year alone, the Japanese embassy in Paris has had to repatriate four people with a doctor or nurse on board the plane to help them get over the shock.

They were suffering from "Paris syndrome". It was a Japanese psychiatrist working in France, Professor Hiroaki Ota, who first identified the syndrome some 20 years ago.

On average, up to 12 Japanese tourists a year fall victim to it, mainly women in their 30s with high expectations of what may be their first trip abroad.

The Japanese embassy has a 24-hour hotline for those suffering from severe culture shock, and can help find hospital treatment for anyone in need.

However, the only permanent cure is to go back to Japan - never to return to Paris.


Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/europe/6197921.stm

Published: 2006/12/20 20:14:11 GMT

© BBC 2012

tennisbum79
Jul 1st, 2012, 11:27 PM
Here's another article that goes more in detail:

http://newsvote.bbc.co.uk/nol/shared/img/printer_friendly/news_logo.gif
'Paris Syndrome' strikes Japanese
By Caroline Wyatt
BBC News, Paris


A dozen or so Japanese tourists a year have to be repatriated from the French capital, after falling prey to what's become known as "Paris syndrome". That is what some polite Japanese tourists suffer when they discover that Parisians can be rude or the city does not meet their expectations.

The experience can apparently be too stressful for some and they suffer a psychiatric breakdown.
Around a million Japanese travel to France every year.

Shocking reality
Many of the visitors come with a deeply romantic vision of Paris - the cobbled streets, as seen in the film Amelie, the beauty of French women or the high culture and art at the Louvre.

The reality can come as a shock.

An encounter with a rude taxi driver, or a Parisian waiter who shouts at customers who cannot speak fluent French, might be laughed off by those from other Western cultures.

But for the Japanese - used to a more polite and helpful society in which voices are rarely raised in anger - the experience of their dream city turning into a nightmare can simply be too much.

This year alone, the Japanese embassy in Paris has had to repatriate four people with a doctor or nurse on board the plane to help them get over the shock.

They were suffering from "Paris syndrome". It was a Japanese psychiatrist working in France, Professor Hiroaki Ota, who first identified the syndrome some 20 years ago.

On average, up to 12 Japanese tourists a year fall victim to it, mainly women in their 30s with high expectations of what may be their first trip abroad.

The Japanese embassy has a 24-hour hotline for those suffering from severe culture shock, and can help find hospital treatment for anyone in need.

However, the only permanent cure is to go back to Japan - never to return to Paris.


Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/europe/6197921.stm

Published: 2006/12/20 20:14:11 GMT

© BBC 2012

Thank for the article, last week was the first time I heard about this on National Public Radio in the US

At least their is a cure with little cost:lol:


The Japanese embassy has a 24-hour hotline for those suffering from severe culture shock, and can help find hospital treatment for anyone in need.

However, the only permanent cure is to go back to Japan - never to return to Paris.

tennisbum79
Jul 1st, 2012, 11:43 PM
Yes, I heard about this syndrome, maybe first about 10-12 years ago.

I think it's just a major clash of cultures :shrug:
I disagree. It is clash of expectations vs. reality.
Japanese tourists are unable to manage this golf between expectation and reality on the ground.


If it were just culture, Japanese tourist would exhibits the same behavior in other cities around the world.

Mixal
Jul 1st, 2012, 11:44 PM
I find some aspects of Japanese culture really strange. This syndrome is old news, no?

tennisbum79
Jul 1st, 2012, 11:46 PM
This syndrome is old news, no?
Yes, it is old news, as Tennisfool and others pointed it out.
But for me, it is new and wanted to share it with other posters.

*JR*
Jul 1st, 2012, 11:56 PM
If Japan wants to get the French 2B nice, let them appoint (Hachinohe city council member) Yuri Fujikawa their Ambassador!

http://www.modelsandmoguls.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/yuri-fuyikawa-japan.jpg :inlove:

tennisbum79
Jul 2nd, 2012, 12:01 AM
If Japan wants to get the French 2B nice, let them appoint (Hachinohe city council member) Yuri Fujikawa their Ambassador!

http://www.modelsandmoguls.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/yuri-fuyikawa-japan.jpg :inlove:
Do you your own research staff that scour the world for beautiful women politicians?

