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View Full Version : BREAKING NEWS: North Korea Launches Rocket; US, Japan, SKorea confirm IT FAILED


tennisbum79
Apr 12th, 2012, 11:23 PM
CNN is reporting that the rocket may have broken apart shortly after takeoff, citing US government officials.

No indication that the debris failed in populated in area



Also ABC online reporting




North Korea's anticipated missile launch failed today after it fired the long-range test rocket, defying U.N. Security Council resolutions and an agreement with the United States.
The 90-ton rocket launched and there was a larger than anticipated flare.
U.S. officials said that the missile is believed to have crashed into the sea.



It was launched from the Sohae Satellite Launching Station in the northern part of the country, near its border with China.
It is expected to travel south by southwest, passing by South Korea, Taiwan and the Philippines.
Splash down is expected to take place in the waters off the coast of Australia.


The Communist nation had announced a five day window for launching the satellite, which began on Thursday.
The show of muscle put the region on edge, but Donald Gregg, former U.S. Ambassador to South Korea from 1989-1993 and an ABC News consultant, said he believed it was new leader Kim Jong Un's way of asserting his power.


"The main audience for this missile is internal not external," Gregg said. "This is [Kim Jong Un's] way of demonstrating to the people of North Korea he is in charge and his country is capable of high tech things. It is a manifestation of his power."


North Korea claimed the planned rocket launch was just a satellite called Shining Star, which was being launched into orbit to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the birth of the regime's founder, Kim Il Sung.
Experts did not doubt the possibility of a satellite being attached to the rocket, but feel the satellite is a cover to test a long-range missile.




A nuclear test may soon follow. Large amounts of dirt and ground cover are being moved at one of North Korea's nuclear sites, which experts believe indicates the North Koreans plan to test a nuclear device. Even more alarming is that officials believe that, unlike the first two nuclear tests North Korea conducted with plutonium, this one could be a uranium device, which would indicate a secret uranium production facility.



Gregg said the U.S. likely would not be a direct target of a potentially nuclear North Korea.
"The North Korea nuclear capability is not ever designed to be used against us. They know anything used against us would result in a catastrophic response," he said.
The rocket launch defies two United Nations Security Council resolutions that prohibit North Korea from testing ballistics missiles. It also breaks a promise North Korean leaders made to U.S. leaders in Beijing at the end of February.





The regime had promised to suspend nuclear missile tests, uranium enrichment and long-range missile launches in exchange for food aid from the United States.
On Tuesday, Jay Carney, the White House press secretary, said the launch of a rocket would hinder the promised aid.
"It's impossible to imagine that we would be able to follow through [and] provide the nutritional assistance that we had planned on providing, given what would be a flagrant violation of North Korea's basic international obligations," Carney said.



Gregg said that given North Korea's history of honoring important events in its regime with extravagant displays of propaganda, the U.S. should have anticipated the country would do something to honor founder Kim Il Sung's birthday.
"It's unfortunate the timing is how it is," he said, adding that he hoped the U.S. would send an envoy to North Korea to work on building a dialogue.



"The obstacle to that is domestically here. The Republicans would be all over anything like that as appeasement," he said. " For Obama to do this in an election year is unlikely."
The rocket launch is the first under Kim Jong Un. The regime's leader, who is believed to be 29 years old, assumed party leadership in January of this year, weeks after the death of his father.


source:http://abcnews.go.com/International/north-korea-launches-test-rocket/story?id=16125951#.T4dlEtV-MyJ

tennisbum79
Apr 12th, 2012, 11:27 PM
Reuters reports



BREAKING: A spokesman for the Defense Ministry in Seoul told reporters at a briefing that the launch at taken place at 0739 local time (2239 GMT) and that South Korea and the United States were checking whether it had been a success.


source: https://plus.google.com/117651204433077625812/posts/7Bknjpz6Fhw

antonella
Apr 12th, 2012, 11:31 PM
Was it called the 'Wozniacki Missile'?

tennisbum79
Apr 12th, 2012, 11:35 PM
USA and Japan strongly believe it fails, but South Korea is still looking to confirm the news.



Japan had vowed to shoot down the rocket if it ventures over its story.

Chip.
Apr 12th, 2012, 11:40 PM
:haha:

tennisbum79
Apr 12th, 2012, 11:42 PM
South Korea is now confirming that the rocket broke up in very early stage of the launch

HawkAussie
Apr 12th, 2012, 11:43 PM
:haha:

+1. Anyway it was going to attack Australia

Milito22
Apr 12th, 2012, 11:45 PM
:lol:

tennisbum79
Apr 12th, 2012, 11:49 PM
Was it called the 'Wozniacki Missile'?
Don't insult Caro, this rocket broke up very shortly after launch.

