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ArturoAce.
Mar 7th, 2012, 08:03 AM
I'm sure all of you guys have heard this by now, if you haven't:
Y4MnpzG5Sqc

I've already bought my bracelet!


I'm not supporting this just because of the hype. I read a book about 5 years ago called A Long Way Gone by Ishmael Beah about child soldiering in Sierra Leone and it was amazing. I was a freshman in high school who hated reading and I read it in 2 days, and thought about it throughout those 2 days. This book was definitely a stand out and it gave some gruesome insight and awareness.

Now the issue has rolled around again and I didn't hesitate to help.

Spread the word! Support by buying an action kit or bracelet!

The Witch-king
Mar 7th, 2012, 08:07 AM
I'm sorry I can't watch the video but what is buying a bracelet supposed to do?

Mashabator
Mar 7th, 2012, 08:14 AM
Everyone should watch it, even if your not going to buy the bracelet or anything, spread the word! im so excited for april 21 to put posters everywhere

ArturoAce.
Mar 7th, 2012, 08:15 AM
I'm sorry I can't watch the video but what is buying a bracelet supposed to do?

100% of the money from your purchase goes to the area of greatest need, including our protection and rehabilitation work in Central Africa and spreading awareness about the conflict around the world.

Basically it brings awareness and helps builds schools/centers with the technology to track intruders/abductors.

KBlade
Mar 7th, 2012, 09:11 AM
I'm all for this cause, but sorry I just had to.

http://a8.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/430481_244459665646742_165332806892762_504490_1060 458827_n.jpg

Yoncé
Mar 7th, 2012, 09:29 AM
There is nothing wrong with supporting a fundraiser, charity or any shit like that. Its dope: Do it!

Just attempt to make an effort knowing where your money is going. InvisibleChildren DO NOT give all of their proceeds to african aid, no where near. That is a fact, sorry.

InvisibleChildren has only donated about 3 million out of the 8 million they gained from donations...

I am completely for this cause, however there are much better fundraisers and charities you can be donating your time and money too, which can make a much larger difference and provide better help

Mashabator
Mar 7th, 2012, 10:54 AM
^ where does the rest go? maybe all the people that work for it arent volunteers :awww:

Yoncé
Mar 7th, 2012, 10:59 AM
^Yeah, sadly most of the money goes into their own pockets!

Mashabator
Mar 7th, 2012, 12:01 PM
Well even if half of the money donated helps, at least the money is doing something :cheer:

ArturoAce.
Mar 7th, 2012, 11:59 PM
There is nothing wrong with supporting a fundraiser, charity or any shit like that. Its dope: Do it!

Just attempt to make an effort knowing where your money is going. InvisibleChildren DO NOT give all of their proceeds to african aid, no where near. That is a fact, sorry.

InvisibleChildren has only donated about 3 million out of the 8 million they gained from donations...

I am completely for this cause, however there are much better fundraisers and charities you can be donating your time and money too, which can make a much larger difference and provide better help

The proceeds don't even matter to me; the awareness is what matters. If someone feels uncomfortable donating, then they shouldn't. 3 million is better than 0, and the rest is going to film making, which I don't find is corrupt if it's supporting meaningful film. There's talk about them pocketing money and so on, and you'll choose what you want to believe. There's always people there to question the legitimacy of anything, which is a great thing, but not when it comes from random blogs and people on tumblr.

This movement is already making a large difference if you ask me.

Stamp Paid
Mar 8th, 2012, 12:04 AM
Thanks for the bump!

Stamp Paid
Mar 8th, 2012, 12:07 AM
I was left with so many questions at the end of this. How did Kony come into power? How has he remained there for so long? Is everybody shaking in fear at his footsteps, or are there other groups against him? They didn't even mention the LRA really or what it is. If its a rebel group, what is it rebelling against? Or is it just more Africans being "savage" and needing "civilizing"? Hmmm...But I wont throw the baby out with the bathwater, and I got a general view of why Kony is so bad and I will use this vid as a starting point, and not as an ending point.

Keegan
Mar 8th, 2012, 01:27 AM
I was left with so many questions at the end of this. How did Kony come into power? How has he remained there for so long? Is everybody shaking in fear at his footsteps, or are there other groups against him? They didn't even mention the LRA really or what it is. If its a rebel group, what is it rebelling against? Or is it just more Africans being "savage" and needing "civilizing"? Hmmm...But I wont throw the baby out with the bathwater, and I got a general view of why Kony is so bad and I will use this vid as a starting point, and not as an ending point.

Religion is probably a massive factor in his campaign. Uganda is very much a Christian country and he wants to start a theocratic government based on the ten commandments, which would gain the support of those who have a similar belief and they will then do whatever he tells them to pretty much. It's happened before in history, and it will happen again. Talk about hypocritical bullshit when he's breaking some of the most vital commandments. What an idiot.

I'm totally for the cause, but I don't think it's being structured the right way. Military action doesn't solve all the world's problems. I honestly think they need to sort out the Ugandan government first, considering they've known about him for years and not been able to do anything. Military presence has already begun making this difficult with Kony altering his tactics, which makes me question whether his tactics were the same beforehand. That in itself makes me question the ability of the Ugandan government, and also the governments of the places Kony has spread to. I know Africa is a very difficult continent with very difficult problems, but that's how I think it should be conducted.

Vartan
Mar 8th, 2012, 03:53 AM
Invisible Children founders check up on how their money is being spent. Photograph by Glenna Gordon - click image to visit her site.

http://www.wrongingrights.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/GlennaGordon_InvisibleChildrenA.jpg


