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VeeJJ
Mar 24th, 2012, 02:40 AM
Anyone can help? Me and science absolutely hate each other. I might as well be reading Chinese. :help:

Can anyone answer:

How many ATPs are produced from two molecules of glucose? Show formula

New_balls_please
Mar 24th, 2012, 02:53 AM
72 ATPs:wavey:

New_balls_please
Mar 24th, 2012, 02:55 AM
I did my undergrad in biochemistry :p

Here's the whole thing, let me know if there's something you don't understand :D

http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/dl/free/0072507470/234439/mc_ch25_fig10.jpg

VeeJJ
Mar 24th, 2012, 03:48 AM
So two glucose would would produce 4 ATP? SO I would just show this by duplicating the top half of the equation?

VeeJJ
Mar 24th, 2012, 03:52 AM
Can you describe glycolysis, pyruvate to Acetyl-CoA, and Krebs cycle and
the interactions between them

and

light reactions, the Calvin cycle, and the interactions
between them.

VeeJJ
Mar 24th, 2012, 03:52 AM
pls

New_balls_please
Mar 24th, 2012, 04:22 AM
So two glucose would would produce 4 ATP? SO I would just show this by duplicating the top half of the equation?

NO. It's actually 72, not 68. My last post is wrong.

Okay, so in aerobic respiration (humans), one molecule of glucose yields 38 ATP molecules, eight produced during glycolysis, six from the link reaction and 24 from the Krebs cycle. But the net gain is 36 ATP, because two of the ATP molecules produced from glycolysis are used in the re-oxidation of the hydrogen carrier molecule NAD. So, 2 molecules of glucose would produce 72 ATPs. Make sense?

New_balls_please
Mar 24th, 2012, 04:25 AM
Can you describe glycolysis, pyruvate to Acetyl-CoA, and Krebs cycle and
the interactions between them

and

light reactions, the Calvin cycle, and the interactions
between them.

You can find all those cycles in books. I would need 4 hours to write down all the reactions :sobbing: And what kind of professor do you have? Those cycles are really hard to memorize. You should be learning like 1 or 2, not 6 :sad:

Ashi
Mar 24th, 2012, 06:00 AM
Yes, all of these cycles & reactions are easily available in books. Which reference books do you use to study biochemistry?
You just have to get your mind around the fact that you HAVE to memorize these. We had to memorize all the cycles, with chemical formulae and the names of each enzyme carrying out the reaction. There's no two ways around it. :shrug: At least when I graduated.

I always turned to 'Principles in Biochemistry' by Lehninger. It's probably the best book for beginners in this subject.

Also, we had a book called 'Biochemistry' written by an Indian author called U Satyanarayana. It was the most concise and easy to understand. :bowdown: especially for those who study for exams at the last minute. :devil:

Ashi
Mar 24th, 2012, 06:21 AM
And, god forbid you have to study the chemical formulae, please study and practice way in advance. You'll be in big trouble otherwise. I remember one exam where I screwed up all the formulae of the different fatty acids. Even after practicing. :sobbing: So yeah.
Initially I found it difficult as well, but then I loved Biochemistry as a subject later.:D

McPie
Mar 24th, 2012, 07:27 AM
And, god forbid you have to study the chemical formulae, please study and practice way in advance. You'll be in big trouble otherwise. I remember one exam where I screwed up all the formulae of the different fatty acids. Even after practicing. :sobbing: So yeah.
Initially I found it difficult as well, but then I loved Biochemistry as a subject later.:D

I think in this case we need Shivank, ain't it? :oh:

InsideOut.
Mar 24th, 2012, 08:19 AM
Yes, all of these cycles & reactions are easily available in books. Which reference books do you use to study biochemistry?
You just have to get your mind around the fact that you HAVE to memorize these. We had to memorize all the cycles, with chemical formulae and the names of each enzyme carrying out the reaction. There's no two ways around it. :shrug: At least when I graduated.

I always turned to 'Principles in Biochemistry' by Lehninger. It's probably the best book for beginners in this subject.

Also, we had a book called 'Biochemistry' written by an Indian author called U Satyanarayana. It was the most concise and easy to understand. :bowdown: especially for those who study for exams at the last minute. :devil:

I absolutely abhor Lehninger. :tape: Plus, I'm not sure the thread-starter is doing an undergraduate degree in biochemistry (are you?) - so perhaps something much simpler would suffice. A simple Google search would help.