Caro reached #1 ranking and stayed there for awhile

tennisbum79
Apr 12th, 2012, 11:53 PM
North Korean officials are not talking... I wonder what they will tell their people

Halardfan
Apr 13th, 2012, 12:36 AM
Hopefully the regime won't try to cover their ineptitude by claiming the rocket was shot down, whether by South Korea or Japan...

The North Korean regime has to be somewhere at the peak of crazed despicable regimes.

Mary Cherry.
Apr 13th, 2012, 12:41 AM
World War 3 should be interesting.

tennisbum79
Apr 13th, 2012, 12:54 AM
They had invited the world media to the combined celebration of the centennial of the great leader and the "successful" launch.

Now the media is there, but no one want to talk to them.

CrossCourt~Rally
Apr 13th, 2012, 12:58 AM
Epic Fail :haha:

cowsonice
Apr 13th, 2012, 01:03 AM
I really wonder how much money is really put into the North Korean military. Clearly they feed and house the soldiers but the R&D is lacking.

Hopefully China can confirm this...just to add another dimension of credibility, them being an ally ;)

*JR*
Apr 13th, 2012, 01:06 AM
Hopefully the regime won't try to cover their ineptitude by claiming the rocket was shot down, whether by South Korea or Japan...

The North Korean regime has to be somewhere at the peak of crazed despicable regimes.

Yeah, but is Pak Jin Jun hot or what? :hearts:

I9HxGhIo-6k

JN
Apr 13th, 2012, 01:09 AM
North Korean officials are not talking... I wonder what they will tell their people

They'll tell them it was actually a rocket fired submersible that's now on it's way to the core of the planet to claim it as a N. Korean territory.

tennisbum79
Apr 13th, 2012, 01:10 AM
I really wonder how much money is really put into the North Korean military. Clearly they feed and house the soldiers but the R&D is lacking.
Apparently, they got technology from China and Russia, but the North Koreans, maybe because of trust issues or pride, decided to develop their own technology; which is not very good according to experts.

Hopefully China can confirm this...just to add another dimension of credibility, them being an ally ;)

In that part of the world, you don't embarrass your ally by divulging potentially embarrassing news.

I bet China won't official say anything, although the Chinese government may have troubled blocking social media from talking about it.

JustineTime
Apr 13th, 2012, 02:14 AM
:haha:

John Wesley Austin was right! :lol:

$uricate
Apr 13th, 2012, 09:06 AM
The rocket was a massive success. It was on the news just there. It was always the intention to launch into the sea.

Everyone is just gelis :rolleyes:

Super Dave
Apr 13th, 2012, 12:58 PM
http://30.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m2e3z9tkGk1qd5giho1_1280.jpg

http://media.nj.com/ledgerupdates_impact/photo/10830944-large.jpg

http://www.france24.com/en/files/element_multimedia/image/soldiers-cry_1.jpg

http://www.irishtimes.com/blogs/gallery/files/2011/12/8.gif

CrossCourt~Rally
Apr 13th, 2012, 01:03 PM
http://30.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m2e3z9tkGk1qd5giho1_1280.jpg

http://media.nj.com/ledgerupdates_impact/photo/10830944-large.jpg

http://www.france24.com/en/files/element_multimedia/image/soldiers-cry_1.jpg

http://www.irishtimes.com/blogs/gallery/files/2011/12/8.gif

:lol:

King Halep
Apr 13th, 2012, 01:18 PM
i miss the Dear Leader :sad:

njnetswill
Apr 13th, 2012, 01:25 PM
Apparently, they got technology from China and Russia, but the North Koreans, maybe because of trust issues or pride, decided to develop their own technology; which is not very good according to experts.



In that part of the world, you don't embarrass your ally by divulging potentially embarrassing news.

I bet China won't official say anything, although the Chinese government may have troubled blocking social media from talking about it.

China thinks of North Korea like an annoying but geopolitically useful stepbrother. I can assure you that top Chinese officials looked like this throughout this entire fiasco: :facepalm: But you are right, they probably won't make public comment.

I was in China when Kim Jung-Il died and trust me, no one in China thinks of North Korea as anything but a poor, backwards, sad little place.

King Halep
Apr 13th, 2012, 01:29 PM
The rocket was a massive success. It was on the news just there. It was always the intention to launch into the sea.