DISCLAIMER FOR LIBERALS: We at DemandNothing do not support the actions of the LRA or Joseph Kony. We have no objection to the principle of highlighting the activities of groups such as these, which are often overlooked in the western media.
Invisible Children released a video, KONY 2012, that called for the raising of awareness of the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) in Uganda across the world. In their video they seek donations so that they can continue their project to bring US advisors in to work with the Ugandan military in finding and apprehending Joseph Kony. Their ultimate wish is for their supporters to agitate for an armed military intervention to stop Kony by raising awareness and confronting policymakers. The US has already deployed a small contingent of armed forces to advise and assist the Ugandan military but Invisible Children would like to see more pressure put on governments to give the Ugandan military more money, technology and foreign military advisers to push the fight on. They are effectively calling for an armed intervention in Uganda.
Armed interventions in Uganda to find and kill Joseph Kony have been tried repeatedly over the decades with no success. Each push scatters the LRA to civilian areas with terrible costs to those who live in those areas. For example, Operation Lightning Thunder, which was a joint operation with the involvement of the US, resulted in the abduction of 700 people and the deaths of 1, 000 civilians.
One of their partners and donators is Chase Community Giving who awarded them $1million as a prize for winning a contest that was mired in controversy and accusations of fraud. This organisation is part of JP Morgan Chase Foundation who are also listed as one of Invisible Children’s network of supporters. This organisation is also owner of Chase Military, an organisation that offers loans, mortgages and insurance to soldiers that are to be deployed abroad. JP Morgan have also used foreign military interventions in the past to secure investment opportunities such as in Afghanistan with the full support of the US Government. Further ties with Uganda include their recent investment in Ugandan agribusiness and their ties as broker and adviser to Heritage Oil, whose operations are expanding into the border of Uganda and the Congo where the LRA are currently based. You’d be forgiven for thinking that, when situating these operations with their support of Invisible Children in the past year, JP Morgan are very interested in Uganda’s assets and are looking for means to foster business-friendly awareness of Uganda’s problems for their own benefit. Military intervention would do nothing but bolster JP Morgans profitmaking opportunities in the region.
This increase in funding from JP Morgan also coincided with Invisible Children’s “Fourth Estate” program. This program was designed to foster a youth-oriented grassroots movement by the controlled manipulation of youth culture, social media, and youth activism. It is to this end that their video was released, which ties into their ventures with the music industry, which concentrates specifically on popular youth bands like Mumford & Sons and Frightened Rabbit, and their Fourth Estate activism education conference in August 2011. Between 2010 and 2011, resources spent on media creation rose from $463, 666 to $699, 617. Similarly, the amount of money that they spent on media awareness rose from $133, 600 to $301, 000 in the same span of time. At the same time, only a little over a third of the money that they raise is spent on their programs. The rest goes to awareness, management, and their product line. In fact, spending on programs went down from $3, 752, 435 to $3, 303, 218 in spite of their overall increase in funding.
Invisible Children’s actions are tied heavily into the promotion of a false consciousness type of activism that glosses over the complex history of the region that they purport to support and ignores the myriad of crimes the Museveni government is embroiled in or the Ugandan People’s Defence Force’s (UPDF) checkered history with profiteering, the use of child soldiers, and rape. The LRA are not even based in Uganda anymore and this has been the case for many years now. Their business-friendly awareness campaign is exemplified by their championing of predatory microfinance initiatives in Uganda, which are offered by CARE international, a charity that is also sponsored by JP Morgan.
It should come as no surprise that the US Government and an investment firm like JP Morgan would show such interest in the work of an otherwise unknown charity. If crowd-sourcing activism in this way was always so successful then we would expect larger movements such as Occupy to have also made similar headway into governments. That is simply not the case though, as the interests of corporations and government run explicitly counter to those in Occupy. This is not to say that Invisible Children and its members are out there to explicitly profiteer or that this is some kind of shadow conspiracy. What they are is an effective propaganda-making organisation whose interests have happened to coincide with the rich and powerful who are seeking to exploit the massive mineral wealth in Uganda, and the conflicts in the country, for their own profit. It’s a lot easier to make a video viral when you have millions of dollars worth of resources at your disposal.
Pushing this rhetoric through the sponsoring of charities such as Invisible Children helps people to believe that what they are doing is for some nebulous “good“ when, in reality, they are sponsoring those who aim to exploit the people of Uganda and armed intervention against child soldiers . The last thing that is needed is well-meaning, energised students committed to action without any real understanding of where their money is going and what their actions are committing them to.

http://demandnothing.org/making-the-invisible-visible/

Sp!ffy
Mar 8th, 2012, 04:12 AM
Sadly, I've heard more debates about the movement itself rather than the atrocities going on in Africa.

WTAtennisfan15
Mar 8th, 2012, 04:50 AM
801 992 likes for the video in just 3 days! All time record by far!

Y4MnpzG5Sqc


They must have trouble handling the money they are getting now, that's how Greenpeace pretty much fell... :sad: they couldn't handle the money/media attention and became arrogant!

AjdeNate!
Mar 8th, 2012, 04:58 AM
http://tumblr.thedailywh.at/post/18909727859/on-kony-2012-i-honestly-wanted-to-stay-as-far

ArturoAce.
Mar 8th, 2012, 05:24 AM
Their responses to every critique:
http://www.invisiblechildren.com.s3-website-us-east-1.amazonaws.com/critiques.html

http://www.invisiblechildren.com.s3-website-us-east-1.amazonaws.com/images/breakdownofexpenses.jpg

Tennis Fool
Mar 8th, 2012, 05:27 AM
I knew this would probably make it to NT.

There is so much wrong with this whole campaign, beyond the super shady IC.

Too many people are sheep.

C. Drone
Mar 8th, 2012, 11:07 AM
"Raising awareness is great. BRB, going to go gun down people in the street to raise awareness about guncrime. Raising awareness is great."

Richie's
Mar 8th, 2012, 01:50 PM
Need a long discuss about this...

Valanga
Mar 8th, 2012, 03:02 PM
This video is really confusing. Why the guy keeps shoving us "Kony is the bad guy, give us $ to support us against this bad guy" without explaining much about the issue itself, instead he keeps babbling on his son and how successful his campaign has been?

What is the focus of the film? The campaign or the victims in Uganda and the surrounding countries? This video is really condescending

Nicolás89
Mar 8th, 2012, 04:38 PM
There is nothing wrong with supporting a fundraiser, charity or any shit like that. Its dope: Do it!

Just attempt to make an effort knowing where your money is going. InvisibleChildren DO NOT give all of their proceeds to african aid, no where near. That is a fact, sorry.

InvisibleChildren has only donated about 3 million out of the 8 million they gained from donations...

I am completely for this cause, however there are much better fundraisers and charities you can be donating your time and money too, which can make a much larger difference and provide better help

So what forum/newspaper/radio station/tv program missinformed you that bad?

Viktymise
Mar 8th, 2012, 06:57 PM
http://visiblechildren.tumblr.com/post/18890947431/we-got-trouble

Stamp Paid
Mar 8th, 2012, 07:01 PM
To the people coming in posting the critical responses to the Kony 2012, thanks.
But I ask, are you using the contrary opinions posted in those sources an an excuse to not give a fuck about the issue? :lol:

Viktymise
Mar 8th, 2012, 07:32 PM
To the people coming in posting the critical responses to the Kony 2012, thanks.
But I ask, are you using the contrary opinions posted in those sources an an excuse to not give a fuck about the issue? :lol:

Nobody said they don't give a fuck about what's happening. This isn't a new issue. And it's not as clear cut as some crazy man, running around Uganda with an army of children.Invisible Children are in support of the Ugandan military which aren't much better than Kony himself, and the situation in the country wouldn't simply be solved if Kony was killed or whatever. The video which accompanies the campaign is zeitgeisty propaganda, which gives us the impression that there's a Hollywood type solution to this problem.

It's great that an issue like this is being highlighted, but it's not something that a big facebook campaign and a couple of hipster rallies will solve. The thing that people are finding fault in 'Kony 2012' is that people are blindly following a campaign such as this, without doing any proper research into what is a very complicated situation.

ArturoAce.
Mar 8th, 2012, 07:35 PM
This video is really confusing. Why the guy keeps shoving us "Kony is the bad guy, give us $ to support us against this bad guy" without explaining much about the issue itself, instead he keeps babbling on his son and how successful his campaign has been?

What is the focus of the film? The campaign or the victims in Uganda and the surrounding countries? This video is really condescending

It really is not confusing, at all. I think he explained the issue quite in depth; the video was 30 minutes for god's sake. :lol: He includes his son as a way to tell us that even a 5-year-old can recognize that this IS a bad man and something needs to be done, which you are struggling to see some how. :tape: What is the focus? All of the above.

Condescending to who?

http://visiblechildren.tumblr.com/post/18890947431/we-got-trouble

Let me hear YOUR points or at least highlight something.
I'm done reading lengthy tumblr posts that say the same thing, word for word. The same post is edited at the end with the response link: http://s3.amazonaws.com/www.invisiblechildren.com/critiques.html

Charlatan
Mar 8th, 2012, 08:12 PM
This video is really confusing. Why the guy keeps shoving us "Kony is the bad guy, give us $ to support us against this bad guy" without explaining much about the issue itself, instead he keeps babbling on his son and how successful his campaign has been?

