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View Full Version : Interesting perspective on politicians and adultery


HippityHop
Mar 14th, 2012, 06:51 PM
What Does Adultery Tell Us About Character?
Tuesday, December 06, 2011

With Herman Cain's announcement that he was suspending his presidential campaign because of the charges of sexual harassment and of a 13-year affair, issues are raised that the country would do well to think through. The two most obvious are whether we should care about a politician's sexual life and how much the press should report about these matters.

But there is a larger issue that needs to be addressed first: What does adultery tell us about a person? For many Americans, the answer is: "Pretty much all we need to know." This certainly seems to be the case with regard to presidential candidates. The view is expressed this way: "If he can't keep his vows to his wife, how can we trust him to keep his vows to his country?"

I am a religious conservative, but I know this statement has no basis in fact. It sounds persuasive, but it is a non sequitur. We have no reason to believe that men who have committed adultery are less likely to be great leaders or that men who have always been faithful are more likely to be great leaders. To religious readers, I point to God Himself, who apparently thought that King David deserved to remain king -- and even have the Messiah descend from him -- despite a particularly ugly form of adultery (sending Bathsheba's husband into battle where he would assuredly be killed).

The rest is here:
http://www.dennisprager.com/columns.aspx?g=90a1ba2c-1d3e-4037-83da-6fbbfaa9b23d&url=what_does_adultery_tell_us_about_character

pov
Mar 14th, 2012, 07:24 PM
But there is a larger issue that needs to be addressed first: What does adultery tell us about a person? For many Americans, the answer is: "Pretty much all we need to know." This certainly seems to be the case with regard to presidential candidates. The view is expressed this way: "If he can't keep his vows to his wife, how can we trust him to keep his vows to his country?"

I am a religious conservative, but I know this statement has no basis in fact. It sounds persuasive, but it is a non sequitur. We have no reason to believe that men who have committed adultery are less likely to be great leaders or that men who have always been faithful are more likely to be great leaders.
:yeah: It's one of the ongoing inanities in USA politics.

pov
Mar 14th, 2012, 07:26 PM
On the other hand I do understand those who want leaders who have and live by this or other personal values

HippityHop
Mar 15th, 2012, 02:41 PM
On the other hand I do understand those who want leaders who have and live by this or other personal values

I concur with the point that he makes later in the article about newspeople. Why shouldn't we know about their private lives?