Everyone is just gelis :rolleyes:

It is actually secretly a giant nuclear torpedo

Nicolás89
Apr 13th, 2012, 03:08 PM
I don't know what the big fuss is about, it was just a satelite not a missile or anything. And many countries have failed in making their satelites orbit earth, the US included. :shrug:

King Halep
Apr 13th, 2012, 03:22 PM
^ :facepalm: thats the cover for developing ballistic technology, the same crap amerika used with the space race as an excuse to spend on military research

Sammo
Apr 13th, 2012, 03:28 PM
http://www.faillol.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/2e2557c9.gif

tennisbum79
Apr 13th, 2012, 04:53 PM
I don't know what the big fuss is about, it was just a satelite not a missile or anything. And many countries have failed in making their satelites orbit earth, the US included. :shrug:
Of course many countries have had many failed launches.

But they don't try to turn the unsuccessful launch to a success.

Let's be real here, we are talking North Korea here.


China and Soviet Union used to play the same game, but given their relative openness, they can't pull that stunt anymore.
In Asia in general, Chinese and Korean culture in particular, saving face is very important.

pierce85
Apr 13th, 2012, 07:12 PM
I wonder how many scientists are going to get executed for this failure

$uricate
Apr 13th, 2012, 07:14 PM
China thinks of North Korea like an annoying but geopolitically useful stepbrother. I can assure you that top Chinese officials looked like this throughout this entire fiasco: :facepalm: But you are right, they probably won't make public comment.

I was in China when Kim Jung-Il died and trust me, no one in China thinks of North Korea as anything but a poor, backwards, sad little place.

Well I was also in China in the aftermath and we mourned for 2 weeks :o

You must have been in one of the bad neighbourhoods. Or Haikou, full of the evils.

Nicolás89
Apr 13th, 2012, 07:32 PM
Of course many countries have had many launches.

But they don't try to turn the unsuccessful launch to a success.

Let's be real here, we are talking North Korea here.


China and Soviet Union used to play the same game, but given their relative openness, they can't pull that stunt anymore.
In Asia in general, Chinese and Korean culture in particular, saving face is very important.

Let's be real here name me a country where you're sure you're completely informed or its goverment moves and/or said goverment doesn't lie to its citizens about anything to save face.

Williamsser
Apr 13th, 2012, 08:59 PM
China thinks of North Korea like an annoying but geopolitically useful stepbrother. I can assure you that top Chinese officials looked like this throughout this entire fiasco: :facepalm: But you are right, they probably won't make public comment.

I was in China when Kim Jung-Il died and trust me, no one in China thinks of North Korea as anything but a poor, backwards, sad little place.

China created North Korea, so...

$uricate
Apr 13th, 2012, 09:13 PM
China created North Korea, so...

North Korea like invented China. It's a less-hot version of North Korea :o

tennisbum79
Apr 13th, 2012, 09:40 PM
Let's be real here name me a country where you're sure you're completely informed or its goverment moves and/or said goverment doesn't lie to its citizens about anything to save face.
It is true that all governments tend to lie, however, those with system of government that will make it difficult to lie tend not to do so.

In democratic societies or relatively open open societies, the government will not lie on matter such as this, because the people will find out either internally, externally or both.
China still tend to "lie" and omit certain facts today, but because the country is now relatively open, the people will find out.


In North Korea, this very unlikely.
There is a total blackout from on the communication from the outside.
Also, the people have been conditioned to be highly skeptical, or right out reject any information not flattering to the regime as malicious and work of the enemy.

Nicolás89
Apr 13th, 2012, 10:05 PM
It is true that all governments tend to lie, however, those with system of government that will make it difficult to lie tend not to do so.

In democratic societies or relatively open open societies, the government will not lie on matter such this, because the people will find out either internally, externally or both.
China still tend to "lie" and omit certain facts today, but because is the country is now relatively open, the people will find out.


In North Korea, this very unlikely.
There is a total blackout from on the communication from the outside.
Also, the people have be conditioned to be highly skeptical, or right out reject any information not flattering to the regime as malicious and work of the enemy.

IDK how all this is relevant to this particular topic where we're discussing a failed satelite lauch not NKs internal politics plus IDK why people is so afraid of NK when the country has never been involved in a war in the last 60 years, if I were you I would be afraid of the US & NATO countries, they have been involved in most of the last 20 years war conflicts. I get it NK tends to threat its "enemies" a lot but mostly when they try to intervene in its internal issues. :shrug:

Halardfan
Apr 13th, 2012, 11:10 PM
IDK how all this is relevant to this particular topic where we're discussing a failed satelite lauch not NKs internal politics plus IDK why people is so afraid of NK when the country has never been involved in a war in the last 60 years, if I were you I would be afraid of the US & NATO countries, they have been involved in most of the last 20 years war conflicts. I get it NK tends to threat its "enemies" a lot but mostly when they try to intervene in its internal issues. :shrug:

I agree to an extent. We in the west get involved in many conflicts, sometimes with good reasons, other times for selfish misguided reasons.