What is the focus of the film? The campaign or the victims in Uganda and the surrounding countries? This video is really condescending

did you watch the whole thing?

dybbuk
Mar 8th, 2012, 08:45 PM
To the people coming in posting the critical responses to the Kony 2012, thanks.
But I ask, are you using the contrary opinions posted in those sources an an excuse to not give a fuck about the issue? :lol:

From what I have read by most people being critical about it, the point is this: We can all see that just the fact Invisible Children has brought this to the attention of a wider group of people is good. But we also have to be critical of the organization and make informed decisions if they are the one you want to give your money to. Almost all the ones I have read have offered several alternatives that aim for the same or similar cause, but are more transparent with their finances (Ie: don't refuse to let independent organizations audit their finances) and are run by people actually from the area, not white guys from America. I think this is where the problems lie mostly, in that many people aren't comfortable with some Americans that are trying to rally support for military intervention in an African country by using emotionally manipulative tactics.

So basically, I don't think it's wrong that some people would choose to give their money to them. And I think it's good attention it being given to the issue because of their videos. I just personally believe there are better routes by which to send your money, and I (and others criticizing it) think people should be made aware of them.

Slutiana
Mar 8th, 2012, 09:07 PM
Adding onto what people have said here:

The video paints a picture of a country currently being ravaged by a madman, with no one - neither in Uganda or the rest of the world - doing anything to stop the carnage. That they're "Invisible".

In reality, while Kony is a horrible, horrible man and needs to be brought to justice for what he has done, they pointedly neglect to mention so much:
- that Uganda is currently in a state of rebuilding and recovery while Kony is in hiding and has been for a while (no one knows where he is), similar to how Saddam was when the US invaded Iraq.

- They are not 'invisible'. This is the whole white saviour hollywood narrative of the white guy saving the poor old africans and getting the bad guy. It's insulting and problematic considering Ugandans have been saving themselves for years and dealing with their issues. In addition, there have been many attempts to find and take Kony from the US and abroad.

- The problem is that the issue is so much more complex. For one, the IC support and fund the Ugandan army, an army well known for commiting their own atrocities like raping and attacking women and children. Can we really say it's worth sacrificing those people for one man?

-And there's the opposition being those kid rebel soldiers who are forced to do what they do.



There's a lot more too, but I'd be here all day. It's just SO complex and there are so many issues, and that's the reason why these problems have spanned decades and decades. Not because the poor Africans are too weak. The video oversimplifies so much and pretty much implies that all you have to do is buy some snazzy bracelet, 'make Kony Famous' and then the white people will interfere and save the day. That's not happening.

Awareness is great, but people need to know the facts and not just a whole load of half-truths to suit the charity's own agenda. If people know it all and still choose to donate to IC over other charities then fine, but clearly 98% of people posting about this/donating don't.

And while they're not fraudulent, the charity has a bad reputation both in official circles and from veteran humanitarians. It has a 2/5 star on Charity Navigator which, needless to say, isn't a good thing.

Viktymise
Mar 8th, 2012, 09:29 PM
Let me hear YOUR points or at least highlight something.
I'm done reading lengthy tumblr posts that say the same thing, word for word. The same post is edited at the end with the response link: http://s3.amazonaws.com/www.invisiblechildren.com/critiques.html

I just did. I've previously watched a documentary about the LRA where children who escaped had said that they were just as afraid of the Ugandan military, as they are notorious for sex-trafficking and civillian brutality. Invisible Children directly supports the military. And the military isn't looking to rescue these child soldiers.

Of course it's a horrible situation. Of course it's great that awareness is being raised. But don't just blindly follow some cause because they made some slick propaganda film.

Richie's
Mar 8th, 2012, 10:20 PM
@ Slutiana @ Chrono!
Well said. The whole "idea" is good but the way it's going and turning is not like the original plan.

If you sit down and analyse the whole thing, there are pretty many dark points on this but I'll keep them for myself. DOn't wanna enter on endless arguments with boys and girls here...

Stamp Paid
Mar 8th, 2012, 10:28 PM
@ Slutiana @ Chrono!
Well said. The whole "idea" is good but the way it's going and turning is not like the original plan.

If you sit down and analyse the whole thing, there are pretty many dark points on this but I'll keep them for myself. DOn't wanna enter on endless arguments with boys and girls here...Please post them. I'm interested to hear what you thought. There are some things shifting around in my mind as well.
I'm not donating any money to IC, if that makes you feel more comfortable expressing your opinion. :shrug::lol:

Tennis Fool
Mar 8th, 2012, 10:36 PM
^If you did donate through their website, and didn't opt out of having your information sold, you'd end up on all kinds of marketing lists. Also something Charity Navigator criticized.

WowWow
Mar 8th, 2012, 11:14 PM
To the people coming in posting the critical responses to the Kony 2012, thanks.
But I ask, are you using the contrary opinions posted in those sources an an excuse to not give a fuck about the issue? :lol:

I can't speak for others and I haven't read any of the contrary opinions. I'm just using my own common sense that I've developed over the years. I'm jaded. That's my 'excuse'. At the same time I'm glad that there are so many people who are not (not cause I think it's gonna help the issue, but because I genuinely believe that it's always better to care for others than not).

Tennis Fool
Mar 8th, 2012, 11:30 PM
Jason Russell on himself:

I am from San Diego California with an upbringing in musical theater. I am going to help end the longest running war in Africa, get Joseph Kony arrested & redefine international justice. Then I am going to direct a Hollywood musical. Then I am going to study theology & literature in Oxford, England, and then move to New York to start “The Academy” – which will be a school where the best creative young minds in the world attend.

http://pmc-mag.com/2011/02/jason-russell/?full=content

Slutiana
Mar 8th, 2012, 11:37 PM
^What kinda delusional foolishness? :help:

Stamp Paid
Mar 9th, 2012, 12:13 AM
Jason Russell on himself:

I am from San Diego California with an upbringing in musical theater. I am going to help end the longest running war in Africa, get Joseph Kony arrested & redefine international justice. Then I am going to direct a Hollywood musical. Then I am going to study theology & literature in Oxford, England, and then move to New York to start “The Academy” – which will be a school where the best creative young minds in the world attend.

http://pmc-mag.com/2011/02/jason-russell/?full=contentWell. We can see he suffers from a bit of megalomania :lol:

cowsonice
Mar 9th, 2012, 01:12 AM
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=3166797753930210643

Here's the original video that started the charity.

I find the social media hype around KONY2012 very :help: of IC. They were a very nice charity back in the day when they focused on supporting schools and microeconomic financing projects for the Ugandanese, truly the "Invisible Children."

But people need to know that it's quite impossible for a charity like IC to give DIRECT AID a la Red Cross or UNICEF. They don't have any UN backing to them nor are they a humanitarian (meaning can go in during war time) aid NGO. IC's focus is based on raising awareness, which they have quite successfully done. It has always been that way. Their demographic targets teens and young adults who probably grew up in very sheltered lifestyles.

But at the same time, what really irks me is "redefining international justice." Yes, Kony is #1 on the ICC's most wanted list, but the charity CEO's need to know that the ICC has charged/punished....ZERO people so far and in all its history of war criminals and committers of crimes against humanity. :help::help::help:

Valanga
Mar 9th, 2012, 01:16 AM
I this I that. STFU. He seems a bit delusional.

ampers&
Mar 9th, 2012, 01:18 AM
I hate, hate, HATE campaigns like this.

Fueled by ignorant white and/or privileged guilt and insufferable saviors who think they can solve the "country" of Africa's woes. Good example of all that is bad about the privileged. Watch a 20 min video, social activist indeed. :facepalm: I bet if I let the average person watch the video, then pulled out a map and asked that person to point to Uganda, they still couldn't do it. Mess. :sobbing:

Valanga
Mar 9th, 2012, 01:32 AM
http://visiblechildren.tumblr.com/post/18890947431/we-got-trouble

"But let’s keep it about Joseph Kony, not KONY 2012."