ALIEN
Jul 2nd, 2012, 12:17 AM
The Japanese are too damn nice and polite :hug:

Tennis Fool
Jul 2nd, 2012, 01:19 AM
I disagree. It is clash of expectations vs. reality.

But expectations are based in culture.

As it states in the article:

"An encounter with a rude taxi driver, or a Parisian waiter who shouts at customers who cannot speak fluent French, might be laughed off by those from other Western cultures.

But for the Japanese - used to a more polite and helpful society in which voices are rarely raised in anger - the experience of their dream city turning into a nightmare can simply be too much."

tennisbum79
Jul 2nd, 2012, 01:31 AM
But expectations are based in culture.

As it states in the article:

"An encounter with a rude taxi driver, or a Parisian waiter who shouts at customers who cannot speak fluent French, might be laughed off by those from other Western cultures.

But for the Japanese - used to a more polite and helpful society in which voices are rarely raised in anger - the experience of their dream city turning into a nightmare can simply be too much."
Yes, it is cultural differences, but the Japanese would have been better prepared to manage that difference (hence less shocked) if they had not had an idyllic picture of Paris in their mind.

I am sure Japanese have gone in many countries where locals have displayed behavior that is not in keeping with Japanese good manners, but if they had been warned and expected that, they would not show any signs resembling the Paris Syndrome.


Japanese tourists visit NYC with its rudeness and abrasive manner, but since they know the city reputation, no such syndrome has ever been reported.

LindsayRulz
Jul 2nd, 2012, 01:36 AM
As a European I can say Paris is one of the shittest capital cities Europe has to offer....

You must be kidding right? Paris is definitely one of the most beautiful cities in the world let alone only european capitals. Besides, the city is a real museum itself and there's just so much more you can do/see than other european capitals (like Budapest).

dybbuk
Jul 2nd, 2012, 01:47 AM
People do realize the Japanese are not a monolithic group and of the huge number that go to Paris this only happens to a small percentage, right? It's hardly built into the DNA of the Japanese people or their culture to freak out at the slightest sign of Western aggression. Not to mention the article said this has happened to non-Japanese people too.

tennisbum79
Jul 2nd, 2012, 02:00 AM
People do realize the Japanese are not a monolithic group and of the huge number that go to Paris this only happens to a small percentage, right? It's hardly built into the DNA of the Japanese people or their culture to freak out at the slightest sign of Western aggression. Not to mention the article said this has happened to non-Japanese people too.
Read the second article.



any of the visitors come with a deeply romantic vision of Paris - the cobbled streets, as seen in the film Amelie, the beauty of French women or the high culture and art at the Louvre.

The reality can come as a shock.

An encounter with a rude taxi driver, or a Parisian waiter who shouts at customers who cannot speak fluent French, might be laughed off by those from other Western cultures.

But for the Japanese - used to a more polite and helpful society in which voices are rarely raised in anger - the experience of their dream city turning into a nightmare can simply be too much.

This year alone, the Japanese embassy in Paris has had to repatriate four people with a doctor or nurse on board the plane to help them get over the shock.

They were suffering from "Paris syndrome". It was a Japanese psychiatrist working in France, Professor Hiroaki Ota, who first identified the syndrome some 20 years ago.

On average, up to 12 Japanese tourists a year fall victim to it, mainly women in their 30s with high expectations of what may be their first trip abroad.

The Japanese embassy has a 24-hour hotline for those suffering from severe culture shock, and can help find hospital treatment for anyone in need.

However, the only permanent cure is to go back to Japan - never to return to Paris.