But I don't agree with your view of North Korea. You yourself brought up its lack of openness, suggesting that all country's hide things from their people. As though there is a measure of equivalency here. I don't agree. They are spectacularly unpredictable, they threaten other countries around them, to blackmail them into sending more food aid, they find the hundreds of millions to build this crap rocket instead of feeding their own people, any dissent is crushed, you can't leave the country if you are a normal citizen, if you try to escape, you will be killed. If you succeed in escaping your remaining family will face severe punishment. The society is sealed off, almost collectively brainwashed, Orwell's 1984 in a living country.

Western countries, indeed most countries in the world are light years ahead of North Korea. For all our wrongs, all our problems, by comparison, yes, we are wonderfully free.

ranfurly
Apr 13th, 2012, 11:22 PM
Just bomb the fucking outfit and get it over with.

Nicolás89
Apr 13th, 2012, 11:34 PM
I agree to an extent. We in the west get involved in many conflicts, sometimes with good reasons, other times for selfish misguided reasons.

But I don't agree with your view of North Korea. You yourself brought up its lack of openness, suggesting that all country's hide things from their people. As though there is a measure of equivalency here. I don't agree. They are spectacularly unpredictable, they threaten other countries around them, to blackmail them into sending more food aid, they find the hundreds of millions to build this crap rocket instead of feeding their own people, any dissent is crushed, you can't leave the country if you are a normal citizen, if you try to escape, you will be killed. If you succeed in escaping your remaining family will face severe punishment. The society is sealed off, almost collectively brainwashed, Orwell's 1984 in a living country.

Western countries, indeed most countries in the world are light years ahead of North Korea. For all our wrongs, all our problems, by comparison, yes, we are wonderfully free.

I get it they have major issues & their situation is more obvious than in the west but our situation isn't much better it is just subtle, we have a system where the little people do not have options & no power whatsoever & the people who does have the power do not share it, in the west you can be free you can be opposed to the system maybe you can prevail at this but people with power will do whatever it takes to shut you up much like in NK or whatever, at the end it is like a slow death for most. At least, Nort Koreans know where they stand.

antonella
Apr 13th, 2012, 11:43 PM
...why people is so afraid of NK when the country has never been involved in a war in the last 60 years, if I were you I would be afraid of the US & NATO countries, they have been involved in most of the last 20 years war conflicts. I get it NK tends to threat its "enemies" a lot but mostly when they try to intervene in its internal issues. :shrug:

North and South Korea are still technically at war as they never signed a peace treaty to end the Korean War. According to Int'l law, the Korean War is still going on with the UN command still active. It's just in the best interests for all concerned that a cease-fire is in-effect(for now). Occasionally flare-ups and pot shots are taken across the DMZ and commando missions are still being conducted.(I could say more about this if anyone is interested).

Halardfan
Apr 14th, 2012, 12:01 AM
I get it they have major issues & their situation is more obvious than in the west but our situation isn't much better it is just subtle, we have a system where the little people do not have no options & no power whatsoever & the people who does have the power do not share it, in the west you can be free you can't be opposed to the system maybe you can prevail at this but people with power will do whatever it takes to shut you up much like in NK or whatever, at the end it is like a slow death for most. At least, Nort Koreans know where they stand.

I think the western situation is far better in the west than in North Korea. If I say the British prime sucks in Britain, nothing will happen to me, if I say that in North Korea, there could be a knock at the door in the morning and I will be taken away. That is a fundemental difference. If I want to leave Britain I can do so without hindrance. If a want to leave North Korea, then I need to watch out for machine gun fire and landmines when I run. You could argue that in this Internet age individuals have never had more power in the west...campaigns on things like twitter can even effect government policy, create pressure on the government.

I understand your sceptical view of Western intervention and interference around the world. To a large extent I agree with that view. Yet I still believe there are fundemental differences between us and a regime like North Korea. We couldn't even be safely having such a discussion in North Korea.

Solitaire
Apr 14th, 2012, 12:07 AM
I get it they have major issues & their situation is more obvious than in the west but our situation isn't much better it is just subtle, we have a system where the little people do not have no options & no power whatsoever & the people who does have the power do not share it, in the west you can be free you can't be opposed to the system maybe you can prevail at this but people with power will do whatever it takes to shut you up much like in NK or whatever, at the end it is like a slow death for most. At least, Nort Koreans know where they stand.