This pretty much sums up my feeling towards the whole situation.

Valanga
Mar 9th, 2012, 01:42 AM
did you watch the whole thing?

Yes I did. The whole video doesn't mention a single word Kony until 8:xx and After 14:xx it's all about how he started IC and blah blah blah, blah blah blah, about the IC, NOT about the situation in Uganda (Yeah later on we know that there was 100 military personnels sent to Uganda helping to catch the bad guy, but that's it, then he elaborates his idea of spreading the idea that letting everyone know who Kony is would solve the problem (23:xx onwards))

And the 6 minutes all I got is that he's still a fugitive, he did some bad things (which he keeps repeating the same agenda, with just one person he interviewed, Jacob). The situation must be more complexed and cannot be explained in 6 minutes, right?

Jesus I might know more about the situation in Uganda typing Kony on wikipedia or the related articles on the Guardian rather than sitting through this 30-minute megalomaniac mess.

Nicolás89
Mar 9th, 2012, 01:52 AM
If you thought the video wasn't clear & you don't know what's the real situation or who is Kony & what has he done, why not search a little? I think the whole point of the video is to get people interest & awareness. I think a video showing a list of all Kony's crimes would get you just as confused & would have half the impact.

fifty-fifty
Mar 9th, 2012, 02:33 AM
https://twitter.com/#!/konyscam

fifty-fifty
Mar 9th, 2012, 03:45 AM
Always do your research before jumping on a bandwagon.

SXVZe-FzicU&feature=related

fifty-fifty
Mar 9th, 2012, 04:08 AM
http://i.imgur.com/K3mgn.jpg

:crazy:

cowsonice
Mar 9th, 2012, 06:32 AM
What good does it do you or the world to point out a charity's "scam"?

young_gunner913
Mar 9th, 2012, 07:43 AM
I'm all for this cause, but sorry I just had to.

http://a8.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/430481_244459665646742_165332806892762_504490_1060 458827_n.jpg

This!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :rolls:

I've heard about the Invisible Children back when I was in high school which was years ago. Where was the outrage then? Now 6 years later when hipsters douches rule the internet, EVERYONE wants to help these kids by liking a facebook post or buying a bracelet? Please.

claypova
Mar 9th, 2012, 10:37 AM
this whole kony thing ... :facepalm:

apparently the organisation spends their money by sponsoring the uganda military :scratch:

debopero
Mar 9th, 2012, 12:00 PM
This!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :rolls:

I've heard about the Invisible Children back when I was in high school which was years ago. Where was the outrage then? Now 6 years later when hipsters douches rule the internet, EVERYONE wants to help these kids by liking a facebook post or buying a bracelet? Please.

Exactly! It is obvious not a bad cause but I remember trying to recruit people for my high school's "Invisible Children" club and being told "I am not joining, why should I care about children in Africa?". I can guarantee that those very people are now on the bandwagon.

fifty-fifty
Mar 9th, 2012, 03:29 PM
Why The US Is Chasing Kony And The LRA

http://crossedcrocodiles.wordpress.com/2012/03/01/why-the-us-is-chasing-kony-and-the-lra/

AFRICOM was created for two main reasons, oil and China. I have documented where US officials have stated this at numerous places in this blog. For a more detailed discussion see Understanding AFRICOM: A Contextual Reading of Empire’s New Combatant Command Part I, Part II and Part III.

Kwesi Pratt, editor of the Insight newspaper in Ghana, was one of the few people who caught on to this very early. His question to President Bush regarding oil and Africa was rudely dismissed by Bush. In this century the West intends on taking 3 Cs out of Africa: Crude, China, and Capital.

he LRA has been a scourge on Uganda for more than 20 years. When Uganda discovered oil prospects, the US became interested in the LRA. The military option to defeat Kony has been explored numerous times in the past, notably Operation North (1991), Operation Iron Fist (2002) and Operation Lightning Thunder (2008-2009). Each failed and led to massive reprisals against civilians.

The Acholi religious leaders, representing the regions and people who have suffered most from Kony and the LRA, point out that the only times things have gotten better is when there have been talks and negotiations.

Kony has no known political affiliations, he just likes war and terrorizing. Humanitarian rationalizations have always been the cloak of legitimacy for the ruthless extraction of African resources. We should recognize this by now.

Kony and the LRA operate across the borders in the territories of several countries that are of particular interest to the United States (partial lists of their resources in parentheses) South Sudan (oil, land, water, China) the DRC – Congo (oil, coltan, tin, tungsten, copper, gold, water, timber, China etc.) Uganda (oil, China, source of ***** soldiers, water, land, etc.) Burundi (uranium, rare earth, diamonds, cobalt, copper, land, water) CAR – Central African Republic (diamonds, uranium, timber, gold, oil). So Kony and the LRA are a very handy target indeed.

It would be excellent for everyone if Kony and the LRA are put out of business. IF (big IF) the US military can put Kony out of business, on its own, that would be a blessing. That is not the real reason the US is there, and the US will not be leaving when Kony is gone.

Museveni used protection from the LRA as a tool against the Acholi and other people of Northern Uganda, some call his methods genocide, they were certainly brutal and pervasive. It was not entirely inconvenient for him to have the LRA in business. The same is true for the United States. Kony and the LRA are very convenient, putting the US military exactly where they want to be.

Kony is a handy cover for the real reasons for US interest in the region, which are all about African resources.

You can see links to more information and documentation in these posts:
Uganda – Stepping On the Mission Creep Accelerator
If Uganda Has Oil It Must Need The Pentagon’s Democracy
or via this search: http://crossedcrocodiles.wordpress.com/?s=lra

fifty-fifty
Mar 9th, 2012, 11:14 PM
https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/423162_10150665863437929_132633832928_9258940_4180 30859_n.jpg

young_gunner913
Mar 9th, 2012, 11:22 PM
Exactly! It is obvious not a bad cause but I remember trying to recruit people for my high school's "Invisible Children" club and being told "I am not joining, why should I care about children in Africa?". I can guarantee that those very people are now on the bandwagon.

Yep. My high school's clubs aimed to help Invisible Children or the victims of the genocide in Darfur were a complete joke. Just a bunch of wannabe cool kids banning together, getting their idiotic friends to show up for an event they don't care about, then they all just hang around and nothing gets done. I imagine that's how most high schools are still. It's cool to care but usually it ends there with most people.

The Dawntreader
Mar 10th, 2012, 01:31 AM
:spit: At people trying to become liberal, courageous activists based on a smaltzy, hollywood documentary. Where was this urgency with the Rwandan genocides, and every other atrocity in the African nations in the last 30 years?

It's typical of knee-jerk wannabe, misinformed liberals who jump on causes that they have ignored for years.

Nicolás89
Mar 10th, 2012, 01:45 AM
:spit: At people trying to become liberal, courageous activists based on a smaltzy, hollywood documentary. Where was this urgency with the Rwandan genocides, and every other atrocity in the African nations in the last 30 years?

It's typical of knee-jerk wannabe, misinformed liberals who jump on causes that they have ignored for years.

Ignored because very few knew. You like it or not this video & invisble children are making people know what is happening.

Danči Dementia
Mar 10th, 2012, 04:54 AM
PGUPr9YhXa4


http://stopbillyfromkillineveryfuckinbody.yolasite.com/

tennis-insomniac
Mar 10th, 2012, 06:03 AM
I first saw "KONY 2012" on an elevator in my college and remembered seeing this before in some youtube comments. So I googled and just have watched the documentary.