Ashi
Mar 24th, 2012, 08:58 AM
:lol: I did my bachelors & masters in Biochemistry with papers in Genetics, Immunology, Biotechnology & Biostatistics. :oh:
Now, I don't really understand what does undergrad mean in the US? How old is this poster? I learnt most of what he's asking about while studying for my graduate degree.
Although, the Citric acid cycle & calvin cycle is also studied in school & junior college here. (10th, 11th & 12th grade in India). :shrug:

Ashi
Mar 24th, 2012, 09:01 AM
I absolutely abhor Lehninger. :tape: Plus, I'm not sure the thread-starter is doing an undergraduate degree in biochemistry (are you?) - so perhaps something much simpler would suffice. A simple Google search would help.
That's why me & my class mates used the concise Indian counterpart by U. Satyanarayana for our exams. :oh:

If you really want to pursue studies in Biochemistry, the Lehninger is a good place to start. ;)

bulava
Mar 24th, 2012, 09:58 AM
Anyone can help? Me and science absolutely hate each other. I might as well be reading Chinese. :help:

Can anyone answer:

How many ATPs are produced from two molecules of glucose? Show formula
Don't hate Science or Math. Try to take it slowly...well check this out:

http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/0072507470/student_view0/chapter25/animation__how_glycolysis_works.html

bulava
Mar 24th, 2012, 10:04 AM
Now, I don't really understand what does undergrad mean in the US?
It means pursing a Graduate degree in India such as B.Tech, BSc etc. Grad in the US is a Post Graduate degree in India such as M.Tech, MSc etc.


Although, the Citric acid cycle & calvin cycle is also studied in school & junior college here. (10th, 11th & 12th grade in India). :shrug:
I remember my school and Intermediate (plus 2) Chemistry fun, especially I was very strong in Organic Chemistry (love those Carbons, kinda rapid-fast scoring). Now, I'm having more fun with Drug molecules for a living!

Ashi
Mar 24th, 2012, 10:11 AM
I liked Organic and Analytical Chemistry too. Absolutely detested Inorganic chemistry. :tape:

Ashi
Mar 24th, 2012, 10:18 AM
Okay, then I'm assuming the thread starter is in high school. I'm sure you have a prescribed text to study then. :shrug:

Helen Lawson
Mar 24th, 2012, 11:02 AM
I took chemistry but it was in the 1920s, it was easy, there were only 4 elements then--Earth, air, fire, and water.

Lachy
Mar 24th, 2012, 01:48 PM
Memorising Glycolysis, TCA, ETC, Oxidative Phosphorylation now :oh: Fun fun :lol:

VeeJJ
Mar 24th, 2012, 04:20 PM
Can you describe glycolysis, pyruvate to Acetyl-CoA, and Krebs cycle and
the interactions between them

and

light reactions, the Calvin cycle, and the interactions
between them.

I just need a short paragraph about he two above topics. Not all the formulas. Can you believe this is intro to bio?!?!?

Sammo
Mar 24th, 2012, 06:19 PM
Wow, I thought that everybody in this forum was a humanist :lol:

I'm either going to study medicine or chemical engineering next year, well medicine was Plan A but the average is very high so I don't know if I will make it :unsure:

bulava
Mar 26th, 2012, 03:22 PM
I liked Organic and Analytical Chemistry too. Absolutely detested Inorganic chemistry. :tape:
In my case, Inorganic Chemicals (Acids, Alcohols, Ketones etc) are the vital backbone in the Pharmaceutical Drug manufacturing processes. I used to work as a Research Engineer/Scientist in the US for almost 16 years, now many friends and former colleagues often wonder how come I'm happily living in this part of the world! :D

Rui.
Mar 26th, 2012, 05:42 PM
Just had a biochemistry exam on glycolysis today in uni :lol: :haha: Really random to find this thread :lol:


I liked Organic and Analytical Chemistry too. Absolutely detested Inorganic chemistry. :tape:

Organic chemistry :hearts: Just love it :)

Moveyourfeet
Mar 27th, 2012, 07:44 AM
If you are only taking Intro to Bio then the answer your prof is looking for is 4 ATP.

In glycolysis, one molecule of glucose forms 2 molecules of pyruvate.
Step 1 and step 3 of glycolysis both use 1 ATP molecule each and in step 7 and step 10, 2 molecules of ATP each are produced (1 for each G3P).
So 2 used, 4 produced. Net of 2 ATP per glucose molecule.

Don't listen to 'new balls please' :lol:. He is WAY more advanced than you lol.

Are you a BIO major? If so, honestly don't worry about it. You are going to go over it again in other BIO classes and in Biochem. (and maybe even in Chem).
It will be more in depth and (hopefully) conceptually easier to grasp.

As for the other cycles, you need to google that stuff for quick soundbites. Why should anyone tell you what is easily obtainable online?

moby
Mar 27th, 2012, 03:36 PM
Once upon a time, I knew this.
Now there is only love in the dark.

Looking at the charts, it's as boring as I remember it to be.

Apoleb
Mar 27th, 2012, 05:22 PM
Once upon a time, I knew this.
Now there is only love in the dark.

Looking at the charts, it's as boring as I remember it to be.

It's not as boring as it looks. Biochemical cycles are all beautifully interconnected with each other and it's an immensely complicated system and there's *gasp* logic behind it, but you can start appreciating that once you drill them into your brain and manage to memorize them.