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tennisbum79
Feb 19th, 2012, 11:50 PM
One of the slave owner, even went as far as killing his 11 slaves to escape prosecution.


The great-grand daughter of this slave owner, who was in the documentary, was on CNN and says she had known this story in her family for a long time




'Slavery by Another Name': PBS documentary explores forced servitude after the Emancipation Proclamation

Sunday, February 12, 2012
By Rob Owen, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette






PASADENA, Calif. -- American history often gets passed on in a too-simple narrative, especially in pop culture.
It's presented as black and white; there were good guys and bad guys.


PBS's "Slavery by Another Name" (9 p.m. Monday, WQED-TV), directed by Sam Pollard and based on a Pulitzer Prize-winning book of the same name by co-executive producer Douglas Blackmon, reveals a largely hidden history that belies the popular narrative that the enslavement for African-Americans ended
with the Emancipation Proclamation.

This 90-minute documentary film recounts -- through recreations and interviews -- how emancipation was a bitter economic pill for former slave owners to swallow.
So they found a substitute.


A loophole in the 13th Amendment worked in their favor: Slavery was abolished except as punishment for a crime.
"Slavery by Another Name" recounts efforts to retain the practice of slavery by enacting contrived laws that made it a crime for a black man to walk beside a railroad,
to speak loudly in the company of white women or to be unable to prove his employment on a moment's notice.





This led to "convict leasing" in which the state would lease prisoners to be used as laborers by plantation owners and even corporations.
It provided a new revenue stream for the state and inexpensive, union-free labor for companies.



"Slavery by Another Name" explains how conditions for these forced laborers were often worse than conditions for slaves in the pre-Civil War era.

"It was never in the economic interest of a slave owner to kill his own slaves or abuse them so terribly they couldn't work anymore,
" Mr. Blackmon explains in the film. "Their economic value protected them in certain ways. After the Civil War, someone working their forced laborers would push them to the very limits of human endurance."


At a PBS press conference last month, Mr. Blackmon said his book grew out of a story he wrote for the Wall Street Journal -- excerpted and published by the Post-Gazette in July 2001 -- about the use of forced labor in Alabama's Pratt Mines by Tennessee Coal, Iron & Railroad Co., which was purchased by Pittsburgh-based U.S. Steel in 1907.
The use of convict labor continued there until 1912, Mr. Blackmon reported.


U.S. Steel receives only a brief mention in the "Slavery by Another Name" documentary, which shows the impact of this practice that wasn't investigated by federal authorities until 1922 with no prosecutions for it until 1942.
In 1951, the U.S. Congress finally passed more explicit laws making any form of slavery a crime, Mr. Blackmon writes.

"A lot of people, particularly younger African Americans, really realize, at a very fundamental level, that there's something about the standard version of American history that doesn't add up, " Mr. Blackmon said.

"That this 80-, 90-year period of time between the Civil War and the civil rights movement that generally is taught to us as having been just this sort of difficult Jim Crow era when blacks are called a bad name and they live in poverty and they can't vote and every now and then there's
violence against an African American here or there, that super-simplistic version of that period of time doesn't really explain why it was the case that, by the time you get to the 1970s, there's still this gigantic gap between whites and blacks in terms of wealth and education and all those other sorts of measures.


To really understand why the country was the way it was then and is the way it is now, you have to realize that something much bigger, something much worse happened in that period of time. And people actually want to know that story."

That includes descendants of both African-American forced laborers and the white men who leased them. Representatives of both are interviewed in the film, including Dr. Sharon Malone, wife of U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, whose uncle was a victim of forced labor.

Mr. Blackmon calls it "mind-boggling" that the slavery that existed before the Civil War, "the greatest moral failure of the history of our country," was followed by another form of slavery immediately afterward. "[It] is a sort of astonishing failure on the part of an entire society."

Mr. Pollard, the filmmaker, offers another realization from this newly uncovered history.