Now this is my view on it.

In short, I think the campaign gives a great deal of emotional appeal but it lacks logic and especially ethic.

Why you need to put so much attention on KONY ? the guy who hardly has any power left in Uganda. The ad (documentary) mainly wants FAME and MONEY to get rid of some guy that has fled the country !! and many believe that his group, the LRA, has reduced to hundreds and scattered all over the places. They are WEAK. To kill/capture a guy who doesn't have much power left, that is not the way to solve problems in Uganda, is it?

While education is undoubtedly the most important issue that needs to be improved in Ugandan society, yet it was addressed only few minutes.

Why is that? Because it wouldn't SELL !!

People need DRAMA and EMOTION. That is why they play the "KONY" game.

Don't be fooled. If you want to help Uganda kids, to donate is always a great choice to help the cause. But don't be "slaves" and brainwashed to some propaganda that would lead to more problems.

I am very wishful that every cents donated to IC would be spent to improve educational system in Uganda instead of warfare, which will make things even worse. I am very supportive of people who are putting effort to help people in Africa but the main issue being discussed here is entirely different; it is about IC's deceptive advertisement and why people should know about it.

It is unethical and insulting to human intelligence.

Richie's
Mar 10th, 2012, 10:28 AM
Please post them. I'm interested to hear what you thought. There are some things shifting around in my mind as well.
I'm not donating any money to IC, if that makes you feel more comfortable expressing your opinion. :shrug::lol:

I'll begin with the reason I'm writing here today... I've some free time this noon, as ;)

First of all, I begin with telling I'm not fan of social media and specially Facebook. I've never use it but I can see how many troubles it can brings. Tough it a great tool for ADV. Market, I just do not waste my time on stuff like this. It has some advantages but the disadvantages are many more.

Secondly, the whole thing about KONY 2012 is clearly designed for "kids"-young people aged around 12-16. I do not believe it's campaign designed to help the young people in Uganda. It seems to have some other dark points.

1. Selling "charity products" on a high price make somebody rich, specially when they cost only 1 USD or less to be made.
2. All out of sudden, somebody in CA decides to discover what's going on in Uganda. And it's not a humanist or a activist.
3. Then trying to take action, by inspiring school boys and girls and "attacking" on their sense of right and justice.
4. Making them to donate, working for free (as volunteers) to support and run the project.

I generally like these kind of ideas but this story is a little bit :rolleyes:
A guy, making a film, travelling to Africa, putting is life in danger as it shows in film.
Then, putting his little son on the film, brining on screen his private life and asking for money to help people.
I may not say it's a cheating story. Nope.
BUT... Where is the money going? How they manage to build schools in Uganda? How they hire people there to teach and etc? How they bring the boys and the girls in USA to talk in schools and etc?
What about the financial side? As a charity organisation, they should post the financial reports of what's coming in and going out.

My point is that after all these actions:
1. Kony won't be arrested for several reasons (you can imagine).
2. Some people will get rich.
3. Some people will be famous.
4. Some people are using this campaign to promote themselves.
5. Some people will work for free, for an idea which can easily be delated by a click on "Facebook"
6. And personally, I don't want to be a part of something which trying to "teach" that social media has only positive effects. I'm against on living on a virtual-digital world, where everything starts with Facebook and ended up on Youtube.

+ Did someone notice that the prices got changed on their e-shop or it's just my idea? I think I saw the whole tool kit being prices at 260 (??) USD? But they remove it later.

WTAtennisfan15
Mar 10th, 2012, 11:57 AM
This Ugandan girl here tells the truth (I found this from Youtube front page) -this is something we all should share with everyone

7DO73Ese25Y

oc3HU5JfjA8

Nicolás89
Mar 10th, 2012, 04:22 PM
I get that she's Ugandian & is at a better position than most of us to make a unbiased critique on the Knoy 2012 movement but I seriously think that she's as clueless as the rest about Kony & invisible children, she bases all of her points on "I heard..." "I think..." "My dad says...". I bet she made these videos because she is mad that Uganda is beign portrayed as a "hell-o" as she says. In the second video she is basically take it all back....

Number19
Mar 11th, 2012, 08:53 PM
A couple days ago is when I first heard about this (yeah, I'm out of the loop), but my first thought was "didn't I hear about the LRA about 10 yrs ago?"

What is the point of getting this support now? I'm sure there's already money and manpower looking for him. Like finding Nazis 50 yrs later. Why is this important now? He's not even in Uganda now.

What about Syria? Or even Nigeria?

fifty-fifty
Mar 11th, 2012, 10:36 PM
Oil Reserves in Uganda, US Sends 'Humanitarian Intervention'

By Kevin Pinner, Death and Taxes Magazine

20 October 11

http://readersupportednews.org/opinion2/424-national-security/7996-oil-reserves-in-uganda-us-sends-humanitarian-interventionEven

See the Economist story on the discovery of oil in Uganda: 'A Bonanza Beckons.' -- JPS/RSN



US Foreign Policy disguises self-interest as altruism. When we see oil and humanitarian crisis, we act: Iraq, Libya, and now Uganda.


ince at least 1997 the abhorrent Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) has murdered at least 2,400, kidnapped at least 3,400, and displaced at least 300,000. LRA is an ideological group, led by batshit crazy polygamist preacher and self-proclaimed "Spokesman of God" Joseph Kony, which seeks a theocratic state in Uganda based on the Ten Commandments and local traditions.

Reports indicate that Kony and his dispicable cronies have been hiding for years. However, last week President Obama announced that, without consulting congress, he has authorized the deployment of some 100 "combat-equipped US forces" to the country in order to fight and hopefully kill or capture the vicious militant who has an international warrant for crimes against humanity.

With regards to the nearly two decades of atrocity, Obama pointed it out. "These forces will act as advisers to partner forces that have the goal of removing from the battlefield Joseph Kony and other senior leadership of the LRA," Obama said. "They will only be providing information, advice and assistance to partner nation forces, and they will not themselves engage LRA forces unless necessary for self-defense."

No doubt Uganda needs help; they are one of the world's poorest nations (17th) and have failed thus far to combat the LRA effectively enough to stop them. It's a good thing that we're fighting this monster, but for a humanitarian crisis that has been ongoing for almost two decades, that has been the scourge of a nation and a domestic terror threat rivaling the worst guerillas in Africa, it took us this long?

Earlier this year, at least 2.5 billion barrels of crude oil were discovered along Uganda's border. The Economist reports that the country expects to earn $2 billion a year beginning in 2015.

A week ago today, three Ugandan government officials resigned, and President Yoweri Museveni addressed the nation concerning what the New York Times called "mounting corruption scandals, particularly in the country's nascent oil sector."

Speaking at a public oil debate entiled "Fighting the Oil Curse," Jackson Wabyoona, activist and president of Bunyoro Local Oil and Gas Advocacy, said, "Well connected officials and business people who had prior information on the oil discovery took advantage of the situation to acquire land from unsuspecting peasants while some of our people become landless." Mr. Wabyoona added the compensation rates were "insufficient" to enable the original landowners, who are now landless, to live a better life.

The fact that oil was discovered earlier this year was at best a footnote in most news outlets. I did not find any journalistic output that points out the striking coincidence that we picked the year when oil was discovered in Uganda to assist in stablization (and I apologize in advance if it exists).

Libya, along with being plagued by Muammar Gadaffi's injustice, is also the site of massive oil reserves: the largest in Africa. And again, Gadaffi's atrocious human rights record didn't begin in the months or years before our invasion there. It had been happening for decades.