The term Paris Syndrome was coined by Japanese psychiatrist who works in Paris, to describe the symptoms experienced Japanese tourist when their expectations of the romantic, cultural, civilized city is crushed.
As far as we know, they are only the only group for which this term as created.

I heard there is similar reaction has been experienced by christian pilgrims visiting Jerusalem, but it can alos be explained by overwhelming religious experience.

WowWow
Jul 2nd, 2012, 02:07 AM
Why is it so hard to be nice for some?

dybbuk
Jul 2nd, 2012, 02:15 AM
Read the second article.



The term Paris Syndrome was coined by Japanese psychiatrist who works in Paris, to describe the symptoms experienced Japanese tourist when their expectations of the romantic, cultural, civilized city is crushed.
As far as we know, they are only the only group for which this term as created.

I heard there is similar reaction has been experienced by christian pilgrims visiting Jerusalem, but it can alos be explained by overwhelming religious experience.

"Most Paris Syndrome sufferers have been Japanese tourists, and the cause of their symptoms, which include "acute delusions, hallucinations, dizziness, sweating, and feelings of persecution,"

It specifically says 'most.' So not all of them are Japanese. And this still doesn't change what I said about some people (actually not you specifically) trying to pin this on 'Japanese culture.' Like the Japanese are all delicate flowers who cannot survive in the West. It simply bothers me suggesting that it's just part of "'their culture.'

tennisbum79
Jul 2nd, 2012, 02:25 AM
"Most Paris Syndrome sufferers have been Japanese tourists, and the cause of their symptoms, which include "acute delusions, hallucinations, dizziness, sweating, and feelings of persecution,"

It specifically says 'most.' So not all of them are Japanese. And this still doesn't change what I said about some people (actually not you specifically) trying to pin this on 'Japanese culture.' Like the Japanese are all delicate flowers who cannot survive in the West. It simply bothers me suggesting that it's just part of "'their culture.'
I agree. And that why I included in title thread the adverb "mostly".

There is no documentation of the same symptom experienced by Japanese in any other European city ... or elsewhere for the matter.
So it is definitely induced by idyllic expectations not matching reality on the ground, as the Psychiatrist indicated.

I actually disagree with the poster(TennisFool) who built his/her argument based on cultural differences. Ta the end we agree to disagree, I could not convince him/her, and s/he could not convince me.

miffedmax
Jul 2nd, 2012, 03:39 AM
Maybe Amelie had a form of it too, which was why she always choked @ RG. :help: (The arena for the Paris Indoor must have had some kind of "special shielding" from it, hence her 3 singles titles there). :scratch: Of course Max could blame Lena losing the '04 RG final (and thus being first female Russian singles Slam winner) to her childhood friend (the Contessa) to the Blond Bomber having this syndrome too. :tape:

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I have no idea what you're talking about. Lena won Paris in 2010. She was very happy.

Stop making stuff up.

Halardfan
Jul 2nd, 2012, 03:50 AM
"Most Paris Syndrome sufferers have been Japanese tourists, and the cause of their symptoms, which include "acute delusions, hallucinations, dizziness, sweating, and feelings of persecution,"

It specifically says 'most.' So not all of them are Japanese. And this still doesn't change what I said about some people (actually not you specifically) trying to pin this on 'Japanese culture.' Like the Japanese are all delicate flowers who cannot survive in the West. It simply bothers me suggesting that it's just part of "'their culture.'

All cultures are not the same and we obviously become most aware of our differences when we travel or live abroad.

If the story reflects badly on anyone its more the French than the Japanese. The way some French waiters behave is unthinkable in Japan!

HippityHop
Jul 2nd, 2012, 04:12 PM
Give me a friggin break. :rolleyes: This reminds me of the cell phone sickness (or whatever it's called) where people actually get physically ill if they forget their cell phones. GTFOH.

EDIT: By the way, I looked it up and it's called "nomophobia". WTF?

pov
Jul 2nd, 2012, 08:20 PM
Yep, much current "science" isn't ridiculous. Not at all.
:facepalm: