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M.S.F
Jun 28th, 2012, 03:15 AM
It's shocking to see the median age in Europe.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0a/Median_age.png/800px-Median_age.png

Overpopulation is pretty bad for sure but an old population is not a good thing for the future either.
Maybe I'm wrong and it's not that bad.
I hope European posters here can give more information about the situation.

Just Do It
Jun 28th, 2012, 09:33 AM
Developed countries = too old
Undeveloped countries = too young

duhcity
Jun 28th, 2012, 10:04 AM
Demographics shift too. I know in the United States, white people are generally having less children, with minorities having more.

ce
Jun 28th, 2012, 10:05 AM
^ So we are developed ?

Just Do It
Jun 28th, 2012, 10:17 AM
^ So we are developed ?

Compared to Africa, India, big part of Asia and South America, yes :tape:

matthias
Jun 28th, 2012, 10:52 AM
Germany is for sure among the worst
We hate kids :o

Mixal
Jun 28th, 2012, 10:53 AM
It's an old map. Kosovo Montenegro is a separate country now. South Sudan too.

The Witch-king
Jun 28th, 2012, 11:03 AM
It's shocking to see the median age in Europe.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0a/Median_age.png/800px-Median_age.png

Overpopulation is pretty bad for sure but an old population is not a good thing for the future either.
Maybe I'm wrong and it's not that bad.
I hope European posters here can give more information about the situation.

http://www.yeahthatsfunny.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/50-cent-and-earnie.gif

Elwin.
Jun 28th, 2012, 12:32 PM
I will have no problems getting a job, when i graduate in about 2 years. :banana:
So many teachers are going to retire the upcoming years :hysteric:

Curcubeu
Jun 28th, 2012, 02:26 PM
I can only speak for Eastern Europe and it seems that the average age in rural areas is something like 50, at least it feels like that.

In the city, the average age is lower, but it's pretty obvious that the population is regressing. The well educated young people emigrate and found their families abroad, while mostly older people or poorer minorities stay back. It's also those minorities were most children are born in.

ALIEN
Jun 28th, 2012, 02:39 PM
That's because women in Europe (and North America) are educated, want a career and they have control over their bodies. In some parts of the world a woman is still basically a slave, she gets married at 14 or something and has 10 kids even though they can't provide for them. And they never heard of contraception either.

pov
Jun 28th, 2012, 04:27 PM
Overpopulation is pretty bad for sure but an old population is not a good thing for the future either.
Maybe I'm wrong and it's not that bad.



A lower birth-rate will shift the median age up but it doesn't mean anything bad for the future. It simply means that the population will decrease or stay steady. Added to that is the fact that nowadays people (in most "developed" countries) stay healthier and fitter for much longer than they did even a few decades ago.

I had to go look-up some stuff but on average the median age in Europe is 7+ years older than the USA. (43+ to 36+) Not significant really. I'd say that a median age of 55+ would start to get dicey.

Sammo
Jun 28th, 2012, 04:54 PM
It's certainly better than 14-20 :help: I had no idea...

M.S.F
Jun 28th, 2012, 05:56 PM
Obviously the economy of the country plays a big rule.
Most of Africa is in the 14-20 range and most people there have a very low income.

It's an old map. Kosovo Montenegro is a separate country now. South Sudan too.

It's from 2009, not that old.

azdaja
Jun 28th, 2012, 06:30 PM
That's because women in Europe (and North America) are educated, want a career and they have control over their bodies. In some parts of the world a woman is still basically a slave, she gets married at 14 or something and has 10 kids even though they can't provide for them. And they never heard of contraception either.
this, and not the economy, is the main reason some societies have lower median age. it's basically the issue of women's rights which results in lower fertility rates (1-3 children per woman on average). there is some connection with the economy since in developed industrial societies women tend to have the same rights as men but there are rich countries where this is not the case, like oil-rich countries in the middle east. economy also plays a role in the sense that there is a longer life expectancy in a rich country (which actually pushes the median age of oil-rich middle eastern countries up, fertility rates are still high there). in africa women still don't have the same rights as in europe and people die young, so the median age is very low.

kwilliams
Jun 30th, 2012, 02:39 PM
I saw a report on the news the other day that said women are having children later in their lives than ever before in Ireland but we still have the one of the highest (possibly the highest) fertility rate in Europe and quite a young population. Life expectancy is still very high but recent trends in immigration have kept the median age fairly low. I also read a report the other day that said there are more women in the workforce now than ever before. This stat could have something to do with the recession and the fact that some families/women cannot afford to only have a one-income home.

These statistics are also significant because it means that people will have to work longer. With an increased number of elderly people, there will be additional financial pressures on countries which are struggling economically. I can imagine the possibility that the elderly will have reduced state pensions in the future. There will probably be more elderly people living on the streets and seeking help from charities. Maybe some of you heard of the story of that retired pharmacist who shot himself near the Greek Parliament in Athens. He was on the verge of having to scrounge in rubbish bins for food. He shot himself only a couple of hours after I had been at Syntagma.

While I was living in Korea, I noticed that the homeless people there tended to be a little older. The same would be true of low-level street vendors, grafters and just seemingly poorer people in general. The Korean welfare system doesn't do enough to help the elderly there as government revenue generated from tax is quite low in Korea. I'm not too familiar with Japan's welfare policies but this could be one reason why the median age is higher in Japan as Koreans have quite healthy lifestyles. The middle aged and elderly are, on the whole, very fit and active. Hiking is a national past-time in Korea and you'll often see throngs of people in their forties, fifties and sixties outfitted in North Face gear on their way to the mountains. The only thing that makes them a little less healthy is that their diets, though not unhealthy, are not all that balanced. Younger people have more balanced diets. It's true that they'll eat more junk food and unhealthy meals as well but younger Koreans are a lot taller and more well-built than older Koreans as dairy products have been introduced into their diets in the last couple of generations and younger Koreans drink quite a bit of milk. Older Koreans don't seem to. I can see Korea's median age rising quite a bit in the next generation or two but hopefully their growing economy will stem the tide of the suffering elderly.

WhoAmI?
Jun 30th, 2012, 07:48 PM
I can only speak for Eastern Europe and it seems that the average age in rural areas is something like 50, at least it feels like that.

In the city, the average age is lower, but it's pretty obvious that the population is regressing. The well educated young people emigrate and found their families abroad, while mostly older people or poorer minorities stay back. It's also those minorities were most children are born in.

This is so true.



I will have no problems getting a job, when i graduate in about 2 years. :banana:
So many teachers are going to retire the upcoming years :hysteric:

Yeah, that's what you'd like to believe. But when they can choose between someone experienced 70+ years old vs 30- years old, they'll take the one who should be retired already. And then complaining about how young people don't come to schools:bs:

Tennis Fool
Jun 30th, 2012, 08:46 PM
Three words: Post-war baby boom.