On a sidenote, Rush Limbaugh had some infuriating, grossly misinformed comments about the invasion. "Lord's Resistance Army are Christians," said Limbaugh on his radio program. "They are fighting the Muslims in Sudan. And Obama has sent troops, United States troops to remove them from the battlefield, which means kill them."

In other words, "Obama is a muslim and hates Christians and look at me connecting the dots like a preschooler at playtime." It's not that simple, obviously. LRA are Christians the same way al-Qaeda are Muslims - that is, they are among the most selective distorters of doctrines that otherwise preach peace and acceptance.

What is clear: decision-making in US foreign policy, long touted by our officials as humanitarian and altruistic, is deeply entrenched in economic factors, such as energy consumption.

Valanga
Mar 16th, 2012, 10:51 PM
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/mar/16/kony-2012-campaigner-arrested?newsfeed=true

:sobbing:

Balltossovic
Mar 16th, 2012, 10:56 PM
:spit:
http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/zimb9uibjLvFnX.6V8doQQ--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7cT04NTt3PTYzMA--/http://media.zenfs.com/en/blogs/theenvoy/jasonrussellin630filenbc.jpg

Jason Russell, the filmmaker behind the mega-viral "Kony 2012" documentary, was arrested in San Diego on Thursday night, NBC reported, citing the San Diego Police Department.
Russell, 33, "was taken into custody after he was found masturbating in public, vandalizing cars and possibly under the influence of something," NBC's San Diego affiliate reported (http://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/local/jason-russell-san-diego-invisible-children-kony-2012-142970255.html), citing San Diego Police Department spokeswoman Lt. Andra Brown.
The San Diego Police Department's Brown did not immediately return two messages left Friday from Yahoo News.
The co-founder of the San Diego-based advocacy group Invisible Children was detained on San Diego's Pacific Beach "acting very strange" the NBC report said.
Russell's 30-minute documentary on Ugandan guerrilla leader Joseph Kony and the Lord's Resistance Army became a surprise mega viral hit, receiving over 80 million viewers since its release last week. But the film has also kicked up a backlash of criticism against the group (http://sg.news.yahoo.com/blogs/envoy/kony2012-invisible-children-viral-video-uganda-conflict-sparks-183106657.html), ranging from how Invisible Children spends its finances to whether it cut corners with the facts in order to create a more compelling film about a more than two-decade old Central African conflict.
But Invisible Children has also found many prominent defenders of its work, from members of Congress to President Barack Obama, who sent 100 U.S. special forces to Uganda last fall to search for Kony.
"I think that these guys are getting mercilessly picked apart by a bunch of intellectual elites who spend their days tweeting but never trending," Cameron Hudson, former Bush White House Africa hand, told Yahoo News last week. "If their aim is to raise awareness, they have done that in spades."


http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/envoy/kony-2012-filmmaker-arrested-san-diego-205649394.html

Stamp Paid
Mar 17th, 2012, 12:49 AM
There's footage :hysteric:
32PBZ870ymg

dybbuk
Mar 17th, 2012, 12:54 AM
Apparently this all happened because he was "malnourished" and "dehydrated" because of all the stress put on him from the big bullies on the internet.

http://static.tumblr.com/v1asjlx/jkplx5g2t/baby_lawd.gif

Sammo
Mar 17th, 2012, 12:55 AM
Hmmmm... disturbing...

young_gunner913
Mar 17th, 2012, 12:56 AM
LMAO. :hysteric:

LeRoy.
Mar 17th, 2012, 12:58 AM
Irrelevant to the topic at hand, but he is openly gay ? (No pun intended)

Charlatan
Mar 17th, 2012, 01:00 AM
:sobbing:

Maddox
Mar 17th, 2012, 05:46 AM
I wonder what substance he used. Strange how one can wank and vandalize cars as well. :confused:

Pops Maellard
Mar 17th, 2012, 06:07 AM
Well the vandalizing cars is a no-no. But as for the wanking in public :hug:. Sometimes you can't fight these urges :awww:.

Valanga
Mar 17th, 2012, 11:33 AM
http://i2.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/original/000/269/086/5ac.jpg

:bigcry:

Valanga
Mar 17th, 2012, 11:35 AM
The video is too good to be a coincidence :sobbing:
Is this a set-up?

knoxt
Mar 17th, 2012, 12:22 PM
He is married w/ 2 children

Mary Cherry.
Mar 17th, 2012, 02:08 PM
Oh

my

god

8tzVzjEUD6k


EDIT: Apparently that's not him :tape: Who knew naked men masturbating in public and trashing cars was a common occurrence?

fifty-fifty
Mar 17th, 2012, 02:24 PM
The video is too good to be a coincidence :sobbing:
Is this a set-up?

By whom? The most logical explanation is that he's on drugs.

Number19
Mar 17th, 2012, 03:15 PM
On the news last night saw they had a screening in the areas in Uganda most affected by LRA. They were not happy and about half way through the Kony2012 video they started throwing rocks a the screen.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/story/2012/03/15/kony-2012-video-uganda-screenings-cancelled.html

young_gunner913
Mar 17th, 2012, 03:39 PM
He is a liberal.

You're an idiot. There's gay conservatives as well... The mess that is 'Plantman'.

pokey camp
Mar 17th, 2012, 08:22 PM
Oh I love it when chickens come home to roost. :drool:
Irrelevant to the topic at hand, but he is openly gay ? (No pun intended)
Lol no. This fool is a pray the gay away fundie. Check all the crazy christian fundamentalist groups that give to IC. Shady as hell. :o

Richie's
Mar 17th, 2012, 08:35 PM
I think he kinda look gay. I do not care about it but I just think it too.

Stamp Paid
Mar 17th, 2012, 08:39 PM
I think he kinda look gay. I do not care about it but I just think it too.I thought so first as well, especially with his interactions with his Ugandan "friend" Jacob. :unsure:

pokey camp
Mar 17th, 2012, 09:22 PM
^^IA. I meant he's not out. Hence the praying with a side of crazy.

Check back in 10 or 15 though. ;)

LeRoy.
Mar 17th, 2012, 09:29 PM
I can "hear the gay" in his voice. He needs to pray harder.

Williamsser
Mar 17th, 2012, 10:10 PM
Obama throws his support behind 'Kony 2012', while criticism against viral video grows

http://articles.nydailynews.com/2012-03-09/news/31141626_1_tim-tebow-child-soldiers-lord-s-resistance-army

President Obama is throwing his support behind Kony 2012.

White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said the commander in chief backs those behind the viral Internet campaign, designed to bring Ugandan warlord Joseph Kony to justice.

"We congratulate the hundreds of thousands of Americans who have mobilized to this unique crisis of conscience," Carney said at a news conference on Thursday, adding the video has helped raise awareness about the "horrific activities" of the child-recruiting Lord's Resistance Army.

DualMedia
Mar 18th, 2012, 08:40 AM
i dont wanna hurt you guys feeling but only 33% of the money is actually helping the cause. The others is paying the employees.

pokey camp
Mar 18th, 2012, 05:31 PM
^^Cause? What cause? Just look at who's funding this nonsense (http://www.vice.com/read/kony-baloney).
IC’s financial statements show substantial donations from the National Christian Foundation—an anti-gay, anti-abortion grant-making fund that helped Ugandan politicians put together legislation making homosexuality subject to the death penalty. Invisible Children’s supporters include other right-wing, anti-gay heavyweights like the Caster Family, who funded the campaign for Proposition 8 in California.