"The phenomenal, positive thing that you should all take away from this is that through all this oppression that black people had to face, what did they do?
They fought in World War I. They fought in World War II.

They were in the Korean War," he said, "because -- no matter how horrible America has treated them -- they believe in America.
I had three uncles who were in World War II because, even though they came from Mississippi and they were glad to get out of Mississippi,
they fought for America."



Rob Owen writes this Sunday TV column for Scripps Howard News Service. Contact him at: rowen@post-gazette.com or 412-263-2582. Read the Tuned In Journal blog at post-gazette.com/tv. Follow RobOwenTV on Twitter or Facebook

source: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/12043/1207183-67.stm

tennisbum79
Feb 20th, 2012, 12:09 AM
“It was a crime in the South for a farmworker to walk beside a railroad,” notes Mr. Blackmon, one of a number of experts who appear in the film.

“It was a crime in the South to speak loudly in the company of white women. It was a crime to sell the products of your farm after dark.”




This is what leaving everything to a state to decide can lead to.
There are times when the Federal government has to step in to protect the right of minorities, any minority.






Channel Surfing: ‘Slavery by Another Name’





By NEIL GENZLINGER (http://www.tennisforum.com/author/neil-genzlinger/)

Programming for Black History Month often seems to cluster around two periods of history: the slavery era and the civil-rights movement. “Slavery by Another Name,” Monday night on PBS (check local listings), is a stark reminder of what sprang up in the South in the years between the two: an economic system that was its own kind of slavery, exploiting black labor under often brutal conditions.





The film, directed by Sam Pollard and based on Douglas A. Blackmon’s (http://www.slaverybyanothername.com/about-the-author/) Pulitzer Prize-winning book, details the use of peonage, but it also explores the ugly manipulation of laws just after the Civil War to ensure an endless supply of black prison inmates, who were rented out by states to serve as forced labor in industry.


“It was a crime in the South for a farmworker to walk beside a railroad,” notes Mr. Blackmon, one of a number of experts who appear in the film. “It was a crime in the South to speak loudly in the company of white women. It was a crime to sell the products of your farm after dark.”


Inmate laborers, the film suggests, may actually have had it worse than slaves.


“It was never in the economic interest of a slave owner to kill his own slaves or abuse them so terribly that they couldn’t work anymore, so their economic value protected them in certain ways,” Mr. Blackmon says. “After the Civil War, someone working these kinds of forced laborers would push them to the very limits of human endurance.”




The inmate-labor system affected the labor movement, social views of blacks and crime, and other areas that still ripple in the present day.

By filling in an overlooked part of black history, this sobering film (http://www.slaverybyanothername.com/pbs-film/) enhances our understanding of why race issues have proved so intractable.





source:http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/02/13/channel-surfing-slavery-by-another-name/

tennisbum79
Feb 20th, 2012, 02:39 AM
At a PBS press conference last month, Mr. Blackmon said his book grew out of a story he wrote for the Wall Street Journal -- excerpted and published by the Post-Gazette in July 2001 -- about the use of forced labor in Alabama's Pratt Mines by Tennessee Coal, Iron & Railroad Co., which was purchased by Pittsburgh-based U.S. Steel in 1907.
The use of convict labor continued there until 1912, Mr. Blackmon reported.
On CNN, when asked what was the motivation behind the book, he responded, and I paraphrased; he grew up in Mississippi and he went to school and lived with majority black people.
So he wanted to understand more why they (blacks) had so little of the advantages he took for granted.

tennisbum79
Feb 20th, 2012, 04:40 AM
Some clips

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Prologue
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Making of the film
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tennisbum79
Feb 20th, 2012, 04:46 AM
An event held on the book, at National Museum of American History, where the author, Douglas A. Blackmon, discusses the book and answers questions from the audience.

The date of the event is Feb. 24,2011; roughly a year before the documentary was made and aired


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Stamp Paid
Feb 20th, 2012, 04:55 AM
This still goes on in Louisiana and Mississippi to this very day, in the form of trustee/convict leasing.