The rich and political class have always been in power and that will never change in any country. I'll take the slow death of western society any day over knowing where I stand in NK. I'm assuming you're from Chile and I highly doubt you would trade your life there for one in NK.

Nicolás89
Apr 14th, 2012, 12:28 AM
I'm just saying the west isn't the haven everyone likes to brag about. Cubans aren't "free" like us & I know many Cubans who love their lifestyles I also know many chileans who would trade their lifes here to a life in Cuba. I won't say I'd trade my life in Chile for a life in NK 1) because IDK much of what happens there & 2) I don't believe in communism, but I guess there are many who would like the N. Korean lifestyle.

Solitaire
Apr 14th, 2012, 12:51 AM
I'm just saying the west isn't the haven everyone likes to brag about. Cubans aren't "free" like us & I know many Cubans who love their lifestyles I also know many chileans who would trade their lifes here to a life in Cuba. I won't say I'd trade my life in Chile for a life in NK 1) because IDK much of what happens there & 2) I don't believe in communism, but I guess there are many who would like the N. Korean lifestyle.

:eek: Believe me you wouldn't find many... There's lots of stuff about what goes on in NK books, films, etc. It's a rather fascinating subject and I would highly suggest you like into. You're right the west isn't a paradise but personally I wouldn't give up my life in the west to live in a dictatorship just for the purity of its totality.

Sean.
Apr 14th, 2012, 09:39 AM
Sabotage?

$uricate
Apr 14th, 2012, 05:18 PM
I agree to an extent. We in the west get involved in many conflicts, sometimes with good reasons, other times for selfish misguided reasons.

But I don't agree with your view of North Korea. You yourself brought up its lack of openness, suggesting that all country's hide things from their people. As though there is a measure of equivalency here. I don't agree. They are spectacularly unpredictable, they threaten other countries around them, to blackmail them into sending more food aid, they find the hundreds of millions to build this crap rocket instead of feeding their own people, any dissent is crushed, you can't leave the country if you are a normal citizen, if you try to escape, you will be killed. If you succeed in escaping your remaining family will face severe punishment. The society is sealed off, almost collectively brainwashed, Orwell's 1984 in a living country.

Western countries, indeed most countries in the world are light years ahead of North Korea. For all our wrongs, all our problems, by comparison, yes, we are wonderfully free.

Free?

Give me a break :rolleyes:

All citizens of every country are brainwashed. By the media, by advertising, by the government.

North Korea are just more upfront about it.

How free are you really?

Think about it for more than a minute. Freedom is a facade, there is no true freedom, everyone is trying to manipulate for their own needs.

I have to laugh at this supposed "freedom" that everyone thinks they have. You all work for the man, whether you are aware or not. When someone discovers this and speaks out they are a radical or a terrorist :lol:

Poor, poor sheeple of this world. If only they knew...

$uricate
Apr 14th, 2012, 05:21 PM
I get it they have major issues & their situation is more obvious than in the west but our situation isn't much better it is just subtle, we have a system where the little people do not have options & no power whatsoever & the people who does have the power do not share it, in the west you can be free you can be opposed to the system maybe you can prevail at this but people with power will do whatever it takes to shut you up much like in NK or whatever, at the end it is like a slow death for most. At least, Nort Koreans know where they stand.

I'm just saying the west isn't the haven everyone likes to brag about. Cubans aren't "free" like us & I know many Cubans who love their lifestyles I also know many chileans who would trade their lifes here to a life in Cuba. I won't say I'd trade my life in Chile for a life in NK 1) because IDK much of what happens there & 2) I don't believe in communism, but I guess there are many who would like the N. Korean lifestyle.

Matias speaks the truth.

Nobody is free. The West just gives the illusion of freedom to make it's populace more willing.

Halardfan
Apr 14th, 2012, 09:54 PM
Matias speaks the truth.

Nobody is free. The West just gives the illusion of freedom to make it's populace more willing.

Simply don't believe it, there is no comparison between North Korea and western countries for example. One is self evidently far more free in a country like Britain than you are in a country like North Korea. The fact that we can have this discussion unhindered is alone ample evidence for that.

Stamp Paid
Apr 15th, 2012, 12:35 AM
Yeah, but is Pak Jin Jun hot or what? :hearts:

I9HxGhIo-6k
Is this a parody, or true propaganda? :hysteric:

tennisbum79
Apr 15th, 2012, 04:51 PM
Sabotage?
One official said that it did not launch because they decided to make a more challenging move in this launch.

Had they launched the previous rocket, he has no doubt it would have been successful.
But this is still successful in the fact they have learned a lot from the launch