Another vid of him melting down from TMZ (http://www.tmz.com/2012/03/18/jason-russell-video-naked-meltdown-kony/#comments-anchor). The end of that pretty much answers the gay spec. Fierce! :lol:

Stamp Paid
Mar 18th, 2012, 05:35 PM
^^Cause? What cause? Just look at who's funding this nonsense (http://www.vice.com/read/kony-baloney).


Another vid of him melting down from TMZ (http://www.tmz.com/2012/03/18/jason-russell-video-naked-meltdown-kony/#comments-anchor). The end of that pretty much answers the gay spec. Fierce! :lol:Well thats reason enough for me to be disgusted with this.

young_gunner913
Mar 18th, 2012, 05:40 PM
That's what all-night, meth fueled, fuck fests will do to you. :tape:

Valanga
Mar 18th, 2012, 05:50 PM
This dude is FUCKED :o

Hurley
Mar 18th, 2012, 06:00 PM
Wait for it...

http://img.gawkerassets.com/img/17gtr9j0rigt1gif/cmt-medium.gif

:oh:

Stamp Paid
Mar 18th, 2012, 06:12 PM
I hope he hasn't exploited Jacob in that way too. :facepalm:

Richie's
Mar 18th, 2012, 10:15 PM
:lol:
As Madonna sings; American life, he lives the American dream!

debopero
Mar 18th, 2012, 11:17 PM
I hope he hasn't exploited Jacob in that way too. :facepalm:

Who's Jacob?

Valanga
Mar 18th, 2012, 11:24 PM
I hope he hasn't exploited Jacob in that way too. :facepalm:

That would be too much of a scandal :unsure:
I hope not :sobbing:

Stamp Paid
Mar 18th, 2012, 11:28 PM
Who's Jacob?WOWWWWWWW
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_KI9gcT8Agi4/TOrGAva0J8I/AAAAAAAAAr8/Vag9-T8MlcU/s400/wendy+williams+i+can%2527t.gif

debopero
Mar 18th, 2012, 11:38 PM
WOWWWWWWW
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_KI9gcT8Agi4/TOrGAva0J8I/AAAAAAAAAr8/Vag9-T8MlcU/s400/wendy+williams+i+can%2527t.gif

:confused:

I didn't watch the video. I am just aware of the campaign.

ampers&
Mar 18th, 2012, 11:39 PM
:confused:
Jacob Acaye. He's the boy featured in all the videos...part of the reason why Russell started this movement in the first place. :unsure:

Stamp Paid
Mar 18th, 2012, 11:43 PM
:confused:

I didn't watch the video. I am just aware of the campaign.That Wowwww wasn't necessarily directed at you, just at how far the message has gotten away from the people actually affected by it. :facepalm:

Balltossovic
Mar 19th, 2012, 06:37 AM
http://failblog.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/epic-fail-photos-failbook-bony1.jpg

Super Dave
Mar 19th, 2012, 01:38 PM
Well, that was fast. :lol:

BuTtErFrEnA
Mar 19th, 2012, 03:30 PM
thoughts?


http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/mar/14/kony-2012-screening-anger-northern-uganda?newsfeed=true


Kony 2012 video screening met with anger in northern Uganda

Victims of the LRA slam film which went viral across world as not representing them and say campaign’s merchandise is offensive

It had been viewed more than 77m times around the world, but not by those who know the Joseph Kony best: his victims in northern Uganda.

That changed on Tuesday night when thousands flocked to watch Kony 2012, the video made by a US charity urging a grassroots campaign against the fugitive warlord that has gone viral.

The film was projected on to an ersatz cinema screen fashioned from a white sheet, held up by metal poles, in a town park. The reaction? Puzzlement, then anger, which boiled over into scuffles and stone-throwing that sent organisers fleeing for cover.

There was particular criticism of the Stop Kony campaign’s use of merchandise, such as bracelets and T-shirts, which victims said they find offensive.

“People were very angry about the film,” said Victor Ochen, director of a local charity, the African Youth Initiative Network (Ayinet), which arranged the screening. “They were all saying, ‘This is not about us, it does not reflect our lives’.”

Ochen said he had wanted to provide an opportunity for victims to see the film made by the charity Invisible Children, mindful that less than 2% of Ugandans have internet access.

The video, posted on YouTube on 5 March and narrated by one of Invisible Children’s founders, Jason Russell, had drawn the support of celebrities including George Clooney and Angelina Jolie, but provoked criticism for oversimplifying the conflict and not making clear that Kony was driven out of Uganda several years ago.

Before sunset on Tuesday two metal rods were hammered into dry dirt and grass and a white sheet hoisted to create an open-air cinema in the mayor’s gardens in the centre of Lira, 220 miles north of the capital, Kampala.

Word about the “premiere” spread on local radio, drawing a crowd on foot and bicycle that grew over several hours and was estimated at more than 35,000 by Ochen, though others put it at more like 5,000.

The expectant, excited spectators, many of whom cannot speak English, included victims who have been left scarred and maimed by Kony’s atrocities.

But Ochen, whose own father and brother were abducted by Kony’s Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), said on Wednesday: “Reacting to the film, there was a strong sense that the video was definitely not produced for an African audience, and that it was not sensitive enough to the victims.

“It was very hurtful for them and their families to see posters, bracelets and buttons, all looking like slick campaign ads of the person most responsible for their shattered lives. One young man who lost four brothers and one of his arms said afterwards: ‘How can anybody expect me to wear a T-shirt with Kony’s name on it?’”

He added: “For all the victims, the attempt to make Kony famous so as to prop up public support for his apprehension is laudable but the way this goal is pursued in the video is inappropriate and ignores their feelings.

“That fame is not what Kony deserves for causing so much suffering was one overwhelming reaction. People were asking: Why give such criminals celebrity status? Why not prioritise addressing the plight of the victims whose sufferings are visible?”

The screening ended amid jeers and scuffles, with some angry viewers throwing stones. Ayinet has decided to suspend planning screenings of Kony 2012 in other parts of northern Uganda indefinitely due to the hostile reaction.

Emmy Okello, a radio journalist in Lira, said: “I cannot understand the intention of this video. It is difficult to account to us if you are not including local people. What has angered people is that the video is about a white person, not about the victims. All of them came here hoping to see video that tells their story.”

Okello Jifony, who was forced to fight under Kony for 18 months, told Reuters: “We expected serious action, Americans fighting Kony like in a real movie.”

He added: “Why didn’t they use the real victims in this film?”

On Wednesday there were calls in Uganda to ban the campaign’s “Stop Kony” T-shirts from entering the country. One caller to a radio phone-in said: “The government must protect us victims not only from Kony but also from things that hurt us like these T-shirts.

“And as people of northern Uganda we will not accept anyone to cross Karuma (a bridge across the Nile that connects north to central Uganda) with that T-shirt.”

Al-Jazeera reporter Malcolm Webb blogged: “One woman I spoke to made the comparison of selling Osama Bin Laden paraphernalia post 9/11 – likely to be highly offensive to many Americans, how ever well intentioned the campaign behind it.”

Kony, a self-proclaimed mystic, is wanted by the international criminal court for crimes against humanity.

On Tuesday a Congolese general said Kony and other LRA leaders have been chased out of the Democratic Republic of Congo to the neighbouring Central African Republic and no longer pose a threat in his country.

General Jean Claude Kifwa, in charge of fighting the LRA in Congo, told journalists: “We have reduced the capacity of the LRA. For us it’s no longer an issue of defence. It’s a public order issue.”

The comment follows a complaint by nearby Uganda that Congo was obstructing its US-backed hunt for Kony.

Valanga
Mar 19th, 2012, 11:26 PM
Are the stories from Huffington Post trustworthy, like this one?
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/19/kony-2012-funding-invisible-children-anti-gay-christian_n_1364069.html?ncid=edlinkusaolp00000003

dybbuk
Mar 19th, 2012, 11:29 PM
Huffington Post isn't particularly untrustworthy, and anyways, that story has been making the rounds in many sources, not just Huffington Post.

Richie's
Mar 20th, 2012, 10:52 AM
BBC: Joseph Kony victims back online campaign

With a controversial US film putting the spotlight on Ugandan rebel leader Joseph Kony and his Lord's Resistance Army, the BBC's James Copnall reports on those in South Sudan and Uganda who believe he must be captured or killed at all costs.

In a refugee camp in the shade of giant mango trees, a Congolese man called Jean-Roger is calling for US soldiers to capture the leader of the Lord's Resistance Army, Joseph Kony.

"We need a military intervention. [President Barack] Obama must make an effort to finish with Kony," he says in a firm voice.

"The LRA has killed a lot of people, and raped a lot of women, and they kidnap children to train them to become like them. They must be stopped."

Continue reading the main story

Start Quote

If the LRA can be stopped, we can return to Congo. But I don't know when it will happen.”

Jeanne
Refugee
Kony 2012 video director detained
Uganda Kony screenings 'stopped'
The recent Kony 2012 film, which has been viewed millions of times, has attracted criticism for simplifying the problem of the LRA.

But Jean-Roger and other victims believe the only thing that matters is to stop the rebel movement.

There are more than 5,000 refugees in the Makpandu camp in South Sudan, the majority from the Democratic Republic of Congo, others from the Central African Republic.

Those are the two countries where the LRA now operates, though its fighters - many of whom are children - sometimes launch raids into South Sudan too.

'World must act'
Another refugee, Modeste, a grey-haired man with a bright floral shirt, also wants foreign troops to help out.

His four daughters, aged between five and 14, were kidnapped when the LRA attacked his village in DR Congo.

"I think they must be dead," he says simply, perhaps not wanting to voice the other, horrifying prospect - that they have been kept as sex slaves.

"I want governments all over the world to act, we must finish the LRA. The world should get enough forces to attack, and kill all of them," he says.

A short walk away, Jeanne is preparing dinner in front of her simple thatched hut. She will grind groundnuts into a paste, and add some cassava leaves.

She is wearing a camouflage top, giving her a strangely military appearance - a bitter irony considering it was the LRA's fighters who drove her from her home.


Screening of the Kony film was abandoned in Uganda last week
"Some of the people from my village were killed, and I don't know what happened to the others.

"If the LRA can be stopped, we can return to Congo. But I don't know when it will happen."

Although the Kony 2012 film has prompted renewed calls for action against the LRA, several forces have been fighting them for years.

The LRA is no longer in Uganda, but the Ugandan army is chasing after them from bases in South Sudan and the Central African Republic (CAR).

The Congolese, Central African and South Sudanese armies are involved too.

But not always with much success.

The LRA's current strength is estimated at a few hundred, but they still terrify many times this number.

"We receive regular refugee arrivals due to ongoing LRA attacks in Congo and CAR. They (LRA) also conduct hit-and-run attacks inside South Sudan," says Mireille Girard, the head of the UN refugee agency in South Sudan.

'Arrow boys'
In the South Sudanese state of Western Equatoria, some residents have taken matters into their own hands.

A dozen men brandish their weapons - one AK-47, some old rifles they describe as "home-made", and the bows and arrows that have given them their name, the Arrow Boys.

In June last year they rescued two people, including a 13-year old girl kidnapped by the LRA from the village of Kidi, about 12km from the town of Yambio, close to the DR Congo border.

That incident was the last time the LRA struck in South Sudan, but their impact over the last few years has been dramatic.

Continue reading the main story

Profile: LRA leader Joseph Kony
"The damage Kony has inflicted on our people in Western Equatoria is actually far greater even than the losses that we incurred during our 22 years of civil struggle with the Khartoum government," says Sapana Abuyi, the deputy governor of Western Equatoria.

It is a startling statement. Two million people are estimated to have died during Sudan's second civil war, although Western Equatoria was less affected than other parts of South Sudan.

The frequency of LRA attacks has now fallen in South Sudan, in part due to the efforts of the Ugandan troops, and the Arrow Boys.

But Mr Abuyi is still wary.

"We cannot rule out more attacks, because they use guerrilla tactics and they can hit at any time."

US role
He also calls on the US advisors to the Ugandan troops to do more, particularly in tracking the movements of the LRA fighters, who often operate in small groups in the forest.

Continue reading the main story

Start Quote

It took time to capture Osama Bin Laden, but eventually he was killed. Kony will have his time too.”

Col Joseph Balikudembe
Ugandan army officer
So far the Americans, who number 100 throughout the region, are there to advise not fight, following President Barack Obama's directives.

So what can the Americans do, if they are not allowed to go into combat?

"Primarily, our advice and assistance is along the lines of planning the fusion of operations and intelligence, logistics planning, and bolstering their communications," the US team's leader Capt Layne told the BBC.

Hunting Kony in a region as heavily covered by forest is akin to "looking for a needle in a haystack" according to the captain.

Would he prefer to kill or capture Kony, who is wanted by the International Criminal Court?

"As long as we rid the region of Joseph Kony, we're happy, however that happens," he says.

Col Joseph Balikudembe is the Ugandan who is leading Operation Lightening Thunder against the LRA.


The Ugandans have not yet got hold of Kony despite a quarter-century of efforts, but the colonel is still optimistic.

"His time is numbered, he will be captured," he says.

"It took time to capture Osama Bin Laden, but eventually he was killed. Kony will have his time too."

The senior officer denies charges made by some campaigners that the Ugandan military has kept the war running for so long as it justifies high military spending and allows officers to make money from the conflict.

The Kony 2012 film, made by the US campaign group Invisible Children, has shone an unprecedented global light onto the LRA.

It has been heavily criticised in some quarters.

"In elevating Kony to a global celebrity, the embodiment of evil, and advocating a military solution, the campaign isn't just simplifying, it is irresponsibly naive," regional expert Alex de Waal wrote.

Dialogue
Bishop Eduardo Hiiboro Kussala has campaigned against the LRA for many years.

Continue reading the main story

Start Quote

The LRA don't want to to see you as a human being. If they see a human, they kill him with a machete or shoot him with a gun.”

Charles
Refugee
He supports the film as a way of raising awareness. But he believes the military option is not the right one.

"When we talk about a military intervention, people who think they are powerful think it is the only way to solve a problem.

"They think that by the gun you can solve the problem, but instead you aggravate it.

"To me military intervention is not a solution. I would encourage dialogue."

In a camp for South Sudanese displaced by LRA attacks near the town of Nzara, that view would not be supported by everyone.

"The LRA don't want to see you as a human being,' says Charles. "If they see a human, they kill him with a machete or shoot him with a gun. That is why we fear them."

Some of the displaced people here have begun to return home. But many remain.

"If Kony is arrested, that can solve the problem," says David, hurrying through his words in his anxiety to stress the point.

"The abduction of the children and the killing of people make us afraid, that is why most of the people don't want to go back to our homes."

These people have not seen the Kony 2012 film. But they are vociferous in their demand for Joseph Kony to be stopped by any means necessary.

Tweety Snape
Apr 5th, 2012, 11:56 PM
Part 2 :oh:
c_Ue6REkeTA
It doesn't tell you any more than the first one (which wasn't much, frankly).